Swiss climber falls to death, preparing for Mount Everest ascent

By Gopal Sharma
Ueli Steck, a mountaineer from Switzerland, speaks to the media during an interview at a hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal May 30, 2016. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

By Gopal Sharma

KATHMANDU (Reuters) - An experienced Swiss climber died on Sunday after he fell in the Everest region of Nepal during preparations to climb the world's highest mountain, the first to perish in the current climbing season, officials said.

Ueli Steck, 40, died after falling to the foot of Mount Nuptse, a smaller peak in the area, said Mingma Sherpa of the Seven Summits Treks company that organized Steck's expedition.

Steck was in the area acclimatizing ahead of a bid to climb Everest through the less-climbed West Ridge route and traverse to Lhotse, the world's fourth highest peak - at 8,516 meters (27,940 feet) in May.

"His body has been retrieved and is being brought to Kathmandu," Sherpa told Reuters.

Kamal Prasad Parajuli, an official with Nepal's Department of Tourism, confirmed Steck died while climbing Nuptse and that he had planned to attempt an Everest ascent.

He said Steck, who climbed Everest in 2012, "slipped and fell 1,000 meters" in the Western Cwm along the normal route to Everest.

The incident took place near the route's Camp Two, which is located at an altitude of 6,400 meters (21,000 feet), Parajuli said.

A veteran climber of Mount Annapurna in western Nepal, the world's tenth highest mountain, and several other 8,000 meter peaks, Steck had won several awards for his mountaineering feats.

Along with two other European climbers, Steck was involved in a brawl with sherpa guides over fixing ropes in 2013. The altercation, which forced the climbers off the mountain, drew international headlines.

Last year, Steck and a German climber discovered the bodies of two famed American climbers, Alex Lowe and David Bridges, who were swept away in 1999 by an avalanche during their attempt to scale the world's 14th highest peak, Shishapangma.

Hundreds of climbers gather at Everest base camp during the March-May climbing season as they prepare to climb the 8,850 meter (29,035 feet) Everest Summit.

(Reporting by Gopal Sharma; Editing by Sam Holmes)

  • Service dog handlers face bitter pushback, kicked out of public places
    News
    CBC

    Service dog handlers face bitter pushback, kicked out of public places

    Mike Rude, a veteran of nearly three decades with the Canadian Armed Forces, did not expect conflict when he went to the Valley Mall in Corner Brook, N.L., with his service dog, Spark. A security guard told Rude, a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder, to get off mall property after questioning him about the validity of his service dog. "It was very frustrating and upsetting," Rude told CBC News. "I knew it was my right to go around with the dog.

  • Calgary police interrogation tactics may cause charges to be dropped in fatal hit and run
    News
    CBC

    Calgary police interrogation tactics may cause charges to be dropped in fatal hit and run

    Robert Mark Varley, 60, is on trial for a hit and run resulting in the death of Farida Abdurahman, 33. Varley had beaten three sets of drunk driving charges in British Columbia before he moved to Calgary in 2011. On July 28, 2015, about 10 hours after Abdurahman was hit, Varley was arrested and brought to police headquarters once police found his damaged Buick Regal a few blocks away from the collision.

  • Washington state governor tells British Columbians don't be 'daunted' by Trump
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Washington state governor tells British Columbians don't be 'daunted' by Trump

    VICTORIA — Washington state's governor took aim at President Donald Trump in a speech to British Columbia's legislature Tuesday, saying travel bans on immigrants and refugees have caused economic and moral wounds in the United States.

  • News
    CBC

    Clients, employees of Shut Ur Pie Hole say they got burned by Winnipeg bakery

    A Winnipeg bakery that achieved fame by sending its signature pies in Mason jars to the Emmy Awards in 2016 is now under fire from local clients and former employees — and the owner says her business got too big, too fast. As recently as October, at least two brides say they were burned by Shut Ur Pie Hole and owner Heather Daymond on their wedding days, alleging the food they ordered and paid for was never delivered. Problems have been building for more than a year for the bakery, says Fisher, who worked for Shut Ur Pie Hole in 2016.

  • VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing veterans
    News
    The Canadian Press

    VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing veterans

    A half a century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a new reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet — test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia. The Department of Veterans Affairs this spring commissioned a small pilot study to look into the link between liver flukes ingested through raw or undercooked fish and a rare bile duct cancer. Of the 50 blood samples submitted, more than 20 per cent came back positive or bordering positive for liver fluke antibodies, said Sung-Tae Hong, the tropical medicine specialist who carried out the tests at Seoul National University in South Korea.

  • Manitoba premier opens up about getting lost, injured in New Mexico desert
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Manitoba premier opens up about getting lost, injured in New Mexico desert

    Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister choked up Tuesday as he recounted a harrowing night in the New Mexico desert that left him lost, wandering and with a broken arm. Pallister was on vacation with his wife Esther when they decided to do a hike in the Gila Wilderness — a remote protected area in southwest New Mexico with limited roads, amenities and cellphone coverage. Thinking it would be a short day hike, Pallister dropped his wife off at the north end of a trail, drove to the south end and started hiking toward a meet-up point halfway, he said.

