Olivia Colman chic in black Prada at 'The Crown' world premiere

On Wednesday night, the new cast of ‘The Crown’ celebrated the upcoming release of the third season with a star-studded red carpet world premiere in London.

Olivia Colman, who replaces Claire Foy as Queen Elizabeth II in the revamped third season of the popular Netflix TV programme, attended alongside her on-screen sister, Helena Bonham Carter, who plays Princess Margaret.

Tobias Menzies, who’s taken on the role of Prince Philip, joined his on-screen wife and sister-in-law on the red carpet.

Also in attendance was ‘Les Misérable’ star Erin Doherty, who acts as the Queen’s daughter Princess Anne, Gillian Anderson, who’s taken on the role of former UK prime minister Margaret Thatcher and “The Durrells’ star Josh O’Connor, who plays Prince Charles.

Olivia Colman on the red carpet at "The Crown" Season 3 World Premiere [Photo: Getty]

For the star-studded occasion, 45-year-old Colman donned a chic black dress from Prada. The elegant gown featured a fishtail and fluted sleeves. A teal satin clutch bag completed the look.

Meanwhile, Bonham Carter, 53, who’s known for her quirky sense of style, turned to London Fashion Week designer Ryan Lo for her feather-embellished gown.

Doherty matched the red carpet in a full-skirted dress by Dolce & Gabbana. The dress featured a corset bodice and satin straps.

Anderson, 51, arrived in a luxe look: a velvet, midnight blue dress paired with a faux fur jacket.

Gillian Anderson, Ruth Doherty and Helena Bonham Carter on the red carpet at "The Crown" Season 3 World Premiere [Photo: Getty]
Harry Treadaway, Tobias Menzies and Josh O'Connor on the red carpet at "The Crown" Season 3 World Premiere [Photo: Getty]

The show’s male leads looked equally glamorous.

O’Connor, 29, showed off his sartorial prowess in a bespoke wool blazer and high waisted pleated trousers by Loewe. A silk tie shirt in white and a black and tulip brooch provided the finishing touches.

Menzies wore a single breasted check, three-piece suit, shirt and silk tie by Corneliani.

While Treadaway, who plays Roddy Llewellyn, opted for a blue, three-piece suit.

The third series of ‘The Crown’ will debut on Netflix on Sunday 17 November. For the first time, the streaming service will make the first episode free for all to watch - including non-subscribers.

  • Joe Biden leads in South Carolina, but Bernie Sanders still the favourite to win Super Tuesday
    News
    CBC

    Joe Biden leads in South Carolina, but Bernie Sanders still the favourite to win Super Tuesday

    In a matter of weeks, former vice-president Joe Biden lost his status as the front runner for the Democratic nomination. That title now belongs to Sen. Bernie Sanders — and could be written in stone after Tuesday's string of primaries across the United States.But first, Saturday's South Carolina primary will give Biden one last chance to make himself a contender again.The next few days will be decisive in the Democratic primaries. Only 2.5 per cent of the 3,979 pledged delegates that will head to the Democratic National Convention in July have been awarded so far.The South Carolina primary will add 54 delegates to the total, but the big prize will come on Super Tuesday, when 14 states and American Samoa vote. After the results are in, nearly 38 per cent of delegates will have been allocated. Up to now, the three votes that have been held in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada have been more important for setting the narrative for the campaign than for their contributions to the delegate count.Biden's poor performances in the first two states knocked him from the top of the polls. A tie in Iowa, a close win in New Hampshire and a big victory in Nevada resulted in a Sanders surge.In polls conducted at least partly after the Nevada caucuses, Sanders is averaging 29 per cent support nationwide. That puts him well ahead of Biden, who trails with an average of 18 per cent support among Democratic primary voters.Former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg, who has yet to contest a state in the race, trails in third with 16 per cent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg at 11 per cent each.Sen. Amy Klobuchar, billionaire Tom Steyer and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard follow with between two and four per cent apiece.Sanders' momentum appears to have continued post-Nevada. He's picked up an average of three points since polls conducted before the state's caucuses. Biden, however, appears to have halted his decline; though he has dropped significantly from where he stood in January before the first ballots were cast, he has held steady in the polls over the last week or so. Instead, Warren and Klobuchar have dropped slightly.But while he holds a sizeable national lead over Biden, Sanders is not yet in a dominant position. That leaves the door open to a contested convention in July if Sanders fails to secure a majority of delegates by then. What happens in South Carolina could have a bearing on that.Biden's turn for a big win in South CarolinaWith his strong support among African American voters, Biden was always counting on South Carolina to give him a boost. What he wasn't counting on was a fourth-place finish in Iowa and an embarrassing fifth-place showing in New Hampshire. That made his second-place result in Nevada look good by comparison, even though Sanders had more than twice as much support as him.He desperately needs a win in South Carolina. The polls suggest he's likely to get one.Surveys conducted in the last week give Biden a big lead, with 35 per cent support on average to just 19 per cent for Sanders. Trailing in third with 14 per cent support is Steyer, who has spent millions of dollars of his own money on campaign ads in the state (he did the same in Nevada, though that didn't help him crack double-digits in support).No other candidate is averaging over nine per cent support in South Carolina. As the rules of the Democratic primaries only award delegates to candidates who achieve at least 15 per cent support statewide (or in congressional districts), that might mean only Biden, Sanders and potentially Steyer could come out of South Carolina with any new pledged delegates.Biden does seem to have turned around his campaign in the state. Polls conducted before the Nevada caucuses but after Iowa voted had put Biden and Sanders in a close race, with only four percentage points separating the two. Now, the gap is 16 points.This is in large part due to Biden's support among African American voters, who make up about 60 per cent of the Democratic primary electorate in South Carolina. An average of three recent polls with demographic breakdowns gave Biden 43 per cent support among those voters, more than double Sanders' 19 per cent.A big win could certainly give Biden's national poll numbers a jolt — results in the three states that have voted have had an obvious and significant impact on the polls. But only three days separate South Carolina's primary from Super Tuesday. Is that enough time for Biden to turn his campaign's negative trajectory on its head?Sanders poised to rack up delegates on Super TuesdayThe latest polls suggest that Sanders, not Biden, is likely to do quite well next week. Among states with polling available, Sanders is leading or is in contention in eight of them, compared to just four for Biden, three for Bloomberg and one apiece for Warren and Klobuchar.While Sanders is leading in small states like Vermont and Maine that are in his own backyard, he also has a sizeable lead in California — the biggest prize, with 415 delegates — and is ahead in Virginia and Colorado. He appears to be in a close race with Biden in Texas and with Warren in her home state of Massachusetts, while the latest numbers suggest he is in a three-cornered contest with Biden and Bloomberg in North Carolina.Sanders is likely to secure delegates in every state. No other candidate can claim the same thing. Both Biden and Bloomberg might do well in the South. Klobuchar might win her home state of Minnesota and Buttigieg might be able to win delegates in a handful of states.But without a big shift in the next few days, it will be difficult for any candidate to catch Sanders. In Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, Sanders averaged just 28 per cent of the popular vote but 45 per cent of the delegates. That is still not a majority, but if he keeps that rate of success up for the rest of the primaries, it will be difficult to deny him the nomination at the convention, even if he doesn't have a majority.And, as primaries have often shown, voters like backing a winner. So far, that's what Sanders looks like. On Saturday, Biden finally gets his shot to be one — for now.

  • Boeing blames incomplete testing for astronaut capsule woes
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boeing blames incomplete testing for astronaut capsule woes

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Boeing acknowledged Friday it failed to conduct full and adequate software tests before the botched space debut of its astronaut capsule late last year.A software error left the Starliner capsule in the wrong orbit in December and precluded a docking with the International Space Station. Another software flaw could have ended up destroying the capsule, if not fixed right before reentry.A Boeing vice-president, John Mulholland, said both mistakes would have been caught if complete, end-to-end testing had been conducted in advance and actual flight equipment used instead of substitutes.“We know that we need to improve,” he said.The company is still uncertain when its next test flight might occur and whether astronauts might be aboard. NASA — which will have the final say — will announce the outcome of the ongoing investigation review next Friday. The first flight test had no crew.SpaceX, meanwhile, aims to launch its Dragon crew capsule with NASA astronauts this spring.Mulholland, who serves as the Starliner program manager, said the company is still reviewing the Starliner's 1 million lines of code to make certain no other problems exist.Because Boeing tested the Starliner's software in segments rather than in one continuous stream to simulate the flight to and from the space station, the company failed to catch an error that knocked the capsule's internal timer off by 11 hours shortly after liftoff. An unrelated communication problem prevented flight controllers from quickly sending commands in a bid to salvage the docking portion of the mission.Then, just hours before the capsule's early return to New Mexico, a second software error was detected by ground controllers. This mistake stemmed from the use of substitute equipment during preflight testing rather than actual flight hardware.Mulholland stressed that the situation had nothing to do with saving money.“We're going to go make it right and we're going to have a fantastic spacecraft going forward,” he said.The December mission was supposed to be the company's last major hurdle before launching the first Starliner crew — two NASA astronauts and a Boeing astronaut. NASA astronauts have not launched from home soil since the space shuttle program ended in 2011.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

  • Indian police detain hundreds after Hindu-Muslim clashes in New Delhi
    News
    Reuters

    Indian police detain hundreds after Hindu-Muslim clashes in New Delhi

    Indian police said on Friday they had detained hundreds of people and were keeping a heavy presence in northeast New Delhi, days after the worst bout of sectarian violence in the capital in decades. At least 38 people were killed in Hindu-Muslim violence this week, police said, amid mounting international criticism that authorities failed to protect minority Muslims. Delhi police spokesman M.S. Randhawa said police were collecting evidence, reviewing video footage of the violence and had already detained more than 600 people.

