Trudeau Apologizes For Sneaking Chocolate Bar In House Of Commons

Zi-Ann Lum
Conservative MP Scott Reid called out the prime minister for breaking a no-food rule in the House of Commons Wednesday.

OTTAWA — There was a teachable moment in the House of Commons Wednesday after Conservative MP Scott Reid accused the prime minister of sneaking a bagel under his desk.

Rules state members "may refresh themselves with glasses of water during debate, but the consumption of any other beverage or food is not allowed."

Watch: Tory MP accuses PM of hiding a snack and breaking a House of Commons rule

Reid, a longtime Tory MP, also called out the defence and heritage ministers for the same violation.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rose to admit to breaching the no-food rule, but said the item wasn't a baked good. "It was a chocolate bar. I apologize," he said.

Montreal Liberal MP Anthony Housefather chimed in on social media to share his disappointment that the snack Trudeau snuck in was a confection and not one of his city's wood-fired bagels.


The oddball moment happened in the first hour of a marathon voting session after the government defeated a Conservative motion asking the prime minister to waive any remaining solicitor-client privilege and cabinet confidentiality restrictions for former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould.

The Tories want Wilson-Raybould to return to the justice committee to continue her testimony and provide more details about a "concerted and sustained effort" she said she experienced from the Prime Minister's Office and other political staff to intervene in the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin.

The defeat of the motion gave way to voting on 257 separate motions which the Conservatives gave notice of last week. It's a procedural tactic the Opposition is using to protest the government's response to the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Wilson-Raybould did not attend the Commons votes. Neither did former Treasury Board president Jane Philpott. Both former ministers quit Trudeau's cabinet last month, with Philpott citing lost confidence over the government's handling of the controversy.

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Every one of the 257 motions oppose the latest supplementary and interim estimates. They're considered confidence votes because each motion deals with government funding for federal programs and initiatives. Losing one vote could trigger an election.

With the most at stake, Liberals set up cots outside the chamber in anticipation of the late-night voting session — which could take up to 40 hours.

Conservative House Leader Candice Bergen told reporters before the vote that the government could avoid the overnight session by siding with the Opposition and agreeing to let Wilson-Raybould return to committee with no restrictions on what she can say.

The Tories are accusing the government of using the annual budget, which was tabled Tuesday, as a distraction from allegations of political interference involving one of their former star ministers.

"We're not going to let them just kind of go about their business here, you know, business as usual, nothing to see with the scandal," Bergen said. She and her leader, Andrew Scheer, have promised "to use every mechanism available" to stop that from happening.

  • New presumptive case of novel coronavirus in Toronto, health officials say
    News
    The Canadian Press

    New presumptive case of novel coronavirus in Toronto, health officials say

    TORONTO — A woman who arrived in Toronto from China last week has a presumptive case of the novel coronavirus, health officials said Sunday, days after announcing the last of three people previously diagnosed in Ontario had been cleared of the illness.The woman went to a north Toronto hospital with an intermittent cough after her arrival on Friday, the Health Ministry said in a statement, adding she was tested for the virus, known as COVID-19, before being discharged into self-isolation.The test came back positive on Sunday, the ministry said, and a further test will be done by the National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg for official confirmation of the diagnosis.Dr. David Williams, chief medical health officer of Ontario, said people should not be concerned about contracting the coronavirus."Because of all the proper protocols and procedures that are in place to contain this virus and exposure to others was limited, I want to assure the public that the risk to Ontarians remains low," he said.The ministry said the woman wore a mask throughout her return to Toronto and had limited exposure to others after landing.Health officials will contact and monitor passengers who were sitting close to the woman on the plane back to Canada, the statement says.Three people in Ontario had previously been diagnosed with COVID-19, including a married couple in Toronto and a Western University student in London, Ont., after all of them had recently returned from travelling in China.The province announced Friday that all three had been cleared.There are six known cases of the illness in British Columbia, most recently a woman in her 30s who returned to the province last week from travel in Iran.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said Thursday the woman's presumptive case was relatively mild, and a number of her close contacts were already in isolation."This one, clearly, is a bit unusual in that the travel to Iran is something new," Henry told a news conference at the B.C. legislature. "Iran has recently started reporting cases and we'll be working with our national and international colleagues to better understand where she may have been exposed to this virus prior to her return to Canada."Far more Canadians are affected by the virus outside of this country. An outbreak of COVID-19 aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship saw 47 Canadians infected.The cruise ship was docked in Yokohama, Japan, and placed under quarantine. People who were diagnosed with the illness are being treated at hospitals there, while those without symptoms were flown back to Ontario on Friday, where they're going through another 14 days of isolation.Six Canadian Armed Forces medical staff and one Canadian government staffer who accompanied the passengers on that flight were released from quarantine on Sunday. Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief public health officer, said she assessed them and determined they weren't at risk of having the virus and did not need to stay in isolation.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 23, 2020.Nicole Thompson, The Canadian Press

  • Police give Tyendinaga Mohawk protesters deadline to clear rail blockade: reports
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Police give Tyendinaga Mohawk protesters deadline to clear rail blockade: reports

    TYENDINAGA MOHAWK TERRITORY, Ont. — Protesters were reportedly given until the end of Sunday night to clear a blockade on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory that's crippled the country's rail network.Ontario Provincial Police and Canadian National informed protesters that they will face an investigation and possible charges if they don't clear the tracks in eastern Ontario by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, according to multiple media reports.The barricade has shut down train traffic along a key corridor for more than two weeks.CN declined to comment on the reported move, and spokespeople with the OPP did not immediately respond.The barricades are a response to a move by the RCMP to clear protesters who had been blocking access to a pipeline worksite on Wet'suwet'en territory in northern British Columbia.Hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en Nation oppose the work on their traditional territory, despite support from elected band councils along the pipeline route.On Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said it was time for the barricades to come down and injunctions ordering the tracks cleared to be enforced.But Heredity Chief Na'moks, also known as John Ridsdale, said Sunday that Trudeau's "misinformed" and "antagonistic" speech had the opposite effect."If the prime minister had not made that speech the Mohawks would have taken down everything," he said. "They were ready. We were on the phone."More rail-line protests sprung up over the weekend, even after Trudeau's stern words.In Vancouver, protesters returned to the site of CN Rail tracks on the city's east side, but police spokesman Sgt. Aaron Roed said the gathering appeared to be a continuation of protests over the past few weeks.He said about 40 people were off to the side of the tracks, not blocking rail lines, and officers had informed them of an injunction already in place.Na'moks said all five hereditary chiefs are expected to meet in northern B.C. on Monday to plan their next steps and talks with the RCMP could resume on Thursday at the earliest.He said the chiefs will not budge from their demands for the Mounties to remove every component of a mobile unit from the 29-kilometre mark from Highway 16 before meeting with them."The local constabulary can look after the patrols," Na'moks said of a detachment in nearby Houston. "The officers that they fly in and out on a seven-day basis is what we want gone from the territory."Dawn Roberts, a spokeswoman for the RCMP, said the mobile unit has been temporarily closed as discussions are underway with the deputy commissioner about its future."This means that the buildings have been locked and secured and that the gates and the fence that's around that property has been locked," she said.Officers who were stationed at the unit are now conducting patrols of the area from the Houston detachment, about 40 minutes away, Roberts said, adding she is not aware of any plans by Mounties to meet with the chiefs on Thursday.The chiefs visited supporters this week in Tyendinaga and Kahnawake south of Montreal, and repeated that their conditions for talks to begin have not been met.Chief Woos, of the Grizzly House, told reporters in Kahnawake on Saturday that attempts to reach out to Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller have not been returned since Trudeau's announcement on Friday."It seems to me like ever since Mr. Trudeau has made his announcement, the communication has ceased," Woos said.But senior cabinet ministers said Sunday the federal government remained ready to talk.Speaking Sunday on Global's news and political affairs series "The West Block," the minister for Crown-Indigenous relations styled conversations as productive and that all sides were making good progress.Carolyn Bennett said that "at no time have we stopped negotiations."She added later in the interview that "keeping the conversation open" along with the removal of the RCMP from the Wet'suwet'en territory are "really important criteria to getting us through this difficult patch and on to a good path."She said there are differing opinions within the Wet'suwet'en Nation, and it is the nation itself that has to sort out the divide."Within the Wet'suwet'en community that there are differing opinions and matriarchs, there are people that are speaking up about their issues as well," Bennett told the program."The solution will be found in the Wet'suwet'en community as they come together with their vision of self-determination and how they can form a government and write their own laws."On CTV's "Question Period," Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said the barricades needed to come down and that the federal government is committed to dialogue. He urged the hereditary chiefs to come back to the table."We all understand the importance of a peaceful resolution, but a speedy resolution, because the impact of these barricades is unacceptable, untenable," Blair said."It can't be maintained because of the harm that it is causing and so we have confidence in the police to do the job peaceably."He said that it was the responsibility of the police in each jurisdiction to deal with the blockades and was cool to the idea of the federal government sending in the military to forcibly remove demonstrators.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 23, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Families with members stuck in China call for third Canadian rescue flight
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    CBC

