• Alberta Education shuts down private Christian school in Cold Lake

    Alberta Education has shut down a private Christian school in Cold Lake following an audit that found questionable spending and conflicts of interest. Trinity Christian School Association, which received more than $5.6 million in Alberta Education funding for the current school year, has lost its registration and accreditation effective immediately, the government announced Tuesday. An audit found that public funding from Trinity Christian School Association was directed to a third party, Wisdom Home Schooling Society, even though Wisdom had "no relationship" with Alberta Education.

  • Nurse accused of killing eight seniors went to rehab twice: friend

    Just a few weeks ago, Elizabeth Wettlaufer gave away her beloved dog, Nashville, a spry Jack Russell terrier. On Tuesday, Wettlaufer was charged with eight counts of first-degree murder in connection with the deaths of seniors in her care — seven of them at a nursing home just a 15-minute walk from her apartment in Woodstock, Ont. Wettlaufer would often join their tight little group as they sat on the grass outside the apartment when the weather was nice, chatting the night away, Gilbert said.

    The Canadian Press
  • Highway closed after rock slide injures contractors working to prevent slides

    Two workers have been injured in a rock slide in Yoho National Park that has closed the Trans-Canada Highway for an extended period. RCMP say the slide happened Monday west of Field, B.C., and that traffic has been stopped in both directions. Parks Canada says in a news release the slide occurred at a rock scaling site, a process that industry websites describe as the removal of loose rock from a slope.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'The gun just went off:' Documents describe deadly Saskatchewan farm shooting

    The afternoon Colten Boushie was killed, police say Gerald Stanley was at home with his son Sheldon when the two heard an SUV drive into his Saskatchewan farmyard. Sheldon Stanley said he heard the family's quad start up. None of the information has been tested in court and Gerald Stanley, who has been charged with second-degree murder, has pleaded not guilty.

    The Canadian Press
  • Trudeau's patience tested as protests interrupt youth labour event

    Protesters turned their backs and some people fired angry questions towards Justin Trudeau at a youth labour forum Tuesday in Ottawa. The prime minister voiced some frustration, but thanked the crowd for "challenging" him.

    Canadian Press Videos
  • Calgary man, 47, killed in workplace incident near Fox Creek

    A 47-year-old Calgary man died Sunday after he was injured on a Shell worksite near Fox Creek. Occupational Health and Safety says the incident occurred around 5:45 p.m. when workers were pumping water to another site. "The pump started revving and when workers went to investigate, a hose on the pump let go and hit one of the workers," said Lauren Welsh, a spokeswoman for Alberta Labour.

  • Hospital frustrated by no shows for MRI appointments

    Health officials on P.E.I. are frustrated by the number of people not showing up for their MRI appointments. On average three people a week fail to show up for their MRI appointments at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. "It's a limited resource and we don't like to see any appointment times wasted," said Gailyne MacPherson, the provincial director of diagnostic imaging.

  • British Airways flight diverted to Vancouver after cabin crew becomes ill

    A British Airways A380 aircraft on its way from San Francisco to London made an emergency landing in Vancouver late Monday after crew members became unwell, sending 25 to hospital. Flight BA286, carrying about 400 passengers, was surrounded by emergency vehicles shortly after it touched down at Vancouver International Airport around 11:30 p.m. PT. It appears all of those hospitalized were cabin crew.

  • These are the most lawless countries in the world

    These are the world’s most lawless countries, according to the World Justice Project’s Rule of Law index.  The index judges how the rule of law is experienced by members of the public in everyday situations in 113 countries and jurisdictions.  It measures a number of indicators, including constraints on government power, levels of corruption, security, open government and criminal justice, to consider how laws are used and enforced.  The WJP uses the testimonies of local residents and legal experts to compile their data - the aim being to accurately collate the experiences of the general population, including marginalised groups.  Denmark was found to be the most lawful country, demonstrating the strongest adherence to the rule of law, and the UK was tenth.  In the most lawless countries, the report found that criminal activity goes unchecked, laws are not applied equally, corruption is apparent, and foreign investment does not reach the people who needed it.  These are the ten countries where the rule of law was applied the least effectively.

    Matilda Long
  • 'I couldn't believe it's real': Residents of Woodstock, Ont., facility stunned by murder charges

    How can that be in a facility like this?" said one retirement home resident who, like several others who spoke with CBC, didn't want to be identified. Caressant Care operates six facilities in southwestern Ontario. Hours earlier, Ontario Provinal Police announced that former Caressant employee Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer, 49, has been charged with eight counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of eight nursing home patients, including one at the Meadow Park facility in London, a 30-minute drive southwest of Woodstock.

  • Mother heartbroken after no criminal charges recommended in B.C. party-bus death

    The grieving mother of a 23-year-old woman who died after falling out of a party bus says she's heartbroken that criminal charges won't be laid in the case. Vancouver police said Tuesday that a malfunctioning door was a main factor in the death of Chelsea James. The owner and driver have been fined under the Motor Vehicle Act, but there is no offence in the Criminal Code to charge them with, police said.

    The Canadian Press
  • Judge finds Kellie Johnson not criminally responsible for killing son, 5

    Johnson, 38, was charged with the first-degree murder of Jonathan Vetter, who was stabbed to death in his sleep at her home. On Tuesday, Court of Queen's Bench Judge Neil Gabrielson told the court Johnson suffered from schizophrenia and she was hallucinating when she slashed the boy's throat.

  • Nutty intruder surprises Oak Bay couple

    Christine Kiss could tell something was wrong the moment she and her husband arrived back at their Oak Bay home from a five-week vacation. "The shells were strewn all over the floor," Kiss said. The constables were about to leave when they heard a squeak in the laundry area, Kiss said.

