• Dene Nation 'not happy' with distribution of $600M in funding for on-reserve housing
    News
    CBC

    Dene Nation 'not happy' with distribution of $600M in funding for on-reserve housing

    The Dene Nation is looking to the federal government for clarity about $600 million in funding announced for on-reserve housing, because the majority of Indigenous people in the Northwest Territories don't live on reserves. "We have two reserves in the Northwest Territories, and 98 per cent of our communities are off reserves," said Dene National Chief Norman Yakeleya. The money is part of a 10-year housing strategy through Indigenous Services Canada that is being developed with First Nations.

  • Kawhi Leonard, Raptors find right mix to silence off-season chemistry concerns
    News
    CBC

    Kawhi Leonard, Raptors find right mix to silence off-season chemistry concerns

    In LeBron James' first season in Miami, the Heat started 9-8. In James' first season back in Cleveland, the Cavaliers began 5-7. This year, in James' first in Los Angeles, the Lakers are 7-6.

  • Cannabis edibles, drinks will mark '2nd wave' of legalization
    News
    CBC

    Cannabis edibles, drinks will mark '2nd wave' of legalization

    Bruce Linton, the founder and co-CEO of Canopy Growth, said new products developed by Tweed — the cannabis brand owned by Canopy and based in Smiths Falls — represent the next big opportunity. Recreational cannabis became legal on Oct. 17, though only dried and fresh cannabis, oil, plants and seeds are allowed under the legislation. The federal government has said edibles containing cannabis and cannabis concentrates would be legal on or before Oct. 17, 2019.

  • Canada has heard Turkish recordings on Khashoggi's killing: Trudeau
    News
    Reuters

    Canada has heard Turkish recordings on Khashoggi's killing: Trudeau

    Khashoggi, a critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, was killed at the kingdom's Istanbul consulate by a team sent from Riyadh. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said over the weekend that audio recordings of the killing had been given to the U.S., French, German and British governments. When asked on a visit to Paris whether Canadian intelligence had heard the Turkish recordings, Trudeau said: "Yes", although he added that had not heard them personally.

  • Indonesia urges more training for pilots after Lion Air crash
    News
    Reuters

    Indonesia urges more training for pilots after Lion Air crash

    The comments shed further light on the areas under scrutiny as investigators prepare to publish their preliminary report on Nov. 28 or 29, one month after the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX dived into the Java Sea, killing all 189 on board. Now the investigation's focus appears to be expanding to the clarity of U.S.-approved procedures to help pilots prevent the 737 MAX over-reacting to such a data loss, and methods for training them. Soerjanto Tjahjono, head of Indonesia's transportation safety committee of crash investigators (KNKT), said on Monday that Indonesian regulators would tighten training requirements as a result of the findings of the investigation so far.

  • Democrats seek ways to protect Mueller probe from Whitaker
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Democrats seek ways to protect Mueller probe from Whitaker

    Stepping up Democratic efforts to shield the Russia investigation, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said he would seek to tie a measure protecting special counsel Robert Mueller to must-pass legislation if acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker does not recuse himself from oversight of the probe. "Democrats in the House and Senate are going to attempt to put on must-pass legislation, mainly the spending bill, legislation that would prevent Whitaker from interfering in any way with the Mueller investigation," Schumer told The Associated Press Sunday. Schumer said keeping Whitaker in charge of the investigation would create a " constitutional crisis" and said if he doesn't recuse himself, Democrats would push to introduce legislation to protect Mueller's investigation.

  • Liberals planning national tourism strategy as part of election-year economic pitch
    News
    CBC

    Liberals planning national tourism strategy as part of election-year economic pitch

    The federal government is creating an advisory council on tourism to help develop a national strategy in a bid to boost the role of tourism in Canada's economy. Frank McKenna — ex-premier of New Brunswick, former Canadian ambassador to the U.S. and now deputy chairman of TD Bank — is to chair the new council. McKinsey also won a recent federal contract to study barriers in the tourism industry.

  • New poll shows growing disconnect between Canadians and nature
    Global News

    New poll shows growing disconnect between Canadians and nature

    The Nature Conservancy of Canada released its findings from a new poll that shows an increasing disconnect between Canadians and nature.