    Families with members stuck in China call for third Canadian rescue flight

    Chinese Canadians and others with family stuck in China's Hubei province are calling for the federal government to send a third plane to repatriate Canadians, visa holders and permanent residents alike. The city of Wuhan, China, was locked down in late January, leaving visitors with little or no opportunity to leave.A group that uses the messaging app WeChat to organize represents at least 50 families with loved ones trapped in Hubei province. A letter the group has sent to Global Affairs Canada, and plans to send to several Members of Parliament, states people still trapped either didn't have enough warning to prepare for the two Canadian flights, felt misinformed about who was allowed to board or didn't sign onto the government's registry quickly enough. "We strongly urge the Canadian government to repatriate these families promptly by deploying another chartered flight. The longer this ordeal carries on, and the longer the lockdown continues for these unfortunate individuals, the more danger it will impose on the Canadians stuck there," the letter reads. "We cannot bear the thought of losing our family members if something were to happen in the next few weeks." One Canadian citizen, Elaine Cheng, said she chose not to board either plane after learning her husband, who only has a Canadian visa, wouldn't be allowed to leave the country with her. She opted to stay in Wuhan, and thinks Canada can do better. "I think the way they treat my husband, or someone similar to my husband's situation in China, is totally inhumane," she said by phone Saturday. "Inhumane, uncompassionate and unfair."The B.C.-resident has been trapped in an apartment for the past month with her husband and limited food.Although she has no plans to abandon her husband, she'd like to return home."That's why I do not choose to live just for my own sake, for humanity and compassion purpose," she said. "That's what we, Canadians, advocate in this country and in this world, to other people in other countries, including China."We should not be abandoning anybody that has close ties to us in our life."Cheng said she had heard reports of confirmed coronavirus cases in her apartment building and that was making her nervous."I do hope the government and embassy in China can do their best to move my family and I away from Wuhan," she wrote via WeChat.Global Affairs respondsGlobal Affairs Canada didn't directly respond to questions about whether the department would send a third plane.But a spokesperson said those trapped in Hubei province can contact Canada's embassy in Beijing, call its 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa or send a message to the federal government's SOS email account."We remain in regular contact with Canadians in China and are continuing to provide assistance to those in need to the extent possible," the spokesperson said.Vancouver-resident Yaqi Huang says her 63-year-old father, a permanent resident of Canada, was visiting her grandfather over the Chinese New Year when the city's roads were shut down and planes were grounded.Not only were her father stuck inside the city, he also became separated from the 89-year-old grandfather. "Most people feel scared. They feel nervous. They feel trapped by the government," she said. While Huang initially heard only permanent residents accompanying Canadian minors were allowed to leave – a decision made by Chinese officials – she was surprised to hear stories of permanent residents without young children being allowed to leave Wuhan.After the second plane left, the 37-year-old emailed the Canadian government again."To say, 'So what is the policy for letting people on the flight?'" Huang said. "I say, 'We just need to know the truth.'"Earlier this month, China's deputy director of the Foreign Ministry Information Department said the country would loosen its grip and allow Chinese citizens to fly out of the city, accompanied by foreign family members. In an emailed response to Huang, however, Global Affairs Canada said the Chinese government maintained absolute authority over who could, and who couldn't, board the planes. "We advocated strongly for Canadians, [permanent residents] and their families to be eligible," the email dated Feb. 19 reads.The emailed response says that even if the Canadian government allowed Huang's father to travel to the airport, Chinese officials would have prevented him from boarding the flight."We share your frustration as well. Your parents are, without a doubt, in a difficult situation right now."While Huang wants her father to be repatriated and supports the efforts for a third plane to be sent, she's not hopeful."I know it's a fat chance for the Canadian government to go help, to send an airplane into Wuhan," she said. "It's really hard. We just want to be treated [fairly], like other families."Other reasons to stayKristina Shramko, of Richmond, B.C., said she's been living in Wuhan for eight months.After graduating university, the 21-year-old decided to travel. She visited Wuhan and, after returning to Canada briefly, had been persuaded to return to China by a romantic partner she started dating. When the novel coronavirus epicentre was placed in lockdown, Shramko contacted the Canadian government, hoping to leave the city.  When she heard about the strict no pets policy on both flights, however, she decided she couldn't go.She had recently adopted a cat, named Kitya."Even if I were to leave my cat with a friend, it's not certain when I would come back," Shramko said. "To me, it would be abandoning her."Elaine Cheng, likewise, has concerns about leaving her cat behind in Wuhan. Shramko would like to come home until the outbreak is over, but feels she can't as long as the pet policy is in place. She said outside of her residence "kind of feels like the zombie apocalypse."The Canadian citizen is currently raising money to pay for a plane ticket for her, and Kitya, when travel restrictions on the city are lifted.  "It's really important for people to know that there are people who have decided to stay in Wuhan," she said. Wife is trappedMost of Simon Zheng's family is now stuck in Wuhan, including his wife. The Canadian citizen's partner, who has a work permit designed for spouses, was also visiting China over the holidays. Zheng, a resident of Surrey, B.C., planned to come to Wuhan later in January but was held back by work. Now his wife is stranded with his in-laws and parents, Chinese citizens who live in the city. The small business owner feels if he had been in Hubei province, his wife might have been able to board a plane, like some non-Canadian citizens who were permitted to leave."I was not there, so she wasn't able to [be] included in those kinds of groups," he said.Zheng said he's uncertain how long the lockdown will last and fears his family's limited supplies could run out. But he hasn't given up hope.The WeChat group he is a part of started with fewer than 10 families, Zheng said, and continues to grow. He hopes the federal government takes the pleas of families with loved ones still trapped seriously."I have good faith, because we're doing whatever we can," he said.

