Toronto's fancy new bridge is setting sail through the Atlantic Ocean

Cheryl Santa Maria
·3 min read
Toronto's fancy new bridge is setting sail through the Atlantic Ocean
Toronto's fancy new bridge is setting sail through the Atlantic Ocean
Toronto's fancy new bridge is setting sail through the Atlantic Ocean
Toronto's fancy new bridge is setting sail through the Atlantic Ocean

Toronto is getting a fancy new bridge, and it's currently floating along the Atlantic Ocean on its way to its permanent home.

Once in place, the red and white structure will transport people to and from Toronto's Port Lands, a $1.25 billion project that's expected to be completed in 2024. The new island will serve as flood protection, create a new shoreline, and create access to new public spaces.

The city is digging a new, one-kilometre channel through the Port Lands, a former industrial area. The channel will act as a new mouth for the Don River that will reduce flood risk in southeastern Toronto and create a new space, called Villers Island, that will be open to the public and be roughly as large as Toronto's downtown core.

"These bridges will be a connection for the public to access the new island we are building, and bridges that will connect us to Toronto's future. The bridges are another piece Waterfront Toronto is adding to make our city's waterfront world class, just as bridges have helped define the image of cities like Chicago and Sydney," Waterfront Toronto CEO George Zegarac said in a press release.

"Work has been continuing all year on the Port Lands project, excavating the new path for the Don River, and creating Villiers Island. Beyond providing critical flood protection, this project is going to deliver a stunning new destination steps from downtown for people to live, work, and enjoy nature, as well as helping to drive Toronto's economic recovery."

Currently, the Cherry Street North bridge is "somewhere between Nova Scotia and Ontario," according to BlogTo, floating along on a 1,300 km journey on a barge in the St. Lawrence Seaway that began on October 29.

The bridge was constructed with parts from Canada and the Netherlands and assembled at Cherubini Bridges and Structures in Dartmouth.

Once it reaches its destination the bridge will be used to replace the Cherry Street Lift Bridge.

You can follow the bridge's journey on the WaterFront TO Twitter page, which has been detailing all construction developments.

Thumbnail image courtesy of Waterfront Toronto.