• Clinton invokes father's memory to hit Trump on business

    Hillary Clinton has landed on a very personal counterpunch to what she says is Donald Trump's checkered business past: her dad. As the Democratic presidential nominee works to undercut Trump's economic record and promote her plans for small businesses, she is invoking memories of her late father's Chicago drapery business. Recalling Hugh Rodham hard at work making and printing curtains for hotels and office buildings, Clinton argues that he would have been "stiffed" in a deal with the celebrity businessman.

    The Canadian Press
  • Mother of man killed in donation bin remembers 'quirky, silly and kindhearted' son

    Kristi Langille says her son, Tyler Laplante, was quirky, silly and kindhearted. Laplante was the 20-year-old from Surrey, B.C. who was killed Tuesday when he became trapped in a clothing donation bin near Guildford Town Centre in Surrey. Laplante was always loved by his family, Langille said, but he also struggled with addiction.

    CBC
  • Manitoban got 'pretty beat up' on hike to Into the Wild bus in Alaska

    When 22-year-old Matthew Sharp was swept 90-metres down the middle of a fast-flowing Alaskan river Wednesday, the ensuing rush of adrenaline at first kept the underlying pain at bay.

    CBC
  • In wake of cousin's fatal shooting, Dwyane Wade speaks out

    NBA star Dwyane Wade's cousin was an innocent bystander, police said, pushing her baby in a stroller near a Chicago school where she intended to register her children when she was fatally shot Friday. This July alone, there were 65 homicides — the most that month since 2006.

    The Canadian Press
  • So long, bumpy highways? N.W.T. gov't thinks it may have a solution

    If you've ever driven on highways in the Northwest Territories, you'll know that bumps and dips are a way of life — but the territorial government says they may have found a solution. Over the past four years, the Government of the Northwest Territories has been testing sections of road on Highway 3 between Behchoko and Yellowknife, using numerous methods in an attempt to combat abnormalities on highways caused each year by melting permafrost. "All of them are performing as our scientists predicted," said Kevin McLeod, the director of highway and marine services for the territory, "and there's one that's performing better than we wanted.

    CBC
  • Nova Scotia sexual assault victims get service dogs to help with PTSD

    Canine companions are helping to relieve symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in sexual assault survivors.

    CBC
  • Zimbabwe's black market targets women to be sold as wives

    Sat, Aug 27: As Zimbabwe deals with political and economic woes, a dried up riverbed has become an easy route for smugglers. A black market is propping up the needs of everyday life in the country. But in the crosshairs, women are being smuggled and sold as wives. Emily Elias reports.

    Global News
  • Quebecers worry about burkini debate

    France's top administrative court has overturned a controversial ban on burkinis, but some Quebecers are concerned about the bathing suit becoming a source of tension on beaches and public swimming pools. Elsy Fneiche, who lives in Laval, says it's her personal decision to wear a burkini because that is what she feels most comfortable in. The burkini is a full-body swimsuit that is similar to a wetsuit, meant for women who normally wear the hijab.

    CBC
  • Headstone of Civil War soldier to be fixed after 154 years

    Some mistakes are never too late to fix. A Civil War soldier misidentified when he was buried at an Ohio cemetery more than 150 years ago is to get a new headstone. Confederate soldier Augustus Beckmann was fatally wounded in the Battle of Shiloh on April 7, 1862.

    The Canadian Press
  • Jiffy Cabs owner dead in Burin Peninsula motorcycle crash

    A notable business owner is dead and a woman is in hospital following a motorcycle crash Saturday in the community of Harbour Mille on the Burin Peninsula. Tom Hollett was the owner of Jiffy Cabs in St. John's but lived in Burin and is well known in the area for his efforts to boost tourism. Marystown RCMP say crews arrived on the scene of the crash shortly after noon where it was confirmed the male driver of the motorcycle had died.

    CBC
  • Gonzaga School encourages young artists to make collage, kids pass

    Gonzaga Middle School opened its doors to young artists in the community on Saturday to create a collage recognizing the history of residential schools and reconciliation, unfortunately the kids didn't show. Tom Lussier, the school's principal and executive director, said controversy around the school's opening didn't have anything to do with the dismal attendance. Although Gonzaga has won over a few critics, some in the community wondered if it would also encourage students to abandon their cultural roots in favour of Catholicism.

    CBC
  • The Latest: Man arrested in nuns' deaths has criminal record

    A spokeswoman says the man arrested in the killing of two nuns in Mississippi has a criminal record and is currently on probation. Grace Simmons Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections, said Saturday that Rodney Earl Sanders was convicted of a felony DUI in Attala County and sentenced on Feb. 23, 2015. Fisher says Sanders was also convicted of armed robbery in Holmes County and served six years.

    The Canadian Press
  • Lost didgeridoo returned to Australian artist after airline fumble

    A once lost didgeridoo has now been found. David Williams, a musician from Australia, was in Saskatoon this week for the Saskatchewan World Indigenous Festival for the Arts. During his travels, he brought along with him his didgeridoo, an Indigenous Australian wind instrument traditionally made out of a hollowed-out piece of wood.