  • Fort Macleod, Alta., to get special advance screening of new 'Ghostbusters' film
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    The Canadian Press

    Fort Macleod, Alta., to get special advance screening of new 'Ghostbusters' film

    There will be something strange in the neighbourhood of Fort Macleod, Alta., in the next few months.A representative for Sony Pictures Entertainment tells The Canadian Press that the studio is working with the town on putting together a special advance screening of "Ghostbusters: Afterlife."Scenes for the film, which is due out in July, were shot in Fort Macleod and other parts of Alberta last summer.The Sony Pictures representative said Fort Macleod is the only Canadian municipality they are currently discussing a screening with.All other details about the advance screening are to be confirmed.Four-time Oscar nominee Jason Reitman, who was born in Montreal, directs the new instalment in the "Ghostbusters" series.His father, Toronto-bred Ivan Reitman, helmed the original films in the supernatural comedy franchise and produced the new one.Cast members include Carrie Coon, Mckenna Grace, Paul Rudd and Vancouver-bred "Stranger Things" star Finn Wolfhard.Coon plays a single mother alongside Grace and Wolfhard as her kids.The story sees the family moving to a small town just as it begins experiencing paranormal occurrences.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 23, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Wet’suwet’en coverage: Has the media been fair? | The Weekly with Wendy Mesley
    CBC

    Wet’suwet’en coverage: Has the media been fair? | The Weekly with Wendy Mesley

    As the Wet’suwet’en land dispute story continues to dominate the headlines, critics wonder: Are journalists giving it fair coverage?

  • Controversial natural gas project in Quebec to undergo environmental review next month
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    CBC

    Controversial natural gas project in Quebec to undergo environmental review next month

    Quebec's environmental review agency will begin examining next month a controversial natural gas project that is already facing opposition from Indigenous communities, but which also has the government's blessing.  Environment Minister Benoit Charrette sent a letter last week to the head of the agency, known by its French acronym as the BAPE, in which he indicates the review process will begin March 16, according to Radio-Canada.The natural gas project is composed of both a pipeline component and a plan to construct a $9.5-billion liquefaction plant by the Saguenay port, roughly 230 kilometres northeast of Quebec City.It is the proposed plant, backed by GNL Québec, that will be reviewed first. The pipeline, which would stretch 780 kilometres from Ontario to Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean and cost an estimated $4.5 billion, will be studied by the BAPE separately.Charrette's letter said the environmental review was necessary because the liquefied natural gas (LNG) project raises a number of potential issues, including greenhouse gas emissions, damage to wetlands and water environments and risk of accidents. Premier François Legault has repeatedly indicated he is favourable to the project, claiming among other things that it will help reduce emissions globally by facilitating exports of LNG, which emits fewer emissions than coal.That claim has been contested by large numbers of academics, including economists and scientists, who estimate that when extracting and consuming the natural gas is considered, the project could be responsible for 1.8 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions over 25 years.That's equivalent to the amount of emissions that 382 million cars produce in a year. Innu oppositionThe project has also stirred opposition from members of Innu communities, whose ancestral territory would be crossed by the pipeline if it's built. Several dozen Innu members attended protest marches this weekend in Mashteuiatsh, on the eastern shores of Lac-Saint-Jean, and in L'Anse-Saint-Jean, about 100 kilometres southeast of Saguenay.  At the demonstrations, where they were joined by local environmental groups, Innu expressed both opposition to the LNG project in Quebec and support for the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs opposing a pipeline project in British Columbia."I have lots of grandchildren and I have two great-grandchildren. I want them to be able to live on a healthy planet," said Huguette Volant, one of the Innu protesters.The company behind the liquefaction plant, GNL Québec, welcomed the news about the upcoming environmental review, which will include a series of public hearings. "It's a big step for our project," said spokesperson Stéphanie Fortin. "For us it's a chance where we'll be able to show all the benefits of the project."The public hearings will be broken into two phases over four months. In the first phase, GNL Québec will outline its project and answer questions from the public. In the second, the public is invited to table documents about the project.At the end of the process, the BAPE will produce a report for the Environment Ministry which may contain recommendations, but the Quebec government gets the final say on whether the project can go ahead.

  • Peter MacKay's Campaign Manager Sends Mixed Messages With Blockade Tweet
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    HuffPost Canada

    Peter MacKay's Campaign Manager Sends Mixed Messages With Blockade Tweet

    Some thought he was encouraging anti-Indigenous violence.

  • Nine dead in Turkey as 5.7 earthquake strikes western Iran
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Nine dead in Turkey as 5.7 earthquake strikes western Iran

    ANKARA, Turkey — Nine people were killed in eastern Turkey by a magnitude 5.7 earthquake early Sunday morning, Turkish Health Minister Fahrettin Koca said.The quake centred just east across the border in neighbouring Iran, west of the Iranian city of Khoy, and affected villages in the Turkish province of Van.At least three of the dead were children, according to Turkish Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu. The health minister later said at least 37 people were injured, including nine in critical but not life-threatening condition.Iran’s official IRNA news agency said at least 75 people had been injured inside Iran, six of whom were hospitalized.A second earthquake — also magnitude 5.7 — struck Sunday evening in the same area in Iran, according to the country's seismology centre.It was not immediately clear if the second quake caused further damage or casualties in either country.The U.S. Geological Survey put the second earthquake’s magnitude at 6.0. Varying magnitudes are common in the immediate aftermath.Turkish broadcaster NTV showed images of locals and soldiers digging through the rubble of collapsed buildings on Sunday, as families sat in snowy streets fearing further tremors.Emergency teams were sent to the remote mountainous region, which has a history of powerful earthquakes. Last month, a quake centred on the eastern Turkish city of Elazig killed more than 40 people. In 2011, more than 600 were killed when a quake struck north of Van province's capital.According to the European Mediterranean Seismological Center, the first quake happened at 9:22 a.m. local time (0552 GMT) at a depth of 5 kilometres (3 miles). The EMSC reported several further quakes that measured up to magnitude 4.4.Iran's seismology centre said the second quake hit the Zarabad district at at 7:30 p.m. local time (1600 GMT) at a depth of 28 kilometres (17 miles).The USGS said the first quake was at a depth of 6.4 kilometres (4 miles) and the second was at 10 kilometres (6 miles).The effects of the quake hit four villages in Van. Seven of the fatalities occurred in Ozpinar village, where Soylu said search and rescue teams had arrived. He added that the quake caused 1,066 buildings to collapse while the Education Ministry said a number of schools were damaged.Koca said 25 ambulances, a medical helicopter and 13 emergency teams had been sent to the region. The Disaster and Emergency Management Directorate (AFAD) said 144 tents for families had been dispatched.IRNA said the first earthquake affected 43 villages in the mountainous Qotour area.___Associated Press writer Amir Vahdat contributed to this report from Tehran, Iran.Andrew Wilks, The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    Last-minute negotiations settle a First Nation's concerns over the Teck Frontier oilsands mine