  • Day 2 of Wet'suwet'en meeting and old sewer systems; In The News for Feb. 28
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Day 2 of Wet'suwet'en meeting and old sewer systems; In The News for Feb. 28

    In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what's on the radar of our editors for the morning of Feb. 28 ...What we are watching in Canada ...SMITHERS, B.C. — Hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en are scheduled to meet for a second day with senior federal and provincial ministers today as they try to break an impasse in a pipeline dispute that's sparked national protests and led to disruptions in the economy.Federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett and British Columbia Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser began the long-sought talks Thursday afternoon.They wrapped up after about three hours with Fraser saying the talks were productive and the mood in the room was respectful.Bennett said it was a "very good start."Hereditary Chief Na'moks left without making a statement.Fraser says it wouldn't be appropriate to release details of what was discussed.\---Also this ...OTTAWA — The latest reading on the how the Canadian economy fared at the end of last year is due out this morning and it's expected to show that growth slowed to a crawl for the final three months of 2019.Statistics Canada is scheduled to release its reading on gross domestic product for December and the fourth quarter.Economists on average expect the agency to report that growth in the fourth quarter slowed to an annualized pace of 0.3 per cent, according to financial markets data firm Refinitiv.Statistics Canada reported in November that real gross domestic product growth slowed to an annualized rate of 1.3 per cent in the third quarter of last year compared with a reading of 3.5 per cent in the second quarter.The GDP report comes amid worries about the impact of the novel coronavirus outbreak that began in China and its impact on the global economy and ahead of an interest rate announcement by the Bank of Canada next week.\---What we are watching in the U.S. ...RICHMOND, Va. — Bernie Sanders doesn't need to win Virginia to have a successful Super Tuesday, but he probably can't afford a big loss there, either.The state is a key test for the Vermont senator's ability to consolidate his position as clear front-runner in the Democratic presidential primary.Virginia is leaning increasingly blue but has long favoured moderates over populists. It also could still flip back to U.S. President Donald Trump in November, making it one of the few major swing states voting among the 14 casting ballots Tuesday.Weak Virginia results could reinforce fears that Sanders will struggle to win over legions of centrists he'll likely need against Trump.\---What we are watching in the rest of the world ...TOKYO — Japan's schools prepared to close for almost a month and entertainers, topped by K-pop superstars BTS, cancelled events as a virus epidemic extended its spread through Asia into Europe and on Friday, into sub-Saharan Africa.The expectation that Japan would close all its elementary, secondary and high schools will send nearly 13 million children home and leave few people untouched by the virus in the world's third-biggest economy. Sporting events and concerts in Japan have already been cancelled, and Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea said, too, they would close until mid-March.But the COVID-19 illnesss caused by a new coronavirus that emerged in December in the Chinese city of Wuhan has now stretched well beyond Asia and taken on a distinctly global character. Saudi Arabia cut travel to Islam's holiest sites as cases in the Middle East reach into the hundreds. Italy's surging outbreak was causing illnesses in other countries, including Nigeria, which confirmed the first sub-Saharan case on Friday.The global count of those infected exceeds 83,000, with China still by far the hardest-hit country. But South Korea has surged past 2,000 cases, and other countries have climbing caseloads and deaths. Iran, with 26 deaths and more than 250 cases, has the most in the Middle East and travel there was connected to cases in countries as far away as New Zealand.\---ICYMI (In case you missed it) ...OTTAWA — Canada's old-fashioned city sewer systems dumped nearly 900 billion litres of raw sewage into this country's waterways over five years, enough to fill up an Olympic-sized swimming pool more than 355,000 times.Data Environment Canada posted to the federal government's open-data website earlier this month shows in 2018, more than 190 billion litres of untreated wastewater poured out of city pipes that carry both sewage and storm water.That is 14 per cent more than in 2017, and 44 per cent more than in 2013.Mark Mattson, president of Swim Drink Fish Canada, said the amount should shock people."It shows you the problem," he said. "It should wake people up."Among the data that was released is the total amount of effluent, or untreated wastewater, that escapes from combined sewer and storm systems like those found in major cities such as Toronto, Ottawa and Edmonton. These systems are often release untreated sewage when storms overwhelm them, to prevent backups and floods. Between 2013 and 2018, the data says 890 billion litres of effluent escaped.In 2018, 10 cities were responsible for more than 90 per cent of the venting, led by Port Alberni, B.C., which pumped out nearly 47 billion litres, followed by Richmond, B.C.'s 42 billion litres.\---Weird and wild ...LOS ANGELES — Authorities have recovered a stolen hearse with a casket and body inside after a police chase Thursday morning on a Los Angeles freeway.The Lincoln Navigator was stolen from outside a Greek Orthodox church in East Pasadena on Wednesday night.The Los Angeles Police Department says one male is in custody.Local media have reported that the body was left in the vehicle while a mortuary attendant brought a different body into the church and that's when the vehicle was stolen.Authorities say the body did not appear to have been disturbed.\---Know your news ...On this day in 1996, Canadian singer Alanis Morissette and her album "Jagged Little Pill" were honoured at the Grammys. How many awards did she win?(Keep scrolling for the answer)\---On this day in 1988 ...The 15th Winter Olympic Games closed in Calgary. Canadian athletes won two silver medals and three bronze.\---News news ...TORONTO — CBC News says its editor-in-chief and general manager is stepping down at the end of this week after more than 10 years with the public broadcaster.Jennifer McGuire has held the post since May 2009, overseeing English language news content and programming on radio, television, and online.A CBC News story quotes a staff announcement in which McGuire says it's time for her to "imagine a life outside of the CBC."Under her watch, CBC integrated its TV, radio and digital news operations, and overhauled its flagship evening TV newscast, "The National."During her time the broadcaster also weathered several scandals, most notably the downfall of radio host Jian Ghomeshi amid a scathing inquiry that excoriated managers for their handling of inappropriate workplace behaviour.\---Entertainment news ...A Nanaimo, B.C., teen is set to appear on "American Idol" on Sunday.Lauren Spencer-Smith says she auditioned for the show in early November in Oregon.The 16-year-old performed in front of Katy Perry, Lionel Richie, and Luke Bryan.She sang the songs "What About Us" by Pink and Lady Gaga's "Always Remember Us This Way," from the 2018 film "A Star is Born."Spencer-Smith can't reveal details about the episode but says she bonded with the other contestants during the experience.The Grade 11 student went viral online last year with a video of her singing "Always Remember Us This Way" and is nominated for a Juno Award for adult contemporary album of the year.\---Know your news answer ...Four. Album of the Year and Rock Album of the Year as well as Best Rock Song and Best Female Rock Vocal Performance, both for her single "You Oughta Know."\---This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 28, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Over 20 years ago, we had a plan to repair the Crown-Indigenous relationship. What happened?
    News
    CBC

    Over 20 years ago, we had a plan to repair the Crown-Indigenous relationship. What happened?