  • 'Every season is tick season': Experts warn of winter Lyme disease risk
    News
    CBC

    'Every season is tick season': Experts warn of winter Lyme disease risk

    "Talking to other dog owners, people have said they will pick 12 or 15 [ticks] off their dog in an hour-long walk on the trails here," she said. Experts say there is a common misconception that you can't get Lyme disease in the winter because people believe ticks are no longer active. Lugar, who has Lyme disease, said she is being contacted increasingly by people who've contracted the disease in the middle of winter.

  • Newfoundland kitchen party erupts at Toronto airport
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Newfoundland kitchen party erupts at Toronto airport

    A group of people waiting on a delayed flight to Newfoundland made the best of a normally annoying situation with a guitar, an accordion and a lot of gumption.

  • Estevan teacher sentenced to 5 years for sexual assaulting students
    News
    CBC

    Estevan teacher sentenced to 5 years for sexual assaulting students

    A teacher from Estevan, Sask. has been sentenced to five years in federal prison after sexually assaulting multiple students. Troy Ruzicka was sentenced in Estevan provincial court on Tuesday having been found guilty of sexual assault and sexual touching. According to the agreed statement of facts, the incidents Ruzicka was charged for spanned from 2014 to 2017 when he worked as a mechanics teacher at Estevan Comprehensive School.

  • Nova Scotia doctor shortage plan hampered by poor communications, says AG
    News
    CBC

    Nova Scotia doctor shortage plan hampered by poor communications, says AG

    Nova Scotia Auditor General Michael Pickup has recommended the Department of Health and the Nova Scotia Health Authority find a way to prioritize the thousands of families who are on the provincial wait-list for a family doctor. Pickup found the Nova Scotia government had a plan to transform primary care in the province but both it and the Nova Scotia Health Authority needed to share that information with the public.

  • US Navy plane with 11 aboard crashes into Pacific; 8 rescued
    News
    The Canadian Press

    US Navy plane with 11 aboard crashes into Pacific; 8 rescued

    Eight people were rescued and three remained missing after a U.S. Navy plane crashed into the western Pacific Ocean on Wednesday, the Navy said. The C-2 "Greyhound" transport aircraft came down about 500 nautical miles (925 kilometres ) southeast of Okinawa as it was bringing passengers and cargo from Japan to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier, the Navy said in a statement. The Reagan was operating in the Philippine Sea during a joint exercise with Japan's Maritime Self- Defence Force when the twin-propeller plane crashed at 2:45 p.m. Japan time.

  • Pledge deaths at US colleges fuel reviews of Greek life
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Pledge deaths at US colleges fuel reviews of Greek life

    The deaths of at least four fraternity pledges this year have helped fuel a re-examination of Greek life at U.S. colleges, which have long struggled with how to crack down on hazing, alcohol abuse and other unwelcome aspects without disbanding organizations that have loyal members and alumni. Florida State suspended 55 fraternities and sororities following a pledge's suspected alcohol-related death.

  • Mail bomb victim Maria Mitousis hesitated before opening 'weird' package
    News
    CBC

    Mail bomb victim Maria Mitousis hesitated before opening 'weird' package

    Maria Mitousis had finished nine holes of golf and breakfast with friends on July 3, 2015, when she stopped by her Stradbrook Avenue law office to check some paperwork and emails. Guido Amsel, 51, is on trial charged with five counts of attempted murder and aggravated assault in connection with three bombs delivered to his ex-wife Iris and two law firms in July 2015, and a December 2013 explosion at his ex-wife's rural municipality of St. Clements. Mitousis said she hesitated for a moment, thinking it was "weird and that she should talk to the firm's managing partner, Connie Peterson.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    B.C. plow operator praised for speedy, potentially life-saving work

    Vern Radloff rushed to assist first responders in Cranbrook reach the 73-year-old who had fallen at her isolated home several days earlier, but had finally managed to reach her phone to call for help. Radloff, a plow operator for the City of Cranbrook for nearly 30 years, says he couldn't believe what awaited him at the rural property.

  • Moore targeted by fellow Republicans' comments in new ad
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Moore targeted by fellow Republicans' comments in new ad

    The words of prominent Republicans are being used against Alabama's GOP Senate nominee Roy Moore in a campaign ad, as Moore's camp on Tuesday continued to go on the offensive against the media and the women accusing him of sexual misconduct. Six women have accused Moore of pursuing romantic relationships with them when they were teenagers and he was an assistant district attorney in his 30s. Democratic candidate Doug Jones began airing a new ad that features statements made by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama and Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Donald Trump, responding to allegations of sexual misconduct against Moore.

  • Man, 31, killed after he was shot several times in northeast Scarborough
    News
    CBC

    Man, 31, killed after he was shot several times in northeast Scarborough

    Toronto police say a man was killed late Tuesday in a shooting in northeast Scarborough. When officers arrived on the scene, just west of the Toronto Zoo, they found a man suffering from gunshot wounds, he said. The man was located outside.

