Windsor labour council to host seminar on conduct in sport

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Windsor labour council to host seminar on conduct in sport

The Windsor and District Labour Council wants to improve human rights and gender equity among amateur sports, particularly after the latest misogynistic comments made by the head of minor hockey in the region. 

Labour council officials are planning an event to help develop more positive qualities in regional amateur sport organizations. The event, dubbed Promising Practices in Sport, will be held May 3 with the goal of the evening seminar called building "safe, inclusive, equitable sport organizations."

Topics covered at the event will include the legal requirements of sport organizations when it comes to human rights, along with speakers on gender equity in sport and how to effect change in sports organizations.

Labour council president Brian Hogan said the forum is "an offshoot of Windsor Minor Hockey Association's story," referencing comments made by WMHA president Dean Lapierre.

Lapierre was temporarily suspended from his position in January after he wrote a Facebook post describing Canadian participants in the Women's March on Washington as "dumb bitches." The post was investigated by the Ontario Minor Hockey Association.

"I used the wrong words. If they wanted to march I should have left it alone," said Lapierre at the time of his reinstatement. 

Shortly after Lapierre's reinstatement, protesters rallied against the move outside the minor hockey association's annual general meeting.

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