    "The time seems opportune; indeed, the cracks in the existing relationship are coming starkly to the fore all across the country, and it should be apparent by now that trying to preserve the status quo is futile."Those words are almost a quarter-century old now. They could have been written yesterday.That quote comes from the 1996 report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) which sought to examine Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples and offer some proposals for reform.The commission itself was born at a time when many thought the wheels were coming off Confederation. Commissioned by then-prime minister Brian Mulroney in 1991, it began its work following the death of the Meech Lake Accord (which was rejected in part by First Nations because they were left out of the process) and the alarming 78-day standoff in Oka, Que., between Mohawk protestors, police and the army.By the time the commission's 4,000-page final report was published, other conflicts had popped up — in Ipperwash, Ont. and Gustafson Lake, B.C.The recent eruptions in the Crown-Indigenous relationship — over pipelines, territorial sovereignty and the use of rail blockades as a protest tactic — don't mirror the situation that faced the commission back in the 1990s.But at a time when many Canadians are wondering where a path forward for that relationship can be found, it's worth remembering that we've been here before. And some of the proposals that have been gathering dust for 24 years are worth a second look.'A new beginning'Over four years, the members of the commission visited 96 communities and held 178 days of public hearings to produce a massive document that outlined a strategy to build what the commission called a "new beginning with Indigenous peoples.""In just 20 years," the report said, "the revitalization of many self-reliant Aboriginal nations can be accomplished, and the staggering human and financial cost of supporting communities unable to manage for themselves will end."That was over 20 years ago now. In the years since, little has changed for Indigenous people in Canada. Partly that was due to a lack of political will; partly it was due to a federal fiscal situation that put deficit-cutting at the top of the priority queue.There were moments, over those two decades, when it seemed to some that a new Crown-Indigenous relationship was within reach. The Kelowna Accord, championed by then-prime minister Paul Martin in 2005, sought to close funding gaps and bring all parties to the table to negotiate new agreements. It died with Martin's government in 2006; the accord itself was never supported by Stephen Harper and his Conservative government.Another window opened in 2008 when Harper delivered a formal apology in the House of Commons for the residential school system. That apology, itself a direct response to the RCAP report, was followed by the establishment of a federal program for compensation of former residential school students and the launch of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.But RCAP was far more ambitious and comprehensive than any of that.It called on Canada to build an entirely new framework to recognize Indigenous rights through the negotiation of modern treaties, treaty renewal, new agreements on independent or shared jurisdiction and new fiscal arrangements.Still 'relevant'When asked about RCAP around the 20th anniversary of the report, one of the commission's co-chairs, George Erasmus, said the "recommendations are still very, very useful" and still "relevant." The current Liberal government clearly agrees; it has said it's using RCAP as a blueprint. Its attempt to legislate a Rights Recognition framework in 2018 was built on the report's recommendations and on the notion that Indigenous rights should be recognized as a starting point for any negotiations. After some behind-the-scenes friction between then-justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould and other cabinet members over timing, and complaints about a lack of Indigenous consultation, the legislative project was shelved.Which brings us up to mid-February and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's statement in the House of Commons on the blockades. In it, Trudeau pointed out a painfully obvious fact: the dire state of the Crown-Indigenous relationship is the result of decades of government inertia and indifference."It is past time for this situation to be resolved," he said. "However, what we are facing was not created overnight. It was not created because we have embarked upon a path of reconciliation recently in our history. It is because for too long in our history, for too many years, we failed to do so."The idea of rights recognition didn't vanish entirely with the failure of the framework. Ottawa joined forces with British Columbia and First Nations to provide a space to talk about rights and self-determination. Right now, some 23 First Nations in B.C. are engaged in some sort of discussions about their future. Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett has said she still believes those discussions could provide a template for other First Nations across the country.But the RCAP report contains hundreds of detailed recommendations that could transform this country and the lives of Indigenous Peoples. None of it could happen quickly; much of the hard work is starting decades late. That's something all sides likely would be willing to acknowledge.The authors of RCAP knew what they were suggesting was ambitious, but possible. "What we propose is fundamental, sweeping and perhaps disturbing — but also exciting, liberating, ripe with possibilities," they wrote.The best time to start working on this was over 20 years ago. In the current fraught climate, getting started won't be any easier now than it was back then.

  • News
    CBC

    Education minister concerned about suspension numbers at Hants East Rural High

    Nova Scotia's education minister says suspension rates at Hants East Rural High School and comments from Indigenous students about feeling disproportionately disciplined are "very concerning."Churchill made the comments following a story by CBC News showing the school suspended more students than any other high school in the province last year. Officials at the Chignecto Central Regional Centre for Education acknowledged Indigenous students and African Nova Scotian students are being suspended at higher rates than other students."My job as minister is to make sure that they're not feeling that they're being targeted," Churchill told reporters at Province House on Thursday."We have some work to do, obviously, to make those kids feel that they're learning in an inclusive, safe environment and we're committed to doing that."Several Indigenous students told CBC that recent discipline they received was much harsher than what was handed out to non-Indignious students and that they don't always feel safe."We have to take that seriously and investigate," said Churchill.A need for more educationThe minister said his department's Mi'kmaw service branch, which was created last year, is already looking into the situation at Hants East. He said the branch is best positioned to work on the issue and it includes support workers.Students, teachers and the entire school community need to come together on the issue, said Churchill."The best way we can deal with situations like this where there is accusations of racism is to educate — to educate our employees, our teachers [and] staff on the best approaches to deal with situations like this," he said.Churchill said those efforts have already been happening and he's pleased to see some positive steps, such as the use of healing circles and provincewide treaty education in schools. But the minister said the work needs to continue and there needs to be a particular focus on the school community in Hants East to understand what's happening there.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Proposed tenant eviction rules coming too late for these P.E.I. renters
    News
    CBC

    Proposed tenant eviction rules coming too late for these P.E.I. renters

    A group of soon-to-be-evicted tenants is saying proposed changes to P.E.I.'s residential tenancy legislation are coming too late.The nine residents at 24 Water Street in Charlottetown were given an eviction notice this month, telling them they would need to move out of their apartments by April 30 because of work being done to the building.The letter outlines plans for a building that will be constructed next door, and that in order to move ahead with those plans, a fire-escape and sprinkler system needs to be installed to 24 Water Street.That requires drilling holes inside the apartment units and the property manager, Jon Locke, said tests have shown there is asbestos inside the walls, meaning no one can be in there while work is ongoing.'Give us more time'Several of the tenants say, though they were given the required notice, as long-term residents they wish they had been given more time. "I was pretty shocked and pretty full of anxiety," said Dave Neatby, who's lived in the building for five years. "The big question is, 'Where am I going to live?' because I'm on a disability pension at the moment. There's not much out there that I can afford and there's not very much time to find something.""Give us more time to find affordable housing,"  said long-time resident Marlene Gallant."There is nothing out there for the normal person ... It's crazy."Proposed changes come a day laterThe notice came just a day before government announced proposed changes to the Residential Tenancy Act. With the changes, landlords would be required to provide six months' notice to tenants facing such an eviction, up from the current 60 days.Tenants who were evicted would also have to be provided the right of first refusal when the unit reopens, an offer residents at 24 Water Street said hasn't been put on the table for them."We've asked to stay, you know, to return to the units after. And I mean whatever rent increase IRAC gives them ... that's fine, but they won't even give us the chance to come back into the unit," Neatby said."It's going to be very difficult specifically to find a place that's safe and a place that's walking distance of my psychiatrist or all the other things that I need to do. I can't afford a car. So I think it can be very difficult." 'It's really hard'The tenants said it's unlikely they'll find anything as affordable in downtown Charlottetown."It's just amazing and it's also super affordable, which you know, based on a musician's salary, is hard to come by," said Dylan Menzie, who also calls 24 Water Street home.And though Menzie can afford to move, "there's a lot of people in this building that I don't know where they're going to go," he said.That's the case for Gallant, who has lived in her apartment for 17 years. "It's really hard. I've been looking around and there's nothing available out there. It's really hard to find something in our price range," Gallant said. Property manager respondsIn a statement sent to CBC, Locke said "the landlord is in regular communication with the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission to ensure we are compliance with the Residential Tenancies Act." The statement also read, "we very much empathize with the tenants at 24 Water St. We have provided more than the mandatory notification period ... and have been working to help find existing tenants other apartments or accommodation arrangements. We will continue to do so and assist in any way possible." Locke did not say when work would begin on the building, if there would be rent increases to the units, or if current tenants would have first right of refusal. Appeal to IRACNeatby, Menzie, Gallant said they and other tenants plan to fight the eviction. They are making an appeal to the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission.Their hope is to be given the chance to move back in after work on the property is complete or be given more time to move. "This could happen to you, you know, and until people start fighting back it's going to keep on happening. People are getting put out of their homes," said Gallant.More from CBC P.E.I.

