Windsor-built Pacifica enjoys record month as FCA Canada sales fall

Windsor-built Pacifica enjoys record month as FCA Canada sales fall

FCA Canada's sales fell 9 per cent in April compared to a year ago but the Windsor-built Pacifica enjoyed its best sales month since launch.

Sales of the Chrysler brand were a highlight for FCA. They were up 31 per cent in April compared to the year before, fueled by the sale of 757 Pacificas. 

FCA Canada sold a total of 27,373 vehicles in April compared to 30,604 vehicles sold in April of last year. 

In the U.S., FCA reported a sales decrease of seven per cent year over year. There were 177,441 vehicles sold in April compared to 190,071 vehicles last year.

  • Trudeau, Scheer and Singh court voters in Quebec on Fete nationale holiday
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trudeau, Scheer and Singh court voters in Quebec on Fete nationale holiday

    For the second time in two days, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was confronted on Sunday by a protester during a visit to Quebec to coincide with the Fete nationale holiday. "Happy Fete Nationale," Trudeau said in response, as he continued to greet members of the crowd. A day earlier, a man confronted Trudeau at an event in his riding and suggested the prime minister had come to speak English and taunt Quebecers in their home.

  • Kushner rips Abbas, says Mideast peace plan due 'soon'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Kushner rips Abbas, says Mideast peace plan due 'soon'

    President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser said in an interview published Sunday that the administration will soon present its Israeli-Palestinian peace plan, with or without input from Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. In an interview published in the Arabic language Al-Quds newspaper, Jared Kushner appealed directly to Palestinians and criticized Abbas, who has shunned the Trump team over its alleged pro-Israel bias, particularly on the fate of contested Jerusalem. The interview came out after a weeklong trip around the region by Kushner and Mideast envoy Jason Greenblatt.

  • Blood Tribe seeks massive land claim in Federal Court
    News
    CBC

    Blood Tribe seeks massive land claim in Federal Court

    In the Blood Tribe's oral history, there is the story of Blood Clot. According to the legend, the beast's intestines spilled out and became the Belly Buttes of southern Alberta. "Within these lands, the Blood Tribe was created, and it is within these lands that the Blood Tribe developed both a practical and a spiritual existence," states a 2007 report by the Indian Claims Commission on the band's boundaries.

  • News
    CBC

    Two Sask.-born hockey players heading to NHL

    Two Saskatchewan-born hockey players were drafted to the NHL Saturday. Cole Fonstad was drafted in round five, selected 128th overall. The Prince Albert Raiders player from Estevan will be joining the Montreal Canadiens.

  • Nearly half of youth incarcerated are Indigenous: Statistics Canada
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Nearly half of youth incarcerated are Indigenous: Statistics Canada

    Nearly half of all youth who end up in custody across Canada are Indigenous, a statistic that a Manitoba activist says shows unacceptable and systemic racism. Data released by Statistics Canada shows Aboriginal youth made up 46 per cent of admissions to correctional services in 2016-17 while making up only eight per cent of the youth population. "It's not actually surprising to me to hear those numbers," said Michael Redhead Champagne.

  • US moves 100 coffins to N. Korean border for war remains
    News
    The Canadian Press

    US moves 100 coffins to N. Korean border for war remains

    The U.S. military said it moved 100 wooden coffins to the inter-Korean border to prepare for North Korea's returning of the remains of American soldiers who have been missing since the 1950-53 Korean War. U.S. Forces Korea spokesman Col. Chad Carroll also said Saturday that 158 metal transfer cases were sent to a U.S. air base near Seoul, South Korea's capital, and would be used to send the remains home.

  • Hometown hidden gems revealed for all Albertans to enjoy
    News
    CBC

    Hometown hidden gems revealed for all Albertans to enjoy

    It was inspired by Edmonton high school student Riley Holterhus, who had no intention of launching a trend. "I'm leaving [Edmonton] soon and won't be back in the future. Among those commenters was someone from the University of Alberta, who offered to work with Holterhus to create a website featuring his favourite places.

