Blood, bullet casing found in Tim Bosma's pickup truck, murder trial told
Blood, bullet casing found in Tim Bosma's pickup truck, murder trial told

Family members of Tim Bosma winced and looked away as a police officer told his murder trial the details of a bullet casing and blood she found inside the Hamilton man's pickup truck. Laura McLellan of Halton Regional Police testified Thursday that she and her team of officers didn't initially

30 minutes agoThe Canadian Press
  • Ontario man believed missing or dead for 30 years to be reunited with his family

    An Ontario man who disappeared three decades ago and was believed dead is about to be reunited with his family. Niagara Regional Police say Edgar Latulip was reported missing in 1986 from Waterloo region. Phil Gavin says Latulip took a bus to the Niagara region, where he suffered a head injury that robbed him of much of his memory.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Couple who raped and killed Sarnia, Ont., teacher says 'sorry' to her family

    A couple whose depraved sexual appetites led them to brutally murder and rape an Ontario teacher they picked up on the side of the road three years ago apologized to the woman's grief-stricken family Thursday as they prepared to spend the rest of their lives behind bars. Tanya Bogdanovich, 34, and Michael MacGregor, 22, chose to face Noelle Paquette's family and friends in a packed St. Thomas courtroom as they took turns voicing their remorse for the gruesome killing that sent shockwaves through southwestern Ontario. "I want to say sorry, I know I can't change or take back what I've done no matter how much I wish I could," said MacGregor, who addressed the court first.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Take Care of Your Beard

    Discover beard care products for the common man. Shop beard kits, oils balms & more!

  • Daddy-long-legs spider wins lopsided battle with deadly snake

    Aussie farmer Patrick Lees snapped this photo last past weekend when he noticed a venomous brown snake caught in the web of spider on his farm, reports ABC. “I’ve heard about it, but I’ve never seen it, let alone a daddy-long-legs,” Lees told ABC. Lees decided to leave the snake alone, as a group of the eight-legged arachnids had already begun encasing the brown snake in web.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • Promises kept, broken, in progress during Trudeau's first 100 days in power

    Justin Trudeau made 214 of them during last fall's marathon election campaign, according to TrudeauMetre.ca, a non-partisan, citizen-driven website that tracks if and when the prime minister delivers on his commitments. As his Liberal government prepares to mark its 100th day in power Friday, the website reckons Trudeau has so far delivered on 13 promises, started 29 more and broken at least two. While some of the website's conclusions are debatable, they underscore that despite a running start, the government has made barely a dent in a sweeping platform that promised transformative change on multiple fronts: stimulating the stagnant economy, transforming government and even overhauling how governments are chosen.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Vancouver custom eyeglass framermaker one of few

    Wed, Feb 10: Squire Barnes introduces us to a Vancouver woman with a very unique profession.

    • Global News
  • Panel denies parole to Sirhan, assassin of Robert F. Kennedy

    Sirhan Sirhan was denied parole Wednesday for fatally shooting Robert F. Kennedy after a confidante of the slain senator who was shot in the head forgave him and repeatedly apologized for not doing more to win his release. Paul Schrade's voice cracked with emotion during an hour of testimony on his efforts to untangle mysteries about the events of June 5, 1968. The 91-year-old former labour leader said he believed Sirhan shot him but that a second unidentified shooter felled Kennedy.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Simple Solution for Coloring Gray Hair

    Your hair color should be a work of art. Ditch the generic drugstore box and try this:

  • Calgary twins who died on bobsled run enjoyed school, church, outdoors

    CALGARY - A funeral was held Thursday for twin teenage brothers Jordan and Evan Caldwell, who died during an after-hours run on a bobsled track at Canada Olympic Park in Calgary. After the accident early Saturday, their parents and sister shared some background about the 17-year-old boys.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Jian Ghomeshi's trial highlights need for deep legal reform: lawyer

    A Toronto lawyer who's called for substantial reforms to how the legal system handles sexual assault cases says the Jian Ghomeshi trial shows that the adversarial model presently in place is "structurally ill-suited" to deal with such allegations. The current system is "basically trial by war," said David Butt, who has represented many complainants in sexual assault cases. Ghomeshi has pleaded not guilty to four counts of sexual assault, which carry a maximum of 18 months in jail, and a choking charge that has a potential maximum of life in prison.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Seoul: N. Korean leader Kim had his military chief executed

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had his military chief executed for corruption and other charges, a South Korean official said Thursday. If true, the execution of Ri Yong Gil, chief of the North Korean military's general staff, would be the latest in a series of killings, purges and dismissals since Kim took power in late 2011. Details about North Korea's opaque government are notoriously difficult for outsiders to get, even national governments, and South Korean officials have a spotty record of tracking developments in North Korea.

