• Alabama inmate coughs, heaves 13 minutes into execution

    A man who killed an Alabama convenience store clerk more than two decades ago was put to death Thursday night, an execution that required two consciousness tests as the inmate heaved and coughed 13 minutes into the lethal injection. Ronald Bert Smith Jr., 45, was pronounced dead at 11:05 p.m., about 30 minutes after the procedure began at the state prison in southwest Alabama. Smith was convicted of capital murder in the Nov. 8, 1994, fatal shooting of Huntsville store clerk Casey Wilson.

    The Canadian Press
  • Brampton man convicted of sexual assault has left the country

    A Brampton man convicted of sexual assault and possibly facing years in prison has managed to slip out of the country before being sentenced. Moazzam Tariq, 29, flew to Pakistan from Montreal on Nov.18, a Toronto court heard on Thursday, two weeks before his scheduled sentencing hearing. In October, Tariq was found guilty of sexually assaulting a Toronto woman who was too drunk to consent to sex.

    CBC
  • Union president Jones challenges Trump on Carrier

    The union president slammed by Donald Trump on Twitter challenged the president-elect Thursday to back up his claim that a deal to discourage Carrier Corp. from closing an Indiana factory would save 1,100 American jobs. "He overreacted, President-elect Trump did," United Steelworkers Local 1999 President Chuck Jones told CNN. Trump and Vice-President-elect Mike Pence — governor of Indiana — visited Carrier's Indianapolis factory Dec. 1 to celebrate the deal.

    The Canadian Press
  • B.C. boy with mysterious broken bones returned to parents after abuse ruled out

    While watching their son and daughter play in a home near Vancouver's children's hospital, a couple from northern British Columbia received the news they had been praying for. The Ministry of Children and Family Development had seized their two children for the second time in October, because their five-year-old son kept suffering unexplained broken bones.

    The Canadian Press
  • Vancouver moving company must pay $14,000 for deceiving customers

    A Vancouver moving company has been hit with more than $14,000 in penalties and costs for deceiving its customers - prompting a company with a similar name to demand better government regulation of the industry to protect consumers and reputable movers. Canadian Van Lines, also known as Coronation Van Lines, was the target of an investigation by Consumer Protection B.C., the province's consumer watchdog agency. "We found Canadian Van Lines had engaged in deceptive business practices," said spokesperson Tatiana Chabeaux-Smith in a media release.

    CBC
  • Defendant's pal: Will Smith's wife and I tried to calm him

    A friend of the driver on trial for killing former New Orleans Saints star Will Smith told a jury Thursday that he tried to restrain Smith in the heated exchange of words following an April 9 traffic crash. "I grabbed Mr. Smith and asked him to please chill out," Kevin O'Neal said. Unlike other witnesses, O'Neal gave no indication that the argument had cooled before shots were fired that night, although Smith's wife Racquel had tried to push her husband back and calm him down.

    The Canadian Press
  • The second Metro Vancouver snowstorm: what you need to know

    Environment Canada has issued a warning that 10 to 20 centimetres is expected for Metro Vancouver, the Sunshine Coast, Sea-to-Sky Region, the Fraser Valley, and virtually all of Vancouver Island. There will be a possible break after that before picking up in the afternoon — but at that point, the snow will likely turn to rain at lower elevations (most of Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, and the southwest Fraser Valley). B.C.'s transportation minister isn't ruling out shutting down the Alex Fraser Bridge and several lanes on the Port Mann, if the storm is as bad as expected.

    CBC
  • Vaughan mother allegedly called racial slur by York Region District School Board trustee

    Thu, Dec 8: The York Region District School Board is facing another alleged incident of racism after several human rights complaints were filed against the board. In the latest incident, a trustee allegedly directed a slur at a black parent during a public meeting last month. Marianne Dimain has the story.

