Canadian rock band The Tea Party may make millions selling domain name

Jordan Chittley
Daily Brew

There is a lot of talk about the Tea Party these days, but anyone hoping for information on the U.S. political party should not go to teaparty.com.

This website is owned by the defunct Canadian rock band, The Tea Party. They registered the domain name in 1993 and while it is rarely updated now, it has been changed to say, "No politics . . . Just Rock and Roll" in big letters.

Despite it not being updated regularly it still appears near the top of the first page of results on a Yahoo! search and a number of people get to it by plugging the name right into the browser.

"So much damage has been done to our name by the political movement that we're considering selling," says bassist Stuart Chatwood to Bloomberg.

If they decide on this course of action, they could be in for a major pay day.

Warren Adelman, president of GoDaddy.com tells Bloomberg campaigns may raise $1 billion dollars online. "It's easy to expect teaparty.com to go for well over $1 million."

Not bad for a name chosen on a whim that had nothing to do with dressing up as natives and throwing tea into the ocean, or smaller government.

"Tea Party was a euphemism the Beat poets used for getting high and writing poetry and vibing with each other," says Chatwood to Bloomberg.

The band released eight albums between 1991 and 2005 when they split up over creative differences. They reunited this past summer to play some shows in Canada.

Selling a domain name for more than $1 million is not unheard of, but it is rare. Sex.com sold for $13 million, business.com for $7.5 million, vodka.com for $3 million and poker.com for $1 million.

As for The Tea Party, they began receiving offers last year mostly from political groups and investors. They are also considering having a little fun and lending the name to Stephen Colbert or Jon Stewart.

(Screen capture from teaparty.com)