Rail passenger injured after wave smashes through window of moving train

Joe Gamp
Contributor, Yahoo News UK
A train passes through Dawlish, Devon, on the coastal railway line as large waves hit the sea wall. (Reuters)

A rail passenger was left with minor injuries after a huge sea wave crashed through the windows of a moving train.

The 1057 Exmouth to Paignton service was travelling through Dawlish station in Devon on Thursday, when a wave crashed on to the side of the train and broke through its windows.

South Western Ambulance Service was called to Dawlish Railway Station at 12pm after it received reports reports of a train passenger being injured.

Large waves crash as a train passes through Dawlish. (Reuters)

The service confirmed they treated one passenger for minor injuries, and that they did not require hospital treatment.

Great Western Railway said “sea debris” had caused damage to the train.

A spokesperson said: “The 1057 from Exmouth to Paignton has been damaged by sea debris. The train has moved now moved forward and the damaged carriage taken out of service.

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“The 1052 Paignton to Paddington service has a train fault between Teignmouth and Dawlish. The fault which has developed on this train has yet to be investigated.”

The British Transport Police said: "We were called today at 12pm to reports of a train window being smashed by a wave at Dawlish. One person with very minor injuries was checked out at the scene as a precaution. We understand the damage caused was a couple of smashed windows. It happened on Station Road close to the station. The line has since been reopened."

Trains that are now leaving Plymouth for Exeter St Davids and beyond are running on time.

Last February it was announced that a wall would be built to protect the seafront railway line, which washed into the sea in 2014.

Up to £80m of government funding will be made available for the project.

The structure will be 2.5 metres higher than the existing five-metre tall wall, to increase protection to the railway from waves during adverse weather.

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    CBC

    St. John's area high schools to reopen Monday

    The Newfoundland and Labrador English School District says it will be phasing in the reopening of schools in the St. John's metro area, with high schools being the first to open on Monday."We're opening just the high schools. The other schools we'll look at [Monday] and make a determination," says Tony Stack, the district's director of education.A further announcement will be made Monday afternoon with respect to all remaining schools in the region.While Stack said the lost days of instruction are "unfortunate," he said he feels a phased approach — opening schools gradually over a period of days — was the best way to get students back to class and limit traffic on city streets. We felt that this was the best, safest approach. \- Tony Stack"I do understand and empathize with parents now that have to struggle with respect to what they do tomorrow when they return to work," he said."But we've got to do things carefully and measured and we felt that this was the best, safest approach."Stack said of the 28,000 students in the St. John's area, high school students make up roughly one quarter, about 7,200 in all.He said because some streets are not yet fully accessible, "significant adjustments" have been made to the majority of bus routes. For example, some students on cul-de-sacs or side streets may have to catch the school bus on larger streets."The primary and secondary routes are OK, but there could be a neighborhood street where there's a crescent or something like that and there may be a bigger road that is accessible, so they'd have to leave their crescent and come out to that main road," said Stack.In a statement Sunday, the NLESD said the adjustments will remain in place until Friday because of ongoing snow clearing, with an update to come at the end of the week.Information on the status of schools and bus routes is available on the district's website.Stack said while the storm was "unprecedented," the district has dealt with multiple day closures before and stopped short of suggesting that the school year will need to be extended."We know that there's ways to adapt how we deliver the curriculum," he said."I'm very confident that we'll be able to manage this situation."The Conseil scolaire francophone said in a statement Sunday that École Rocher-du-Nord will reopen Monday, while École des Grand-Vents will be closed.The CSFP said it is communicating directly with families of students who will be affected by adjustments to bus routes on Monday.Memorial University, Marine Institute and the College of the North Atlantic campuses in St. John's are also expected to reopen Monday.Getting back to normalSt. John's Mayor Danny Breen says city crews are hard at work clearing roads and sidewalks in advance of what will be the first day back to school and work for many in the city."We've done a lot of work on the sidewalks around school zones, we've got a lot of those cleared out and we're continuing to work on those," he said."There's places in the city where you can get off the road to walk, so it's improving."Breen said close to 5,000 dump truck loads of snow have already been removed from the streets, and the city's snow clearing equipment remains on the road around the clock to continue the work.He said dealing with all the snow has been a huge challenge, but it's important to remove as much as possible, because there's lots of winter weather left to come."Right now, we're concentrating on getting the city back to normal operations, and you know, we're only three weeks into winter," said Breen."We're going to have more snow, so we've got to get ready to be prepared for that."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Salma Hayek apologizes for praising controversial new novel
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Salma Hayek apologizes for praising controversial new novel

