• News
    People

    Halle Berry Responds to Criticism After Her Son, 6, Wears Heels: 'Have a Laugh and Some Compassion'

    Halle Berry said her son had some "harmless fun" and told commenters to have "compassion" during the coronavirus pandemic

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    People

    Kate Upton and Justin Verlander to Donate His Weekly MLB Paychecks to Coronavirus Charities

    "Everyone around the world is affected by this virus," the Houston Astros pitcher said

  • State of emergency in Ontario: What police can and can't do with expanded powers
    News
    Ahmar Khan

    State of emergency in Ontario: What police can and can't do with expanded powers

    Police Officers in Ontario will now have the right to stop and have the public identify themselves or face hefty fines for violating their orders, according to a new power granted by the province of Ontario using the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA). 

  • Princess Eugenie's Father-in-Law George Brooksbank Is Hospitalized Due to Coronavirus
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    People

    Princess Eugenie's Father-in-Law George Brooksbank Is Hospitalized Due to Coronavirus

    Princess Eugenie’s father-in-law George Brooksbank has been in the hospital for several days now and has been ill for a couple of weeks, PEOPLE can confirm

  • COVID-19 in Canada: PM Trudeau, Doug Ford express disappointment in Trump's trade 'mistake'
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    Elisabetta Bianchini

    COVID-19 in Canada: PM Trudeau, Doug Ford express disappointment in Trump's trade 'mistake'

    As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

  • COVID-19 in Canada: A recap of the first month of the pandemic in Canada
    News
    Elisabetta Bianchini

    COVID-19 in Canada: A recap of the first month of the pandemic in Canada

    An archive of the first month of developments in the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada.

  • 'Canada will lose every time:' COVID-19 pandemic threatens Canada-U.S. relations
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    Elianna Lev

    'Canada will lose every time:' COVID-19 pandemic threatens Canada-U.S. relations

    While Canada and the U.S. have historically had strong ties in times of crisis, the current pandemic seems to be setting a different tone.

  • Italian Shoe Designer Sergio Rossi Dies of Coronavirus Complications at 84
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    People

    Italian Shoe Designer Sergio Rossi Dies of Coronavirus Complications at 84

    Sergio Rossi designed shoes worn by countless celebrities

  • Matthew Broderick's Sister Janet Opens Up About Being 'Close to Death' During Coronavirus Battle
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    People

    Matthew Broderick's Sister Janet Opens Up About Being 'Close to Death' During Coronavirus Battle

    Janet Broderick — the older sister of Matthew Broderick — was diagnosed with COVID-19 in early March

  • Passengers on COVID-19-stricken cruise ships hope to be on land again soon
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    The Canadian Press

