Ontario housing

CIBC World Markets economist Benny Tal on Ontario's moves to cool the housing market

  • Student: Boy arrested in school shooting has violent past
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Student: Boy arrested in school shooting has violent past

    A 16-year-old boy accused of shooting a classmate at a Texas high school on Monday had a history of aggressive actions at school, a fellow student said. The injured student, a 15-year-old girl, was airlifted to a hospital in Dallas following the shooting inside the cafeteria at Italy High School, which is in the small town of Italy about 40 miles (64 kilometres ) south of Dallas. The boy fled after being confronted by a school district official but was later arrested.

  • UBC student stabber sent back to Saudi Arabia after discharge
    News
    CBC

    UBC student stabber sent back to Saudi Arabia after discharge

    A UBC student found not criminally responsible for stabbing a fellow student in the neck has been sent back to Saudi Arabia after being discharged from custody. In a majority decision last month, a B.C. Review Board panel found that Thamer Hameed Almestadi did not present a significant threat to public safety despite a considerable risk of psychotic relapse. Board member Paula Cayley wrote the dissenting opinion.

  • Daughter waits to bring parents home after Winnipeg couple found dead in Jamaica
    News
    CBC

    Daughter waits to bring parents home after Winnipeg couple found dead in Jamaica

    A Winnipeg woman whose parents were killed in Jamaica two weeks ago is still waiting for answers about their deaths and hoping she can soon bring their bodies back to Canada. Melbourne Flake, 81, and Etta Flake, 70, were discovered in their home in St. Thomas on Jan. 9. The couple, who immigrated to Canada more than 50 years ago and made Winnipeg their home, often travelled back to their homeland in their retirement and recently finished building a vacation home there.

  • Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies

    Boeing says it has not decided whether to submit its Super Hornet fighter jet as a potential replacement for Canada's aging CF-18s, and is instead waiting to see how the federal government will run the multi-billion-dollar competition. The comments come after government officials briefed dozens of industry representatives and foreign delegates Monday on Canada's plan to purchase 88 new fighter jets in the coming years for an estimated $15 billion to $19 billion. Boeing did not send anyone.

  • Quebec town swaps out salt for eco-friendly wood chips on icy roads
    News
    CBC

    Quebec town swaps out salt for eco-friendly wood chips on icy roads

    The town of Rosemère, Que., is opting for a more environmentally-friendly way of keeping roads from becoming slippery due to ice, snow and freezing rain — it's using wood chips. The town, located just northwest of Laval, is testing out wood chips as a replacement for salt or gravel on the roads. Rosemère Mayor Eric Westram said they are ditching the "old, conventional way" in favour or something more eco-friendly and more efficient.

  • Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator
    News
    CBC

    Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator

    More than 2,500 Islanders currently live with dementia and Snow told attendees at P.E.I.'s annual Alzheimer's Awareness Conference in Charlottetown that those lives can be lived to the fullest. One of the biggest misconceptions about Alzheimer's disease is that it is simply a memory problem, Snow said — but it happens to be much more than that.

  • Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination
    News
    CBC

    Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination

    Three servers from 1909 Taverne Moderne, a sprawling new sports bar next to the Bell Centre, have filed complaints with Quebec's human rights commission alleging they were fired last week because of racial discrimination. All three told CBC they were given no clear explanation as to why they were fired. All said the manager who fired them told them their work ethic and appearance didn't compare favourably to two model employees, both white francophone Quebecers.

  • News
    CBC

    Saskatchewan family sells everything, moves to Alberta in search of jobs

    Christine Angst and her spouse, Jeremy Dole, were lifelong Saskatchewan residents until last November, when they decided to sell everything they owned and move to Alberta in search of work. Dole and his nephew decided to combine their money and head to Alberta.

  • Owner euthanized dog that left 6-year-old girl with 75 stitches to her face
    News
    CBC

    Owner euthanized dog that left 6-year-old girl with 75 stitches to her face

    The dog that attacked a 6-year-old Windsor girl leaving her with 75 stitches on her face has been voluntarily euthanized by its owner. The young girl's grandmother wrote about the incident in a series of Facebook posts beginning on Jan. 6. The woman wrote her granddaughter was attending a sleepover when she was attacked, leaving her with wounds to her head and leg that required dozens of stitches.