  • Quebec school board must pay boy who had chemical substance poured over his head

    A Montreal-area school board has been ordered to pay $15,000 to a student who had a corrosive substance poured over his head in a chemistry class. The boy was 15 years old in February 2015 when a friend of his sprinkled some sodium hydroxide into his hair as a joke. The judge's ruling said the chemical product reached his brain.

    The Canadian Press
  • 400 cattle stranded, farmer says province needs to step up

    A northern Manitoba farmer said he's feeling exhausted and frustrated after weeks of battling floodwater on and around his land that he says the province is responsible for. Tim Berscheid has 400 cows and calves he wants to care for but can't.

  • Teenager attacked and tossed in Winnipeg river recalls darkness and pain

    A teenager who was beaten, sexually assaulted and forced into a Winnipeg river told her attacker Tuesday she continues to suffer the physical and emotional pain of an attack that almost claimed her life. The girl, who cannot be identified under a court order, wrote a one-page victim impact statement for the sentencing hearing of Justin Hudson, 22, who pleaded guilty last December to two counts of aggravated sexual assault.

    The Canadian Press
  • Lightning goalie Ben Bishop loses his two front teeth but stays in the game

    Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Ben Bishop made 40 saves and lost two teeth Tuesday night. Bishop was dazed by a Peter Holland wrist shot late with 6:40 in the second period of Tampa's 7-3 win over the Maple Leafs. The hard shot went through the legs of defenceman Andrej Sustr and hit Bishop in the mask, jarring his two front teeth — both crowns — loose.

    The Canadian Press
  • With Trump on ropes, Clinton looks to new target of winning power in Congress

    Spare a thought for Donald Trump — Hillary Clinton barely did as she began a visit to America's biggest swing state Tuesday. Democrats' increasing confidence about winning the White House has prompted a late-campaign recalibration, slightly away from the presidential race toward the new target of regaining power in Congress. Clinton spent the first five minutes of a Florida speech lacing into an opponent — and it wasn't Trump.

    The Canadian Press
  • Family, friends of alleged victims of Woodstock, Ont., nurse remember loved ones

    Elizabeth Wettlaufer, 49, has been charged with eight counts of first-degree murder. Daniel Silcox, of Pontypool Ont., said he discovered his father was among the alleged victims while listening to the radio Tuesday morning.

  • Maple Leafs coach Mike Babcock has brief salty moment at goalie criticism

    Maple Leafs coach Mike Babcock got a little salty Tuesday when a reporter, referencing Don Cherry, took aim at the team's goaltending. Facing the assertion that the goaltending has been an issue in Toronto for a number of years, Babcock pointed out the season was just five games old and that he had been in charge of the team for a little over a season. Well now that I know where I'm getting my facts from, here we go," the coach said.

    The Canadian Press
  • N.W.T. Dene leaders call for halt to B.C.'s Site C dam construction

    Dene leaders in the N.W.T. are calling for an immediate halt on construction of the Site C Dam in northern B.C., saying it violates treaty rights on their traditional homeland. In a news release, Dene National Chief Bill Erasmus said the federal government has an obligation to respect land agreements with the Dene, including the protection of water flowing from the dam area into Dene territory. The release said Dene leaders met last week in Inuvik and voted unanimously to call for a stop of construction of the dam.

  • Toronto renters blast remote security system after homeless men found asleep in shared spaces

    In two Toronto apartment buildings, the security situation has deteriorated to the point where homeless people have been able to take up residence in basement bathrooms and laundry rooms. Residents at the Bloor Street West and Spadina Avenue-area apartment towers say the problems began when management, Starlight Investments, got rid of their human security guards in favour of a video camera-based security system around two years ago. Since then, the residents say, their buildings have become such easy marks that people can infiltrate shared spaces like laundry rooms.

  • Landscape photographer of the year - the winners

    These are the spectacular winners of the 2016 Landscape Photographer of the Year awards. Dramatic coastal views, busy city-scapes and glorious countryside vistas were all recognised by the judges, who were looking for photographs that capture the UK’s rich and diverse landscapes. A picture of a frantic storm of swallows on the Brighton seafront, taken by photographer Matthew Cattell, was crowned the overall winner.  Charlie Waite, the founder of the Awards, said: “The sense of movement is palpable in Matthew’s photograph and you really feel what it would have been like to stand beside him.  “The starlings seem to be swirling around the iconic remains of Brighton’s West Pier in a manner reminiscent of the tornado in the Wizard of Oz.” The Landscape Photographer of the Year Awards are held in association with VisitBritain.  Winning entries will be displayed on the Balcony of London Waterloo from 21st November 2016 - 5th February 2017.  The Awards book, Landscape Photographer of the Year: Collection 10 (AA Publishing) is available now.

    Matilda Long
  • Former Spitfire Ben Johnson sentenced to 3 years in prison

    Former Windsor Spitfire Ben Johnson has been sentenced to three years in prison for a sexual assault conviction. Johnson will be listed with the sex offender registry for 20 years. Johnson's lawyer Patrick Ducharme said an appeal of the conviction will most likely be filed on Wednesday.

  • Driver dies after slamming into tree next to Memorial Drive

    A motorist who veered off Memorial Drive east of downtown and struck a large tree has died from his injuries, police say. The Volkswagen sedan appeared to be travelling normally in an eastbound lane when, according to witnesses, the driver suddenly went off the road near the Bridgeland-Memorial C-Train station, said Det. The man, believed to be in his 70s, had to be extracted from the vehicle, which hit the tree with such force that the tree toppled on top of the car.



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