    Passengers on COVID-19-stricken cruise ships hope to be on land again soon

    Two cruise ships with Canadian passengers aboard finally docked Thursday in Florida after weeks at sea and days of negotiations with initially resistant local officials.The MS Zaandam and a sister ship, the MS Rotterdam, were both given permission to unload passengers at Port Everglades after reaching an agreement with officials who feared they would divert needed resources from a region that has seen a spike in virus cases.Earlier Thursday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the Canadians would stay in isolation upon their return to Canada. Trudeau said a chartered plane would carry asymptomatic Canadian passengers aboard the ships home in the coming days, though he didn't provide an exact timeline.But Catherine McLeod of Ottawa, who was on the Zaandam with her husband before they were transferred to the Rotterdam, said she was preparing to come home, even before American officials gave the ships the go-ahead to dock in Florida."It's kind of a done deal we're getting off this pleasure cruise," McLeod said in a phone interview from her cabin. "So we're very, very hopeful. I will feel 100 per cent better once the plane lifts off the runway. It's going to be one hell of a Hallelujah hoot going up then."She said she and her husband were waiting for a medical check-up to make sure they remained asymptomatic before getting their "disembarkation" papers."I think what they're trying to do is get our fannies on a bus and outta here ASAP," McLeod said.Holland America, which operates the cruises, said U.S. officials at the local, state and national levels cleared both ships to dock on Thursday afternoon, and would allow all guests fit to travel to disembark."Guests who still have symptoms will remain on board and disembark at a later date to be finalized after they have fully recovered," the cruise line said.Global Affairs Canada said the passengers would be screened after the ships docked. It said passengers showing no symptoms will travel to Canada on a flight chartered by the cruise line."Once here, they will be screened again and subject to mandatory 14-day self-isolation," the department said in a release. "Passengers who display symptoms after disembarking the ships will be treated locally."The docking plan indicated that Florida residents would leave the ship first, with the disembarkation of all passengers not concluding until Friday night.For nearly three weeks, passengers have not been able to leave the ships, and four elderly passengers have died on the Zaandam — at least two from COVID-19, ship owner Carnival Cruise Lines said in a statement.There are 442 guests and 603 crew on the Zaandam, and 808 guests and 583 crew on the Rotterdam, which was sent last week to take in some of the passengers and provide assistance to the Zaandam since it was denied permission to dock at ports in South America.Holland America said 97 guests and 136 crew members on the ships have developed flu-like symptoms.Initially, 248 Canadians were aboard the MS Zaandam, Global Affairs has said. As for what happens when they return to Canada, the details remain fuzzy."My understanding is they will be flown home on a charter flight but we are still looking for those details and we will ensure they are isolated when they get home," Trudeau said.He did not specifically say if passengers from the ships will be required to remain in quarantine at federal quarantine centres, like passengers from the Diamond Princess and Grand Princess were in February and March.Chris Joiner of Ottawa, who remains on the Zaandam, said in written messages that he's been told he may be able to disembark on Friday if Florida grants the necessary permissions."People are so bored. Some sleep all the time. I mean, booze is free but you can’t get drunk every day," Joiner said.He said the once-lively cruise ship has quieted in the last week."The only thing you hear is food being delivered, dishes picked up and the odd knock when your garbage can is emptied or they dropped off clean towels or booze," he said.Meanwhile, a Toronto couple who were transferred over to the Rotterdam said they were trying to keep their heads up before ultimately putting this disaster behind them."Here we are on day 24 of a 14-day cruise!" Kevin and Jeannette Balgopal wrote in an email on Wednesday. They said the cruise company and captain were providing as much reassurance as they could under the circumstances.The couple has been confined to their cabin for fear a half-hour of daily "fresh air time" would "jeopardize any attempts to get us to dock," the Balgopals wrote. "Life is not easy."— With file from The Associated PressThis report by The Canadian Press was first published April 2, 2020.Liam Casey and Nicole Thompson, The Canadian Press

