TODAY'S CHARTS: Tesla earnings on tap, place bets accordingly

Forget flashy car releases and CEO mood disorders, today Tesla’s (TSLA) headlines will be about earnings.

Here’s what to look for.

Tesla Model 3 sedan

Investors are expecting earnings per share (or really losses per share) of -$1.80 on revenue of $2.55 billion, more than double the $1.27 billion revenue from a year ago. That follows the trend of steadily increasing losses, but also skyrocketing revenue.

The key will be to watch what the company signals about the future. Last week, CEO Elon Musk revealed some more pricing details of the Model 3. Its $35,000 base price climbs to $59,000 with all the add-ons, and he said that increasing production would be “hell.”


So what exactly does a trip through hell with Elon Musk looks like? Many analysts think that may involve Tesla raising more money.

Softening demand for Teslas?

Another question is about demand for the older Model S and Model X cars. The company has produced more cars than it sold for six quarters, and sales were flat for the past three. Musk recently hinted that anticipation for the cheaper Model 3 was affecting sales of the more expensive Model S.

Investors will also be looking for more information about demand for the Model 3. Tesla says it has more than 500,000 deposits for the car, up from 375,000.

Tesla shares have been on a tear for the past 6 months, with the stock up 25% despite the massive selloff last month when the company reported lower than expected deliveries.

Even Elon Musk thinks the stock is a little frothy, Tweeting, “Tesla stock is obviously high based on past [and] present, but low if you believe in Tesla’s future. Place bets accordingly.”


For more on Tesla, check out The Final Round starting at 3:55 p.m. Eastern, right here on Yahoo Finance.

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