• Don Cheadle, Michelle Williams outraged at Trump's Dwyane Wade tweet

    Donald Trump is once again igniting outrage with a single tweet. The U.S. Republican presidential nominee posted a message on social media Saturday morning following the shooting death of Nykea Aldridge, the cousin of NBA star Dwyane Wade. The initial tweet didn't offer condolences, instead focusing on his bid to win African-American voters in the Nov. 8 American election.

    CBC
  • Manitoban got 'pretty beat up' on hike to Into the Wild bus in Alaska

    When 22-year-old Matthew Sharp was swept 90-metres down the middle of a fast-flowing Alaskan river Wednesday, the ensuing rush of adrenaline at first kept the underlying pain at bay.

    CBC
  • Mother of man killed in donation bin remembers 'quirky, silly and kindhearted' son

    Kristi Langille says her son, Tyler Laplante, was quirky, silly and kindhearted. Laplante was the 20-year-old from Surrey, B.C. who was killed Tuesday when he became trapped in a clothing donation bin near Guildford Town Centre in Surrey. Laplante was always loved by his family, Langille said, but he also struggled with addiction.

    CBC
  • Zimbabwe's black market targets women to be sold as wives

    Sat, Aug 27: As Zimbabwe deals with political and economic woes, a dried up riverbed has become an easy route for smugglers. A black market is propping up the needs of everyday life in the country. But in the crosshairs, women are being smuggled and sold as wives. Emily Elias reports.

    Global News
  • Quebecers worry about burkini debate

    France's top administrative court has overturned a controversial ban on burkinis, but some Quebecers are concerned about the bathing suit becoming a source of tension on beaches and public swimming pools. Elsy Fneiche, who lives in Laval, says it's her personal decision to wear a burkini because that is what she feels most comfortable in. The burkini is a full-body swimsuit that is similar to a wetsuit, meant for women who normally wear the hijab.

    CBC
  • The Latest: Man arrested in nuns' deaths has criminal record

    A spokeswoman says the man arrested in the killing of two nuns in Mississippi has a criminal record and is currently on probation. Grace Simmons Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections, said Saturday that Rodney Earl Sanders was convicted of a felony DUI in Attala County and sentenced on Feb. 23, 2015. Fisher says Sanders was also convicted of armed robbery in Holmes County and served six years.

    The Canadian Press
  • Traffic chaos as truck hits, collapses bridge on UK highway

    Witnesses and British emergency services say a truck has struck an overpass and collapsed a pedestrian bridge onto one of England's busiest highways, injuring one person. Witnesses say a truck hauling construction vehicles appeared to clip the bridge Saturday on the London-bound M20 highway 30 miles (48 kilometres ) southeast of the British capital.

    The Canadian Press
  • So long, bumpy highways? N.W.T. gov't thinks it may have a solution

    If you've ever driven on highways in the Northwest Territories, you'll know that bumps and dips are a way of life — but the territorial government says they may have found a solution. Over the past four years, the Government of the Northwest Territories has been testing sections of road on Highway 3 between Behchoko and Yellowknife, using numerous methods in an attempt to combat abnormalities on highways caused each year by melting permafrost. "All of them are performing as our scientists predicted," said Kevin McLeod, the director of highway and marine services for the territory, "and there's one that's performing better than we wanted.

    CBC
  • How to ask China about human rights: Dos and don'ts for Trudeau

    There's one question Prime Minister Justin Trudeau can be certain reporters will ask him on his first official trip to China this week. "Did you bring up human rights forcefully enough? Journalists have asked variations of these questions for decades, grasping for some way to ensure politicians aren't abandoning principle as they try to build ties to countries, such as China, with a record of high-profile human rights abuses.

    CBC
  • Boy, 3, suffers life-threatening injuries after car hits pole in Toronto

    Toronto police say a child suffered life-threatening injuries after a car hit a pole near Avenue Road and Eglinton Avenue West early Saturday. The child was transported after the crash at Avenue Road and Roselawn Avenue to Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children. Toronto paramedics told CBC News they were called to the scene at 8:10 a.m. Two of three occupants in the car were taken to hospital.

    CBC
  • Convenience store the big winner in McIvers chase the ace fever

    There are just seven cards left in the deck in the wildly popular chase the ace fundraiser for the McIver's Come Home Year 2017 celebrations. "It's wonderful, bring it on," laughed Tammy Sheppard, who runs the business on the north shore of the Bay of Islands, with her husband Peter Sheppard.

    CBC
  • Calgary police investigate death of woman whose body was found on a driveway in Cranston

    Calgary police are investigating after a woman was found lying dead on a driveway in the southeast community of Cranston on Saturday morning. Emergency crews arrived at the scene in the 100 block of Cranston Green S.E. around 7:15 a.m. after a resident reported a person in medical distress, said EMS spokesman Stuart Brideaux. A police spokesman said the medical examiner did not indicate a cause of death, so the case is being treated as suspicious until a post mortem can be conducted next week.