  • N.S. areas prone to sinkholes highlighted in interactive online map
    News
    CBC

    N.S. areas prone to sinkholes highlighted in interactive online map

    The provincial government is urging Nova Scotians to consult an online map to reduce their risk of suffering damage from sinkholes. The map shows risk levels across the province and where the province's more than 1,000 known sinkholes are located.Officially called the "Karst Risk Map of Nova Scotia," the online map was built by combining provincial geology data with a database of known sinkholes.Karst is a geological term for terrain that includes running water and dissolvable rocks such as gypsum and limestone, leading to the formation of sinkholes and caves."The first step towards reducing your risk is to understand where there's a higher chance of sinkholes occurring, and that's what the map does," said John Drage, a senior geologist with Nova Scotia's Department of Lands and Forestry.Users can zoom in on the map to look at a particular community, or search by street address.It shows if an area has a low, medium or high risk for sinkholes.Drage said in this context, risk is a relative term because high-risk areas have on average one sinkhole per 100 square kilometres of land."The risk is still low," he said.Drage said in the past 10 years he's been working on sinkholes, he hasn't seen anyone suffer injuries because of sinkholes, but he's seen buildings damaged by them."I've only seen two cases in the last five years where there has been damage to infrastructure," he said. "So it doesn't occur very often, but when it does, it can have expensive implications. So it's still worthwhile trying to reduce those risks if you're in a high-risk area."Oxford exampleDrage said he started to develop the sinkhole map in 2014, four years before a sinkhole appeared in Oxford, N.S., shut down the local Lions Club Community Centre and made national headlines.Drage said nine per cent of the province's land mass is in the high-risk zone, which contains 96 per cent of the province's sinkholes. Areas where sinkholes are most probable are the Windsor area and the landscape around Oxford."Within the high-risk areas, there are areas that are higher risk and the best way to see that on the map is to look where there are a number of sinkholes," he said.Drage said the best way to protect existing buildings from sinkholes is to keep rainwater and other runoff at a distance."What you don't want to do is concentrate your stormwater runoff in one place," he said."That leads to dissolving the bedrock, which leads to sinkholes. So what you want to do is first try to disperse it as much as possible."Drage said the solution can be as simple as installing pipes that carry water from downspouts away from a home's foundation, but the ideal solution is to direct the water into an existing natural watercourse.In the case of new construction, Drage said it's wise to inspect the property for signs of caving or sinking, or in the case of a large project, to pay for a geological inspection.He said it's possible to design buildings to be sinkhole resistant."Sometimes they'll extend foundations larger than you would need, but large enough to span a sinkhole so the whole building wouldn't fall into the sinkhole," he said.He said it's also possible to repair a sinkhole by plugging a drainage channel in the underlying bedrock with concrete.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Scientists discover 1st animal that doesn't breathe oxygen
    News
    CBC

    Scientists discover 1st animal that doesn't breathe oxygen

    Scientists have discovered something they didn't think existed: an animal that can't breathe oxygen, and obviously doesn't need to.That animal is a parasite called Henneguya salminocola, distantly related to jellyfish. It lives in the muscles of salmon and trout, causing unsightly little white nodules known as "tapioca disease." The parasite has just 10 cells and is smaller than many of the cells in our bodies, but it has an extraordinary superpower — the ability to live without the machinery to turn oxygen into energy, researchers reported this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."In a way, it changes our view of animals," said senior author Dorothée Huchon, a zoology professor in the Faculty of Life Sciences and the Steinhardt Museum of Natural History at Tel Aviv University, who worked with collaborators in Israel, the U.S. and Canada.While many microbes have evolved the ability to live without oxygen, animals tend to be much more complex, with many different kinds of cells and tissues combined in one organism. As far as scientists knew until now, all animals were powered by organelles called mitochondria, which convert sugar and oxygen into energy through a process called respiration, and have their own "mitochondrial" genes.Huchon was sequencing the genomes of Henneguya extracted from a Chinook salmon and related fish parasites when she noticed Henneguya's mitochondrial genes were missing."At first I thought, 'Oh, we made an error,'" she said. But when the cells were stained with a dye that makes DNA fluorescent, only the cells' nucleus was stained — no mitochondria appeared, as they did in related fish parasites.The mitochondrial DNA wasn't the only thing missing. So were genes for many enzymes involved in respiration normally found in the nucleus.But where does the energy come from?The cells still had organelles that looked like mitochondria and made other enzymes that mitochondria make. They just didn't do respiration anymore.What the researchers don't yet know is how the organism gets energy without breathing oxygen.Some microbes that don't breathe oxygen breathe hydrogen instead, but there's no evidence Henneguya does this.Some parasitic microbes don't breathe themselves, but steal energy molecules called ATP from their hosts. "We believe this is what our parasite is doing," Huchon said.Henneguya and its relatives spend part of their life cycle in a fish and part of their life cycle in a worm, although each organism is specialized in terms of what kind and part of the fish it chooses and what kind of worm it lives in. In the case of Henneguya, it lives in the muscles of coho, chinook, pink, sockeye and chum salmon as well as rainbow trout.While it's related to jellyfish, it doesn't look anything like one. In the spore stage, it is somewhat tadpole-like."Otherwise, it's just a big blob," Huchon said.The parasite doesn't appear to bother the fish much, she said, but tapioca disease can make its meat unmarketable and also cause the meat to spoil more quickly, making it a nuisance for the seafood industry: "No one wants to eat salmon full of white dots inside."She suspects that both the salmon muscle and Henneguya's host worm are low-oxygen environments, making the ability to breathe oxygen useless to the organism.Andrew Roger, a Dalhousie University biology professor who was not involved in the study but was part of a team that discovered the first eukaryote (organism with complex cells) without mitochondria, said he was surprised by the discovery, but found the evidence convincing."There was a belief that all animals should have mitochondrial DNA and be able to do aerobic metabolism," he said. "This one can't. It changes the textbook account of what you see in the animal kingdom."However, he believes "it's inevitable" that scientists will find more animals like Henneguya among those that are adapted to living in places with almost no oxygen, such as the bottom of the ocean.In fact, scientists have already proposed that one such group of animals called loriciferans can do that, though it hasn't been proven.Roger says animals can actually use an oxygen-free process to produce energy from sugar, but it's far less efficient. He suspects this may be what Henneguya is doing.Patrick Keeling, a biology professor at the University of British Columbia has also studied parasitic microbes that don't breathe oxygen, but wasn't involved in the research.He said it's hard to prove that something doesn't exist, but said Huchon and her team have done that.He added that the ability to live without breathing oxygen has evolved many times among microbes in environments with little or no oxygen."In a way, it's not surprising," he said. "But it's pretty cool that animals can do it too."

  • News
    CBC

    'It looked like hell': Montreal Road partially reopened after major fire

    The cleanup of a Thursday night fire that tore through a two-storey building housing a church, a pawn shop and an appliance store in Ottawa's Vanier neighbourhood is now underway.An employee at 81 Montreal Rd. called 911 at around 6:40 p.m. to report "haze" coming from the inside of the building, said Ottawa Fire Services in a media release.It was initially declared a two-alarm fire, but a third alarm was called in around 9 p.m. when the building began to show signs of collapsing, fire officials said.It was also around that time firefighters had to retreat from the building.The fire was eventually extinguished early Friday morning. There's no word on the cause or damage estimate from fire officials.While it took awhile for flames to begin shooting from the building, once they appeared, they moved swiftly, said Vanier resident Roger Giroux."I'm like, wow, this [fire] is fast. I'd never seen this in my life," said Giroux, who lives in an apartment across the street."It looked like hell to me."Fire investigator on sceneMontreal Road was closed between North River Road and the Vanier Parkway after the fire broke out.At around 3 p.m. Friday, Ottawa police said three of the four lanes had reopened. One westbound lane was still closed early Friday evening for cleanup work.Heavy equipment has been called in to assist with the building's eventual demolition, officials said, and a fire investigator is on scene to determine the cause.No injuries have been reported.

  • Finding the best credit cards: What you should be looking for
    Global News

    Finding the best credit cards: What you should be looking for

    Money expert Preet Banerjee reveals his guide for choosing the best credit card.

