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Study Shows There Was in Fact a Seismic 'Swift Quake' When Taylor Swift Brought the Eras Tour to L.A.

Researchers at CalTech and UCLA confirmed that Swifties' dancing and jumping at the fifth show of the pop superstar's six-night run at SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles resulted in seismic activity

<p>Javier Vicencio / Eyepix Group/Future Publishing via Getty </p> Taylor Swift performing at the Eras Tour in March 2023 in Arlington, Texas

Javier Vicencio / Eyepix Group/Future Publishing via Getty

Taylor Swift performing at the Eras Tour in March 2023 in Arlington, Texas

Taylor Swift's fans did more than just "Shake It Off" at one of her Eras Tour concerts in Los Angeles last year.

According to a study conducted by researchers at Caltech and UCLA, when the pop superstar, 34, brought her career-spanning concert to SoFi Stadium in August 2023, 70,000 Swifties' jumping and dancing amounting to creating seismic activity.

The event is the latest "Swift quake" to result from one of the Grammy winner's shows — as her July tour stop at Seattle's Lumen Field was similarly reported to have resulted in seismic activity the "equivalent of a 2.3 magnitude earthquake" last year.

The researchers released their findings in a report that was published on Wednesday and titled "Shake to the Beat: Exploring the Seismic Signals and Stadium Response of Concerts and Music Fans." According to the academic paper, the audience's movements, as opposed to the music itself, generated "distinct harmonic tremors."

<p>Christopher Jue/TAS24/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management </p> Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in February 2024 in Tokyo, Japan

Christopher Jue/TAS24/Getty Images for TAS Rights Management

Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in February 2024 in Tokyo, Japan

Related: See All the Best Photos from Taylor Swift's Eras Tour

According to The Los Angeles Times, the researchers conducted their study specifically on the fifth night of Swift's six-night run at SoFi Stadium by setting up motion sensors just over five-and-a-half miles from the venue.

The data was then analyzed by looking at spectrograms, or graphs tracking wave length frequencies, which found "Shake It Off" produced the largest local magnitude of 0.851 and "Love Story" also had a significant amplitude.

The scientists were even able to conclude just how large "Swift quakes" are by also looking at the "concert tremors" caused by other huge shows at the same venue from performers like Beyoncé, Metallica and Morgan Wallen.

Caltech and UCLA's study followed findings shared by seismologist Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, who previously looked at how the record-breaking attendance at her Eras Tour show at Seattle's Lumen Field in July resulted in seismic activity.

<p>Kevin Mazur/Getty</p> Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in March 2023 in Glendale, Arizona

Kevin Mazur/Getty

Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in March 2023 in Glendale, Arizona

Related: Taylor Swift's Eras Tour Surprise Songs: The List So Far

Swift's acclaimed Eras Tour first launched in spring 2023 and has shattered multiple attendance records throughout its run — even becoming the highest-grossing music tour of all time.

The North American leg of the hitmaker's tour ran throughout much of the spring and summer of last year, and she ended the year by playing a handful of shows across North America.

In 2024, Swift resumed her three-and-a-half-hour show with several dates in Japan, Australia and Singapore, and soon she'll take the concert overseas to Europe.

Following the release of her forthcoming, 11th studio album The Tortured Poets Department, which is due out on April 19, the "Cruel Summer" singer will resume the Eras Tour in late May. Dates across Europe and the U.K. are set to continue throughout the summer and, by the fall, she'll play a handful of additional North American dates.

<p>John Shearer/TAS23/Getty</p> Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in May 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee

John Shearer/TAS23/Getty

Taylor Swift performing in the Eras Tour in May 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee

Related: Taylor Swift and Travis Kelce Are 'Still Very Happy' Together as They Hang in L.A. amid Eras Tour Break (Source)

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The concert film of the singer-songwriter's live show recently made its streaming debut on Disney+. Several months after the documentary, directed by Sam Welch, premiered in cinemas in October of last year, the full-length version hit streaming with the show's entire setlist, which has been previosuly cut from the theatrical version for length.

The film broke box office records — earning the most of any concert film in history in its debut weekend — as well as streaming stats. The version exclusive to Disney+, which has been dubbed Taylor Swift | The Eras Tour (Taylor’s Version) , became the most-watched music film on the platform just three days after it arrived.

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