    CBC
  • Lost Lagoon's last mute swans have new home in animal sanctuary

    The last mute swans in Stanley Park's Lost Lagoon have flown the coop. With only three of the birds still living in the park, down from 70 in the 1960s, the Vancouver Park board has moved the remaining birds to an unspecified 10-acre animal sanctuary. "They're elderly birds, to start with," said park ranger Mike McIntosh.

    CBC
  • Headstone of Civil War soldier to be fixed after 154 years

    Some mistakes are never too late to fix. A Civil War soldier misidentified when he was buried at an Ohio cemetery more than 150 years ago is to get a new headstone. Confederate soldier Augustus Beckmann was fatally wounded in the Battle of Shiloh on April 7, 1862.

    The Canadian Press
  • Pair extracted from precarious 50-foot ravine in Nelson, B.C.

    A couple was rescued by rope from a 50-foot ravine in Cottonwood Park in Nelson, B.C., Friday night.

    CBC
  • Jasper Park camping trip brings refugees together from around the world

    As the sun set behind the Rocky Mountains, the campers abandoned volleyball and soccer games to gather around the campfire. Most are newcomers to Canada, and most have never been camping before. Many of the campers have lived in Edmonton for less than six months.

    CBC
  • Photographer captures Syrian family's new found joy in St. John's

    As images of the horrors Syrians are facing continue to pour in, a St. John's-based photographer is telling a different story. Photographer Elbonita Kozhani has documented the playfulness and challenges of the Khalif family – a Syrian couple and their eight children –  as they adjust to a new home in Canada's eastern-most province. "You typically see what is going on in Syria but one thing we don't see is the aftermath, after they have arrived.

    CBC
  • Restoration revving up on Labrador's 1st snowmobile

    A rare piece of Labrador history is slowly taking shape in a barn on the Northern Peninsula. Machinist Frank Noseworthy is painstakingly reconstructing a 1927 Ford Model T snowmobile that was discovered in Nain two years ago. Where am I going to get that part How can I restore it?" Noseworthy told CBC's Labrador Morning.

    CBC
  • Fire destroys farm equipment dealership in Summerside, P.E.I.

    RCMP in Charlottetown said the fire broke out at Green Diamond Equipment Ltd. on Locke Shore Road near Route 2 around 11 a.m. on Saturday. Summerside Fire Chief Jim Peters said fighting the fire was challenging because of strong winds and a lack of water supply. Jason Gaudet lives and works at Sherbrooke Mechanical located next door to the blaze.

    CBC
  • Free coding course in Halifax emphasizes need for programming skills

    Halifax's tech scene got a few new members after a free coding course Saturday. Around 115 people attended the introduction to web programming course put on by Lighthouse Labs at the Halifax Central Library. "I always hear about computer programming.

    CBC
  • Gonzaga School encourages young artists to make collage, kids pass

    Gonzaga Middle School opened its doors to young artists in the community on Saturday to create a collage recognizing the history of residential schools and reconciliation, unfortunately the kids didn't show. Tom Lussier, the school's principal and executive director, said controversy around the school's opening didn't have anything to do with the dismal attendance. Although Gonzaga has won over a few critics, some in the community wondered if it would also encourage students to abandon their cultural roots in favour of Catholicism.

    CBC
  • Monthly marijuana cooking class teaches Calgarians to cook with cannabis

    A group of Calgarians took part in a special cooking class Saturday to learn to cook with marijuana. First up, Crystal Gooding explained her recipe for CannaCoconut Oil, which is coconut oil infused with marijuana. "You're going to dump your cannabis in there, your ounce... and you're going to bring it to a good simmer," she told the group of about 15 people who turned up at the 420 Clinic in Inglewood for the cooking class.

    CBC
  • Little precedent for $400 million cash payment to Iran

    A $400 million cash delivery to Iran to repay a decades-old arbitration claim may be unprecedented in recent U.S. history, according to legal experts and diplomatic historians, raising further questions about a payment timed to help free four American prisoners in Iran. The money was sent to Iran on Jan. 17, the same day Iran agreed to release the prisoners. The Obama administration claimed for months the events were separate, but recently acknowledged the cash was used as leverage until the Americans were allowed to leave Iran.

    The Canadian Press
  • Lost didgeridoo returned to Australian artist after airline fumble

    A once lost didgeridoo has now been found. David Williams, a musician from Australia, was in Saskatoon this week for the Saskatchewan World Indigenous Festival for the Arts. During his travels, he brought along with him his didgeridoo, an Indigenous Australian wind instrument traditionally made out of a hollowed-out piece of wood.

    CBC
  • Ratatouille recipe serves up harvest vegetables

    Drawing inspiration from fall harvest vegetables, chef Fraser MacLeod of 529 Wellington prepared and served a roasted squash ratatouille using only the ingredients he could find at the downtown Winnipeg farmers market on Thursday.

    CBC