  • Agriculture minister knows Bill 6 anger will be used in re-election fight
    News
    CBC

    Agriculture minister knows Bill 6 anger will be used in re-election fight

    As the burgers sizzle on the nearby barbecue, Brad Javorsky is asked about who he plans to vote for in next year's election. The young farmer wears a T-shirt from the defunct Wildrose Party so it's clear he isn't voting for Carlier. The former Wildrose constituency president is involved in the Alberta Advantage Party, which was formed by Wildrose members dismayed over last summer's merger with the Progressive Conservatives.

  • Syrian children's choir not to attend festival over fears about U.S. travel
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Syrian children's choir not to attend festival over fears about U.S. travel

    A Toronto-based Syrian children's choir will not be travelling to the United States to perform at an international festival due to fears about crossing the border under the Trump administration's travel ban, its founder said Saturday. Fei Tang, general manager of the Nai Kids Choir, said the chorus of about 60 Canadian newcomers between the ages five and 15 were invited to perform at the Serenade! Choral Festival in Washington, D.C., next week. Tang said she was thrilled by the opportunity for the children to sing alongside choirs from all over the world in the U.S. capital, but there was just one issue — getting there.

  • Carr says he expected in April Canada was going to have to buy the pipeline
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Carr says he expected in April Canada was going to have to buy the pipeline

    Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr says he knew almost the moment he heard Kinder Morgan was pressing the pause button on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on April 8 that the federal government was likely going to have to buy the whole thing. Although the final decision to purchase took more than seven weeks of secret negotiations with the company — many of which even Carr was not in on as they were handled by Finance Minister Bill Morneau and a very small team of finance officials — Carr says when he got a phone call in his hotel room during a business trip to New York City he knew what the final outcome was likely to be. Carr says he wasn't really expecting the April announcement that Kinder Morgan was halting all non-essential spending on the project pending proof from the federal government the political risks to the project had been erased.

  • Egg-stra bad timing: Bluesfest main stage work jeopardized by nesting bird
    News
    CBC

    Egg-stra bad timing: Bluesfest main stage work jeopardized by nesting bird

    "We all want to see the bird happy and healthy and have her eggs hatch," said Nate Graves, head of the crew at Bluesfest that's preparing to construct the stage. "I've seen that before. I knew it was protecting a nest. The NCC told CBC News it's been in contact with Bluesfest organizers and the federal Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change about the nesting killdeer.

  • News
    CBC

    Canoe collaboration 'an Ottawa story'

    Andrew Szeto likes to make things. So does his artist pal Drew Mosley.

  • New Zealand PM reveals name of baby
    BBC News

    New Zealand PM reveals name of baby

    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has revealed that her new baby daughter is to be called Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford. She said that she and her partner Clarke Gayford were "sleep deprived, but super well".

  • Search for amputee actor leads to compromise in push for inclusion
    News
    CBC

    Search for amputee actor leads to compromise in push for inclusion

    It was a dilemma that haunted Liane Faulder for months. Paul Franklin, whose story she had chronicled first in the pages of the Edmonton Journal, then in a book called The Long Walk Home. Franklin lost his legs in Afghanistan in 2006 in a suicide attack that also killed Canadian diplomat Glyn Berry.

  • For richer or poorer: Sharing CPP with a spouse at divorce means never getting it back
    News
    CBC

    For richer or poorer: Sharing CPP with a spouse at divorce means never getting it back

    John Aitken was married for 30 years. When the marriage ended he and his ex-wife Sheena agreed to split the Canada Pension Plan credits accumulated during their time together 50-50. CPP is reduced for people who take it early.

  • News
    CBC

    Support for news, culture was on Joly's agenda for 2017 meeting with Google execs

    When Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly walked into a room full of Google executives last year, she came armed with a list of questions that really could have been reduced to just one: What is Google willing to do for Canada? Ahead of meetings with Google and YouTube executives in California in April 2017, Joly's staff prepared short background notes for the minister with suggested questions for her to ask, according to documents obtained under access to information law. In a meeting with Philipp Schindler, Google's chief business officer, Joly was prompted to sound out Google's interest in funding content.

  • Heat warning in effect for northeast Alberta
    News
    CBC

    Heat warning in effect for northeast Alberta

    The northeast corner of Alberta is under a heat warning. The warning is in effect for the Fort McMurray, Fort MacKay, Fort Chipewyan and Wood Buffalo National Park regions. People in the area can expect a prolonged period of heat with maximum daily temperatures near 29 C, according to the Environment Canada website.