  • After 48 years, Yellowknife goalie says goodbye to net after surgery
    News
    CBC

    After 48 years, Yellowknife goalie says goodbye to net after surgery

    Tom Williams didn't plan to be a goalie when he first started playing hockey as a child.But last Saturday night, the Yellowknife man strapped up his goalie pads for the final time after a 48-year stint in net. Williams had hip replacement surgery on Monday morning.Williams remembered watching an NHL game on TV as a kid and wanting to become a player himself.He has lived and played all over the North. When the arena in Inuvik, N.W.T., was still under construction, Williams played hockey on the streets and on his friend's 'L' shaped backyard rink nearby."You [would] go on a breakaway, stop, and then you had to go the other direction," he said. "It was fun times."In 1972 when he was ten years old, he switched over to goalkeeping after starting out on defence.At 15 years old, he helped backstop the team that won the last commercial league championship in Yellowknife."The old Gerry Murphy [arena] was packed," he said. "I can't recall the score but I'll remember the pandemonium when we won, because it was the last time to have the Commercial League."Williams went on to play junior hockey in Alberta's Medicine Hat and Drumheller.'It's getting harder and harder'But the years have taken a toll on his body. Hockey's it. And I'm going to miss it. \- Tom WilliamsWilliams has had knee surgery four times in the past six years. And while he said it seems to finally be better, it's now his hip that can no longer take the strain."I tell people to shoot on the right side, not on the left side, that's the bad hip," he said jokingly.He said it hurts at times while playing, but more often the adrenaline keeps him from feeling the pain until after a game."It's getting harder and harder," he said. It takes two days to recover after a game now, he added.Family comes to cheer at last gameHe won't be leaving the game forever though. Williams plans to come back as a goal scorer. "The love of the game, that's what it's all about — and the people in the dressing room. It's fun," he said. "It's a big part of my life and my kids' life and my grandkids' life. Hockey's it. And I'm going to miss it."Williams is also considering coaching since his grandchildren are getting older and more competitive in the game."Maybe [I] will have to put on the skates and be a coach and grab a whistle," he said.During his last game as goalie on Saturday, his family came out to cheer him on.His daughter, Aurora Kotokak, said her father attends the games she plays in the women's league and watching her kids' games."He's really passionate about it," she said. "Especially when the kids were smaller, he would play hockey with them in the living room. He loved to pass on his knowledge."Kotokak said she started as a goalie as a kid when her dad coached her, then moved to a defence role.Williams said he'll be passing on his goalie gear to his daughter's two-year-old son who said he wants to become a goalie one day."This will be it," Williams said, just before his last game on the weekend ahead of his surgery. "But I'm coming back, look out."

  • Who knew? Lower prices trigger higher sales at Cannabis NB
    News
    CBC

    Who knew? Lower prices trigger higher sales at Cannabis NB

    Cannabis NB launched believing low prices were not required to succeed in New Brunswick but after consumers taught it a hard lesson on that point, the Crown corporation has adopted a different approach — aggressive price discounting.And it appears to be working.Last week Statistics Canada reported legal cannabis sales in New Brunswick in December were $4.1 million, an 18.4 per cent improvement over November. It's the fourth straight monthly increase in sales in New Brunswick, where per capita purchases at government cannabis outlets have overtaken those in Nova Scotia.In January Cannabis NB's Tom Tremblay credited lower prices - which the agency initially dismissed as unimportant - for much of the improvement."We've been able to offer competitive pricing and a consistent value offering and this has attracted new customers and more consistent traffic in our stores," he said following the release of positive sales figures in November.Once home to Atlantic Canada's highest prices on almost every cannabis product, Cannabis NB's website is now full of rotating deals, promotions and volume discounts that in many cases offer the lowest prices in the region - if consumers buy enough.  In Nova Scotia this week the best price offered on the Durga Mata 2 cannabis flower by the brand Namaste is $10.33 per gram (tax included) in a 7 gram package. But Cannabis NB has it on sale for $5 per gram (tax included) if consumers buy a full ounce (28 grams) for $140.It's an aggressive pricing strategy aimed  at regular users who care about prices, a major change in the agency's business model.When sales were first legalized in Canada in October 2018, Cannabis NB did not offer a single product for less than $8 per gram, the only retailer in the region to set its lowest price that high.Then-president of Cannabis NB, Brian Harriman, said the Crown corporation was expecting to be undercut by illegal dealers on price but he was betting it would not matter to consumers."We're not going to get into a price war with the black market," Harriman said during a CBC interview the week before legal sales began."For similar reasons people don't go to bootleggers anymore when you have the opportunity to come in to a Cannabis NB store with 250 different products available with an educated person there to help you make the right choices and its legal and it's safe, we think that shopping experience should be better than the current illegal one."The experiment failed early, but for a time Cannabis NB did not accept its high prices were a problem, instead blaming supply problems and product shortages in early 2019 for the lack of consumers.  At the time the cheapest product Cannabis NB carried sold for $8.57 per gram."Price point is not the driver of sales shortages — lack of supply is," Cannabis NB spokesperson Marie-Andrée Bolduc said in a statement in May 2019. That was immediately after first fiscal year end sales were reported to have come in 58 per cent below projections and were well behind neighbouring provinces. That eventually triggered plan B - deep discounts.Cannabis NB now offers multiple deals for consumers who buy cannabis by the ounce - prices between $140 and $160. The up front cost can be significant but the per gram price of between $5 and $5.71 is often the lowest in Atlantic Canada and half the product's regular price.There are also smaller deals on smaller amounts.Pre-rolled joints that could only be bought from Cannabis NB for $7.50 each last year are now often on special for $5.00. This week Cannabis NB had the best price in the region on Indica Aces pre rolls by Aurora at $5.20 each if bought ten at a time. That's 16 per cent cheaper than the lowest price available on the same product in Nova Scotia  On Thursday 308 products were listed for sale on Cannabis NB's website, 121 of which had a promotional price, volume discount or other offer attached.The relationship between product discounts and improving sales is undeniable according to Cannabis NB's Sarah Bustard."We have been continuing to implement a number of competitive pricing initiatives for our customers and are seeing an increase in our sales (primarily flower) that's been generated by these lower price points," Bustard said in an email to CBC News.

  • 'Very unfortunate': Winter Stations art installation in The Beach removed due to damage
    News
    CBC

    'Very unfortunate': Winter Stations art installation in The Beach removed due to damage

    Organizers of the annual Winter Stations art exhibition on Woodbine Beach admit they should have probably "kid tested" one of the installations after they had to remove it due to damage this week.The exhibit, titled Noodle Feed, was taken down when an inspection found the long tubular arms, made from recycled sailcloth and stuffed with straw, began tearing and leaking. "Unfortunately, it was in a state where we thought it would be in our best interests and the interests of the artists that we would remove the piece because it was kind of coming apart," said Aaron Hendershott, organizer of the Winter Stations art project.Hendershott says the damage wasn't the result of vandalism, but "wear and tear" due to its popularity.  As with all the installations, which are designed to encourage people to explore, climb and even jump on the artwork, visitors had been invited to move the arms and turn them into chairs, beds and shelters and share their experiences using an augmented reality app."We decided that it would be in everyone's best interests to pull that piece off of the beach. Very unfortunate," Hendershott told CBC Toronto.This week, visitors looking for the installation only found some piles of straw left behind."Durability was an issue. Maybe we should get it kid tested next time," Hendershott told CBC Toronto.Noodle Feed was designed by three artists from iheartblob, an award-winning Austrian architectural design studio, says Hendershott, an architect with a group called RAW Design."I think maybe that piece may have gotten the hug of death from all the kids who were loving it and playing with it," said Hendershott."I think it might have to do with wear and tear and and people of all ages jumping all over it ... That was somewhat how it was intended to be used, but maybe it was not as robust as we'd hoped."But Noodle Feed will live on in the virtual world, he says. Visitors to the installation uploaded photos and stories of their experiences that can be still be seen by other users. "These things happen with outdoor temporary art installations," said Anna Sebert, the executive director of the Beach Village Business Improvement Area."It just goes to show how many people really liked it. Kids were all over it. It would have been great to see it out the whole time, but it's just the nature of the event."The remaining three Winter Stations installations are Mirage from Madrid; Kaleidoscope of the Senses from Scotland; and The Beach's Percussion Ensemble from Centennial College.They will remain up until March 30.