    NEW YORK — Salma Hayek is apologizing for promoting a controversial new novel, Jeanine Cummins' “American Dirt,” without actually reading it.“American Dirt,” published Tuesday, tells the story of a Mexican woman and her 8-year-old son fleeing to the U.S. border after numerous family members are murdered in drug cartel-related violence. The heavily publicized book has been praised by Stephen King and Ann Patchett among others and was chosen by Oprah Winfrey for her book club. On Saturday, it ranked No. 4 on Amazon.com's bestseller list.But numerous Mexican-American writers have called “American Dirt” an ill-informed narrative about Mexico that reinforces stereotypes. Cummins, a non-Mexican, even acknowledged in an author's note that she had reservations about writing the novel. She has said she wanted to personalize the issue of immigration and be a “bridge” between different worlds.Earlier this week, Hayek had posted a picture of herself on Instagram holding the book, and she praised Winfrey for "giving a voice to the voiceless & for loving harder in response to hate.” But after facing criticism online, the Mexican-American actress pulled back Friday, writing that she was unaware of any controversy.“I thank all of you who caught me in the act of not doing my research, and for setting me straight, because that means you know me and gave me the benefit of the doubt,” she wrote, "I apologize for shouting out something without experiencing it or doing research on it.”The Associated Press

  • Canada's first coronavirus patient had symptoms on flight from China
    News
    Reuters

    Canada's first coronavirus patient had symptoms on flight from China

    The province of Ontario health officials on Saturday said a man in his 50s developed a respiratory illness after arriving in Toronto on Jan. 22 from Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak of the viral disease, and was being treated in a public hospital and in isolation. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief health officer, told reporters in Ottawa that the patient had mild symptoms while on the flight, though he did not report his condition after landing at the Toronto airport.

  • Residents unable to heat homes amid northern B.C. wood pellet shortage
    News
    CBC

    Residents unable to heat homes amid northern B.C. wood pellet shortage

    Darrin Super's heart sinks every time he has to turn someone away who is looking for wood pellets. A wood pellet shortage in northwestern B.C. means suppliers have no pellets to deliver to retailers, which means people who rely on those wood pellets for fuel in their wood stoves are out of luck. Super, the store manager at the Bulkley Valley Home Centre in Houston, B.C., received an email on Jan. 9, days before the province-wide cold snap, saying that the supplier had completely run out of wood pellets and would not be able to deliver any. "Usually I have 50 to 60 tonnes sitting in my yard at any given time," he told Daybreak North host Carolina de Ryk. "Our community relies on this for their sources of heat.""I would say the majority of people here have wood stoves."The store has been without wood pellets for two weeks. Now, he's turning to suppliers in Alberta, even though his town is surrounded by trees. "There is nobody locally," he said. "The forestry industry is our No. 1 industry here locally and we have to go to our neighbouring province for wood pellets. It just doesn't seem right."Super believes mill shutdowns and curtailments around the province are major contributors to the shortage. For that reason, he said he wants government officials to step in and find a way to keep the forestry industry, which is Houston's largest industry, afloat.   "I'd like to see the mills run at full capacity again, have that fibre being sent to the pellet plants, have our pellets made and I'd still have a full inventory of pellets," Super said.Listen to the full interview here:

  • Fatal pizza shop shooting that killed 1, injured 2 was gang-related, police say
    News
    CBC

    Fatal pizza shop shooting that killed 1, injured 2 was gang-related, police say

    A triple shooting that left a man dead and two other people injured at a pizza shop in Scarborough on Saturday night was gang-related, Toronto police say.Det. Rob Choe, spokesperson for Toronto police's homicide squad, told reporters on Sunday that police are seeking two suspects in the shooting, which happened on Kingston Road, west of Markham Road, at about 9 p.m.Both suspects are wanted for first degree murder.The man killed in the shooting has been identified as s Stephon Kelly, 28, of Toronto. Kelly is Toronto's sixth homicide victim of the year. Police have not released his photo.Choe said at a news conference at Toronto police's 43 Division that police suspect that Kelly was targeted. Two men approached the pizza shop and bar and shot into the establishment through the front glass door and front windows, Choe said. Police believe the pair then fled. They may have left in a silver vehicle.Several people called 911 about the shooting.A man in his 50s was grazed by a bullet to the head, while a woman in her 40s suffered an injured finger, Choe said. Both people, who were believed to be bystanders, were taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries and both have been released.Despite efforts by paramedics to save his life, Kelly was pronounced dead at the scene.Police dogs searched for clues after shootingOn Saturday night, police taped off the area and there was a heavy police presence. Officers canvassed the area for witnesses and security camera video from the plaza in which the pizza shop is located.Police canine teams also searched the surrounding area for evidence.A stretch of Kingston Road was closed for hours as officers investigated. A Toronto police's forensic identification services vehicle came to the scene.Homicide detectives are continuing to investigate.Anyone with information is urged to call police at (416) 808-4300 or (416) 808-7400, or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477).