  • NZ Prime Minister Ardern names new-born daughter Neve Te Aroha
    News
    Reuters

    NZ Prime Minister Ardern names new-born daughter Neve Te Aroha

    By Charlotte Greenfield WELLINGTON (Reuters) - New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced on Sunday she had named her new-born daughter Neve Te Aroha as she prepared to leave hospital amidst an outpouring of public excitement. Ardern appeared before dozens of reporters and a flurry of camera flashes at Auckland City Hospital in her first appearance since giving birth, thanking the public for their support as her three-day-old daughter slept in her arms. Sleep deprived, but really well," Ardern said.

  • A glimpse of the past: First Nations University aims to put names to faces in century-old photos
    News
    CBC

    A glimpse of the past: First Nations University aims to put names to faces in century-old photos

    For Wayne Goodwill, a 77-year-old Dakota man from the Standing Buffalo Dakota Nation in the Treaty 4 area of central Saskatchewan, that is exactly what happened. After attending the annual Treaty 4 gathering in Fort Qu'Appelle in the summer of 2017, Goodwill entered a room filled with a recently rediscovered photo collection from the archives of the First Nations University of Canada in Regina. The photo showed a much younger version of his great-grandmother Martha Tawiyaka taken around 1897-1899.

  • Two-spirit Anishinaabe dancer called to dance powwow
    News
    CBC

    Two-spirit Anishinaabe dancer called to dance powwow

    Gayle Pruden puts on her beaded hair ties and necklace as she gets ready to dance in Winnipeg's 2nd annual two-spirit powwow. Putting on her regalia and dancing is a ritual she's being doing for more than 14 years but this was the first time she was attending a two-spirit powwow in her home city of Winnipeg. The elder told her that the Creator was calling her to dance powwow.

  • Ditching plastic straws to set an environmental example
    News
    CBC

    Ditching plastic straws to set an environmental example

    A St. John's business is getting on the global bandwagon to eliminate the use of plastic straws. Customs broker PF Collins is distributing stainless steel straws to all of its employees, in a project spearheaded by its marketing and communications specialist, Jill Hampton. "We all have to do our small part, whether as an individual or small businesses, to protect the environment," Hampton told the St. John's Morning Show.

  • News
    CBC

    Job-related injuries create mounting danger for search and rescue workers

    Submerged underwater more than 270 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland, Sgt. Damien Robison almost ran out of air. Chunks of ice in the water whipped by as Robison tried to puzzle out how he and the sealers would survive. After that rescue, Robison said he was pretty banged up.

  • 'Reviving a language': New app teaches people to speak Wolastoqey
    News
    CBC

    'Reviving a language': New app teaches people to speak Wolastoqey

    An Indigenous woman in Fredericton is fighting to keep her language alive through modern technology. The Wolastoqey Latuwewakon Language app is designed to teach people in the community how to use words and phrases related to the Walostoqey people and their culture. "Our language is alive," said Imelda Perley, elder-in-residence at the University of New Brunswick.

  • 'We're solution-finders': Clearwater boss takes measured stance on surf clam controversy
    News
    CBC

    'We're solution-finders': Clearwater boss takes measured stance on surf clam controversy

    The federal decision will mean less production for the Halifax-based company's processing plant in Grand Bank, N.L., one of the few year-round seafood plants in Atlantic Canada, and less fishing activity for the three vessels that harvest the quota. "We're solution-finders," Risley told CBC News during a visit to St. John's on Thursday. When asked what that solution might entail, Risley replied, "I'm not going to speculate on that.

  • Waiting for Peter Thiel: big tech directors miss shareholder meetings
    News
    Reuters

    Waiting for Peter Thiel: big tech directors miss shareholder meetings

    By Ross Kerber BOSTON (Reuters) - Some small investors who want to give a piece of their minds to big tech company directors are losing their only chance: many board members are skipping annual shareholder meetings. Companies that hold meetings online have some of the worst records for attendance. A large portion of Alphabet Inc , Facebook Inc , Netflix Inc and Twitter Inc directors have not attended annual shareholder meetings in recent years, company records and securities filings show, in some cases in growing numbers.