    The Alberta government has resolved a First Nation's concerns over the Teck Frontier mine, eliminating one obstacle that could have blocked the project's approval.However, the deal may not matter after the Vancouver-based Teck Resources signalled late Sunday it was no longer planning to proceed with the oilsands project.The provincial government and the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) reached an agreement over the weekend after a bitter public dispute between the two parties. The down-to-the-wire negotiations ended ahead of an expected decision from the Liberal government this week on the fate of the $20.6-billion mega-mine."Given the recent discussions with the Alberta government and their fresh and positive approach," Chief Allan Adam said in a news release. "We reconfirm our support of the project and encourage the Canadian government to approve the project without further delay."Adam said his nation and the Alberta government have agreed on a "comprehensive and meaningful package of action items," but the news release didn't state what those items are.ACFN had accused the province of Alberta dragging their feet on the Dené nation's concerns over water, bison habitat and the need for financial compensation for treaty rights. The provincial government said that it has been in dialogue with the nation and accused the band's Chief Adam of being primarily concerned with money.Each accused the other of delays that could block the project.In July, a federal-provincial environmental panel recommended the approval of the Teck Frontier mine. The mine would disturb 292 square kilometres of pristine wetlands and boreal forest — an area half the size of the city of Edmonton — over its 40-year lifespan, although Vancouver-based Teck Resources would not begin mining the whole area all at once.Two weeks ago, CBC obtained a letter Adam wrote to federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. The letter stated it was unlikely ACFN's concerns would be resolved within the prescribed timelines. This disagreement, a federal government source told CBC then, would weigh on the government's decision to approve the mine.The end to this public battle gives opponents of Teck Frontier one less argument. Conversely, it arms the project's cheerleaders with the backing to honestly say all 14 Alberta Métis and First Nations in the immediate sphere of the project support it. Another band in the shadow of the project, the Mikisew Cree First Nation, also issued a press release Friday reiterating its support.The Liberal caucus is divided over the issue.Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith told CBC Radio's The House Canada would not be able to meet its net-zero emission target by 2050 if Teck Frontier was approved. On that front, it was announced Friday that Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon would enforce a cap on oilsands emissions, which may alleviate concerns over Teck Frontier's greenhouse gas footprint.Teck has estimated the project would emit about four million tonnes of direct carbon emissions per year. One environmental group, the Oilsands Environmental Coalition (OSEC), estimated that it would be the equivalent of adding 891,000 cars to roadways.In a statement of his own, Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon celebrated the resolution."I am again calling on the federal government to approve the Teck Frontier mine project, given that the major concerns raised by the Joint Review Panel have been addressed," Nixon said."The opportunity that this project presents for our Indigenous communities, our province and the thousands of jobs it would create cannot be killed for political reasons. This project has played by the rules. It has followed the process. It's time to get it done."

  • Quebec invests $5M for home decor in long-term care facilities
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    CBC

    Quebec invests $5M for home decor in long-term care facilities

    Some residents of long-term care facilities will soon have the ability to choose their own paint colours and furniture options, Marguerite Blais announced Sunday. The government is investing an additional $5 million for cosmetic renovations in the province's long-term care facilities, known in French as CHSLDs. Contrary to the $2.6 billion the province invested in long-term care facilities last November, it will be up to the resident committees of each CHSLD to decide what they would like to do with the additional cash. Where the $2.6 billion was aimed at getting the essentials into long-term care facilities, such as air conditioning and additional rooms, Blais said this new budget would be aimed at smaller projects like gardens or furniture for the residents."It's a first in the history of Quebec because they will take the initiative of what they want," said Blais. Blais said the idea behind the new budget is to make residents feel more at-home. Though this is a one-time initiative for now, Blais said she is working to get it renewed yearly. The budget will be divided across the province's network of private and public care facilities, which consists of more than 2,500 CHSLD's. The money will be distributed according to the number of residents each one accommodates.  The announcement was made at the CHSLD Armand-Lavergne, where residents already have a certain level of autonomy. "Here, they have empowerment and we want every CHSLD to have this type of empowerment," said Blais. Irene Boileau, a resident at the CHSLD Armand-Lavergne and the president of its residents committee, said the residents recently got to repaint their rooms whatever colour they wanted to.Boileau herself chose to paint her room purple, and said it made her feel a lot happier. "This will help us make even more renovations," said Boileau. She said residents of the Armand-Lavergne facility are hoping to use the new budget to purchase better windows. Patricia Gagné, the director general of the group that oversees resident committees, said this new power is something residents have wanted for a while. "It's been proven by research that the decor, the environment, the colour on the walls have a direct impact on the mental and physical health of the residents," said Gagné. "It's not a lot [of money] but it is a first. What we want is for it to become recurring."

  • Before his death on the job, Sam Fitzpatrick told TV crew his worksite was 'pretty dangerous'
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    CBC

    Before his death on the job, Sam Fitzpatrick told TV crew his worksite was 'pretty dangerous'

    Not long before Sam Fitzpatrick was crushed to death by a falling boulder on a Peter Kiewit Sons worksite on B.C.'s Central Coast, he gave an interview to a TV documentary crew about the risks of his work.Fitzpatrick, 24, was working as a rock scaler with his younger brother Arlen, and the November 2010 episode of the Discovery Channel program Mega Builders shows the pair hanging from ropes as they work to stabilize the steep slope of a hydroelectric project alongside Toba Inlet, north of Powell River."When you're going over rock cuts and there's loose rocks everywhere, you can get hit by rocks.… It's pretty dangerous for that," Fitzpatrick tells the producers."So far, it's been pretty good. We haven't got hit too bad."The rock that struck and killed him on Feb. 22, 2009, measured about 1.8 metres across, according to a WorkSafeBC investigation. Arlen was nearby, and watched helplessly as it happened.Watch: Sam Fitzpatrick speaks about the risks of his jobIn May, a little more than 10 years after that tragedy, Crown prosecutors announced that Kiewit and two former managers had been charged with criminal negligence causing death.It was the outcome that family and friends had been fighting for."I was truly amazed when it actually happened. I was bowled over that it was real," family friend Mike Pearson told CBC this week."I'm a big believer in this case and a big cheerleader for it, but I had some skeptical moments."But after that triumph, the last year has only brought more tragedy for Fitzpatrick's family. His mother, Christine Tamburri, died of cancer on Dec. 4 at the age of 65. Fitzpatrick's father, Brian Fitzpatrick, died in 2017 after years of advocating for accountability and criminal charges against Kiewit."It's almost too much to take, just tragedy piled on top of tragedy in this story," Pearson said.Company offers 'sincerest, deepest condolences'Saturday marks exactly 11 years since Fitzpatrick died.Just one day before the fatal rockfall, another boulder had tumbled down the same steep rock face, seriously damaging a piece of heavy equipment. A WorkSafeBC investigation later found that Kiewit had been running the site with a "reckless disregard" for safety.Thirty-three days have now been set aside, beginning in November, for a Vancouver provincial court judge to hear evidence against Kiewit. Company spokesman Bob Kula told CBC in an email that Kiewit did not "willfully contribute to or cause this fatality" and plans to fight the charge in court."We continue to offer our sincerest, deepest condolences to [Fitzpatrick's] family, friends and those who worked with him for their tragic loss," Kula said.Engineer Timothy Rule will also stand trial beginning in November. He makes an appearance in the Mega Builders episode about the Toba Inlet project, and tells the producers that the crew is dealing with challenging weather and tight deadlines."The main headaches right now are meeting our goals for the season before we get pushed out by snow," he says.Former Kiewit manager Gerald Karjala is also charged in Fitzpatrick's death, but he's currently in the U.S. and has not made an appearance in court.Watch: Sam and Arlen Fitzpatrick work on Toba Inlet projectKiewit is one of the largest construction companies in North America, with a long history of working on B.C. infrastructure projects like the SkyTrain system, the new Port Mann Bridge and the Sea-to-Sky Highway.Since the criminal charges were laid on May 31, the company has lost out on two major B.C. government contracts: the $1.377-billion replacement of the Pattullo Bridge and the Highway 91/17 upgrades in Delta.A transportation ministry spokesperson would not comment on whether the criminal charges were a factor in those decisions, but described the procurement process as "open, fair and competitive."At the federal level, Kiewit has had more success, and was recently awarded the $17.6-million federal contract to clean up the landslide at Big Bar. The Government of Canada's Integrity Regime does bar companies from being awarded federal contracts if they are charged or convicted of certain crimes — including fraud, bribery and drug trafficking — but criminal negligence causing death isn't one of them.Unanswered questionsThere's still nearly nine months to go before Kiewit's criminal trial begins, but Pearson said he hopes that extra time will allow prosecutors to gather the best possible case.Now that both of Fitzpatrick's parents are gone, Pearson plans to take up their search for answers.He said he's trying to learn all he can about the WorkSafeBC investigation into Fitzpatrick's death, which led to a $250,000 fine against Kiewit. He's also trying to get a better understanding of why the Workers' Compensation Appeal Tribunal (WCAT) reduced that penalty to less than $100,000 after Kiewit appealed.Pearson is particularly curious about one line in the WCAT decision, which states that Fitzpatrick's union, the Christian Labour Association of Canada (CLAC), had argued a precedent-setting fine "was not appropriate given the employer's prior demonstrated commitment to safety."Pearson wants to know, "How did the CLAC union end up supporting the company and not supporting the dead worker?" CLAC was not involved in the pursuit for a criminal investigation into Fitzpatrick's death. The United Steelworkers, which had no direct connection to the fatal incident, helped Brian Fitzpatrick advocate for accountability. CLAC spokespeople did not respond to requests for comment on this story.

