You can take a look inside Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla's home at Clarence House

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You can take a look inside Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla's home at Clarence House

Want know how royalty really lives? Well, now you can.

Want to know how royalty really lives? Well, now you can.

Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall are opening the doors of their home to the public for one month as they vacation at Birkhall.

Built in 1825, Clarence House is one of the last remaining aristocratic townhouses in London. The four-story home was initially built for King George III's third son, Prince William Henry, Duke of Clarence. Notable designer John Nash took on the project, designing each room to perfection.  

The Prince of Wales has called Clarence House home since 2002. Before that, Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother resided in the landmark for fifty years, while Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip moved in following their 1947 nuptials. Prince William and Prince Harry have also resided in Clarence House. 

Each tenant has made considerable renovations to the historic home, altering the color schemes with new textiles and pieces of artwork from the Royal Collection. Prince Charles, who has an extensive art collection of his own, has decorated the home with many of his personal pieces. Mantles and walls are also decorated with personal pictures of the royal family, including Prince George and Princess Charlotte

Curious visitors can sign up for a 45-minute tour, which will take them to five rooms on the ground floor, where Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla host official engagements. Guests will be able to see the Lancaster Room, the Morning Room and the library, which was used by The Queen Mother for intimate dinners when she lived in the house. The dining room and the garden room -- which was created from two rooms which Princess Margaret lived in before her marriage -- are also included on the tour. 

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The quarters on display will "remain recognizably" as they were in Queen Elizabeth's time, with furniture and art being returned to their former positions. Details of past exhibits include ornate pedestals and furniture from the 1700s, photographs from the 1950s, an 18th century French vase and personal photographs of the royal family. 

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