Damaging wind threat as 'weather bomb' slams Atlantic Canada

Digital Writers
·3 min read
Damaging wind threat as 'weather bomb' slams Atlantic Canada
Damaging wind threat as 'weather bomb' slams Atlantic Canada
Damaging wind threat as 'weather bomb' slams Atlantic Canada
Damaging wind threat as 'weather bomb' slams Atlantic Canada

The start of November will be a memorable one for parts of Atlantic Canada with a deepening low pressure system impacting the region into Tuesday. The system, which can be referred to as a 'weather bomb' as it drops at least 24 millibars in just 24 hours, has prompted widespread warnings across parts of the Maritimes and Newfoundland. Such a rapid drop in pressure can cause damaging winds, with gusts potentially reaching up to 120 km/h in some places through early Tuesday. More on the timing and impact, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

  • 'Weather bomb' to bring 100-120 km/h winds to N.L., 80 km/h to coastal Maritimes

  • Rainfall amounts of 50+ mm of rain expected for southwestern Nova Scotia, 30-50+ mm for southern Newfoundland

  • Calmer pattern for the Maritimes to round out the week, warmup on the way

MONDAY: RAIN TRANSITIONS TO LIGHT SNOW FOR SOME

Rain has already started change to snow across northern and central sections of New Brunswick, with a transition to light snow also expected over the higher terrain of Nova Scotia Monday evening.

In total, a widespread 30-50+ mm of rain is expected across much of Atlantic Canada before fully tapering through Tuesday morning.

atlrain (1)
atlrain (1)

MUST SEE: November begins with noticeable pattern reversal across Canada

The heavy rain in Newfoundland will ease off in the overnight hours, but another system is on the heels for Tuesday evening.

DAMAGING WIND THREAT

Strong winds associated with this system will also be widespread through Monday evening, before winding down in the overnight hours.

Gusts could exceed 100 km/h, possibly reaching as high as 120 km/h along the Atlantic coast, east of Halifax and Cape Breton.

The winds have increased through the day in southwestern Newfoundland and the southern shores, and may gust up to 130 km/h in the Wreckhouse area. For the Avalon, winds will peak during the evening hours, with gusts up to 110 km/h before easing by Tuesday morning.

WATCH: TIMING THE WIND GUSTS AT THEIR STRONGEST

With such powerful winds, there is the potential for downed trees and power outages.

“The Cape Breton Highlands and most of Newfoundland are at risk of seeing power outages on Monday afternoon,” warns The Weather Network meteorologist Tyler Hamilton.

Environment Canada also warned residents with any outdoor Halloween decorations to bring them inside before the storm's arrival on Monday.

"Damage to buildings, such as to roof shingles and windows, may occur," states Environment Canada in the warnings.

outagerisk
outagerisk

LOOK AHEAD: CALMER WEATHER FOR THE MARITIMES, HEAVY SNOW FOR NEWFOUNDLAND

For the Maritimes, quieter weather is expected for the rest of the week, with a warming trend helping temperatures climb well above seasonal by the end of the week.

ATLTempFri
ATLTempFri

Hot on the heels of this system, heavy snow will accompany another one as soon as Tuesday, which targets southeastern Newfoundland late Tuesday night and into Wednesday. A heavy swath of 15-25 cm of snow is expected, including for the Gander area, while the precipitation stays as mostly rain for the Avalon.

Stay tuned to The Weather Network for the latest updates on the active weather in your area.