  • News
    Reuters

    Comfort and Glamour at Dolce & Gabbana as show goes on in Milan

    Dolce & Gabbana prepared for the winter chill on Sunday, staging a Fall/Winter 2020 show featuring oversized chunky sweaters, woolly socks and furry slippers. The Italian fashion house's presentation at Milan Fashion Week came shortly after Giorgio Armani announced he would hold his show, due to take place two hours after Dolce & Gabbana, in an empty theater without any press or buyers present due to the coronavirus outbreak. Some guests at the Dolce & Gabbana catwalk show could be seen wearing surgical masks as they took their seats.

  • Box office goes 'Sonic' again but hears 'Call of the Wild'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Box office goes 'Sonic' again but hears 'Call of the Wild'

    LOS ANGELES — The hedgehog edged the sled dog by a nose at the box office.“Sonic: The Hedgehog” zoomed to the top of the box office with a take of $26.3 million in its second weekend while audiences ignored critics and heeded “The Call of the Wild” as the Harrison Ford CGI dog flick finished a close second with $24.8 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.It was a strong weekend for both films, with each outperforming expectations and overcoming early doubts about design problems.Paramount Pictures' Sega video game adaptation “Sonic the Hedgehog” was a laughingstock when its first trailer was released last year, but after a delay and a title-character makeover, the film has now spent two weeks atop the box office and brought in over $200 million globally.20th Century Studios' “The Call of the Wild” was also mocked by many on social media for its CGI dog — the first five film adaptations of Jack London's 1903 novel all used real ones — and reviews were decidedly mixed with a Rotten Tomatoes score of 62 per cent, but moviegoers bought into the digital dog and his 77-year-old co-star, who would have won the weekend were it not for a late surge from “Sonic.”“For ‘Call of the Wild’ heading into weekend the estimates were all over the place, as low as 10 million for the weekend, some saying it could do 15, maybe 20," said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Comscore. "So like ‘Sonic' it over-performed.”In a very distant third with $7 million was “Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey" in its third week.The weekend's other wide release, “Brahms: The Boy II” starring Katie Holmes, was fourth with just $5.9 million.That was a disappointing opening at a time of year when horror films often do well. 2020 appears to be bucking that trend with family films thriving in the early weeks of the year.“'Sonic' and ‘Call of the Wild’ represent two PG-rated movies where that void in the marketplace for families is the key to their success in this part of the year, a time that’s usually dominated by awards holdovers and R-rated films,” Dergarabedian said.And those family audiences may be why critics didn't matter for the top two films.“PG-rated films are more immune to reviews and are more about the audience. If a kid wants to go see a film, they’re going to go see it” he said.Best picture winner “Parasite” continued its post-Oscars surge in a week where its victory was mocked at a rally by President Donald Trump, bringing in $3.2 million in North America, where it has earned nearly $50 million.Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theatres, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included.1\. "Sonic the Hedgehog," 26.3 million, ($38.3 million international).2\. "The Call of the Wild," $24.8 million, (15.4 million international).3\. “Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey,” $7 million, (10 million international).4\. “Brahms: The Boy II,” $5.9 million, ($2.2 million international).5\. “Bad Boys for Life,” $5.86 million, ($8.1 million international).6\. “1917,” $4.4 million, ($9.4 million international).7\. "Blumhouse's Fantasy Island,” $4.2 million, ($3.9 million international).8\. “Parasite,” $3.1 million, ($8.9 million international).9\. “Jumanji: The Next Level,” $3 million, ($1.3 million international).10\. “The Photograph,” $2.8 million.___Follow AP Entertainment Writer Andrew Dalton on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton.Andrew Dalton, The Associated Press

  • Overlooked prime ministers honoured by Kamloops sculptor
    News
    CBC

    Overlooked prime ministers honoured by Kamloops sculptor

    John Abbott, John Thompson, Mackenzie Bowell and Charles Tupper: They're not exactly household names. But in his Kamloops studio, artist Nathan Scott is painstakingly creating clay models for life-size sculptures of the four early Canadian prime ministers who are sometimes called "the unfortunate four."In the five years after the death of Canadian prime minister John A. Macdonald in 1891, each of the four men held Canada's most powerful political position for a short time. Their terms were cut short by "ill health, death, resignation and a snap election," Scott told Daybreak Kamloops' Jenifer Norwell, who visited the artist in his studio."It was just really an unfortunate time, where it was supposed to go really smoothly and just nothing happened," Scott said."I don't think any of these guys ever wanted to become prime minister. It was just being at the right place at the wrong time. And there they are."The Ontario charitable organization that commissioned the sculptures asked for them to be placed in a conversational grouping, Scott said. It was appropriate because they would have known each other as active members of the same party during the same time. After being cast in bronze, Scott's Unfortunate Four will join more well-known members of their rank along the Prime Ministers Path in the township of Wilmot, Ont. The others include Sir John A. Macdonald, Kim Campbell, Lester B. Pearson and another of Scott's sculptures, Sir Robert Borden. Scott said as he read and learned more about his latest subjects he came to see their largely forgotten status as undeserved.Despite their brief tenures, he said, "there were things that they were involved with that shaped our country. It might have been small at that very time for them, or be something they didn't want to deal with, but it ultimately shaped our country."When complete, each figure will include several "Easter eggs" — subtle symbols or icons revealing significant details about the person. The sculpture of Tupper, who was a doctor, has a stethoscope. Abbott, a lawyer, grips a newspaper with articles about him. Other "Easter eggs" indicate Thompson's Catholicism and for Bowell, holding an orange, his position as grand master of the Protestant orange order.To hear the complete interview with artist Nathan Scott, tap the link below: With files from Jenifer Norwell and Daybreak Kamloops

  • News
    CBC

    Sask. junior hockey goalie suspended 30 days for incident with on-ice official

    A goalie in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL) has been suspended for 30 days.Liam McGarva of the La Ronge Ice Wolves received a match penalty for "physical harassment of officials" in a Feb. 12 blowout loss in Estevan, Sask.The league said he was suspended for "physically becoming involved with an on-ice official."Ice Wolves coach Kevin Kaminski said he was told McGarva sprayed a referee with a water bottle.And when McGarva was ejected, Kaminski said his player pushed a linesman in an attempt to talk to the ref."You can't push a linesman," Kaminski said. "And it's one of those games. He got frustrated and did something he regrets."Kaminski said the suspension is fair and both the team and the player accept its length."I think in any sport in any level — reffing or umpires or whatever it is — they're hard to find these days, especially good ones," Kaminski said."We've got to work with them. We can't afford to be losing those guys."McGarva was recently named one of three finalists for the SJHL Goaltender of the Year award and came into the weekend tied for the league lead in wins and shutouts.The Ice Wolves will make their first appearance in the postseason since the 2015-16 campaign, but it's expected the suspension will cost them the services of their starting goalie for most of the first round of the playoffs.SJHL President Bill Chow said the league didn't have an option but to follow a Hockey Canada discipline guideline in the McGarva case.McGarva is the latest high-profile SJHL player to receive a lengthy suspension in recent weeks, as the runaway leader in the league scoring race was also suspended this month.Yorkton Terriers forward Chantz Petruic, who has been averaging more than one goal and two points a game this season, was suspended for six games for leaving the bench to start a fight in a Feb. 7 home game versus Weyburn.Mike Stackhouse, a long-time SJHL communications official, said he doesn't recall anyone in the league ever receiving the type of suspension McGarva was handed.But, he said most leagues now defer to automatic suspension guidelines already prescribed in rule books.Stackhouse said if some incidents he has seen in SJHL rinks in years past were to occur today, they might have resulted in "half-a-year or full-year" suspensions by today's standards."I don't think it's a reflection of added violence in the game or disrespect or anything like that," he said."In fact, I think it's probably been better than it's ever been."