  • News
    CBC

    Richmond County chided over no funding to women's conference

    Provincial and federal cabinet ministers in Nova Scotia are weighing in after Richmond County councillors declined financial support for a conference for aspiring women politicians earlier this week.The Leadership School for Women conference is being run by a group called Government FOCUS (Female Objectives Cape Breton Unama'ki Strait). They asked local municipal and First Nation governments for funds to help defray child care and other costs for participants.Six of 16 councils are supporting the cause so far, but Richmond Warden Brian Marchand said women are at no disadvantage compared to men when it comes to campaigning.Coun. James Goyetche said it would be irresponsible and stupid to use taxpayers money to encourage someone to run against him.The lack of support from Richmond caught the attention of politicians, business owners and members of the public.'None of us own these positions'Kelly Regan, Nova Scotia's Minister Responsible for the Advisory Council on the Status of Women, said she thought it was a shame when she heard the comments in the news."None of us own these positions," she told reporters in the Legislature."Our constituents lend them to us for a period of time, so I would encourage everyone to do what they can do to encourage more women to run. I can tell you that Status of Women is in fact supporting that particular campaign college."Regan said far fewer than 50 per cent of local councillors are women.She also said she has spoken with one of the conference organizers and offered additional funding if necessary.Bernadette Jordan, a Nova Scotia MP who's also the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, weighed in as well.She tweeted that women face many barriers, and even though some get elected, "it doesn't mean the playing field is level."Jordan used the social media post to call for donations to the Cape Breton Partnership to support participants at the Leadership School for Women conference."It's really disheartening when you're trying so hard to give women a hand up to see councils like Richmond not supporting women running," Jordan told CBC News.She said travel, childcare and paying for things are among the biggest barriers faced by women looking to enter politics.Jordan said only 10 women have been elected federally in the history of Nova Scotia, adding it's "quite disappointing to think that people think that women are getting elected and they don't need extra help."Over Twitter, Jordan put out a call to raise money for women across Canada to go to the conference."We know when women's voices are heard, we're all better off," said the MP.Confusion over decisionNova Scotia's municipal affairs minister, Chuck Porter, also said he supports efforts to increase female representation in politics, adding that his department hosts provincial and municipal campaign schools for women.Porter said the comments from Richmond County council might dissuade women from entering politics."I'm not sure why they have made the decision they have made, but they will be ... held accountable to their electorate when the time comes," said the minister.Municipalities across the province will hold general elections in October.Public reactionFollowing the Richmond County council meeting this week, several local businesses and citizens stepped up to subsidize participants.Bruce Joshua of Arichat wrote a letter to the editor and sent it to several media outlets, including CBC, saying he was appalled by council's decision.In his letter, Joshua said Richmond County is a wonderful, diverse place to live, but it needs progressive representatives at the council table."As a resident, I expect better," he said. "I am hopeful that we may find an interested female or member of a visible minority who is ready, willing and able to run for election in District Number One."I would be willing to collaborate with that individual regarding his or her campaign and am pledging that I will assume the entry fee cost to ensure that such a person is able to run, without barriers, to hopefully bring a voice of reason to our council chambers when future positive initiatives are brought forth for discussion and support." The Leadership School for Women's conference is being held May 1 to 2 at Nova Scotia Community College's Strait Area campus in Port Hawkesbury and includes 10 municipalities and six First Nations in Eastern Nova Scotia.MORE TOP STORIES

  • News
    CBC

    More than 2 million acres worth of Sask. crop remains on ground from 2019

    More than two million acres worth of crops from last year remain on the ground throughout Saskatchewan, according to the president of the Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan.Todd Lewis says farmers who already have their combines out on the fields in February is a good — albeit unusual — occurrence. "It is very fortunate that we're able to have some producers able to get out in the fields now and get last year's harvest cleaned up so they can prepare the field and be ready for spring seeding here," Lewis said Thursday.Warm weather in parts of southern and central Sask. in the new year has resulted in less snow cover than usual. A majority of the crops still out on the field — 1.3 million acres — are uninsured, according to the province. It's estimated that $350 million in crop insurance will be paid out for 2019. It's amazing what can be salvaged but it's also going to be very disheartening in a lot of cases. \- Todd Lewis, president of APASSome farmers have taken to the fields in the southern parts of the province and taken advantage of the unseasonably warm weather.There could be some crops from last year salvaged too, depending on each farmer's field. Oil seeds like flax and canola may still yield something ready for consumption, Lewis said."It's amazing what can be salvaged but it's also going to be very disheartening in a lot of cases," he said. "You will have a real loss in your land quality, as well."Sask. producers had a particularly tough year in 2019, marred by weather that was too dry early in the year followed by too much moisture later on.Trade disputes made it more difficult as well, as China's government slowed and then halted Canadian canola exports altogether at one point, Lewis said.The ability to get product to market has been further hampered by railway blockades as well, he added."Farmers, we're a resilient bunch," Lewis said. "After a very disappointing 2019, hopefully this is going to be the beginning of better things to come in 2020."There will be some relief, as the federal and provincial governments have made some changes to their crop insurance programs. Soybean coverage will extend to the entire province and irrigation coverage will be available as well. Premiums will decrease to $7.24 per acre, down from $8.61 last year.

  • Wireless repair shop seemingly goes under overnight, leaves this man with no cellphone
    News
    CBC

    Wireless repair shop seemingly goes under overnight, leaves this man with no cellphone

    One Toronto man is looking for answers — and his cellphone — after several Fixt Wireless repair stores seemingly went out of business overnight.Dave Niven had used the phone and laptop repair franchise in January for his Google Pixel phone and "they fixed it fine," he said. So when he brought it in again two weeks ago, he thought nothing of leaving it with the staff. But the day after they emailed to say it was ready, he walked over to the store in College Park at Bay and College streets, only to find the door locked and the lights off. Niven tipped off CBC News about the closure earlier this week, but so far the company has not answered repeated emails or phone calls.He returned twice more on Monday and Tuesday of this week, during scheduled business hours, but again it was closed. "That's when I started calling the head office and other stores, I sent them a message on their Facebook page but they never answered," he explained. There is no note of explanation for the closures either on the company's website or on its social media accounts.On Tuesday, on a hunch, Niven decided to jump on the subway and head over to another Fixt store at the Hudson's Bay Centre at Bloor and Yonge streets, and when he arrived that store was also closed. Besides just wanting his phone back, Niven is a little worried about the fact that the company has his password to get into the phone. "So they could get into some of my accounts. I don't really know what happens if someone goes into the store now and takes it [saying] 'Oh here's a bunch of phones and a bunch of passwords,' so that's a little concerning," he said. 'Reliable, good neighbours'Desiree Maklin owns a ceramics store, The Clay Room, directly beside a Fixt Wireless on Danforth Avenue just west of Chester Avenue. She shares a landlord with the owner and has known the staff for the last three years they've been at that location and "they've always been pretty reliable, good neighbours," Maklin said. "They would replace my [phone] glass for me just as a courtesy for being a good neighbour," she said, adding "there were always people in and out; they were always working on stuff when I went over."The company has not responded to numerous requests for comment from CBC Toronto. At least three of the eight stores CBC Toronto visited were closed during business hours. Nobody answered phone calls or emails at the other five, or at head office.

  • Local job app gets more than 1K users — just weeks after launch
    News
    CBC

    Local job app gets more than 1K users — just weeks after launch

    The creator of a new job app is surprised by the number of people using the program just more than a month after it launched.Rakesh Naidu said he planned for about 300 users within the first few months of launching Aye Work, a mobile app which allows job seekers to find both long-term and short-term gigs.But after 42 days, he said the app garnered 1,300 users — most of whom are in the Windsor-Essex area. Naidu, who is also the executive director of Windsor's Chamber of Commerce, said it's too early to say how many jobs were granted but the numbers alone show there is "definitely a need."The app is his personal project. one that grew out of the job matching he was doing on spreadsheets for international students. He said students reach out to him through social media, emails and texts."They tend to think that because I'm in this position, I would know a lot of employers and could get work for them," he explained. He began taking their information to connect them with local businesses. Most student visas restrict students to 20 hours of off-campus work weekl — so Naidu began mapping students availability with the demands of local businesses on his own.But it quickly grew to be too laborious. That's when he developed Aye Work, paid for out of his own pocket."I heard a lot of horror stories about desperate students trying to do all kind of things to just get by and make ends meet. I couldn't really sit back and do nothing about it," he said.The volume of users searching for a job is no surprise, considering the Windsor-Essex region has the country's highest unemployment rate as of January 2020. About 85 per cent of Aye Work users are students, Naidu said. That also comes as no surprise to University of Windsor business professor Francine Schlosser. She is a part of the Building Migrant Resilience in Cities team and said whenever unemployment numbers spike, international students take a hit."This is a vulnerable population. Many of them are under a lot of pressure ... because their families have entered into debt to get them here," she said. "Some of the jobs they take put food on the table, but they don't get them the experience they need."Schlosser said it's important to monitor engagement to ensure students are not being taken advantage of and "paid under the table." The app has a rating tool that allows employees to monitor employers and vice-versa — something Naidu said should help combat unacceptable behaviour. 'The workforce of the future'The struggle of finding a good job is something Rupinder Chohan is all too familiar with. Last year, the only option he had was to accept a 3 a.m. shift at a local warehouse. "I would get an hour to an hour and a half of sleep — and then would have to go to work," the international business student said. The app is already receiving attention from other regions in the country, according to Naidu. Universities and colleges in British Columbia and the GTA have reached out explore the idea of bringing the app to their campuses. "This is the workforce of the future. We want their talent," Naidu said. "But we need to provide the support and help they need today."

