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Mikaela Shiffrin | USA | Skiing

mikaelashiffrin: Stars in the right hand, stripes in the left.. make sure it’s right side up.. careful with the wind.. don’t drop it!.. Okay okay, all set.. cool.. now SMILE!!” (Photo via Instagram/mikaelashiffrin)

Social snaps from PyeongChang: Feb. 15, 2018

Take a behind-the-scenes look at PyeongChang through the eyes of the Olympians.


  • Turkish official: Police found evidence of Khashoggi slaying
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Turkish official: Police found evidence of Khashoggi slaying

    Police searching the Saudi Consulate found evidence that Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi was killed there, a high-level Turkish official said Tuesday, and authorities appeared ready to also search the nearby residence of the consul general after the diplomat left the country. The comment by the Turkish official to The Associated Press intensified pressure on Saudi Arabia to explain what happened to Khashoggi, who vanished Oct. 2 while visiting the consulate to pick up paperwork he needed to get married. The crown prince "told me that he has already started, and will rapidly expand, a full and complete investigation into this matter.

  • What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online
    News
    CBC

    What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online

    As of Oct. 17, each person of legal age in their province can legally purchase and possess 30 grams of marijuana. From the RCMP: Canada Post has standard operating procedures in place related to the inspection of mail while in transit. From Canada Post: Canada Post has been delivering medical cannabis safely since 2013.

  • Toronto police welcome to apply to march in Pride Parade again, organizers say
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Toronto police welcome to apply to march in Pride Parade again, organizers say

    Toronto's Pride Parade has lifted a ban on uniformed police officers participating in the colourful annual event, saying the force was welcome to apply to be a part of next summer's festivities. The relationship between Pride Toronto and city police has been tense for the past two years — uniformed officers were banned from the parade in 2017 over concerns of racial profiling, and again this year over criticism the force had not taken the disappearances of several men missing from the city's gay village seriously. Pride Toronto said Tuesday the two sides have made progress on conversations related to "policing and institutional power" and said that if police apply to march in the 2019 parade, their request will be granted providing they meet the event's rules.

  • Raptors banking on championship pedigree of Leonard, Green
    News
    CBC

    Raptors banking on championship pedigree of Leonard, Green

    It would've been easy for the Toronto Raptors to stick with what they had. First to go was Dwane Casey, only the winningest head coach in Raptors history. Assistant coach Nick Nurse was promoted to take his place.

  • Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation
    News
    CBC

    Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation

    Wednesday marks the start of legal cannabis in Canada and a larger conversation about its pros and cons, according to several Nunavut officials who've been preparing for Oct. 17. Iqaluit's city bylaws prohibit smoking in any place where the smoke could enter another person's residence or a public place. "Hopefully when the time comes for some revenue sharing, [the government of Nunavut will be] willing to help acknowledge that we have costs, and therefore share some of the revenue," Stevenson said.

  • Take a tour of the Yukon government's new pot shop
    News
    CBC

    Take a tour of the Yukon government's new pot shop

    The Yukon government says it's ready to start selling legal pot on Wednesday — even though it's got just a fraction of  what it's ordered in stock. "Like every other jurisdiction, [Yukon] is a little bit short on product. Cummings and other government officials invited reporters to tour the Cannabis Yukon retail store in Whitehorse on Tuesday.

  • Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed
    Yahoo Canada News

    Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed

    As of 12:01 a.m., recreational cannabis became legal across Canada. Well before the hour struck, lineups were queueing up outside pot stores in the country’s biggest cities. Ian Power was the first person to purchase legal marijuana in Canadian history. He lined up at midnight in St. John’s during the opening of the Tweed retail location. That event was attended by Bruce Linton, CEO of Canopy Growth Corporation, which owns the Tweed brand. “I’m elated,” Power told CBC News. “I’m so excited, I can’t stop smiling. I’m not cold. It’s freezing cold out, but I’m not cold.” Power also told The Canadian Press he was not actually going to smoke the first bud he bought, and would keep it as a memento “forever.” On Wednesday morning, stores began opening in other provinces, and more Canadians made their first purchases. Among those waiting outside the store in Sydney River, N.S. was none other than Canadian fiddling legend Ashley MacIsaac. “I don’t need to be a criminal anymore, and that’s a great feeling,” MacIsaac told The Canadian Press. In 2001, he was arrested for possession in Saskatchewan. “And my new dealer is the prime minister!” But not every province and territory has brick-and-mortar locations available. Sales in Ontario will only be through the Ontario Cannabis Store’s website until April 2019 at the earliest. It was down early Wednesday morning, but was back up as of this writing. Alberta’s online pot store also received heavy traffic as soon as 12:01 a.m. hit. At 12:07 a.m. local time, the Alberta Liquor and Gaming Commission tweeted: “You like us! Our website is experiencing some heavy traffic. We are working hard to get it up and running.” Here’s a look at some of the first Canadians to get their hands on legal pot. With files from The Canadian Press.

