• Photo: The Canadian PressPhoto: The Canadian Press
    Estimates vary, but as few as one in three young voters bothers to go down to the polling station on election day.

    The abysmal turnout among Millennials in the last two federal elections has been singled out to Elections Canada as one of the main culprits in the overall demise in voting numbers.

    But the problem is not that young voters are any less civically engaged or politically aware than their older compatriots.

    There is a generational divide between Canadians under age 35 and those over, says the study released Friday by the Broadbent Institute.

    “When we ask why they don’t vote, a lot of them say the biggest reason is not because they don’t know about politics,” David McGrane, a professor of political science at the University of Saskatchewan and author of the report, tells Yahoo Canada News.

    “They know every bit as much as older Canadians. They know where to vote; they know how to vote.”

    But young voters across the country tend to lean to the left of the political spectrum, says

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  • U.S.-Canada relations: Keystone has cooled an already frosty relationship

    “The United States and Canada are best friends—like it or not.”

    Issues like the Keystone XL pipeline have strained an already fragile relationship. (Reuters/CP)Issues like the Keystone XL pipeline have strained an already fragile relationship. (Reuters/CP)

    Our bilateral relationship is akin to a Ferris wheel (round and round/up and down/where it stops nobody knows).

    But if the sobriquet of “best friends—like it or not” is the paradigm, we are certainly well into the “not” category. Irritations are becoming problems; problems are evolving toward crises.

    Perhaps our relations are more akin to living with bipolar disorder: With careful tending, good meds, and occasional professional psychiatric intervention, we negotiate the rough patches in our relations with no more than grimacing and accentuating the positives. Occasionally, however, the juxtaposition of particularly neuralgic but important substantive issues and mutual senior leadership irritation generates a crisis.

    There is a rolling laundry list of niggling problems, often of the hardy perennial nature, that keep diplomats and bureaucrats busy. Over the years, these have included hanging file folders, magazine advertising, pork bellies, Pacific Coast salmon, softwood lumber—just to

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  • With the right attitude, those little problems between Canada and the U.S. don't seem so bad. (Reuters)With the right attitude, those little problems between Canada and the U.S. don't seem so bad. (Reuters)

    From a Canadian perspective, Canada-U.S. relations have advanced to a point where they are capable of transcending a very unpopular president such as George W. Bush. While Barack Obama was welcomed into office overwhelmingly by Canadians, his misinformation to justify a presidential veto of legislation key tothe Canadian Keystone XL pipeline was a serious blow to good bilateral relations.

    The relationship overall is probably no better or worse than it has been for many years, largely because our two countries are now seen on both sides of the border as alternative civilizations and thus increasingly unlikely to diverge or converge on a range of public issues. Our expectations of each other are perhaps becoming more realistic.

    David Jones and I wrote Uneasy Neighbo(u)rs about the two nations in 2007. Some features of the relationship continue to apply, including the approximately ten-to-one disparity in population and GDP. Canadian differences with our neighbour today are still often

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  • Thu, Mar 26: On this edition of the News Hour Plus, the Global BC anchors discuss how to deal with hecklers and haters after meteorologist Kristi Gordon received a hurtful letter from an unhappy viewer about her pregnancy wardrobe.Thu, Mar 26: On this edition of the News Hour Plus, the Global BC anchors discuss how to deal with hecklers and haters after meteorologist Kristi Gordon received a hurtful letter from an unhappy viewer about her pregnancy wardrobe.
    Sometimes, people suck. That’s not news.

    But a British Columbia meteorologist has sparked a revolt against the haters by speaking out on Global BC’s newscast about rude emails she’s received as she continues her full-time job on-air through her second pregnancy.

    Kristi Gordon is six months pregnant. She has a three-year-old at home. She works full-time.

    Contrary to popular belief, she has no makeup person, stylist or personal shopper.

    As any TV personality can attest, a small number of critical emails, calls and letters come from members of the public. But a handwritten letter sent this week prompted Gordon to address the issue on-air.

    “It was so hateful,” Gordon tells Yahoo Canada News.

    At the outset of her second pregnancy, the meteorologist appealed to viewers to “be nice.” She’d been through on-air changes in her appearance before.

    Some sad, angry people struggle with nice.

    The letter, sent to “Globel,” called the mom-to-be “gross” and said the viewers had changed the channel.

    Read More »from Pregnant B.C. TV meteorologist  calls out the bullies for fat shaming
  • Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson wants MPs to consider tightening up House conflict of interest code.Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson wants MPs to consider tightening up House conflict of interest code.
    Taiwan came out as the top travel destinations for MPs — when it didn’t come out of their own pockets or the government’s coffers — in 2014.

    On Thursday ethics commissioner Mary Dawson released the annual list of sponsored travel for MPs. In total, 60 MPs racked up $442,524 in free travel over the past year. 

    Members of Parliament are required, as a rule under the conflict of interest act, to disclose to the ethics commissioner any travel that exceeds $500 in cost and that are not “wholly or substantially” paid from by a government revenue fund, their own personal funds or by any interparliamentary or friendship group.

    In the 2014 calendar year, there were 17 trips to Taiwan. The cost of most of these were covered by the Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association.

