Ukraine: The Latest -Russia blows up own HQ

A Ukrainian drone pilot reaches for a reconnaissance drone in the Luhansk Region, Ukraine,
A Ukrainian drone pilot reaches for a reconnaissance drone in the Luhansk Region, Ukraine, - Bram Janssen/AP

Today on the Telegraph’s Ukraine: The Latest podcast, we hear from Roland Oliphant who has just returned from Ukraine and how military support for Kyiv is unlikely to be affected by a potential US government shutdown.

Dominic Nicholls, The Telegraph’s Associate Editor for Defence, reports on the fascinating story of Russia demolishing their own headquarters:

Russian authorities are currently in the process of demolishing their Black Sea Fleet headquarters in Crimea. This was after the suspected storm shadow (also known as SCALP) cruise missile attack few days ago. Controlled explosions were expected to be carried out on the site.

That came from the Kremlin installed governor of Sevastopol, Mikhail Razvozhayev, who we quoted the other day. Nothing says your “lightning 3-day assault on Kyiv” is going to plan quite like blowing up your own Black Sea Fleet Headquarters a year and a half later.

He also offers fascinating analysis on FPV drones:

First person view drone is the guy sand girls we see wearing goggles and driving the drone some kilometers away. 

There’s an incredible piece on social media today of a drone that was hunting Russian headquarters or field headquarters, found a place, scooted around, went inside the tents, went down into the trenches and then detonated.

We’ve said before, are drones changing or are they just a new, is it just a new technological expression of an old military ideal? But some of these things, we used to do what’s called “triple AD” in the military, all arms air defense, which was somebody had to beon stag the whole time looking up, looking for helicopters and planes and what have you.

Now, nowhere is safe. This headquarters was underground,  under camouflaged tents, nobody saw a drone hovering around and hunting about and also chucked a stick at it, as we’ve seen before, to swat it out of the sky or shot it or what have you.

Listen to Ukraine: the Latest, The Telegraph’s daily podcast, using the audio player at the top of this article or on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favourite podcast app.


War in Ukraine is reshaping our world. Every weekday The Telegraph’s top journalists analyse the invasion from all angles - military, humanitarian, political, economic, historical - and tell you what you need to know to stay updated.

With over 40 million downloads, our Ukraine: The Latest podcast is your go-to source for all the latest analysis, live reaction and correspondents reporting on the ground. We have been broadcasting ever since the full-scale invasion began.

Ukraine: The Latest’s regular contributors are:

David Knowles

David is Head of Audio Development at The Telegraph, where he has worked for nearly three years. He has reported from across Ukraine during the full-scale invasion.

Dominic Nicholls

Dom is Associate Editor (Defence) at The Telegraph, having joined in 2018. He previously served for 23 years in the British Army, in tank and helicopter units. He had operational deployments in Iraq, Afghanistan and Northern Ireland.

Francis Dearnley

Francis is assistant comment editor at The Telegraph. Prior to working as a journalist, he was chief of staff to the Chair of the Prime Minister’s Policy Board at the Houses of Parliament in London. He studied History at Cambridge University and on the podcast explores how the past shines a light on the latest diplomatic, political, and strategic developments.

They are also regularly joined by The Telegraph’s foreign correspondents around the world, including Joe Barnes (Brussels), Sophia Yan (China), Nataliya Vasilyeva (Russia), Roland Oliphant (Senior Reporter) and Colin Freeman (Reporter). In London, Venetia Rainey (Weekend Foreign Editor), Katie O’Neill (Assistant Foreign Editor), and Verity Bowman (News Reporter) also frequently appear to offer updates.

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