  • 'They dithered; he withered:' Final arguments in Calgary child death trial
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'They dithered; he withered:' Final arguments in Calgary child death trial

    Jurors in the trial for a couple charged in their 14-month-old son's death heard starkly differing accounts Tuesday of why he died. Jennifer and Jeromie Clark of Calgary have pleaded not guilty to criminal negligence causing death and failure to provide the necessaries of life for their son John. There's no mystery of what happened to John," prosecutor Shane Parker said in his closing arguments.

  • Kativik school board in northern Quebec calls emergency meeting in wake of youth suicides
    News
    CBC

    Kativik school board in northern Quebec calls emergency meeting in wake of youth suicides

    Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board serving Quebec's Inuit territory of Nunavik, has called an emergency meeting at the end of this month to respond to a spate of youth suicides over the past four weeks. One of the victims was still in elementary school. "We feel the situation requires urgent collective action at the regional level," said the head of Kativik, Robert Watt, in a letter addressed to Inuit leaders, public service workers and elected government officials.

  • Doctors flag marijuana concerns on eve of legalization
    Global News

    Doctors flag marijuana concerns on eve of legalization

    The Canadian Medical Association Journal issued a stark warning as Canada embarks on legalizing cannabis, likening the move to an uncontrolled experiment that could detrimentally affect the health of the country. Eric Sorensen reports.

  • City councillors want Regina to shift to wind, solar power by 2050
    News
    CBC

    City councillors want Regina to shift to wind, solar power by 2050

    A town hall has been set for Tuesday night to discuss a motion with that goal. It will be brought to council Oct. 29, with the backing of councillors Andrew Stevens, Joel Murray and John Findura. The city has not set any renewable energy goals yet, according to Stevens, and Regina can learn from other municipalities that have already agreed to help out.

  • Calgary Flames co-owner helped pay ransom to free hostage Amanda Lindhout
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Calgary Flames co-owner helped pay ransom to free hostage Amanda Lindhout

    A Calgary businessman and philanthropist paid roughly $750,000 to help free kidnapped journalist Amanda Lindhout in Somalia. Allan Markin, a co-owner of the Calgary Flames, didn't know Lindhout when she was taken hostage in 2008. "I was just glad that she survived," he told The Canadian Press on Tuesday.

  • Richard Branson recalls rock 'n roll days as gets Hollywood star
    News
    Reuters

    Richard Branson recalls rock 'n roll days as gets Hollywood star

    Billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson on Tuesday recalled an era of sex, drugs, and rock'n roll as he added a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame to his list of accomplishments. Branson, 68, the maverick British businessman behind Virgin Group ventures into airlines, record stores and space travel, unveiled his star with the help of singers Lance Bass and Ben Harper - two of the many musicians he signed to his Virgin Records label. "Running a record company can be a lot of fun, and yes, it did involve sex, drugs and rock 'n roll," Branson said.

  • News
    Reuters

    Chinese electric car makers, nurtured by state, now look for way out of glut

    The company wants to find a niche in a crowded sector that already includes renewable equipment manufacturers, battery makers and property developers like the Evergrande Group, as well as established auto giants. "This (large number of firms) is inevitable, because whenever there is an emerging technology or emerging industry, there must be a hundred schools of thought and a hundred flowers blooming," said Zhou Xuan, Automagic's general manager, referring to Chinese leader Mao Zedong's ill-fated 1956 "Hundred Flowers" campaign aimed at encouraging new ideas. China is using preferential policies and brute manufacturing power to position itself at the forefront of global efforts to electrify transportation.

  • U.S. border patrol warns 'amnesty' for pot convictions doesn't guarantee entry
    News
    CBC

    U.S. border patrol warns 'amnesty' for pot convictions doesn't guarantee entry

    A senior U.S. border patrol official is warning travellers that cannabis remains an illegal narcotic in the U.S. despite Canada's legalization — and even if you've been granted amnesty for a previous pot-related criminal conviction, you could still be denied entry to the United States. A person with a criminal history typically seeks a pardon to make it easier to rent an apartment, apply for a mortgage, get a job or volunteer, or cross the Canada-U.S. border. Federal Liberal cabinet ministers are expected to unveil details of the pardon plan tomorrow — Oct. 17 — when cannabis for recreational purposes becomes officially legal in Canada.

  • Couple bikes from Ontario to Alberta for fresh start, fresh bud
    News
    CBC

    Couple bikes from Ontario to Alberta for fresh start, fresh bud

    From rolling hills in Ontario to golden leaves on the Prairies, Josh Millard and Chloe Chaput saw a lot of Canada over the past two months as they biked from Toronto to Edmonton. The couple decided to move to Alberta for front-row seats to a changing day in Canadian history — on the eve of legalization, they plan to be first in line to buy cannabis at an Edmonton pot shop. The 25-year-olds were lured to Alberta in part by the province's relatively lax cannabis rules.

