‘How is he even able to carry on as President’: Lauren Boebert attacks ‘Sleepy Joe’ after debate

MAGA stalwart Rep Lauren Boebert frequently takes aim at Biden – but her Democrat nemesis has now called for the president to withdraw from the race  (AP)
MAGA stalwart Rep Lauren Boebert frequently takes aim at Biden – but her Democrat nemesis has now called for the president to withdraw from the race (AP)

Lauren Boebert’s usual barrage of anti-Biden tweets found an unlikely ally this week in her political nemesis, Democrat Adam Frisch – who nearly unseated her two years ago and who called this week for the president to withdraw from the race.

“Only in politics is stating the obvious rarely done,” Frisch said in a video posted Tuesday on his social media accounts and in a statement. “It has been clear to me for some time – and the debate only reinforced it – neither candidate should be running for President. We need a President that can unite America to realize our nation’s unlimited potential.

“We deserve better,” he said.

“President Biden should do what’s best for the country and withdraw from the race. I thank President Biden for his years of service, but the path ahead requires a new generation of leadership to take our country forward.”

Frisch was weighing in on Biden’s universally-panned performance during last week’s debate against former president Donald Trump – which Boebert took great delight in blistering on social media.

“Forget the election, how is he even able to carry on as President?” she posted after the debate on X, where she often attacks “Sleepy Joe.”

“Democrats need to stop acting like they didn’t know Biden was cognitively shot until the debate,” the unwavering MAGA acolyte wrote on Wednesday.

“Everyone with two eyes knew. You actually didn’t even need eyes ... just ears. This has been obvious since he ran from the basement!”

A former independent, Frisch has been heavily touting his moderate credentials (“I am not focused on Team Democrat or Team Republican, but Team CD3,” he likes to say) since his first campaign against Boebert in 2022. It ended up being the closest race in the nation; the loudmouth conservative incumbent won during a recount by just 546 votes.

Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert, a fierce MAGA acolyte and Biden critic, currently represents Colorado’s third congressional district and won the Republican primary last week in the fourth district across the state (AP)
Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert, a fierce MAGA acolyte and Biden critic, currently represents Colorado’s third congressional district and won the Republican primary last week in the fourth district across the state (AP)

Frisch’s robust 2024 rematch campaign was widely seen as the congresswoman’s reason for abandoning Colorado’s third congressional district in favor of a more conservative one on the other side of the state.

She sailed to victory in last week’s primary as the Republican candidate in the fourth congressional district, which the party is expected to win by a landslide in November given the right-leaning voting trends of the heavily agricultural constituency.

Back in CD3, however, former Aspen city councilman Frisch is again the Democratic candidate – and he’ll face Republican Jeff Hurd in November after the Grand Junction attorney won his primary last week. Hurd’s campaign was muted in comparison to the style of his predecessor, and it was the father-of-five’s first run for office.

Grand Junction attorney Jeff Hurd, left,  with his wife and five children, won the Republican primary in Boebert’s old district after she abandoned her re-election campaign at the end of last year (Jeff Hurd)
Grand Junction attorney Jeff Hurd, left, with his wife and five children, won the Republican primary in Boebert’s old district after she abandoned her re-election campaign at the end of last year (Jeff Hurd)

Western Slope voters, with unaffiliateds making up the largest bloc, will now choose between two far less bombastic candidates after four years of Boebert scandals and controversies.

“I would like personally congratulate Jeff Hurd,” Frisch wrote after the primaries. “My hat goes off to anyone who is willing to stand up to represent their country and community. It’s unfortunate, however, that both political parties often cater to the extremes and prioritize party loyalty over the best interest of the country ... I won’t be a yes man for either party.”

“I think there was maybe a sense among the voters here that they were getting worn down by a kind of politics that’s really loud and in your face and aggressive,” Hurd, 44, told The Independent on the day of the primary. “Some like it; some will continue to like it. But I think, by and large, most rural Coloradans were ready to move on.”