B.C. coast the 'bullseye' for long duration rain, 100+ mm coming

·2 min read
B.C. coast the 'bullseye' for long duration rain, 100+ mm coming
B.C. coast the 'bullseye' for long duration rain, 100+ mm coming

Vancouver is still on its quest for a 15°C day in October, while Toronto hasn't recorded a day cooler than 15°C this month.

Even though the temperature pattern has been pretty peculiar across Canada, the precipitation story is a classic tale for B.C. in the middle of October.

Thursday will feature showers, yes, but consider this the appetizer. Friday and into Saturday, two slugs of significant moisture slam into coastal regions. By Saturday evening, over 100 mm of rainfall is likely to accumulate for some of those nestled below the North Shore mountains. Even heavier amounts are possible for the higher terrain.

BCRain (5)
BCRain (5)

Special weather statements have already been issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), warning of the wet and windy weekend ahead.

"This event could bring beneficial rain to the region, especially after such an exceptionally dry summer, but may also cause hazards like mudslides, road washouts, and rising river and stream levels, as copious amounts of moisture gets transported towards the coast," warns Matt Grinter, a meteorologist at The Weather Network.

These are all hazards that could impact sections of the Lower Mainland and parts of Vancouver Island.

The freezing level has that classic roller-coaster vibe going on; it's easy to spot the warmer frontal system this weekend and that'll dash snowfall chances at the three local Vancouver ski hills: Cypress, Grouse and Seymour.

freeze
freeze

At higher terrain, near the peak of Whistler, it’ll be mostly a snow event, with upwards of 50 cm forecast across the higher mountainous terrain.

snowaccum
snowaccum

"As freezing levels rise over 2000 metres on Saturday, snow melt will also add to run off. Swelling of local streams and localized flooding are possible during this time," ECCC warns in the statement.

As for winds, they’ll gust their way below severe criteria, but a few gusts might clock close to 70 km/h through the Strait of Georgia. Between 40-60 km/h will be the typical wind speed along the water with these particular frontal systems. Enough for a rocky ferry ride, but unlikely to cancel sailings.

Conditions are expected to improve for early to mid week next week, but an active and unsettled pattern returns for the second half of the week and continues through the final week of October with below seasonal temperatures expected.

Be sure to check back for the latest updates on this soggy set-up in B.C.

With files from meteorologist Tyler Hamilton.

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