  • Andrew Scheer Defends Free-Market Capitalism And 'Paw Patrol’
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Andrew Scheer Defends Free-Market Capitalism And 'Paw Patrol’

    He was responding to a CBC article about the show.

  • News
    CBC

    2 Catholic boards in GTA 'deeply concerned' at report of sex abuse by Jean Vanier

    Two Catholic school boards in the Greater Toronto Area say they are deeply distressed at a report that found respected Canadian religious figure Jean Vanier sexually abused at least six women.Vanier, according to the Canadian Encyclopedia, devoted his life to "advocating for persons with intellectual disabilities." He founded of L'Arche, an international network of communities where people with and without intellectual disabilities live and work together.The Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) says social workers will be available at Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Scarborough — on Midland Avenue north of Eglinton Avenue East — on Monday to provide support to staff and students."We are deeply concerned about this news and for those individuals and communities that may be impacted," Shazia Vlahos, spokesperson for the TCDSB, said in a statement on Sunday. The Halton Catholic District School Board (HCDSB), meanwhile, says it is "too soon to know" whether a decision will be made to change the name of Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Milton, Ont.Several Catholic schools across the province are named after Vanier.In an internal report, L'Arche International, a French-based charity, said Vanier had relationships with at least six women between 1975 and 1990 where he "used his power over them to take advantage of them." Vanier died at age 90 last year.Pat Daly, educator director for the HCDSB, said in a statement on Sunday that the board has already received questions about a possible name change. He is a former principal at Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Milton."As a school district, we are shocked and deeply saddened to hear the reports of sexual abuse that have surfaced about Jean Vanier, founder of L'Arche. This news is especially upsetting to us, given that one of our schools bears the namesake of Jean Vanier," Daly says in a statement. "... I have a personal connection with this community and know that the staff, students and families will be greatly affected by this news. I also know that the spirit of love, faith, and service to others that has been characteristic of this community since the school has opened will continue," he added.As for a possible name change, he said: "There are a number of considerations that will need to be explored, and conversations to be held at both the school and board levels."Board to pray for sex abuse victimsDaly said the board extends its sympathies to the victims of the abuse."We hold them in our prayers as they journey through their pain and hope that all will soon find peace and comfort during this very difficult time," he said. The Canadian Encyclopedia also says of Vanier: "His writings and way of life promoted the belief that each person has a unique value as a human being."During the inquiry, commissioned by L'Arche last year and carried out by the independent, U.K.-based GCPS Consulting group, six adult, non-disabled women said Vanier had engaged in sexual relations with them as they were seeking spiritual direction.According to the report, the women, who have no links to each other, reported similar facts and Vanier's sexual misconduct was often associated with alleged "spiritual and mystical justifications.''A statement released by L'Arche France on Saturday stressed that some women still have "deep wounds.'' Vanier's actions show "he had a psychological and spiritual hold on these women,'' the statement said, adding that nothing suggests that disabled people may have been involved.

  • News
    CBC

    Province, feds reach agreement to protect dwindling Labrador boreal caribou herds

    The federal and provincial governments have announced an agreement for the conservation and protection of boreal caribou in Labrador.In a statement released Thursday, the province said the agreement includes $5.4 million in funding from Ottawa and will guide efforts to preserve the Mealy Mountain, Lac Joseph and Red Wine caribou herds.Populations are declining in the three sedentary herds and the animals are under a hunting ban. The Red Wine herd was estimated at just 20 animals in 2015.The agreement will also lead to the development of a conservation plan to be implemented over the next four years, focusing on research, monitoring and collaboration with Indigenous governments and organizations.'Great for caribou'Jim Goudie, deputy minister of lands and natural resources with the Nunatsiavut government, says his government has been working with the province for over a year on caribou conservation. Goudie says the caribou are always a "hot button topic," but the agreement is positive news."I thought it was a great day for the boreal caribou of Labrador. I think it was a long time coming, I think for years they've been put on the back burner," he said."I think it's great for caribou, I think it's great for Labradorians."Goudie said there are a number of issues facing the boreal caribou, including illegal harvesting, and he believes that more scientific study and education about the herds is needed. It's going to make a dramatic difference in how we view boreal caribou management. \- Jim GoudieHe said the funding will likely go toward strengthening Nunatsiavut's presence on the ground in the Mealy Mountain area for stewardship and conservation."There's a lot of different aspects to it and how we spend our portion of the funding, we're still hammering out the nuts and bolts of that… it's going to go a long way. It's going to make a dramatic difference in how we view boreal caribou management," said Goudie."A lot of different segments of work that can be done with boreal caribou is being covered under this plan."Goudie said Nunatsiavut, the NunatuKavut Community Council and Innu Nation have all had discussions with the province about the agreement.He said contribution agreements now have to be finalized and then programs can be launched."The future looks bright in regards to boreal caribou — certainly in terms of a funding perspective."Provincial Minister of Fisheries and Land Resources, Gerry Byrne, said in Thursday's statement he hopes the measures will help to grow the herds."I am very pleased to announce this bi-lateral agreement that formally recognizes Indigenous participation and traditional Indigenous knowledge in the future recovery and protection of Labrador's boreal caribou herds," Byrne said."The provincial government is fully aware of the cultural significance of boreal caribou to the people of Labrador and is anxious to begin work with all partners to implement a comprehensive plan that provides for enhanced conservation and recovery efforts."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Raf Simons joining Prada in full creative collaboration
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Raf Simons joining Prada in full creative collaboration