  • The latest developments on COVID-19 in Canada
    News
    The Canadian Press

    The latest developments on COVID-19 in Canada

    The latest news on the COVID-19 global pandemic (all times Eastern): 8 p.m.Two cruise ships with Canadian passengers aboard have docked in Florida after weeks at sea.Their arrival also comes after days of negotiations with initially resistant local officials.The MS Zaandam and a sister ship, the MS Rotterdam, were both given permission to unload passengers at Port Everglades.Officials had feared the ships would divert needed resources from a region that has seen a spike in virus cases.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the Canadians would stay in isolation upon their return to Canada.\---6 p.m.The B.C. government says there are 55 new cases of COVID-19 in the province for a total of 1,121.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says one of the new cases is an inmate at the Okanagan Correctional Centre.She says it's the first positive test in a correctional facility in B.C.Henry also reports that six additional people have died after contracting the virus, bringing the total number of deaths in B.C. to 31.She says 149 people are hospitalized, while 641 people have recovered.\---5:40 p.m.Alberta is reporting 96 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the total in the province to 968 cases.Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province's chief medical health officer, also says two men in their 90s have died, bringing the number of deaths to 13.She says the outbreak has spread to nine continuing care centres, including Calgary's McKenzie Towne centre, where there are 65 cases.She says 174 people who tested position in the province have recovered.\---4 p.m.Passengers aboard two COVID-19-stricken cruise ships have been given the green light to disembark at a Florida port.American officials say they have reached an agreement to allow asymptomatic passengers to get off the MS Zaandam and MS Rotterdam.There are more than 200 Canadians on board the ships, which have been stranded for weeks because no country would accept them.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the Canadian passengers will be brought home on a chartered flight, and will have to stay in isolation.\---3:30 p.m.More than 200 cases of COVID-19 have now been reported in Saskatchewan.The Ministry of Health announced 13 new cases today, bringing the total to 206Two of the people infected are in intensive case.The government says to date, public health officials have performed more than 11,000 tests.\---2 p.m.Health care workers in Canada's federal prison system are on the verge of walking off the job in the next few days over a lack of personal protective medical gear, according to their union.The Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada says there is a "real, escalating danger" that prison nurses won't show up for work, citing provisions of the Canada Labour Code that allow workers to refuse unsafe work.Union president Debi Daviau says her members understand there is a shortage of much-needed equipment as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.But she says there is no need to have every medical staffer at work in every institution as the pandemic spreads.Public Safety Minister Bill Blair has asked the federal prison service and parole board to look at early release for some offenders.\---1:59 p.m.New Brunswick is reporting 10 more cases of COVID-19, for a provincial total of 91.The province's chief medical officer of health, Dr. Jennifer Russell, says there is one community where five members of a church have tested positive.She did not identify which community or church, but again stressed the need for social distancing and avoiding mass gatherings.\---1:15 p.m.The B.C. government is increasing the monthly amount that people on income and disability assistance receive to help them with COVID-19.Anyone on those programs who is not eligible for the federal government's emergency support programs will get an automatic $300 monthly supplement for the three months, starting this month.Social Development Minister Shane Simpson says the supplement will also go to low-income seniors.As well, he says people who are getting assistance from the province will not see a reduction in their benefits if they also qualify for the new $2,000 Canada Emergency Response Benefit.\---1:15 p.m. Quebec Premier Francois Legault is encouraging police to be less tolerant with people refusing to follow the COVID-19 rules of engagement.Legault says he's hearing of people who are flouting physical distancing rules or companies that remain open and is warning who aren't following public health regulations will be hit with fines ranging between $1,000 and $6,000.Quebec has seen another spike of the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19, reporting 5,518 cases in the province today.That number represents an increase of 907 cases in the province since Wednesday.Authorities also reported three more deaths, bringing the provincial tally to 36.\---1:15 p.m.Melania Trump says she has spoken with Sophie Gregoire Trudeau to wish her good health as she recovers from COVID-19.The U.S. first lady says on Twitter that she spoke with her Canadian counterpart earlier today and expressed gratitude for what she calls the special relationship between the two countries as they address pandemic-related challenges.A readout of the call from the White House says Trump and Trudeau discussed the importance of maintaining the economic links between Canada and the U.S., and noted the $1.7 billion US worth of daily trade that crosses their shared border.The two also discussed the repatriation efforts that are ongoing to get Americans and Canadians home from cruise ships and other places around the world.\---1 p.m.Nova Scotia is reporting 20 new cases of COVID-19 for a total of 193 confirmed cases.Health officials say five people are currently in hospital, while 16 people have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved.Most cases in Nova Scotia are connected to travel or a known case, with one confirmed case of community transmission to date.Nova Scotia's cabinet met today by teleconference and agreed to ask the lieutenant governor to extend the province's state of emergency for another two weeks, with the order to take effect at noon Sunday, April 5th and extend to noon, April 19th.\---1 p.m.Prince Edward Island has one new case of COVID-19 Thursday, bringing the provincial total to 22.Chief medical health officer Dr. Heather Morrison says the latest case is a man in his 50s and is related to international travel.Three cases on the Island are considered as recovered.P.E.I. has begun doing its own COVID-19 testing, reducing the reliance on the national laboratory.\---12:30 p.m.There are eight more positive cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador, bringing the total to 183 in the province. Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, the province's chief medical officer of health, says 143 cases have been linked to a funeral home in St. John's where someone with the illness attended a service earlier this month.The eight new cases are in the Eastern Health region.Fitzgerald says 11 people are in hospital and four in intensive care.\---12:20 p.m.Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller says 15 people living in Indigenous communities have been diagnosed with COVID-19.Miller says the virus is a unique challenge in communities that are remote and he says the government is trying to get equipment there to help.But he says COVID-19 is just one of the challenges Indigenous communities are facing this spring, including the risk of flooding.\---12:15 p.m.Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief public health officer, says almost half of the deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Canada have occurred in long term care homes.Tam says at least 50 of the 111 deaths already confirmed took place in these high risk settings.She says we need to double down on efforts to keep the novel coronavirus from spreading.\---11:30 a.m.More than 11 million face masks have arrived in Canada in recent days, including a shipment of one million masks that arrived at a Hamilton warehouse overnight, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said today.He said workers are trying to quickly assess that they meet the needed standards, and that 10 million masks are already being distributed to provinces and territories.He also said the government has ordered hundreds of thousands of face shields from Bauer, the company that normally makes hockey equipment.\---10:35 a.m.Ontario is reporting 401 more COVID-19 cases today, including 16 more deaths.A Bobcaygeon nursing home is also reporting two more deaths of residents in a COVID-19 outbreak there, bringing the total to 16.In the province, there are now 2,793 cases of COVID-19, including 53 deaths and 831 resolved.\---6:10 a.m.A survey by an organization representing the Canadian restaurant industry says that over 300,000 restaurant jobs have been lost in Ontario as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.Restaurants Canada estimates that 800,000 jobs have been lost in the sector nationwide.The company said nearly one in 10 restaurants in Canada have already closed and nearly one in five expect to close if conditions don't get better in a month.Restaurant Canada CEO and President said the numbers are the worst he's seen since Restaurants Canada was founded 75 years ago.\---The Canadian Press