    CBC
  • Actress Emma Thompson backs Nunavut community against seismic testing

    Thompson was invited by the community through Greenpeace, which is financially backing Clyde River's Supreme Court of Canada battle against the National Energy Board's decision to allow seismic testing in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. The community has argued the underwater blasts used to search for oil could scare off marine mammals, a vital food supply for the remote Arctic community.

    CBC
  • Calgary police investigate death of woman whose body was found on a driveway in Cranston

    Calgary police are investigating after a woman was found lying dead on a driveway in the southeast community of Cranston on Saturday morning. Emergency crews arrived at the scene in the 100 block of Cranston Green S.E. around 7:15 a.m. after a resident reported a person in medical distress, said EMS spokesman Stuart Brideaux. A police spokesman said the medical examiner did not indicate a cause of death, so the case is being treated as suspicious until a post mortem can be conducted next week.

    CBC
  • Toronto mother sells house to support son with developmental disabilities

    Vicki McCallum is the mother of 27-year-old Julian McCallum. He is deaf, has an intellectual disability and suffers from a genetic syndrome — a combination that means Julian lives at home and depends on his parents. 

    CBC
  • Regina Symphony Orchestra welcomes Gordon Gerrard as new conductor

    "The biggest preparation has been moving to Regina, actually," said Gordon Gerrard, the RSO's new music director. Gerrard, originally from Manitoba, said it feels good to be a permanent fixture of the orchestra after having worked with the musicians as a guest multiple times in the past. Former conductor, Victor Sawa, stepped down in May after 20 years wielding the baton.

    CBC
  • The perils of taking information at face value

    The press release declared that an "overwhelming majority" of Winnipeg CAA members want the intersection to remain closed off to pedestrians. Given the longstanding debate over this very issue and the fact that Winnipeg's mayor Brian Bowman campaigned on the idea that citizens should once again be able to cross that intersection by foot, it was only a matter of time before our newsroom and all others rushed to publish their own versions of the story under tight deadlines. Ever the skeptic, a newsroom colleague thought it worthwhile to request a copy of the underlying survey results — which had not been provided as part of the press package — to better understand how CAA Manitoba derived its conclusions.

    CBC
  • Lost Lagoon's last mute swans have new home in animal sanctuary

    The last mute swans in Stanley Park's Lost Lagoon have flown the coop. With only three of the birds still living in the park, down from 70 in the 1960s, the Vancouver Park board has moved the remaining birds to an unspecified 10-acre animal sanctuary. "They're elderly birds, to start with," said park ranger Mike McIntosh.

    CBC
  • Federal government moving forward on plain packaging for cigarettes

    Sat, Aug 27: The federal government is moving forward on its pledge to require plain packaging for cigarettes sold in Canadian markets, a change that would further limit creative labeling and packaging techniques use by tobacco companies to attract customers. Su-ling Goh reports.

    Global News
  • Traffic chaos as truck hits, collapses bridge on UK highway

    Witnesses and British emergency services say a truck has struck an overpass and collapsed a pedestrian bridge onto one of England's busiest highways, injuring one person. Witnesses say a truck hauling construction vehicles appeared to clip the bridge Saturday on the London-bound M20 highway 30 miles (48 kilometres ) southeast of the British capital.

    The Canadian Press
  • Photographer captures Syrian family's new found joy in St. John's

    As images of the horrors Syrians are facing continue to pour in, a St. John's-based photographer is telling a different story. Photographer Elbonita Kozhani has documented the playfulness and challenges of the Khalif family – a Syrian couple and their eight children –  as they adjust to a new home in Canada's eastern-most province. "You typically see what is going on in Syria but one thing we don't see is the aftermath, after they have arrived.

    CBC
  • Thrill of the chase the ace: What are your chances?

    All the fuss and, for some, all the travel for what could be a $300,000 chase the ace jackpot in Bay de Verde might make you wonder: is it worth the trouble? Based on Wednesday night's attendance and sales at Bay de Verde, Fan calculated a person's odds of winning the jackpot at one in 42,000, although buying more tickets improve your odds — while increasing your investment. Fan has no plans to drive to Bay de Verde to try to win next Wednesday's jackpot, but he adds your chances of catching the ace are good when compared to big-jackpot national lotteries.

    CBC
  • Restoration revving up on Labrador's 1st snowmobile

    A rare piece of Labrador history is slowly taking shape in a barn on the Northern Peninsula. Machinist Frank Noseworthy is painstakingly reconstructing a 1927 Ford Model T snowmobile that was discovered in Nain two years ago. Where am I going to get that part How can I restore it?" Noseworthy told CBC's Labrador Morning.

    CBC
  • Pair extracted from precarious 50-foot ravine in Nelson, B.C.

    A couple was rescued by rope from a 50-foot ravine in Cottonwood Park in Nelson, B.C., Friday night.

    CBC