    MILAN — Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons — two of the fashion world's biggest creative names — will collaborate on Prada collections from Spring/Summer 2021 going forward indefinitely, the designers announced Sunday at a news conference on the sidelines of Milan Fashion Week.Prada, who has been the creative force behind one of luxury’s most successful brands for 30 years, said the new partnership didn't signal an eventual succession.“Don’t make me older than I am,” the 70-year-old designer quipped.Simons, 52, is considered one of the fashion world’s biggest talents, whose future has been the subject of intense speculation since he left Calvin Klein in 2018. He previously was creative director of Jil Sander and Dior, and also has his own eponymous label, which he said would continue.Their first collaboration will appear on the September runway for Spring/Summer 2021.“The contract in theory is forever,” Prada said.“Maybe this is the first time in fashion history that two expert designers who had their own successes in this sector will work together,” said Patrizio Bertelli, the co-CEO of the Prada Group with his wife, Miuccia Prada.The announcement came on a day when the new coronavirus was a growing concern around the fashion capital. Giorgio Armani took the unusual step to show his collection behind closed doors to an empty theatre, streaming for the fashion public, as a precaution. The rest of the fashion shows scheduled for Sunday continued as planned. Later Sunday the number of confirmed cases in Italy rose to at least 152 and officials halted the Venice Carnival to try to stop the spread of the virus.Prada said they went ahead with the announcement despite the growing emergency in Italy — where more cases of the COVID-19 virus have been confirmed than in Hong Kong. She said that the globalized world is becoming ever more complex “and we need to work, also if these ugly and difficult things are happening.”The designers said that the collaboration was born out of long mutual respect dating from 2005 when Simons took over as creative director of Jil Sander, which was at the time part of the Prada Group.They both said that the collaboration was also meant as a bulwark against a tendency in the fashion world for creativity to be squelched by business priorities.“I think a lot of creatives in a lot of positions dealing with independent brands and creative directorships feel troubled, feel like the fashion industry is moving more and more toward an industry that might end up excluding creatives,” Simons said. He specified that in the fashion world there are examples of financial success without a strong creative direction.“It is definitely something we question, and we do believe that a collaboration between creatives could re-position that aspect of the whole business,” he said.___This story has been corrected to show that the correct title of Patrizio Bertelli is the co-CEO of the Prada Group, not the chairman.Colleen Barry, The Associated Press

  • South Korea put on high alert, Italy battles virus outbreak
    News
    The Canadian Press

    South Korea put on high alert, Italy battles virus outbreak

    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — South Korea’s president said Sunday that he was putting his country on its highest alert for infectious diseases, ordering officials to take “unprecedented, powerful” steps to fight a soaring viral outbreak, while a continent away in Italy, authorities battled to contain Europe's first major outbreak of the virus.China also reported hundreds more infections for a total of about 77,000, and Iran raised its death toll from the virus to eight — the highest toll outside of China. While the number of patients worldwide is increasing, some virus clusters have shown no link to China and experts are struggling to trace where those clusters started.The Iranian health ministry said there were now 43 confirmed cases in Iran, which did not report its first case of the virus until Wednesday.In Italy’s northern Lombardy region, which includes the nation’s financial capital, Milan, the governor announced Sunday that the number of confirmed cases stood at 110. Italy now has 152 cases, the largest number outside of Asia, including three deaths, the most recent on Sunday.Venice, which is full of tourists for Carnival events, reported its first two cases, said Veneto Gov. Luca Zaia, whose region includes the lagoon city. It wasn't immediately known if the two infected had participated in Carnival festivities.As Italy scrambled to check the spread of the virus, authorities announced that all Carnival events had been called off as well as major league soccer matches in the stricken region. Cinemas and theatres were also ordered shuttered, including Milan's legendary La Scala.Warning that China’s virus epidemic is “still grim and complex,” President Xi Jinping called for more efforts to stop the outbreak, revive industry and prevent the disease from disrupting spring planting of crops.Xi defended the ruling Communist Party’s response as “timely and effective” in a video conference with officials in charge of anti-disease work, according to the official Xinhua News Agency.“The current epidemic situation is still grim and complex,” Xinhua cited Xi as saying. “Prevention and control are at the most critical stage.”South Korean President Moon Jae-in said his government had increased its anti-virus alert level by one notch to “Red,” the highest level, in response to the spread of the disease that has infected more than 600 people in the country, mostly in the last few days. The step was last taken in 2009 to guard against a novel influenza outbreak that killed more than 260 people in South Korea. Under the highest alert level, authorities can order the temporary closure of schools and reduce the operation of public transportation and flights to and from South Korea.Moon’s education minister, Yoo Eun-hae, said later Sunday that the new school year for kindergartens, elementary, middle and high schools in South Korea has been put off by one week and will start on March 9.Moon said the outbreak “has reached a crucial watershed,” and that the next few days will be critical. “We shouldn’t be bound by regulations and hesitate to take unprecedented, powerful measures,” he said.South Korea announced 169 more cases of the new virus, bringing the country’s total to 602. It also reported three more fatalities, raising its death toll to six.Mainland China reported 648 new infections for a total of 76,936. The daily death toll fell slightly to 97. In all, 2,442 people have died in the country from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.The number of new Chinese cases has seesawed daily but has remained under 1,000 for the past four days. Several changes to how infections are counted, however, have made it difficult to draw conclusions from the figures.The central Chinese city of Wuhan and other parts of Hubei province, where the outbreak first emerged in December, remain under lockdown. More than 80% of the country's cases are in Hubei, where the death toll has also been higher than the rest of the nation.Most of the South Korean cases have been reported in the country's fourth-largest city, Daegu, and the surrounding area. According to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some 320 cases have also been confirmed to have links to a branch of the local Shincheonji church in Daegu, which has become the biggest cluster of viral infections in South Korea.Shincheonji, which has been viewed as a cult movement by mainstream Christian organizations, tried to defend itself from growing public anger directed at the church.In a video statement posted on its website, church spokesman Simon Kim said Shincheonji has shut down all its 1,100 local churches and other facilities since one of its church members tested positive for the virus on Feb. 18, the first patient in Daegu.Earlier Sunday, Daegu Mayor Kwon Yong-jin said there were concerns that the number of those infected in the city could see yet another massive increase because authorities were launching intensive examinations of church members with virus-related symptoms.Meanwhile. a cruise ship passenger who had been hospitalized after testing positive for the new virus died on Sunday, the third fatality from the Diamond Princess, Japan's health ministry said.The ministry also announced 57 more cases of infections from the ship, including 55 crew members still on board and two passengers who had infected roommates and are in a prolonged quarantine at a government facility.With the new cases, 691 people have been infected on the ship, or nearly one-fifth of its 3,711 passengers and crew. Japan has confirmed a total of 838 cases and four deaths from the virus, including those on the ship.Meanwhile, a diplomatic row erupted after Israel turned back a South Korean airliner, underscoring fear and tensions over the fast-spreading outbreak.A Korean Air flight with 188 passengers that landed at Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion airport Saturday evening was taxied away from the terminal while authorities allowed only 11 Israelis to enter the country. The plane returned to South Korea with the rest of the passengers on Sunday, according to airline officials.Seoul’s Foreign Ministry said Sunday that it was closely monitoring the incident and providing active consular assistance to South Koreans staying in Israel. It said it will evacuate South Korean tourists from Israel if necessary.Yonhap news agency cited South Korea's Foreign Ministry as registering a strong protest with the Israeli government.South Korea earlier informed Israel that a group of tourists who travelled to Israel and the West Bank for a week this month tested positive for the virus upon returning home. Israeli and Palestinian health authorities asked people who were in close contact with the tourists to quarantine themselves.South Korean health authorities said Sunday that 18 of the 39 South Koreans who had made the group pilgrimage later tested positive for the virus. She said the 21 others were being tested. Forty-one Catholic churches in their neighbourhoods halted Sunday Masses and other gatherings.Israel's Foreign Ministry issued travel warnings to South Korea and Japan due to the coronavirus, and the Health Ministry ordered Israelis returning from those countries to remain in home quarantine, as previously ordered for those returning from Hong Kong, China, Macau, Thailand and Singapore.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will be adding more restrictions on entry to Israel from additional countries, including Australia and Italy.Jordan said it was denying entry of non-Jordanians coming from Iran and South Korea, on top of a previous ban on those coming from China. Nationals arriving from those countries will be quarantined.Downtown Daegu was mostly deserted Sunday, with shelves at some supermarkets and stores empty. Many restaurants, bars, real-estate offices and tour agencies shut down as traffic nosedived and people stayed home, ordering food and supplies online.Kim Mi-yeon, who opened her cake shop in Daegu on Sunday despite worries about infection, said she received only one group of customers.“I’m also worried about being infected, but I still opened my shop today to make a living,” she said by phone. “On weekends, I used to hire five part-time employees, but I've recently told all of them not to come. How can I hire them at a time when I have fewer then 10 customers a day?”___Associated Press journalists Yanan Wang and Henry Hou in Beijing, Frances D'Emilio in Rome, Ilan Ben Zion in Jerusalem, Fares Akram in Amman, Jordan, and Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report.Hyung-Jin Kim, The Associated Press

  • News
    Reuters

    IMF extends visit to crisis-hit Lebanon: sources

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) will continue meetings with Lebanese authorities on Monday, sources familiar with the process said, extending a visit to provide technical advice that was expected to end on Sunday. The IMF began meetings with Lebanese authorities on Feb. 20 to provide broad technical advice on how to tackle the country's crippling financial and economic crisis. Lebanon has not requested financial assistance from the IMF as it draws up a rescue plan to tackle a long-brewing financial crisis that spiraled last year as capital inflows slowed and protests erupted against the ruling elite.