  • Silent cinema and empty seats at Vienna's Breitenseer Lichtspiele
    News
    Reuters

    Silent cinema and empty seats at Vienna's Breitenseer Lichtspiele

    Cinema buffs familiar with movie theaters in Los Angeles, Cannes and Berlin do not necessarily link their passion with Austria's capital Vienna. Its license dates back to 1905, when founder Anna Nitsch-Fitzfirst started showing moving pictures in a tent. Vienna's Breitenseer Lichtspiele cinema was the place to go to watch silent movie classics such as "A Woman of Affairs" with Greta Garbo in the 1920s.

  • Training kids to kill at Ukrainian nationalist camp
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Training kids to kill at Ukrainian nationalist camp

    The campers, some clad in combat fatigues, carefully aim their assault rifles. The camp has two purposes: to train children to defend their country from Russians and their sympathizers — and to spread nationalist ideology. "We never aim guns at people," instructor Yuri "Chornota" Cherkashin tells them.

  • 'We like to do it in a fun way': Prairie Pride teaches viewers about LGBTQ community in Sask.
    News
    CBC

    'We like to do it in a fun way': Prairie Pride teaches viewers about LGBTQ community in Sask.

    Saskatchewan's first TV program organized and produced by LGBTQ people hails from the Queen City. Prairie Pride, hosted on Access 7, takes a look at what's happening in the LGBTQ community in Regina and Saskatchewan as a whole. "It's a variety of stuff, we have a lot of good interviews,"  Prairie Pride host Terry Van Mackelberg said.

  • Bar gunman was 'out of control' in high school, coach says
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Bar gunman was 'out of control' in high school, coach says

    A second high school coach of the gunman who killed 12 people at a Southern California bar recalled him on Sunday as volatile and intimidating, and said that repeated complaints to school administrators about his behaviour failed to prompt any discipline. Evie Cluke coached Ian David Long on Newbury Park High School's track team in 2007 and 2008. Another time, he used his hand to mimic shooting her, Colell said, adding that she feared for herself whenever she was around him.

  • Youth spread kindness like confetti in Cambridge Bay
    News
    CBC

    Youth spread kindness like confetti in Cambridge Bay

    The "kindness confetti" adorning telephone polls, doorways and buildings were made by local youth and posted around the community after trick-or-treaters retreated for the night. It was an idea that Caroline Robinson, a mental health outreach worker for the Department of Health, came up with after seeing a Facebook post about a similar project in England.

  • Meet Tuk — the dog who hates music
    News
    CBC

    Meet Tuk — the dog who hates music

    A passerby might think something has gone horribly wrong in Mike Mansfield's house — a guitar string is plucked, and then comes a painful howl from a dog. The dog cries, whimpers, and he tries to run away. The Mansfield family brought Tuk home and when he heard music, he would howl along.

  • In the news today, Nov. 12
    News
    The Canadian Press

    In the news today, Nov. 12

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says politicians need to learn how to enhance citizen engagement through the use of social media in the face of leaders using those platforms to undermine democracy. Without mentioning any names, he suggested there are politicians who are using the technology to foster polarization in the electorate. U.S. President Donald Trump, of course, is notorious for using angry tweets to fire up his legions of followers and vent at his critics.

  • How hanging around his basement helps a P.E.I. man recover after a near fatal 30-metre fall
    News
    CBC

    How hanging around his basement helps a P.E.I. man recover after a near fatal 30-metre fall

    Matt Cormier clings to his basement climbing wall, with fingers and toes painfully reaching out to the nearest plastic hold.

  • Missing man's body found after truck went into water near Terra Nova
    News
    CBC

    Missing man's body found after truck went into water near Terra Nova

    Police say they have recovered the body of a 37-year-old man who went missing after his truck fell into a river in a remote area about 40 kilometres from the town of Terra Nova. Glovertown RCMP and the Bonavista Bay ground search and rescue team searched the shoreline Saturday while RCMP divers searched the submerged vehicle and surrounding area "until they ran out of daylight," according to a release sent Monday by police. In the end, his body was found after an air search by Universal Helicopters.

