3 newborn lynx kittens thriving at Montreal Biodôme

·2 min read
A camera allows the team to keep a close eye on the little family, which will remain out of sight until the youngsters are ready to explore their enclosure safely. (Space for Life/YouTube - image credit)
A camera allows the team to keep a close eye on the little family, which will remain out of sight until the youngsters are ready to explore their enclosure safely. (Space for Life/YouTube - image credit)

Three lynx were born at the Montreal Biodôme on May 1 and the kittens and their mother are doing well, the Space for Life said in a statement.

The kittens' mother is providing the babies with all the maternal care they need, the statement said.

This is the second litter produced by the seven-year-old female and eight-year-old male. Their last litter was in 2016.

The Biodôme's staff are strictly adhering to protocol in order to maintain a tranquil environment for the mother to nurse and groom her kittens without any disturbances, the statement said.

A camera allows the team to keep a close eye on the little family, which will remain out of sight until the youngsters are ready to explore their enclosure safely. The kittens are expected to make their first public appearance this summer.

For the moment, the team has not verified the kittens' gender, but that will be done in the coming weeks, the statement says.

The mother arrived at the Biodôme in January 2015, after her own mother was hit by a car in the Chibougamau, Que., area, some 700 kilometres north of Montreal.

The father was born at the Biodôme in 2013 from a pair of lynx rescued from a fur farm in 2006.

The Canada lynx can live up to 20 years in captivity. The gestation period is around 65 days, and there can be up to eight babies per litter but the average is usually around three or four.

In the wild, lynx live mostly in the forests of Canada and the northern United States.

The Biodôme participates in a species survival program of the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Reproduction of the Biodôme's lynx contributes to the growth of the captive population and its genetic diversity.

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