  • China, US disaster drills show a shared goal: saving lives
    News
    The Canadian Press

    China, US disaster drills show a shared goal: saving lives

    A man lay on the grass, shivering beneath his bloodstained T-shirt as Chinese military doctors and U.S. Army medics hovered over him, applying a splint and an IV. On a pine-studded base along the Oregon coast, military units from two seemingly unlikely partners were carrying out a joint response to a natural disaster. It was only a drill, but the roughly 100 soldiers from China and the U.S. and their top commanders are ready to use what they learned in a real disaster, no matter the state of relations between the nations.

  • CBS News and PBS cut ties to Rose following sex allegations
    News
    The Canadian Press

    CBS News and PBS cut ties to Rose following sex allegations

    CBS News and PBS both cut ties to Charlie Rose on Tuesday, less than 24 hours after several women who worked with him on his PBS interview show alleged a pattern of sexual misconduct, including groping and walking naked in front of them. Both organizations stressed the importance of providing a safe, professional workplace. Rose joins a lengthening list of media figures who have lost jobs because of workplace behaviour , including Fox News CEO Roger Ailes, Fox host Bill O'Reilly, NBC News political reporter Mark Halperin and National Public Radio news chief Michael Oreskes.

  • New Brunswick city councillor quits to work as lifeguard in the Bahamas
    News
    The Canadian Press

    New Brunswick city councillor quits to work as lifeguard in the Bahamas

    A New Brunswick city councillor has stepped down to take an unlikely gig: lifeguard in the Bahamas. Jordan Nowlan was one of the province's youngest-ever politicians — he was in high school when he ran for Dieppe city council in 2012 and he turned 19 the day after he was elected. "I absolutely loved being an elected official," Nowlan said in a telephone interview from the Bahamas.

  • Doctors plead with Senate committee to protect their income amid tax changes
    News
    CBC

    Doctors plead with Senate committee to protect their income amid tax changes

    Three doctors from Cape Breton stood before a Senate committee on national finance in Halifax Tuesday and pleaded with its members to do whatever they could to protect doctors' income. The doctors are worried the federal government will put an end to a 20-year custom in this province of incorporating their private practices.

  • Indigenous kids largely apprehended because of poverty, says former child protection worker
    News
    CBC

    Indigenous kids largely apprehended because of poverty, says former child protection worker

    A former child protection worker, once with the Ministry of Child and Family Development, says, in her experience, Indigenous children are largely being apprehended due to poverty, and their parents are being over policed when trying to reunite with them. According to a report from B.C.'s representative for children and youth, although Indigenous children are less than 10 per cent of the population, they account for 62 per cent of children in government care. In an MCFD 2016 performance management report, the main reason (43%) listed for Indigenous children being apprehended is because their parents were "unable/unwilling to care." The lowest percentages of reasons include sexual abuse (0.7%) and deprived of health care (0.5%).

  • News
    CBC

    Canada 'prepared for the worst' amid squabbles over NAFTA, Freeland says

    Despite making progress on "bread and butter" issues, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said differences remain between Canada and the U.S. on a number of key chapters of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Speaking to reporters as the fifth round of negotiations concluded in Mexico City, the Toronto-area minister said "significant" sticking points include the U.S. push to change the rules of origin — which could be detrimental to the Canadian auto industry — and demands for a five-year sunset clause in the deal. "There are some areas where some extreme proposals have been put forward, and these are proposals that we simply cannot agree to," she said, while adding the U.S. position of these contentious issues, which were introduced in earlier rounds of negotiations, are largely unchanged.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Singing, dancing help travellers pass the time during flight delay

    Waiting out a flight delay is anything but a joyous experience for most, unless it's a group of Newfoundlanders with instruments and a trove of traditional music. Some travellers at Pearson International Airport in Toronto waiting for a WestJet flight to Newfoundland and Labrador on Tuesday brought out some instruments and it wasn't long before the waiting area became a Newfoundland Kitchen Party — airport style.

  • JFK birth centennial ending on assassination anniversary
    News
    The Canadian Press

    JFK birth centennial ending on assassination anniversary

    A year of events marking the 100th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's birth is drawing to a close exactly 54 years after his assassination. National park rangers will lay a wreath outside Kennedy's childhood home in Brookline, Massachusetts, and a 21-gun salute by an honour guard will follow. The observances are being held at what is now known as the John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site administered by the National Park Service.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Laurier apologizes to TA who aired debate clip on gender-neutral pronouns

    An Ontario university has apologized to a teaching assistant who was severely chastised for airing a clip of a debate featuring a controversial figure, saying the woman was not treated according to the institution's values. The president of Wilfrid Laurier University said the school is proceeding with a third-party investigation into the dispute with graduate student Lindsay Shepherd, but said recently revealed audio recordings of her interactions with her immediate superiors made it clear an apology was in order. Shepherd said she discreetly recorded a meeting with three Laurier staff members in which she was roundly criticized for failing to condemn the views of polarizing University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson, who has refused to use gender-neutral pronouns.