  • The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada
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    The Canadian Press

    The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

    The latest numbers of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 6:14 p.m. on April 2, 2020:There are 11,283 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada._ Quebec: 5,518 confirmed (including 36 deaths, 224 resolved)_ Ontario: 2,793 confirmed (including 53 deaths, 831 resolved)_ British Columbia: 1,121 confirmed (including 31 deaths, 641 resolved)_ Alberta: 968 confirmed (including 13 deaths, 174 resolved)_ Saskatchewan: 206 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 36 resolved)_ Nova Scotia: 193 confirmed (including 16 resolved)_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 183 confirmed (including 1 death, 10 resolved)_ Manitoba: 152 confirmed (including 1 death, 11 resolved), 15 presumptive_ New Brunswick: 91 confirmed (including 22 resolved)_ Prince Edward Island: 22 confirmed (including 3 resolved)_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed_ Yukon: 6 confirmed_ Northwest Territories: 2 confirmed_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases_ Total: 11,283 (15 presumptive, 11,268 confirmed including 138 deaths, 1,968 resolved)This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 2, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • 'It's a huge problem:' Dangerous lies about coronavirus spreading on WhatsApp
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    Ahmar Khan

    'It's a huge problem:' Dangerous lies about coronavirus spreading on WhatsApp

    Gurgling warm water, eating fennel flower seeds or steaming your nose will not protect you from COVID-19, no matter what the scholars of WhatsApp University tell you.

  • Stock market crash may force some investors to postpone retirements, say experts
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    The Canadian Press