  • 'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control
    News
    CBC

    'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control

    Volunteers with Four Paws Food Bank in Kamloops, B.C., have been hauling out bags of rotten cat food and feces from a feral cat colony on the city's north shore. Bonnie McBride runs Four Paws Food Bank and says her group was tagged in a Facebook post after someone was walking through the north shore area and spotted a number of sick looking cats. Cat colonies form when a group of feral cats have access to food and shelter, often created when people provide food to the animals.

  • Peter Mansbridge giving lecture in Regina with focus on 'fake news'
    News
    CBC

    Peter Mansbridge giving lecture in Regina with focus on 'fake news'

    Mansbridge is giving the James M. Minifie Lecture at the University of Regina for the second time in his nearly five-decade career in journalism. This time, he said one of the main topics he'll discuss is fake news.

  • Canadians travel to Montego Bay despite emergency
    Global News

    Canadians travel to Montego Bay despite emergency

    Mon, Jan 22: Just days after the prime minister of Jamaica declared a state of emergency in the part of his country that includes Montego Bay, Canadians are still travelling there and flights are still departing for the region. Returning Canadians say they were never told about the violence or warning to stay indoors. Sean O’Shea reports.

  • Sex trade 'alive and well' in Yukon, researcher says after 3-year project
    News
    CBC

    Sex trade 'alive and well' in Yukon, researcher says after 3-year project

    It's becoming more common and widespread for women to sell sex to cover basic necessities like food, shelter and transportation in Yukon, and instances of human trafficking are more prevalent than previously thought, according to a three-year research project by the Yukon Status of Women Council. Charlotte Hrenchuk is the coordinator for the "Not Your Fantasy" project, which was funded by Status of Women Canada and Yukon's Crime Prevention Victim Services Trust Fund. "The sex trade is alive and well and living in the Yukon," Hrenchuk said.

  • Hospital staff knew woman later found frozen and dead outside was anxious to leave ER
    News
    CBC

    Hospital staff knew woman later found frozen and dead outside was anxious to leave ER

    Just hours before an emergency room doctor realized a meth-using pregnant patient was gone, she was slurring her words, exhibiting bizarre behaviour and had told hospital staff she wanted to leave. Windy Sinclair was later found frozen and dead outside an apartment block in Winnipeg. The 29-year-old pregnant mother of four's body was discovered outside a West Broadway apartment block on Dec. 28, days after she sought help for her meth addiction at Seven Oaks Hospital.

  • RCMP officers allege sexual abuse by doctor at Mounties' health office
    News
    The Canadian Press

    RCMP officers allege sexual abuse by doctor at Mounties' health office

    Police in Halifax are investigating allegations that RCMP members and recruits were sexually assaulted by a doctor at the Mounties' health clinic in Nova Scotia over two decades. The force's commanding officer in Nova Scotia, Assistant Commissioner Brian Brennan, said in a note to officers that several employees have come forward, and he expects "many more" in the months ahead. To say I'm shocked and disheartened doesn't seem like enough," Brennan wrote.

  • News
    CBC

    'Stop feeding the birds': B.C. town overrun by dozens of wild turkeys

    Wild turkeys have become such a problem in one small B.C. Interior community that the regional district is considering a bylaw that would prohibit people from feeding them. Roughly 100 turkeys can be found roaming the streets around Edgewater, B.C., roosting in local trees and causing extensive property damage by defecating in private yards and breaking tree branches. "I've got about 60 or 70 of them living in my trees," said resident Mark Holmes.

  • 'I did not kill my family:' Men who murdered Alberta family speak at sentencing
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'I did not kill my family:' Men who murdered Alberta family speak at sentencing

    Jason Klaus, 42, and Joshua Frank, 32, were found guilty earlier this month on three charges of first-degree murder. "I did not kill my family and the little involvement that I did have I will regret for the rest of my life," said Klaus, who choked back tears in a rambling apology during sentencing arguments before Justice Eric Macklin and a packed courtroom. "I cannot express my sorrow about what has happened to my family, to your family.

