Windsor Eid al-Adha celebration 'extra special' as in-person event held over weekend

·2 min read
The parking lot was full of fun inflatables for children as Eid al-Adha celebrations returned to taking place in person this weekend. (Jacob Barker/CBC - image credit)
The parking lot was full of fun inflatables for children as Eid al-Adha celebrations returned to taking place in person this weekend. (Jacob Barker/CBC - image credit)

Windsor's Islamic community was happy to be back in person this year to celebrate Eid al-Adha celebrations at Windsor Mosque on Sunday.

Eid al-Adha, is a celebratory festival which concludes the Hajj, the Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca. It also commemorates the story of Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his first born son for god — a story told in the Qur'an.

"This is a very celebratory and exciting occasion for all," said Zaid Khan, media director at the Windsor Islamic association.

Khan said the festival has added meaning this year as people are allowed to celebrate the festival in person again, following pandemic shut downs.

Jacob Barker/CBC
Jacob Barker/CBC

"It's extra special to be able to do this and we hope that it continues to be extra special in years to come," he said.

The festival took place at the Windsor Mosque where the parking lot was filled with inflatables including a bouncy castle and other entertainment for the children.

"It's a special holiday and all our family gets together and has events," said Hassan El Chaar, as he waited in line for the dunk tank.

Jacob Barker/CBC
Jacob Barker/CBC

'Whatever can make the kids smile'

Maysa Tarabain, who helped coordinate volunteers, said it was important for them that the children feel a sense of celebration.

"...especially coming out of the pandemic, our festivals have been non-existent," she said. "Whatever can make the kids smile."

Jacob Barker/CBC
Jacob Barker/CBC

Tarabain said for her the celebration represents sacrifices and the celebration of dedication to God and religion.

"It's a nice breath of fresh air and relief we can all enjoy after having worked so hard after developing ourselves after the past few months," said Tarabain.

Lots of food

Food was also a big part of the celebration as a Barbeque was also a big part of the celebration. Omar Asfour said he expected to serve 1,800 hamburgers throughout the day and 1,000 hot dogs.

Jacob Barker/CBC
Jacob Barker/CBC

"Any time there's a Middle Eastern, Arabic, Muslim... celebration, food is going to be a huge part of it," Asfour said.

Huda Sweilem said it was a wonderful event after being in lock down for the last two years.

"It's just something that we were very eager and anxious and excited to have once again," she said.

Jacob Barker/CBC
Jacob Barker/CBC

"As long as the kids are happy, we're happy too."

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