    Stock market crash may force some investors to postpone retirements, say experts

    TORONTO — The biggest market downturn in more than a decade has rattled nerves and may ultimately force some investors to postpone their approaching retirements, say experts."I do see that this is going to be impactful for the average Canadian out there because you know, not everybody, unfortunately, plans," says Chris Gandhu, vice-president high net worth planning for TD Wealth Advisory Services.A well-developed plan designed years before the expected date of retirement can help to control these "black swan events."Even those that should be good on paper, including Gandhu's mother, may feel anxious about their plans."I think she's in a decently good spot. But of course, she's rethinking everything and wondering whether she needs to work a bit longer," he said from Calgary.The TSX/S&P Composite Index is down 25 per cent from its record high after losing as much as 38 per cent of its value in a little over a month as markets were rattled by the economic impact of the novel coronavirus.The swift market plunge has prompted workers to re-examine their plans to see if their post-retirement goals have changed.For example, those with dreams of travelling in the first couple years of retirement may no longer feel comfortable doing so because of the global pandemic."I don't know if many people are going to be looking to take a cruise in the next year or two," said Ed Lee, vice president of Morneau Shepell’s retirement practice.Even the most conservative investment strategy has netted a significant retirement cushion over the 12-year bull run but also fostered a sense of complacency.Adjusting expenses until a recovery occurs may be an alternative to delaying retirement, says Manmeet Bhatia, head of private wealth Franklin Templeton Canada."You might want to extend your working years a little longer, but you also may want to look at your spending habits," he said.He said investors can't count on a quick recovery. That's especially true for sectors such as the hospitality industry that could face significant layoffs.Bhatia said the best way to control large swings in the equity market is through a balanced portfolio that consists of equities, fixed income, a multitude of sectors and geographies."The reality is there's going to be major corrections that can occur at inopportune times — you know exactly like what we're facing now," he said.The situation is likely to be more stressful for those with defined contribution pension plans, rather than defined benefit plans that guarantee a retirement payout regardless how markets perform."The current market problems are much more impactful to people that are much closer to retirement, because those are the people that may be need the market to return to normal in three or six or nine months, but it might take two years for the market to fully rebound, to where it once was," said Joseph Nunes, co-founder and executive chairman of Actuarial Solutions Inc. and author of a paper entitled “The Power of Postponed Retirement.” Nunes suggests that the Canadian government should extend the age to invest in tax-sheltered securities to 75 from 71.In the meantime, Finance Minister Bill Morneau has addressed the impact of the virus on older investors by reducing the minimum withdrawal from registered retirement income funds by 25 per cent in 2020."It was an acknowledgment that forcing people to get money out of their retirement savings at age 71, 72, etc, especially when the markets have taken a hit is not necessarily in everyone's best interest for the long haul," Nunes said in an interview. Baby boomers aren't always the most financially secure despite their long employment records.They account for one out of eight consumer insolvency filings in Canada and have seen the largest increase in filings in the past five years, said Pierre Fortin, CEO of insolvency firm Jean Fortin & Associates.And now they will be among the most financially affected by job losses due to COVID-19 because as the most susceptible to contracting the virus, they may be forced to remain at home and would be the first to be laid off.While this cohort would have had an easy time in the near full-employment pre-COVID labour market, they will face stiff competition from many younger people looking for jobs if their employers cease operations."Postponing retirement to pay off consumer debts and mortgages was a necessity for many baby-boomers," he wrote in an email. "Post-COVID-19 will create hardships for everyone but more so for those 65+ age groups whose consumer debts surpass their net annual income.”The fact that some investors were forced to adjust their retirement date because of the recent market fluctuations means something went wrong with their retirement plan, says Sylvain Brisebois, national sales manager at BMO Private Wealth.That's because retirement is about cash flow that is visible several years in advance of retirement."You can be asset rich and cash poor and that's a deadly combination for retirement," he said.Retirement cash flow should come from interest payments, dividends and bond maturities that are predictable and secure.Asset sales could be part of the plan, but it should be flexible enough to put off any sales until the market recovers."If you are stuck selling assets, now, you've really you've really messed up," he said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 2, 2020.Ross Marowits, The Canadian Press

  • Spain Salutes Hospital Cleaning Staff During COVID-19 Pandemic
    News
    Jon Rumley

    Spain Salutes Hospital Cleaning Staff During COVID-19 Pandemic

    Cleaners are sanitizing health-care facilities to keep everyone safe.

  • Exclusive: Amazon to deploy masks and temperature checks for workers by next week
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    Reuters

    Exclusive: Amazon to deploy masks and temperature checks for workers by next week

    The company, which has reported virus cases among warehouse staff and faced several demonstrations, said it would start testing hundreds of thousands of employees a day for fevers. All locations will have surgical masks available by early next week, after millions were ordered weeks ago, according to Amazon. Particle-blocking N95 masks it has ordered will instead be donated to medical workers or sold at cost to government and healthcare organizations, it said.

  • Coastal communities call for travel restrictions as visitors trickle in
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    CBC

