U.K. man says someone else's mistake may force him to leave the life he's built in Newfoundland

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U.K. man says someone else's mistake may force him to leave the life he's built in Newfoundland

U.K. man says someone else's mistake may force him to leave the life he's built in Newfoundland

A U.K. man who's built a life in Newfoundland and Labrador is worried he'll have to leave it all behind because of someone else's mistake.

Geoff Young has worked in many parts of the world.

"I've worked in Saudi Arabia, Norway, the U.S. and Korea... South Korea," he said

Young is an engineering consultant in the oil industry.

For most of the last 18 years he's worked in Newfoundland on projects like the Hebron platform, but with the downturn in oil prices jobs are disappearing and Young lost his work permit last fall.

So he applied to become a permanent resident.

"As a permanent resident I can apply for most jobs that come on the market. So that's why i did it," he said.

PF Collins, a company that does immigration consulting, was hired to make Young's application, but he says the company made a mistake.

He said when it submitted his application to the federal immigration department, a crucial piece of information was left out.

"One of the requirements were background, police checks," he said.

"We paid for them and got them back, and they were clear, but unfortunately PF Collins omitted to submit the police check reports and my application was turned down."

Young asked the department if it would accept the information late, but was told he would have to start his application again.

That could take three months.

"I've got no money to wait three months for that to happen. Our savings are taking a pounding and I'm still paying a mortgage and that's why you can see a for sale sign out front," he said.

PF Collins not talking

PF Collins told CBC News that it won't comment on this case. And so far, federal officials haven't spoken either.

Young said PF Collins tried to help but couldn't offer a satisfactory solution.

"We had a meeting and they were sorry, but sorry unfortunately doesn't get me out of this bind. They said that I could apply for a visitor's permit, but that would only allow me to stay in Canada but I can't work."

Young hasn't worked since October and says he won't be able to stay in Newfoundland and Labrador indefinitely.

"Unfortunately, I'll have to leave Canada. We've got about another month left."