  • News
    CBC

    Wind warnings put BC Ferries, Harbour Air trips at risk

    Wind warnings for Greater Victoria and West Vancouver Island have put some BC Ferries sailings and Harbour Air flights at risk Sunday afternoon. Environment Canada says a Pacific storm moving across northern Vancouver Island Sunday morning will likely bring strong winds of up to 90 km/h by the afternoon, which could damage to buildings. BC Ferries has issued a travel advisory in relation to the wing warning. And Harbour Air says its flights to Victoria are experiencing delays. Environment Canada says the winds are expected to subside by Monday morning. Snowfall warnings for Fraser Valley, InteriorElsewhere in the province, Environment Canada has issued a snowfall warning for the Fraser Valley and Fraser Canyon, including the Hope to Merritt section of the Coquihalla.Heavy flurries are expected to continue Sunday night, bringing snowfall accumulations of up to 25 cm. There are also snowfall warnings for: * Kootenay Lake * West Kootenay * Nicola * Boundary

  • More French-speaking pediatricians, speech therapists needed on P.E.I., parents say
    News
    CBC

    More French-speaking pediatricians, speech therapists needed on P.E.I., parents say

    Some parents on P.E.I. say there is a need for French-speaking pediatricians and speech therapists on the Island.More than 100 parents gathered at a forum organized by the P.E.I. French Health Network Saturday in Summerside.The network presented its findings from regional consultations and research undertaken during the last months about health-care needs for French-speaking children up to age six.The lack of French-speaking pediatricians and speech therapists was raised as a concern, said Elise Arsenault, the network's executive director."If a child has problems with language development, and if you see a speech pathologist to help you with that, and if you have to do it in another language, it's not as effective as it would if you were actually doing therapy in your own language."Arsenault said French-speaking speech pathologists are available in Prince County, but they are not as prevalent in the rest of the province. She said she is unaware of any pediatricians who identify as francophone.Karine Gallant, who moved to P.E.I. from the bilingual province of New Brunswick, said it's important to have access to French speaking health-care professionals for her son."I would say there was clearly more comfort when he could communicate openly with his professional," she said in an interview with Radio-Canada.It can be even more important when dealing with mental health issues, said Maurice Chiasson of the P.E.I. French Health Network."When we talk about the field of mental health, often mental health we think of young people, adolescents. But it must still be tackled very very young," he told Radio-Canada, translated in English."Imagine if the professional does not speak the language of the child and the parent. It can be harmful. "The research and consultations were part of an initiative funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada for French health networks across the country in minority settings. That includes P.E.I., where children six and younger whose mother tongue is French make up only 2.5 per cent of Island families.Arsenault said they will present their findings to the province to consider under the French Language Services Act, which is based on the community needs and government capacity to deliver those services. The P.E.I. French Health Network looked at access to service in other government departments as well, such as education and housing, to help identify priorities. They will present a report to a national committee that will include project proposals to reduce stress on young children and their parents.Those projects could include activities to promote healthy eating, physical exercise and protecting the environment, Arsenault said.More P.E.I. news

  • Invader's 'Rubik Mona Lisa' beats estimate at Paris auction
    News
    Reuters

    Invader's 'Rubik Mona Lisa' beats estimate at Paris auction

    A French street artist's interpretation of the Mona Lisa made of 330 Rubik's Cubes sold for 480,200 euros ($520,680) on Sunday at a modern art auction in Paris, well above presale estimates of up to 150,000 euros, organizers Artcurial said. The 2005 artwork by anonymous street artist Invader uses the plastic puzzles' squares to create a mosaic of the Mona Lisa and her famous smile in garish colors. Invader is known for his mosaic tile works featuring pixilated versions of the 1978 Space Invaders video game characters, which "invade" cities around the world.

  • Northern youth gather in Yellowknife to create policy change
    News
    CBC

    Northern youth gather in Yellowknife to create policy change

    14 young people from across the North are in Yellowknife this weekend, hoping to shape policy in their territories and across Canada.Throughout the 18 month Jane Glassco Northern fellowship program, they will get training in policy skills as they tackle public policy on an issue important to them.This is the fifth group of fellows since 2010, and this year they represent places across the North, including Northwest Territories, Yukon, Nunavut, Nunavik, and Nunatsiavut.'Working for the people'Jessie Fraser is from Sanikluaq, Nunavut and became interested in getting more involved with policy after starting to work with the territory's land claim organization. She said she wants to remind policy makers to work for the people they serve."Even though it's a lot of theory and lots of paperwork and thinking about bigger things and not always being able to see how it trickles down and how it affects people in communities — you're still working for the people."Fraser, who speaks Inuktitut, is passionate about lifting the voices of Inuit people, and ensuring they are represented at all levels.'Necessary and urgent reforms'Curtis Mesher is also interested in shaping policies that protect Inuit people.Though he grew up in Montreal, his family is originally from Kuujjuaq in Nunavik. Northern policy issues were always a prominent issue for him growing up, he said, with both of his parents working for Makivik Corporaiton, the land claim organization representing Quebec's Inuit.So it was no surprise that he became interested in how public policy affects northerners. As a law student, he's focusing his research on the justice system."I think that there [are] a lot of necessary and urgent reforms that must be done for our criminal justice system our corrections system in the North," he said.More specifically, Mesher said he wants to look at the justice system in Nunavik, and hopes to examine how potential reforms could come from traditional approaches to rehabilitation.Protecting future generationsAnother big issue on the table this year is creating policy that protects future generations of northerners.As a new mother, protecting today's children is a prominent concern for Alyssa Carpenter, originally from Sachs Harbour, N.W.T.She said she wants to look into suicide prevention, But for her, the issue isn't just about policy — it's also personal. Carpenter has worked in social work on the front lines of suicide response, and has struggled with depression."This is an issue that we know impacts everybody in the North," she said. "It's something that needs to be talked about. It's something that needs to be addressed, and we need to remind the people who are in those policy decisions."Whitney Johnson-Ward is also hoping to shape policy that protects today's youth, through climate action and wellness programs."The land is really important to me and [it is] my home," she said. "Keeping it in a good condition for the next generation is really important."Johnson-Ward is from Champagne, Yukon and was inspired by the messages she heard from other young people when she took part in the territory's First Nations climate action gathering in Whitehorse earlier this month.Johnson-Ward said intergenerational knowledge sharing and collaboration is important to taking action against climate change and creating the next generation of ambassadors.The fellows will have 18 months to work on their policy projects. During that time, they will have three other regional gatherings — opportunities to work together on making lasting policy changes.