Where the parties stand on issues that matter most to Quebecers

Over the next few weeks, the federal parties will be angling for your vote in the Oct. 21 election.

Who deserves your vote? 

Here's an overview of where they stand on some of the issues that have mattered most to Quebecers over the last four years — identity, environment, immigration and the economy.

We'll be updating this guide throughout the campaign. 

Ivanoh Demers/Radio-Canada

Liberals:

Conservatives:

NDP:

Bloc Québécois:

  • Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet supports Bill 21 and has vowed to protect the province from attempts by the federal government to interfere with the legislation.

Greens:

People's Party:

  • PPC Leader Maxime Bernier has criticized the other federal leaders for speaking out against the Quebec secularism law, saying they should mind their own business. He promised in March to bar people from wearing face coverings, such as a niqab, while swearing federal oaths.

Liberals:

  • The Liberals have been critical of the Quebec government's plan to reduce immigration levels by more than 20 per cent this year, noting the province is facing a labour shortage.

Conservatives:

  • Scheer says a Conservative government will end the "illegal border crossings" at Roxham Road, which is where most asylum seekers have crossed into Canada since 2017. That plan includes declaring the whole border a point of entry, which would prevent those making an irregular crossing from claiming asylum.

NDP:

Bloc Québécois

  • Blanchet says he won't oppose Quebec's desire to reduce immigration levels.
  • The Bloc campaign platform calls for the Safe Third Country Agreement to be suspended and for the whole U.S.-Canada border to be considered a point of entry.  

Greens:

  • The party is opposed to closing the loophole in the Safe Third Party Agreement that allows asylum seekers to make a claim at irregular crossings, such as Roxham Road. Like the NDP, it does not consider the U.S. to be a safe country for asylum seekers.

People's Party:

  • Bernier has proposed building a fence to prevent asylum seekers from crossing at Roxham Road.

Liberals:

  • Trudeau has said there is no support in Quebec for the construction of a Canada-wide oil pipeline, such as the defunct Energy East project.

Conservatives:

  • Scheer wants to see the construction of a pipeline that would carry Western oil through Quebec and into New Brunswick. He hopes to convince Quebecers to support the project.

NDP:

  • The party is opposed to the efforts to revive the Canada-wide pipeline project. Singh has also pledged to provide money to help with the electrification of transit.

Bloc Québécois:

Greens:

  • The party opposed the Energy East project and remains opposed to attempts to revive the plan.

People's Party:

  • Bernier has said he would overrule provincial opposition to the Energy East project, if a private company backs its construction.

Liberals:

  • Trudeau has said that he opposes a single-income tax return managed by the province, telling reporters that handing over federal responsibility is not a decision the government can take lightly.

Conservatives:

  • Scheer wants to create a single-income tax return administered by the province. When he proposed the idea, the National Assembly backed it unanimously. He would also create a cabinet minister position that would specifically deal with Quebec economic development.

NDP:

  • Singh has promised to hold a meeting within the first six months of his term with all of the premiers, discussing an expansion of the Quebec and Canada pension plans.
  • An NDP government would consult Quebec before signing international trade deals and would also consult the province before reaching tax agreements with web giants such as Netflix.

Bloc Québécois:

  • The Bloc opposes the creation of a Canada-wide securities regulator.
  • The party wants to exempt farm owners from the capital-gains tax to make it easier for property to be transferred within families.
  • A Bloc delegation would push the federal government to tax web companies that conduct more than three per cent of their business in Canada, such as Facebook and Amazon.

Greens:

  • Nothing specific announced yet.

People's Party:

Is there an issue that you want to see included on this list? Send us an email: webquebec@cbc.ca or reach us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.