    • The Canadian Press
  • $462M in MSP payments overdue says Canadian Taxpayers Federation

    B.C. is short about a half-billion dollars due to overdue Medical Service Plan payments, according to the Canadian Taxpayer's Federation. "The BC Liberals have doubled the rates since they came into office ... people are just falling further and further behind," said Bateman.

    • CBC
  • Snoring can cause health and relationship issues.

    Closed airways lead to snoring and sleep apnea. Snoring and sleep apnea can lead to serious health and relationship problems. I found the fix.

  • Homeless man reunites with his family for the first time in 40 years

    Social media is often criticized, but it can be an incredible thing. A homeless man in Miami used its power to reunite with his family, who he hasn’t seen in 40 years. Isaac Avila, better known as Chico, has spent the past 10 years living on the streets of Miami, just blocks away from the Miami Herald, where he used to work as a printer, reports WSVN.

    • Good News
  • American expats in Canada renouncing U.S. citizenship to avoid punitive taxation

    For American citizens living and working in Canada, these are stressful times. As tax season heats up, a growing number of American expats will begin the long, drawn-out process of renouncing their U.S. citizenship in a bid to avoid costly, complicated and onerous tax compliance obligations. “In the last 24 months we’ve seen a tremendous increase in the number of people who are interested in or want to renounce their citizenship,” says Roy Berg, a lawyer and director of U.S. tax law at Moodys Gartner in Calgary.

    • Daily Brew
  • Ex-priest arrested in 1960 slaying of Texas beauty queen

    For more than half a century, the unsolved killing of a young schoolteacher and beauty queen who was last seen at church haunted the Texas city of McAllen. Using a walker, a frail-looking John Bernard Feit, now 83, appeared in court Wednesday in Phoenix after being arrested a day earlier at his home in Scottsdale, Arizona, on a murder charge. "This whole thing makes no sense to me because the crime in question took place in 1960," Feit said, adding that he plans to fight extradition to Texas.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Town councillor killed in eastern Ont., shooting; 2 others seriously injured

    Sarah Cameron was taken to hospital with what police described as life-threatening injuries on Thursday morning after a shooting at her father's home in Almonte, Ont., about 50 kilometres west of Ottawa. Bernard Cameron, died today in a violent incident, an incident that also gravely injured his daughter," Shaun McLaughlin, the mayor of Mississippi Mills, Ont., said Thursday in a statement. Carolyn Della Foresta is the administrator of the longterm-care facility where Sarah Cameron works in Almonte.

    • The Canadian Press
  • A New Solution That Stops Snoring.

    Snoring causes headaches, high blood pressure and fatigue. Each leads to something more serious. Here's a simple SOLUTION to a very serious problem.

  • Full suit of armour, 1967 Mercedes-Benz among items on auction in Winnipeg

    A full suit of armour is just one of the items Kaye's Auction House manager Jason Kaye was surprised to see from an estate in a Winnipeg home. 

    • CBC
  • B.C. superintendent of real estate denies ignoring 'shadow flipping' problem

    British Columbia's superintendent of real estate is denying that she has failed to take action on "shadow flipping," saying she only learned of specific allegations from the media last week. Carolyn Rogers said her office has not received any complaints in recent years about the assignment clause, which involves a real estate agent selling the same home multiple times before the sale closes to drive up the final price and collect multiple commissions. Opposition New Democrat housing critic David Eby has accused Rogers and the Real Estate Council of B.C. of turning a blind eye to what he calls fraudulent and unethical behaviour by some Metro Vancouver real estate agents.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Study: Neanderthal DNA may influence modern depression risk

    A new study says a person's risk of becoming depressed or hooked on smoking may be influenced by DNA inherited from Neanderthals. Researchers found evidence that one bit of Neanderthal DNA can boost the risk of tobacco addiction, while others can slightly raise or lower the risk of being diagnosed with depression. Neanderthals and modern people split off from each other on the evolutionary tree hundreds of thousands of years ago.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Storm-battered cruise ship returns to New Jersey homeport

    Royal Caribbean's Anthem of the Seas docked at Bayonne's Cape Liberty shortly after 9 p.m., its passengers cheering wildly. "I could kiss the ground" a woman cried as she rushed toward the cruise terminal, where passengers were reunited with family members. The ship was carrying 4,500 passengers and 1,600 crew members when it departed Saturday on a seven-day cruise to the Bahamas.

    • The Canadian Press
  • G700 Millitary Tactical Flashlight

    Get 75% Off World's Coolest and Brightest Flashlight. Check it Out Today!