  • 'Trapped in a dump': Shawnigan Lake resident frustrated over high property value
    News
    CBC

    'Trapped in a dump': Shawnigan Lake resident frustrated over high property value

    A resident in Shawnigan Lake, B.C., says he is shocked that his assessed property value remains high despite the provincial government's decision not to remove around 100,000 tonnes of contaminated soil from a controversial landfill next to his property. "It hasn't decreased enough because we have a toxic waste dump in our backyard. We're all paying too much tax," says resident Kevin Glass.Glass said he and his neighbours are appealing their assessments, hoping to have them lowered, so they can sell more easily, and so newcomers will be able to afford to build new homes and move in to what "was supposed to be a high-end neighbourhood."Landfill timelineThe landfill, located in an old quarry in the hills above the community of Shawnigan Lake, received a permit in 2013 to accept and store up to 100,000 tonnes of contaminated soil each year. Contaminated soil is typically caused by industrial activity but does not include hazardous waste.In 2017, the province pulled the permit after it said the company, Cobble Hill Holdings, failed to provide documents proving financial security.The decision to revoke the permit followed years of protests and several court battles over the facility.In July 2019, the province decided on a landfill closure plan that does not involve removing the soil, but involves regular monitoring by the province. Glass said his property value only decreased by four per cent last year, after it was announced the soil would stay. It had jumped 20 per cent the year before, after the site's permit was pulled.After years of controversy surrounding the site and widespread concerns over possible contaminants in the drinking water, Glass is left questioning what the "real market value" might be "when we're trapped in such a dump."He added that there are a number of half-constructed houses in the neighbourhood because it's too expensive to complete them.Assessments 'based on market transactions'Gerry Marolla, deputy assessor for B.C. Assessment's Vancouver Island branch, said residents from the neighbourhood have been appealing their property values since 2015, when the issue took off. Currently, five property owners have appealed their 2019 assessment. "At the end of the day, we have to look at what the market transactions are selling for in the area," Marolla said about how property values are assessed.District continues to pressure governmentAaron Stone, chairman of the Cowichan Valley Regional District, says he "absolutely sympathizes" with the residents, and continues to pressure the Ministry of Environment to remove the contaminated soil from the site."Protecting drinking water is paramount," said Stone, adding the district did propose a soils deposit bylaw in 2017, but "reclamation of mining sites or contaminated sites … are not within the jurisdiction of the regional district." The bylaw was amended in 2019 to require fees for soil deposits.Bernhard Juurlink from the Shawnigan Basin Society said the Vancouver Island Health Authority conducted a test of the well water right next to the site, where it found lead levels to be five times higher than the allowable limit.A statement from the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy says "though the Cobble Hill Holdings landfill site is no longer operating, the company is responsible for maintaining and dealing with the site under the Spill Prevention Order."It says any new soil added to the site "advances work of the closure plan" and will "stabilize the landfill" and "reduce any chance of erosion."

  • News
    CBC

    Changes afoot for West Prince Graphic, publisher says

    Starting next week, the West Prince Graphic will no longer be delivered to Island homes.This comes as a result of the decision to close the Transcontinental printing plant in Borden-Carleton. The plant is expected to close its doors this week.Officials said the newspaper will now be delivered to retail outlets.Prior to the change, the paper was delivered to more than 6,000 homes from Tyne Valley to Tignish. "It will have an impact," said publisher Paul MacNeill."But ultimately time will tell and readers will tell us if we got it right or wrong," he added.Distribution reassessedMacNeill said the paper's distribution model had to be reassessed.with printing no longer available on P.E.I.The paper will now be printed by Advocate Printing in Pictou, N.S."It obviously has an impact in terms of deadlines, when we need to get files to the printer, because driving papers back from Pictou is considerably more time-consuming than getting them from Borden. But it's not bad. It could be worse to be honest with you."MacNeill said reporters will continue to cover meetings, events and community gatherings, but some items may have to be updated on its website due to time constraints."It's the end of an era on P.E.I. in terms of having the type of printing capacity necessary to print newspapers. We've always had a press."A full list of where the paper will be available will be released shortly, he said.More P.E.I. news