    Global News
  • Historians shrug as two prime ministers erased from Canadian banknotes

    Losing two of Canada's wartime prime ministers from the country's $50 and $100 bills won't be a step backwards for a country that has plenty to learn about itself, a pair of leading history buffs say. Soon after the federal government announced Thursday that the faces of William Lyon Mackenzie King and Sir Robert Borden would be dropped from the banknotes, Historica Canada weighed in, saying there will always be ways to pay tribute to the two men. "We think that history is a moving target," said Anthony Wilson-Smith, CEO of Canada's largest independent organization devoted to enhancing awareness of Canadian history.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'More children are going to get hurt,' province warned on eve of review

    The man who led Alberta's last task force on children who die in provincial care says more kids are going to get hurt while the government conducts yet another review of the children-in-care system. "It's pretty frustrating to hear that this is the exact same process that the previous Conservative government went through about two years ago," said Tim Richter who chaired the Alberta Child Implementation Oversight Committee in 2014. "It's really about implementing the recommendations that have been made.

    CBC
  • Man paralyzed in hatchet attack sues province for failing to keep up with care costs

    When Michael Levy was 18, he was attacked by three other teens at a youth dance in Surrey, B.C. The three 17-year-olds were armed with bottles, bear spray and a hatchet. Now, 10 years later, Levy is suing the province for allegedly refusing to increase his payments to match the climbing costs of his care as his caregivers' rates increase over the years. The suit alleges the province has also refused to compensate for the resulting care cost increases.

    CBC
  • Woman drugged, sexually assaulted after taking Winnipeg taxi, says Indigenous group

    A woman says she took a taxi in Winnipeg last month and after being given something to smoke, she woke up the next day in bed with a man she didn't know.

    CBC
  • Meadow Lake, Sask., landlord accused of sexually assaulting tenants

    A landlord in Meadow Lake, Sask., is being accused of sexually assaulting at least two of his tenants. Meadow Lake RCMP first received a complaint in October. RCMP said a second victim — also a former tenant — came forward shortly after.

    CBC
  • More people apply to become Mounties under new rules

    There are early signs that changes to the RCMP's application process are leading to a big bump in recruits. The police force changed its application requirements six months ago with the aim of simplifying the process and making more people eligible to apply. Now, recruits don't have to be Canadian citizens, they can put off taking the physical fitness test until they've been accepted at the RCMP's training division and university graduates no longer have to take the national police force's entrance exam.

    CBC
  • How life off the grid in Cape Breton lured families from British Columbia

    This is how Brett Walkins recalls the three years he spent living in British Columbia's Fraser Valley: Nights of teeth-grinding and swearing in his sleep. Walkins and his young family now live near Whycocomagh, N.S., a small village in rural Cape Breton where two local sisters made international headlines in September when they started offering free, three-acre plots of land to anyone willing to work at their understaffed country store for five years. While the offer of free land piqued the interest of the Walkinses — they had already been looking for a home in P.E.I. after their escape from B.C. — they agreed to come to Cape Breton in search of something far less tangible.

    The Canadian Press
  • Ottawa paramedics warned to wear masks over fear of powerful new drug

    A drug called carfentanil, an animal tranquillizer that's 100 times stronger than fentanyl, is so dangerous Ottawa paramedics are being warned to wear masks on the job. Carfentanil has now been detected in drugs sold on the streets in Ontario. Yesterday, Toronto police also warned they found carfentanil in heroin sold on city streets.

    CBC
  • Windsor, Ont., homeless woman goes from sleeping in dog cage to new apartment

    Minerva Treminio, who has spent many nights sleeping in a dog cage on the streets of Windsor, Ont., has finally found a home of her own. After being homeless for eight months, Treminio was accepted into the city's public housing. Like Treminio, hundreds of people struggle to find a place to sleep in Windsor, according to the latest results of a survey by the city and the Homeless Coalition of Windsor Essex County.