    Coastal communities call for travel restrictions as visitors trickle in

    Leaders in small communities along B.C.'s Central Coast are calling on the province to restrict travel into the region, fearing that visitors will introduce COVID-19.Officials say there's been an influx of visitors travelling into the region. Health-care centres in communities near Bella Bella aren't equipped to handle the coronavirus outbreak, according to the Central Coast Regional District.For example, the lone hospital in Bella Bella only has one ventilator, said director Daniel Bertrand."We don't have health-care resources to handle an outbreak, and we're seeing people coming to their summer homes. We're at the start of our tourism season," said Bertrand."We're seeing RVs coming down the hill into Bella Coola, people travelling by yacht, even from as far away as Washington state," he added. "It's very easily noticeable in a small town when you seen an Alberta licence plate, a New York licence plate or a red sports car drive by a farm."The district's travel restriction order was removed by the province when Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth suspended all local states of emergency (except for the City of Vancouver) last week.It has since been calling on the province to prohibit non-essential travel into the region, largely out of concerns for a vulnerable population."Sixty-five per cent of our population in the regional district is Indigenous, and the vast majority of Indigenous language speakers are senior citizens," said Bertrand. "And they're really the national treasures of the First Nations in the region. And they disproportionately live in overcrowded housing and are susceptible COVID-19."Four Central Coast First Nations — Nuxalk, Oweekeno, Kitasoo-Xai'Xais and Heiltsuk — have implemented travel restrictions on their own, including a checkpoint on Highway 20. The province has not taken any action against them.Coastal communities urge distanceA swath of other communities along the central and south coast are also asking visitors to stay away, but haven't gone as far as to ask the province for a travel restriction.In March, Tofino issued a plea to vacationers not to visit, also fearing a stressed medical system. Mayor Josie Osborne said most have been respectful but a few have trickled in."There's probably a very, very small handful of operators — it's not unlawful to accept a visitor right now, but it really isn't the best decision for our community," sad Osborne.The population of Tofino generally triples once the spring tourism season hits.Leaders in the Gulf Islands have also asked tourists to steer clear.Destination B.C. vice president Maya Lange says communities that rely heavily on tourism are taking the pandemic seriously."Tourism is a $20 billion industry. It employs about 167,000 people, and there's about 19,000 tourism businesses. So it's extremely painful for the entire industry," she said."Our number one priority is making sure we can flatten the curve as quickly as possible so we can get back out to exploring British Columbia again," she said.

  • Looking for work? These industries are hiring in Toronto during the COVID-19 pandemic
    News
    CBC

    Looking for work? These industries are hiring in Toronto during the COVID-19 pandemic

    As restaurants, bars and other businesses shut their doors during the COVID-19 pandemic, laying off tens of thousands of people, there are other industries in the city looking to hire workers — and they're not just retail and cashier jobs. Sure, cashier positions are in abundance now at places like grocery stores, says Marc Belaiche, president of TorontoJobs.ca.But he urges job seekers to look closely at the postings coming out of Loblaw, Amazon and other companies like them experiencing a sudden hike in demand for online sales and deliveries from people who've been told to stay at home."Within those [companies] you have the other support mechanisms, like accounting, operations and management, that are all needed to handle [the retail] surge," said Belaiche, whose company deals with internet recruitment and staffing within the Great Toronto Area. There's also been a huge uptick in IT jobs as more people are working from home, says Belaiche. Digital ad agencies 'doing exceptionally well'"E-commerce focused companies and digital advertising agencies are also doing exceptionally well during this time," said Trina Boos, president of Boost Agents. Boos's company recruits candidates for mid- to high-level positions in the marketing, communications, digital and creative sectors. Jobs are being posted, but she warns that there could be a lot of competition. "There's a lot of talent in the marketplace, really great talent ... temporarily laid off. It is a good time for companies who are looking to pick up great talent," said Boos. Hourly rates higher during COVID-19 pandemicTo help the thousands of servers, bartenders and cooks currently out of work, the mobile employment app Hyr is trying to connect them with businesses that have short-term needs. The company says it's taking steps to help workers in the gig economy suddenly in need of temporary work get the cash they need quickly."We've eliminated our service fee," said Joshua Karam, CEO at Hyr. "All the money that flows through Hyr goes directly into the pockets of those who need it most … They get the money deposited into their bank account within 72 hours," said Karam. There are more than 25,000 Canadians currently using the app and Karam says that number is growing daily. Some of the jobs being offered through Hyr are grocery order fillers, delivery drivers and security guard positions. The best part, Karam says, is that most of these gigs are receiving higher hourly pay than usual."We're seeing it across the board," he said. Walmart, Dollarama and some food-delivery companies like Goodfood announced last month that they'd be hiring more people during the COVID-19 pandemic to keep up with demand.Recruiter tip: let people know you're out of workThe City of Toronto is also looking to bring on staff to help support six newly opened shelters for people experiencing homelessness. Duties for these positions include on-site support and cleaning. Meantime, if you are out of work and are planning on applying for the government's Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB), Belaiche says you should still let your professional circle know that you're out of a job, in case something comes up. He says opportunities could arise and if people know you're looking they could reach out to you directly. "Reconnect with old employers, former coworkers, update your resume and LinkedIn profile."

