Zika-transmitting mosquito known as 'aggressive daytime biter' found in Windsor

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Aedes Albopictus mosquitoes are shown in a file photo. (AP Photo/Josh Replogle) (Josh Replogle/Associated Press - image credit)
Aedes Albopictus mosquitoes are shown in a file photo. (AP Photo/Josh Replogle) (Josh Replogle/Associated Press - image credit)

Mosquito surveillance efforts in Windsor-Essex have detected a tropical invasive mosquito that can potentially spread the Zika virus.

The mosquito, known as Aedes albopictus, was found within Windsor city limits, according to the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, which carries out mosquito surveillance.

The mosquito is capable of transmitting the Zika virus, but it's not likely to be the main spreader of the infection, since it feeds on animals in addition to people, according to the health unit.

"There is no change in risk for Zika virus in our community and the Aedes albopictus mosquito found tested negative for Zika virus and West Nile virus," medical officer of health Dr. Wajid Ahmed said in a news release on Monday.

"This is an important reminder for everyone to remove standing water around our homes and workplaces to prevent mosquito breeding and protect ourselves and our families from mosquito bites."

The mosquito typically lays eggs in standing water as opposed to ponds, according to the health unit.

"Aedes albopictus mosquitoes are aggressive daytime biters, with peaks in activity in the early morning and late afternoon," WECHU said.

The mosquito was first detected in Windsor-Essex in 2016, and has also been found in Ottawa, Toronto and Peel region, as well as in the U.S.

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