  • News
    CBC

    Ottawa defends decision to give Hudson contract to same company that aborted another refit months earlier

    The federal government is defending its decision to award another $840,000 refit contract on the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Hudson to the same company behind an aborted refit on the venerable research ship last year. Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) said Heddle Marine (NL) is a "separate operating entity" from Heddle Marine Services, the company responsible for the aborted dry docking refit on the Hudson at its Ontario shipyard in 2017. Eleven days after receiving questions about the latest refit contract, a PSPC spokesperson said Heddle Marine (NL) submitted the lowest compliant bid for the upcoming mechanical refit, scheduled for the 54-year-old research vessel at its home base at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.

  • Island farmers urge snowmobilers to stay off crops
    News
    CBC

    Island farmers urge snowmobilers to stay off crops

    ​Greg MacKenzie, owner of MacKenzie Produce in Stratford, says he has hibernating plants beneath the blanket of snow on his some of his land and that snowmobilers are driving off the trails and over those crops. MacKenzie doesn't like hanging the signs up and restricting snowmobilers, he said — he'd rather just ask people to be a bit more aware of where they're driving when they're off the trails. "I understand there hasn't been much snow and you have a sled, you want to get out and use it, but [use] a little bit of caution," MacKenzie said.

  • Feds clarify LGBTQ and abortions rights attestation for summer jobs funding
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Feds clarify LGBTQ and abortions rights attestation for summer jobs funding

    The Liberal government has clarified what it would mean for organizations seeking youth summer job funding to prove they respect reproductive and other rights, but is standing firm on its decision to deny grants to groups advocating against abortion. Employment and Social Development Canada, which oversees the Canada Summer Jobs program that created nearly 69,000 temporary jobs last year, added a section on its website Tuesday further explaining the language — and the intended goal — of the controversial new requirement. The Liberals have said that faith-based organizations are welcome to seek federal funding to create summer jobs for youth, but they and all other applicants are being asked to attest to their respect for sexual and reproductive rights — including "the right to access safe and legal abortions" — as well as other human rights.

  • Ex-train engineer Tom Harding apologizes for his role in Lac-Megantic derailment
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ex-train engineer Tom Harding apologizes for his role in Lac-Megantic derailment

    The former train engineer recently acquitted of criminal negligence in the Lac-Megantic railway disaster apologized Monday in a rare public statement since the 2013 tragedy that claimed the lives of dozens in the small Quebec town. With visibly quivering lips and flanked on each side by his lawyers, Tom Harding read a short, prepared statement in French and in English before the cameras. "I do not find the words sufficient to express my sympathies," said Harding, who was found not guilty Friday along with two former railway colleagues of criminal negligence causing death.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Doctor who came to US as child jailed by immigration agents

    A Michigan doctor who came to the U.S. from Poland as a young child was in jail Monday, nearly a week after immigration agents arrested him at his home. It's not clear why Lukasz Niec, 43, was taken into custody last Tuesday. Niec is a legal U.S. resident who works at Bronson Methodist Hospital in Kalamazoo.

  • Tsunami fears send people in B.C. to higher ground; warning ends after quake
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Tsunami fears send people in B.C. to higher ground; warning ends after quake

    Sirens and officials banging on doors roused people from their sleep in the middle of the night Tuesday in British Columbia as a tsunami warning was issued along a large swath of the province's coastline after a powerful earthquake off Alaska's coast. The warning was lifted about three hours later, ending a tense period for some as they made their way to safety on higher ground. "I just heard the fire trucks going around, honking their horns and on the loud speaker saying there is a tsunami warning," said Gillian Der, a University of British Columbia geography student who is studying in Queen Charlotte on Haida Gwaii.

  • Ontario landlords call for right to immediately ban pot in rentals despite tenant laws
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario landlords call for right to immediately ban pot in rentals despite tenant laws

    Ontario landlords want the right to immediately ban the use of pot in rental properties when recreational weed is legalized this summer, arguing they should be allowed to change tenants' existing leases to stop the drug from being consumed in their units. Some marijuana users say, however, that the situation would leave renters with few places to legally use weed, given the province's already restrictive rules around the drug. Medical marijuana use will be permitted anywhere that cigarette smoking is allowed, the legislation says.

  • Reports doctor sexually assaulted RCMP members during medical exams
    Global News

    Reports doctor sexually assaulted RCMP members during medical exams

    A doctor in Atlantic Canada is being accused of sexually abusing some members of the RCMP during medical exams. Ross Lord reports.