  • News
    CBC

    Body cameras coming for municipal officers in Happy Valley-Goose Bay

    Newfoundland and Labrador's privacy commissioner says body cameras on Happy Valley-Goose Bay's municipal enforcement officers may be an unnecessary invasion of privacy.Starting March 4, the department's employees will be outfitted with body cameras during their day-to-day tasks, such as conducting investigations and making traffic stops.The town says the cost was $500 to outfit two constables and one animal control officer. Privacy Commissioner Michael Harvey says he was surprised the town didn't notify his office of the plan. "When a public body collects personal information, they need to do it in the minimum extent possible," Harvey said. "Our concern with body cameras and other forms of video surveillance is that they collect a maximal amount of personal information."Harvey noted body cameras collect information about the person being recorded as well as the person wearing the device and anyone else around. "We want to be sure that if a public body is collecting that amount of information, then it really needs to be doing it," he said. The use of such cameras by law enforcement has been shown to "protect both officers and the general public" and "ensures transparency," said a news release from the town."All cameras within law enforcement, especially the body-worn cameras, it creates a protection for the citizens as well as the law enforcement officials that are wearing them," said Const. Larry Baker of the town's municipal enforcement.  Baker brought the idea to the town and its enforcement committee. It was then brought to the town's council, where the idea was fully supported. Harvey acknowledges there may be legitimate reasons for the body camera initiative, but he wants the town to ensure no citizen ends up feeling as though they've lost their right to privacy. "Advances in technology … make it easy for public bodies to collect personal information, but just because we can doesn't always mean that we should," he said. "It's important for the town to explain to the public why it's doing what it intends to do, and to get their feedback." Few police forces or enforcement agencies in Canada have adopted body cameras. A recent pilot project in Montreal found them ineffectual, with a report concluding the cameras didn't build trust and left both civilians and officers feeling uncomfortable and overly monitored.. However, Calgary's police force has outfitted hundreds of its officers with the tool, with one sergeant saying constables appreciated having video evidence of their interactions with the public.Video from the cameras aided a police shooting investigation last year.The federal privacy commissioner's office, in a 2015 guide, said the technology "poses serious implications for individuals' right to privacy," citing the ability of body cameras to pick up the conversations or likenesses of bystanders.The report also outlined the benefits of body cameras, such as a decrease in the use of force by law enforcement, but said those improvements should be balanced against the loss of privacy.The report recommended deploying body cameras in a pilot project to better assess implications for privacy rights, while avoiding recording bystanders and maintaining awareness of cultural sensitivities. Recordings should be encrypted, edit-proofed and stored on a secure server with access restricted on a need-to-know basis, according to the commissioner.Baker says only he and the Happy Valley-Goose Bay town manager will have access to any video, which will only be released for the purposes of court trials. The town said it "understands concerns relating to privacy," but did not elaborate further in its statement. Cameras in patrol vehicles have been a staple for years within the town."Enforcement officers work the majority of the time alone, so we think it's important we use these body cams," said Coun. Jackie Compton Hobbs. Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • 'We're at a decisive point': Hospitals ramp up pandemic plans for COVID-19
    News
    CBC

    'We're at a decisive point': Hospitals ramp up pandemic plans for COVID-19

    Canadian hospitals are gearing up their disaster preparedness plans in anticipation of the next phase of the COVID-19 epidemic, from containment to mitigation. Current efforts to control the epidemic focus on keeping community spread at bay. If it's declared a pandemic, that will shift to slowing down the spread of the virus in populations where it's taken root.In a pandemic, large numbers of people fall sick, though the disease may or may not be severe.The World Health Organization is calling on governments, health care and other institutions as well as individuals to prepare."We're at a decisive point," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters on Thursday. "For the past two days, the number of new cases reported in the rest of the world has exceeded the number of new cases reported from China."Dr. Michael Gardam, an infectious disease specialist and chief of staff at Humber River Hospital in Toronto, is a veteran of SARS and H1N1 and is watching this outbreak closely."The tone has changed," Gardam said. "We need to shift our thinking into this is going to become a problem within Canada within a matter of weeks to months."Currently, health care workers in Canada screen people who show up with flu-like symptoms and say they've travelled to any of seven places  — China, Japan, Hong Kong, Italy, Iran, Singapore and South Korea."At some point we'll have to shift into just screening people that are travelling, and it doesn't necessarily matter to where they're actually travelling from," Gardam said.WHO said China's experience shows aggressive early measures can prevent the virus from gaining a foothold, and there hasn't been widespread community transmission — the spread from one person to another when there was no known exposure to the virus through travel or close contact with an infected individual.But the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported a case of COVID-19 in California suspected of being the first person-to-person transmission in the general public in that country, which has alarmed U.S. health officials because it raises the possibility of widespread transmission, already suspected in Italy, Germany and South Korea.WATCH:  Infectious disease doctor explains what's happening with global spread of COVID-19"This suggests the virus is out there in the community," said Dr. Dean Blumberg of University of California Davis Medical Center. "We don't know who might be carrying it. We don't know who we could get it from."There's probably other cases in the community that we don't know about."Ontario's chief medical officer of health, Dr. David Williams, said the province is preparing for the possibility of community transmission."Right now, we're doing 30 to 40 tests," Williams said. "Our lab can do 1,000. But we can't rest on that. What if we have to go to 2,000 or 3,000? How do we prepare for that?"Gardam said it is time to expand testing."I think at this stage, we should be testing people without a travel history who are sick enough to be admitted and who do not have another obvious cause of their illness. This is what they eventually did in California that allowed them to find their case."Medical facilities also have to take stock of their facilities, equipment and supplies to see where they are lacking: masks, gloves and gowns for health care workers; testing supplies; the ability to isolate patients. Federal pandemic stockpiles include medical equipment and supplies, such as ventilators and masks, as well as standard medications like antibiotics and antivirals, the Public Health Agency of Canada said in a statement to CBC News. Bracing for resource strain  Dr. Anand Kumar teaches medical microbiology at the University of Manitoba and works as a critical care physician in Winnipeg, where he sounded an alarm about lack of ventilators to care for patients during the H1N1 pandemic in 2009.Kumar expects the risk in terms of severity of illness in the potential COVID-19 pandemic will be similar to H1N1.In 2009, many places found a major "choke point" was a lack of resources in intensive care units, including nurses. "The pressures on the health care system in terms of resources are likely to be similar," Kumar said. Although H1N1 and Ebola offered head starts in developing contingency plans, most hospitals already operate at full capacity, particularly during flu season. Gardam said if an epidemic were to go on for several months, hospitals would have to start looking at how to free up beds by putting people in "unusual places" and stopping elective procedures. Hospital preparations should also include additional training: having staff practise putting on and taking off preventative equipment safely, said Nancy Johnson, a retired occupational health and safety specialist with the Ontario Nurses' Association in Sudbury."Safety of health care workers right now is not negotiable," Johnson said. "If they're not safe, none of us are."Masks and gloves in short supplySome family physicians have already found supplies running short, including masks to put on sick patients. I "check the mail every day for N95 masks, which have yet to arrive," said Dr. Iris Gorfinkel, a family physician in Toronto. "[And] more gloves, hopefully. We don't have them or hand sanitizer."Health Minister Patty Hadju encouraged Canadians to prepare as they would for a storm."First of all, making sure that you do have enough supplies so if someone in your family becomes ill, if you yourself become ill, that you have what you need to survive for a week or so without going outside," Hadju said.To help, individuals can do their best to stay healthy and keep up to date as the epidemic evolves. The standard prevention measures include washing hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, getting a flu shot, staying home when sick and coughing and sneezing into a tissue or your elbow.