  • Uber boosts bond offering to $2 billion: Bloomberg
    News
    Reuters

    Uber boosts bond offering to $2 billion: Bloomberg

    (Reuters) - Ride-hailing firm Uber Technologies Inc increased the size of its debut bond offering to $2 billion as orders for the private placement swelled, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday, citing people with knowledge of the sale. The offering includes a $1.5 billion portion of eight-year bonds, up from an originally planned $1 billion. The rest $500 million has a five-year tenure, the report said https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-16/uber-is-said-to-boost-bond-sale-to-2-billion-as-orders-swell. Uber did not immediately respond to a request for comment. ...

  • Lawyer says Paul Bernardo will 'express remorse' in parole bid. Here's why it's unlikely to sway the board
    News
    CBC

    Lawyer says Paul Bernardo will 'express remorse' in parole bid. Here's why it's unlikely to sway the board

    Nearly 25 years after Paul Bernardo was convicted of first-degree murder in the deaths of Ontario teens Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy, their mothers will address the parole board members who will decide whether to grant the notorious killer some freedom. Bernardo's chances are considered very slim.

  • China says interning Muslims brings them into 'modern' world
    News
    The Canadian Press

    China says interning Muslims brings them into 'modern' world

    China on Tuesday characterized its mass internment of Muslims as a push to bring into the "modern, civilized" world a destitute people who are easily led astray — a depiction that analysts said bore troubling colonial overtones. The report is the ruling Communist Party's latest effort to defend its extrajudicial detention of Central Asian Muslim minorities against mounting criticism. China's resistance to Western pressure over the camps highlights its growing confidence under President Xi Jinping, who has offered Beijing's authoritarian system as a model for other countries.

  • Hundreds of Sask. police officers trained to nab drug-impaired drivers
    News
    CBC

    Hundreds of Sask. police officers trained to nab drug-impaired drivers

    Saskatchewan police services say hundreds of officers have been trained to identify drug-impaired drivers ahead of recreational cannabis legalization on Wednesday. The Regina Police Service and the Saskatchewan RCMP say they have each trained about 100 officers to do field sobriety tests. More than 100 Mounties will also be trained as drug recognition evaluators, and some officers are learning to conduct roadside saliva testing.

  • Girl who died after being hit by Calgary C-Train wandered off: parents
    News
    CBC

    Girl who died after being hit by Calgary C-Train wandered off: parents

    The girl, who has been identified in a GoFundMe page as Efua Ogbeide, was struck by the train on Monday morning at an intersection near a Calgary C-Train station. The girl's father, Jeff Ogbeide, told CTV Calgary that his daughter wandered off as her mom was getting her and the other children dressed for school.

  • Artists fear SkyTrain expansion threatens Vancouver's struggling visual arts hub
    News
    CBC

    Artists fear SkyTrain expansion threatens Vancouver's struggling visual arts hub

    Two art galleries that have helped foster Vancouver talent worldwide face losing their home within two years. The former Finning tractor shop at 525 Great Northern Way, where the art galleries are housed, is slated to be razed for the new Broadway SkyTrain line — and both the city and the province say there is no turning back. Over the years, the location has featured photographers, painters and other artists including, Fred Herzog, Gordon Smith, Jack Shadbolt, Mary Pratt, Ben Reeves, Douglas Coupland and Sonny Assu.

  • Mega Millions jackpot now $667M, 3rd largest in US history
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Mega Millions jackpot now $667M, 3rd largest in US history

    The Mega Millions prize was already giant, but now it's even bigger. Lottery officials have increased the estimated jackpot for Tuesday night's drawing from $654 million to $667 million, making it the third-largest grand prize in U.S. history. The record lottery jackpot was a $1.6 billion Powerball prize won in January 2016.

  • More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid
    News
    CBC

    More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid

    Calgary held the first of six public engagement sessions Tuesday to provide information and let people weigh in on whether or not the city should bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. Barbara Hennessey was one of more than 200 people who attended the open house at the Dalhousie Community Association, hoping to gain some information to help her decide how to vote on Nov. 13. "It's a no, I don't feel Calgary is in a position to host them right now.

  • Waive wireless bills for some Hurricane Michael victims: U.S. FCC chief
    News
    Reuters

    Waive wireless bills for some Hurricane Michael victims: U.S. FCC chief

    Verizon Communications Inc, which has been criticized for the pace of its restoration efforts, said late on Tuesday that all consumer and business customers in hard hit Bay County and Gulf County, Florida, would be automatically credited for three months of mobile service for each line they have. At least 18 deaths in four states have been blamed on Michael, which crashed into the Florida Panhandle on Oct. 10 as one of the most powerful storms on record to hit the continental United States. Pai said in a written statement the progress in restoring service is "completely unacceptable" and that the FCC will investigate the outages.