'They were good tears': N.B. woman relieved after abandoned baby moose gets happy ending

·2 min read
The baby moose was originally separated from its mother last Thursday. (Submitted by Margaret Williston - image credit)
The baby moose was originally separated from its mother last Thursday. (Submitted by Margaret Williston - image credit)

A baby moose in New Brunswick who was left distraught and hungry after it was separated from its mother for four days, has been united with an adult moose.

Margaret Williston, a woman living near Miramichi, N.B., has been looking after the newborn moose since Thursday, when its mother was spooked by a car near a creek at the end of Hortons Creek Road.

Williston tried to find a solution for the baby moose, who was crying and pacing around her property, but she was told by the Department of Natural Resources she wasn't allowed to take care of the moose and the only option — other than letting it be — was to put it down.

The calf followed Williston "like a puppy" and was in need of attention and food.

On Sunday evening, Williston and her husband led the baby moose to the creek where her mother was spooked. After four hours, an adult moose and another calf appeared.

Williston said the baby began calling and the adult moose called her back.

The calf kept returning to Margaret Williston's property looking for its mother.
The calf kept returning to Margaret Williston's property looking for its mother.(Submitted by Margaret Williston)

"Finally the baby left and went toward her and she kind of sniffed it all over and eventually let it suckle," she said.

"We were left teary-eyed, but they were good tears."

Williston said she doesn't know if the adult moose was the mother.

"Whether that was her mother and she had twins or not, it seems to have taken it in, and it's amazing how animals will take in an orphan and never once think of putting it down," she said.

Williston said the incident was eye-opening about how moose and deer are treated when they need help.

She learned that a provincial regulation prevents rehab facilities from taking in moose or deer and any inquiries about those animals are directed to the province.

CBC News contacted the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development on Saturday, but no one responded.