Wildfire smoke hits the Sahtu, Tłı̨chǫ, Dehcho regions again as hot, dry conditions linger

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A wildfire burns near Behchoko, N.W.T., on June 30, 2020. Many communities will notice smoke from wildfires Friday.  (NWT Fire/Facebook - image credit)
A wildfire burns near Behchoko, N.W.T., on June 30, 2020. Many communities will notice smoke from wildfires Friday. (NWT Fire/Facebook - image credit)

Several N.W.T. communities will experience smoke from wildfires Friday, as hot, dry weather persists in much of the territory and the fire danger remains high or extreme in the North and South Slave, the Sahtu and the Dehcho regions.

The smoke forecast from FireSmoke Canada, a project of the University of British Columbia, shows smoke from nearby wildfires affecting virtually all of the communities in those regions on Friday and Saturday.

The latest wildfire update from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) shows 111 fires burning across the territory, including 15 that started in the last 24 hours.

None of the active fires are currently threatening any communities or structures.

Fire danger, according to ENR, remains extreme in Wrigley, Fort Simpson, Enterprise, Fort Providence, Fort Smith and Hay River.

Firefighters are still actively working on a fire about 60 kilometres northwest of Fort Simpson, which may bring smoke into the community.

A fire that has been burning south of Wrigley continues to burn, though ENR said in its latest bulletin that fire crews are monitoring the fire. Smoke from that fire is expected to reach Highway 1.

In the North Slave, a fire is burning on the southeastern edge of Blatchford Lake, with crews beginning an "initial attack" on the fire.

People in Yellowknife may notice smoke from a fire burning near Stagg River, about 23 kilometres south of Behchokǫ̀. ENR says it's declared that fire under control.

A fire that flared up from a campfire in Yellowknife's Range Lake neighbourhood on Wednesday was extinguished by the Yellowknife Fire Department as well as a helicopter from ENR.

As a result of that fire, the city reminded residents that open air burning requires a permit or an approved fire pit.