  • Coast Guard: Cruise ships must stay at sea with sick onboard
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Coast Guard: Cruise ships must stay at sea with sick onboard

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The U.S. Coast Guard has directed cruise ships to prepare to treat any sick passengers and crew on board while being sequestered “indefinitely" offshore during the coronavirus pandemic.The new rules outlined in a memo are required for ships in the district that covers Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Puerto Rico. They also come with a stiff warning: Any foreign-flagged vessels “that loiter beyond U.S. territorial seas" should try first to medically evacuate the very sick to those countries instead.Many South Florida cruise ships are registered in the Bahamas, where hospital capacity is limited and people are still recovering from last year's devastating Hurricane Dorian.The rules, which apply to vessels carrying more than 50 people, were issued in a March 29 safety bulletin signed by Coast Guard Rear Admiral E.C. Jones, head of the seventh district. All ships destined for U.S. ports were already required to provide daily updates on their coronavirus caseload or face civil penalties or criminal prosecution.Dozens of cruise ships are either lined up at Port Miami and Port Everglades or waiting offshore due to the coronavirus pandemic. Most have only crew aboard, but Carnival Corp., which owns nine cruise lines with a total of 105 ships, notified the SEC on Tuesday that it has more than 6,000 passengers still at sea.Federal, state and local officials have been negotiating over whether Carnival's Holland America cruise ships, the Zaandam and Rotterdam, would be allowed to dock at Port Everglades this week. But the company's Coral Princess is coming, too, with what that ship's medical centre called a higher-than-normal number of people with flu-like symptoms.Carnival said three of the 40 ships that were at sea when it paused its cruises last month are expected to arrive at port by week's end. In addition to the ships arriving in Fort Lauderdale, other ships are approaching Civitavecchia, Italy, and Southampton, England, spokesman Roger Frizzell said.Two of four deaths on the Zaandam were blamed on COVID-19 and nine people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, Carnival's maritime chief officer William Burke told Broward County commissioners at a Tuesday meeting. The company said more than 200 have reported symptoms. More than 300 Americans, with about 50 Floridians, are on Zaandam and Rotterdam. Four children under 12 are on board.Gov. Ron DeSantis said he expected a resolution Wednesday after speaking with President Donald Trump, but port authorities later said discussions between the company and officials over the terms of docking were ongoing and they did not expect to update Broward County commissioners on Wednesday as foreseen at the Tuesday meeting.DeSantis maintained Florida's health care system is stretched too thin to take on the ships' coronavirus caseload, but he said he would accept the Florida residents on board.“My concern is simply that we have worked so hard to make sure we have adequate hospital beds,” he said.Trump had expressed sympathy toward the passengers on Tuesday.“They're dying on the ship,” Trump said. “I'm going to do what's right. Not only for us, but for humanity.”Passengers expressed their frustrations to The Associated Press on Wednesday.Andrea Anderson and her husband Rob coughed their way through a video chat from the Zandaam. Asked what she would say to Florida's governor, Anderson said, “How would he feel if his mother was on this ship? Would he still be saying, 'No they can't dock?'”Mary Beth Van Horn said she's “terrified” for her brother Tom Brazier, 77, of Ocean Park, Washington, who went on the South American cruise with his wife before he was supposed to begin a new bone cancer treatment in April. They weren't allowed to transfer to the Rotterdam with other apparently healthy people because they have portable CPAP machines and other mobility problems.“He is afraid. Last time, he told me 'I just don't see how this could end well,'" she said.For most people, the virus causes a fever and cough that can clear up in two to three weeks without hospitalization. Older adults and people with existing health problems are more likely to suffer severe illness and require oxygen to stay alive.Under normal conditions, a ship can call on the Coast Guard to medically evacuate people too sick to be cared for on board.Now a Coast Guard flight surgeon in the seventh district will decide if a transfer is absolutely necessary, but the cruise companies then would be responsible for arranging on-shore transportation and hospital beds.“This is necessary as shore-side medical facilities may reach full capacity and lose the ability to accept and effectively treat additional critically-ill patients," the memo said.___ Associated Press contributors include Kelli Kennedy in Fort Lauderdale and Julie Walker in New York City; Gomez Licon reported from Miami.___Follow AP coverage of the virus outbreak at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak.Freida Frisaro And Adriana Gomez Licon, The Associated Press

  • Is it COVID-19 or the flu? Can it live on groceries? Top questions about coronavirus answered
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