    CBC
  • Attack on Toronto high school thwarted, 17-year-old under arrest: police

    Police say a tip from the U.S. helped thwart an attack on a high school in Toronto on the 27th anniversary of the massacre at Polytechnique Montreal. Len Nicholson told reporters a news conference Wednesday night that the tip came from a member of the public on Dec. 1, when a person saw the threat on a blogging site. "Toronto police received a call ... from an individual in the United States, on the west coast, saying that there was a threat that was posted on a blog site and it was threatening the school in Toronto," Nicholson said.

    The Canadian Press
  • 6.5-magnitude earthquake strikes off north coast of California

    A 6.5 magnitude earthquake struck off the north coast of California at around 6:50 a.m. PT Thursday, the U.S. Geological Service reported. There were reports of moderated shaking along the California and Oregon coasts, but no tsunami alert was issued and no damage has been reported. It occurred on the boundary between the Juan de Fuca Plate, which stretches all the way up to B.C., and the San Andreas Fault, according to CBC seismologist Johanna Wagstaffe.

    CBC
  • Hells Angel testifies he strung along police informant over cocaine shipment

    A member of the Hells Angels says he never intended to ship cocaine from Ontario to Saskatoon but strung along a police informant because the man was his sole source of drugs for his back pain. Rob Allen, 36, testified Wednesday at his trial for cocaine trafficking, charges laid under the RCMP's Project Forseti, which saw 19 locations raided across Alberta and Saskatchewan. Allen testified that Harder pestered him constantly about using his contacts with Hells Angels in Ontario to get cocaine.

    The Canadian Press
  • Motherless bear cub caught by neighbours, sent to sanctuary

    Many bears have been shot by conservation officers in B.C. this year, but a tiny black bear cub hanging around a Revelstoke neighbourhood will get a second chance. The motherless cub, about the size of a small dog, was hanging around the home of Fred and Penny Lee for about a month before it was trapped by the Lees and their neighbours and taken to a bear rehabilitation centre in Smithers. "It kept coming and going, and we knew with this cold weather coming it probably didn't have a chance for the rest of the winter," Fred Lee told Radio West guest host Josh Pagé.

    CBC
  • Syrian children ask for violins and lions after 1st meeting with Santa

    Wesan Hsakh swiped at the cookie crumbs around her mouth and grinned. The 13-year-old Syrian refugee had just seen Santa and told him about her wish list. "I wish to Santa so I can have an iPad, so I can have a telephone and makeup," she said. Unlike many of her Canadian peers, Wesan has never written a letter to Santa before.

    CBC
  • Fatal shooting of teen has mother grieving, neighbours worried

    The fatal shooting of a 17-year-old boy in Hintonburg Tuesday night has left an Ottawa woman childless and has people in the community questioning the safety of their neighbourhood. Leslie Mwakio was found shot in an SUV on Bayswater Avenue near Laurel Street at about 10:40 p.m., police said. Phillipina Mwakio, the victim's mother, spoke briefly with CBC News Wednesday afternoon as police escorted her to a friend's home at her request.

    CBC
  • 'Incredibly rare': Dinosaur blood, feathers found in ancient amber

    A new discovery from the University of Alberta suggests the plot of Jurassic Park never needed the mosquito. In order to clone a new race of dinosaurs, genetic engineers in the blockbuster sci-fi film extract dinosaur DNA from insects who fed on the prehistoric creatures 130 million years ago and then became entombed in amber. Paleontologists have found a tiny segment of dinosaur tail preserved in a golden nugget of amber from Myanmar, dating back 100 million years.

    CBC
  • Pooches, owners turn up noses at newly renovated Leslieville dog park

    A Leslieville dog park that pet owners contributed thousands of dollars to renovate is getting bad reviews, not only from some owners, but their dogs, as well. "People in the dog walking community are extremely upset that their office space and the place where they exercise their dogs is pretty much useless now," said dog trainer Katie Reid. The dog run, located at Dundas Street East and Greenwood Avenue, re-opened after about a month-long renovation last week.

    CBC

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