  • Restrictions to protect whales pose hurdles, opportunities for cruise ship industry
    News
    CBC

    Restrictions to protect whales pose hurdles, opportunities for cruise ship industry

    With a record number of cruise ships slated to visit P.E.I. in the coming season, port managers in Charlottetown are facing uncertainty after the federal government announced restrictions to protect endangered right whales for the 2020 season.Those restrictions include a new voluntary speed reduction zone in the Cabot Strait, a key corridor for cruise ships travelling between P.E.I. and Halifax. "It will be interesting to see how that impacts us," said Corryn Clemence, the communications manager for Port Charlottetown. "So I guess we'll see how it plays out."The federal government announced Thursday in Ottawa it will monitor results of the voluntary speed zone as it shapes strategies to protect whales in the future. The voluntary reduction would apply to portions of the coming summer season.New limitsThe rules bring in a new 10-knot speed limit for 15 days in areas where a whale is seen. The rules is intended to make shipping restrictions more nimble — quick implementation when a whale is found, and speedy removal after the whales leave the area.New detection technology, including drones and underwater acoustic equipment that was tested last year, will be used.Port managers see potential to keep cruise ships moving, with reduced risk to whales."If we have a better understanding of where the whales are, it may allow those dynamic zones to be open more often," said Clemence.Transport Canada will restrict shipping in the Shediac Valley, an area in waters off western P.E.I. Any ships required to enter the area must limit their speed to eight knots. However, few cruise ships travel through that portion of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, according to Clemence.Fishermen will be required to modify their gear, to include colour coding on ropes and lines to identify the origin of the equipment should a whale become entangled. Fisheries and Oceans Canada also said it has contracted new ice-breaking services in Northern New Brunswick to allow snow crab fishermen to finish their season before the whales arrive."We're all looking to make sure we ensure the safety of these whales," said Clemence.The P.E.I. Fishermen's Association declined comment on the restrictions Thursday. It says it is seeking more information from Fisheries and Oceans Canada.It's been a positive start to 2020 for the endangered whales, for the most part. Four mother and calf pairs were spotted off the southeastern U.S. coast, although one days-old calf was injured by a propeller. There were seven newborns in the 2019 calving season and none in 2018. Rrsearchers say 12 North Atlantic right whales died last year.More from CBC P.E.I.

  • Vatican says pope 'slightly unwell', dismisses speculation
    News
    Reuters

    Vatican says pope 'slightly unwell', dismisses speculation

    The Vatican moved on Friday to dismiss speculation that Pope Francis was anything more than "slightly unwell" as the 83-year-old Roman Catholic leader canceled official audiences for the second day. The Vatican has not specified what the pope is suffering from. At his general audience on Wednesday he appeared to have a cold and spoke with a slightly hoarse voice, and he coughed during an afternoon Ash Wednesday service in a Rome church, his last appearance outside the Vatican.

  • Air fresheners in stinky Parliament station being removed
    News
    CBC

    Air fresheners in stinky Parliament station being removed

    At least 22 air fresheners normally intended for bathrooms at the Parliament LRT station, notorious for its sewage-like smell, will be removed.On Thursday, CBC found 12 of the continuously running fresheners installed above the westbound and eastbound platforms, while 10 more were attached to pillars and ceilings around the station and in the tunnels.CBC reached out to the City of Ottawa and Rideau Transit Maintenance (RTM) Thursday afternoon for comment about the installation of the air fresheners, including when and why they were installed.Friday morning, after CBC published its stories, OC Transpo general manager John Manconi said he'd asked they be removed immediately.City media relations had said the LRT's maintenance company RTM would answer questions. RTM has not yet responded.For citizen transit commissioner Sarah Wright-Gilbert — who raised the issue of the station's stomach-turning sewage smell at a transit commission meeting in December — the air fresheners don't go far enough, however."I'm concerned that they're now pumping artificial scent and chemicals into the station. That's not helpful," Wright-Gilbert said Thursday."Masking the problem is not a solution. Finding the source of the problem and solving that — that's the solution."Advisories neededRiders have complained about a foul odour at Parliament station for months, with Twitter user @LRTstank bringing it up in a tweet in October.Wright-Gilbert said she hasn't been in the station recently, but knowing there are air fresheners installed would lead her to avoid the station.She said artificial smells can trigger her asthma and headaches."I'd like them to advise the public of that because people can get really sick if they are sensitive to scents," she said.CBC did not see any type of warnings posted about the fresheners.Designed for low ceilings, good airflowThe air fresheners are made by Citron Hygiene and appear to be the company's EcoAire model. This model, according to the manufacturer's website, works best in washrooms with one to five toilet stalls.The ones installed in Parliament station provide a sweet, citrusy smell."The EcoAire ... is an ideal choice for rooms with low ceilings and good airflow," says Citron's website. In December, the city made repairs to a sewer line near Parliament station in an effort to close a leak discovered in August that was thought to be one cause of the stink.At the time, the city said it could not promise the fix would eliminate the smell. As of Thursday, in areas a few metres away from the air fresheners, the station continued to have a musty odour.

  • Tensions rise ahead of B.C. herring fishery season
    News
    CBC

    Tensions rise ahead of B.C. herring fishery season

    Wildlife advocates on Vancouver Island say their calls to close the province's last remaining herring fishery have never been so loud, as commercial fishing boats enter the Strait of Georgia for herring fishery season expected in early March.PacificWild's Ian McAllister said many people in B.C. are deeply concerned that the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans is allowing the commercial fishery to open once again in 2020.This is despite government estimates that the total mass Pacific herring in the area will fall from 130,000 metric tons in 2016 to around 54,000 metric tons in 2020 — a  nearly a 60 per cent decrease over four years."It's totally unsustainable that these populations are at critically low numbers. They need a reprieve," said McAllister, adding that herring are a major food source for chinook salmon which are in turn the favoured prey of endangered southern resident killer whales.In its 2020 Pacific Herring Integrated Fisheries Management Plan, the DFO recommended that a 20 per cent herring harvesting quota be placed on the fishery once again — a limit that's been set annually for a few decades. McAllister is worried that as populations continue to decline, over-harvesting will become even more likely. He said it's "beyond understanding" that the DFO won't at least lower the fishing limit. Rich Ronyecz, a Qualicum Beach resident and member of the local advocacy group Herring Aid, said the economics of continued harvesting "do not make sense." "You're risking thousands of [related] jobs down the line if you overfish. You're risking First Nations heritage… It's vital to let these herring spawn," he said.DFO says herring management is evidenced-basedA statement from the DFO says it "relies on evidence-based decisions to effectively manage the Pacific herring fisheries," adding the 2020 herring report was approved after consultation with First Nations communities, organizations and commercial harvesters.It said the allowable catch is consistent with conservation goals, and "allows for economic opportunity for fish harvesters whose income depends upon this work.""Our priority is preserving the health and sustainability of these stocks into the future," it said, noting the department will "continue to maintain open dialogue on these issues."Concern larger than ever in 2020Ronyecz said Herring Aid has a rally planned on Sunday at the Qualicum Beach Waterfront, and hopes hundreds of people will attend.McAllister said that the "level of interest and concern and scrutiny has elevated dramatically" in the last year. "People are much more educated about this… Many more businesses, organizations, and First Nations [are] stronger on this issue," he said.The concerns are echoed by federal MP Gord Johns, who last year called for a moratorium on the fishery while a sustainable plan could be developed to revive herring numbers. Last December, Johns began a petition to suspend the 2020 Salish Sea fishery and compensate commercial fishers who would be impacted. Another petition published by Conservancy Hornby Island over a year ago has now garnered more than 119,000 signatures from people all over the world. Grant Scott, the organization's president, said he never expected so many signatures. He said a number of events at the Conservancy's Herring Festival, planned for next week, have already sold out and hundreds are expected to attend. McAllister said he and the PacificWild team will be "in the water looking at the state of the fish, the populations, and the size of the fish" during the fishery over the next few weeks.

  • Extra R1, S1 OC Transpo buses running again Friday
    News
    CBC

    Extra R1, S1 OC Transpo buses running again Friday

    OC Transpo is again running extra buses for longer hours along a shorthanded LRT line.At last update, nine trains were running for service every six to seven minutes.Like Thursday, OC Transpo will run S1 express buses from Tunney's Pasture, Hurdman and Blair stations to downtown in the morning and from downtown to those hubs after noon.They run all day — instead of just during peak periods, as they had for the last month — along with its R1 buses all day that stop at all LRT stations.The shortage comes after issues with four trains, including a loose power component shut down the LRT's east-end service Wednesday, then two more problems early ThursdayRideau Transit Group (RTG) CEO Peter Lauch, whose consortium built and maintains the LRT, said the trains have been pulled out of service for a variety of reasons including "heavy maintenance."Three of the trains are getting covers over the power connections on their roofs, which have proved vulnerable to winter weather.The city actually purchased 34 Alstom Citadis Spirit train vehicles, enough for 17 coupled trains.The Confederation Line was supposed to run with 15 trains plus two spares, but it's never had 15 working trains.OC Transpo now says it needs 13 trains to keep on its peak period schedule.OC Transpo general manager John Manconi said Thursday the city "is going to do more is to hold RTG accountable to the service that our customers deserve."