    MPs, including Russ Heibert, Bruce Hyer, Dominic LeBlanc, Bev Shipley and Peter Goldring, made trips to Taipei over the past year, either on parliamentary delegations or on trips to assess or learn about trade and

    Read More »from Taiwan ranks #1 for dishing out free trips to Canadian MPs
  • Kurdish peshmerga forces carry their weapons at outskirts of Kirkuk March 15, 2015. (Reuters)Kurdish peshmerga forces carry their weapons at outskirts of Kirkuk March 15, 2015. (Reuters)
    It’s a foregone conclusion Prime Minister Harper will win next week’s Commons vote to expand Canada’s military mission against Islamic State.
    Harper's plan is for the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) to attack ISIS targets inside neighbouring Syria. 
    Critics of the mission say besides being an illegal intrusion into a sovereign state, CF-18 air strikes increase the potential risk to pilots. Unlike Iraq, where allies are close at hand to help a downed pilot, Syria is entirely hostile territory.

    Last December, a Jordanian pilot whose aircraft went down in ISIS-held territory was captured and executed, but not before ISIS extracted maximum propaganda value from the incident.

    As of yet, there have been no Canadians captured by ISIS, despite the military missions in the region and Canadians choosing to join Kurdish forces independently. But after seeing what has happened to other foreign nationals, Canadians can’t help but wonderwhat would happen if it were one of their own citizens

    Read More »from ISIS mission in Syria: What happens if a Canadian gets captured?
  • Ed Sheeran crashes wedding, gives couple a first dance to remember

    "Available for weddings, birthdays and bar mitzvah’s"

    On Wednesday, Ed Sheeran performed his best Adam Sandler impersonation when he crashed an Australian wedding and quickly became the entertainment.

    The 24-year-old British singer-songwriter was the surprise guest at newlyweds’ Kya and Matt Debono’s nuptials. 

    "Just surprised this lovely couples first dance," he wrote on Instagram. “Available for weddings, birthdays and bar mitzvah’s, contact your local super market for details.”

    Sheeran’s appearance was arranged by KISS 1065 radio hosts Kyle & Jackie O after the couple admitted on-air that they were struggling to afford a wedding after the bride, a mother of two, lost her mother to suicide in 2012.

    The radio station teamed up with the Sydney Bridal Expo to give Kya and Matt a dream $60,000 wedding — with Ed Sheeran, who happened to be on tour in Australia at the time, serenading them for their first dance.

    Sheeran sang his hit single “Thinking Out Loud,” the song the couple had previously picked as their choice for their first dance.

    Read More »from Ed Sheeran crashes wedding, gives couple a first dance to remember
  • NDP Leader Tom Mulcair speaks with the media on March 25, 2015. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)NDP Leader Tom Mulcair speaks with the media on March 25, 2015. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)

    NDP leader Tom Mulcair unveiled another election platform plank Friday: a commitment to reducing child poverty in Canada by closing tax loopholes for high earners and redirecting that money to low-income families.

    Mulcair made the announcement to delegates at the left-leaning Broadbent Institute’s second annual Progress Summit in Ottawa.

    In his address, Mulcair reminded delegates of former NDP leader Ed Broadbent’s 1989 motion in the House of Commons to end child poverty in Canada by 2000. The motion was adopted by all political parties, but he said subsequent governments failed to get the job done.

    “It wasn’t a lack of tools, it wasn’t a lack of resources,” Mulcair said. “It was a lack of political will.”

    The party leader doubled down on NDP commitments to help struggling middle-class families. He said that Canadians are working hard but falling further behind, and that wealth in the country is ending up in fewer and fewer hands.

    The NDP plan to tackle this problem, he continued,

    Read More »from Tom Mulcair announces NDP's Robin Hood proposal to reduce child poverty
  • Man wins $7 million from scratch-off lottery ticket in his get-well card

    “I said, Honey, I think we won $7,000,000," Joseph Amorese explains

    While Joseph Amorese was recovering from hernia surgery last month, his father sent him a get-well card. Inside was a scratch-off Lottery ticket.

    While receiving a lottery ticket from his father was nothing new — his retired father frequently sends him tickets — receiving a winning one was: the ticket was a $7-million winner in the “Golden Ticket” game (after taxes, the total prize is about $4.6 million).

    "I took my glasses off, I’m looking at it, I was pretty shocked to say the least," Amorese told reporters at a press conference. “I had surgery so I didn’t jump up and down, but in my mind I was jumping up and down.”

    Amorese immediately sent his father a photo of the winning ticket.

    “Do I usually include a ticket? Yeah,” Amorese’s father told ABC News, refusing to say if his son will share the jackpot with him. “I’m retired and I have time on my hands. You know, you want them to get something but if they get $100, they’ll be happy. Most of us don’t usually think you’re going to hit

    Read More »from Man wins $7 million from scratch-off lottery ticket in his get-well card
  • Watch these engineering students extinguish a fire using sound waves

    Seth Robertson and Viet Tran have high hopes for their creative invention

    What began as an idea for a senior research project is now a fully-functional device that really has the Internet talking.

    Engineering students Seth Robertson, 23, and Viet Tran, 28, from George Mason University in Virginia invested about $600 of their own money into developing a “somewhat portable” device that can put out fires with low-frequency sound waves.

    Tran explained to the Washington Post that sound waves are “pressure waves, and they displace some of the oxygen” and at the right frequency, those waves can separate the fire’s oxygen from the fuel.

    “The pressure wave is going back and forth, and that agitates where the air is. That specific space is enough to keep the fire from reigniting.”

    Initially, the duo assumed high-frequency sound waves would prove effective in dousing a fire. Instead, low frequencies did the trick.

    “But it’s low-frequency sounds—like the thump-thump bass in hip-hop that works,” Tran told the university’s website.

    Robertson and Tran applied for a

    Read More »from Watch these engineering students extinguish a fire using sound waves

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