  • 'I'm going to miss it,' Walkerville row homes to come down after $1.5M fire
    News
    CBC

    'I'm going to miss it,' Walkerville row homes to come down after $1.5M fire

    The damage at a row of homes in Walkerville after a weekend fire is now pegged at around $1.5 to $1.8 million, according to Windsor fire. Crews were called to Argyle Road, between Ontario and Ottawa Streets, at about 6 a.m. Saturday because the attic above six townhouse units was ablaze. Chief fire prevention officer John Lee said the 105-year-old units have a common attic.

  • From liquor store to your door: Booze delivery app launches in Vancouver
    News
    CBC

    From liquor store to your door: Booze delivery app launches in Vancouver

    Consumers in Vancouver can now have booze delivered to their door with the arrival of an app-based service that includes age-verification software. The Boston-based Drizly website and mobile app promises to deliver consumers beer, wine and spirits from select Liquor Depot locations in under 60 minutes. The company first partnered with Canadian retailers in 2016 when it launched for the Alcanna-owned Liquor Depot and Liquor Barn stores in Edmonton.

  • P.E.I. farmers come together amid tough potato harvest
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. farmers come together amid tough potato harvest

    Looking out across his fields last week, Bryan Maynard said he was quickly losing hope. There were more than 100 acres of potatoes still in the ground at Farmboys, the farm he co-owns with his brother, Kyle, in Arlington, P.E.I. "It's almost a helpless feeling," Bryan Maynard said.

  • Safety watchdog suspends Air India operations director's pilot license for three years
    News
    Reuters

    Safety watchdog suspends Air India operations director's pilot license for three years

    This is the second time Arvind Kathpalia has been in trouble over alcohol tests. "The privileges of his license have been suspended for a period of three years from 11.11.2018 as per the provisions of applicable regulations," a spokesman at the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) said in a statement. Kathpalia, who sits on the airline's board, told Reuters the DGCA directive "is a rule and so it is meant to be followed".

  • New generation drives Calgary's Muslim arts scene
    News
    CBC

    New generation drives Calgary's Muslim arts scene

    More young Muslims in Calgary are picking up brushes, pens, cameras and microphones, and creating their own arts scene. A new generation is expressing themselves while honouring their religion in many different ways, including everything from traditional Islamic patterns and geometric art to performance poetry, writing and video installations. "Islam is rich in art but sometimes people don't associate Islam with art," said Uma Samari at the latest Muslim Art Movement event at Calgary's Festival Hall in Inglewood.

  • Bloody expensive: purse project helping homeless women tackle the cost of periods
    News
    CBC

    Bloody expensive: purse project helping homeless women tackle the cost of periods

    One Regina woman is trying to change that through the Regina Period Purse Project. Kot is taking donations of new or gently used handbags, as well as sanitary supplies like tampons, pads, and menstrual cups. It was launched by Jana Girdauskas in 2017 and has now expanded to include nine additional chapters across Ontario.

  • New $10 bill featuring Viola Desmond goes into circulation next week
    News
    The Canadian Press

    New $10 bill featuring Viola Desmond goes into circulation next week

    A new $10 banknote featuring Viola Desmond's portrait will go into circulation in a week, just over 72 years after she was ousted from the whites-only section of a movie theatre in New Glasgow, N.S. The civil rights pioneer and businesswoman is the first Canadian woman to be featured on a regularly circulating banknote, which will also show a map of Halifax's historic north end, home to one of Canada's oldest black communities and the site where Desmond opened her first salon. "That was a pinnacle event, down in New Glasgow, when she refused to give up her seat.

  • Russian cybersecurity firm Group IB to open global HQ in Singapore: CEO
    News
    Reuters

    Russian cybersecurity firm Group IB to open global HQ in Singapore: CEO

    Sachkov, 32, is a co-founder of the Moscow-based company which was set up in 2003 and focuses on investigating high-tech crimes and online fraud. The move to Singapore comes as Russia and the West are in a stand-off over allegations that Moscow meddled in the U.S. elections. Sachkov, who runs a team of more than 300 people, said timing of the Singapore move was right.