  • TransCanada must overcome Quebec identity politics in quest to build Energy East

    On a recent visit to Montreal, the head of Energy East was all smiles as he spoke about how his company is listening to Quebecers' concerns about the deeply divisive pipeline project. The company behind Energy East, TransCanada (TSX:TRP), says it is confident it can address worries about spills, explosions and the perceived lack of economic benefits for communities along the proposed pipeline route from Alberta to New Brunswick. What TransCanada might have a more difficult time dealing with are two Quebec-specific obstacles that stand in the way of the project getting approval in the province.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Saskatoon, Regina growing faster than urban average: StatsCan

    Saskatchewan's two biggest cities continue to grow faster than other urban areas across Canada, Statistics Canada says.

    • CBC
  • New dating app ‘Bernie’ launches in Vancouver

    Thu, Feb 11: Computer programmer Justin Long has developed a new dating app Bernie A.I. to take the stress out of dating. Using artificial intelligence, Bernie learns your personal preferences and then matches you with suitable candidates on dating websites.

    • Global News
  • Economist delivers potential solutions to Canada Post's troubles in new study

    A new study is delivering some potential solutions to Canada Post's woes, including a recommendation that postage rates should be higher in rural areas than urban ones. The paper by the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary paints a grim picture for the Crown corporation under the status quo: the number of letters delivered dropped by nearly a quarter between 2006 and 2013 and is expected to keep falling. Meanwhile, the number of addresses in Canada is rising by nearly a quarter million a year.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Dramatically Improve Your Short Game

    Hit Quality Shots Closer To The Hole, Every Single Time GUARANTEED!

  • Group urges Ottawa to allow dementia patients to request assisted death in advance

    The advocacy organization Dying With Dignity is urging Ottawa to include a provision for advance consent in right-to-die legislation that would allow people diagnosed with dementia to arrange for physician-assisted death while they are still cognitively competent to make the choice. Shanaaz Gokool, national campaigns director for the Toronto-based group, said the ability to provide advanced consent for assisted death is critical for people who have been told they have a progressive and eventually fatal medical condition such as Alzheimer's disease. A poll commissioned by Dying With Dignity and released Thursday suggests 80 per cent of Canadians agree that individuals with a terminal medical condition like dementia should be permitted to consent to assisted death in advance.

    • The Canadian Press
  • P.E.I. lobster levy will launch this spring

    When the lobster fishery begins this spring, P.E.I. will become the first province in the region where a two-cent-per-pound levy will be collected. A lobster marketing board — comprised of six executives from the P.E.I. Fishermen's Association (PEIFA) and six lobster fishermen — has been established to decide how to spend the harvesters' half of the money.

    • CBC
  • U.S. announcer thinks Saskatchewan is home to sasquatches

    NBA announcer Jeff Wade recently made a comment during a game between the Dallas Mavericks and Utah Jazz, claiming that Saskatchewan is named after sasquatches because that’s where all the furry Bigfoot creatures live, CTV News reports. Wade apparently made the bizarre comment in regards to Trey Lyles, who plays for the Jazz and is the first-ever NBA player from Saskatchewan, The Huffington Post reports.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • Send your ex on a $3,000 Alaskan cruise through a break-up kit

    For $50, the ‘I’m not ready to be in a profile picture with you’ package comes with a box of tissues and a three-month subscription to Netflix. The 'we’re perfect … for other people,’ package, includes a 12-month Netflix subscription, a box of tissues, a snuggie blanket, a dozen of roses and chocolate, all for $250.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • Finally, a snoring fix that beats CPAP

    Closed airways lead to snoring and sleep apnea. Snoring and sleep apnea can lead to serious health and relationship problems. I found the fix.

  • State TV: Teacher shoots dead 6 colleagues in Saudi Arabia

    A teacher in southern Saudi Arabia opened fire on colleagues Thursday, killing at least six people and wounding two, state television reported. The brief reports on the state television channel's website and Twitter account did not elaborate or offer a reason for the shooting at an education department building. The state-run Saudi Press Agency did not immediately report the shooting.

    • The Canadian Press
  • From common law to 'adult interdependent relationships': How laws vary by region

    The federal government recognizes common-law partners as two people living in a conjugal relationship for a year. NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR: The province's Family Law Act doesn't set out rules for division of property and debt for common-law couples as it does for married spouses. In the event of a breakup, common-law partners keep what belongs to them, whether it is something they bought or an item in their name.

    • The Canadian Press
  • 9-year-old with cystic fibrosis becomes ‘Iron Boy’ for the day

    Domenic is a huge Iron Man fan, and so the children’s charity Make-A-Wish Australia teamed up with the New South Wales Police to turn him into “Iron Boy” for the day. “Around 9am this morning, Domenic received an urgent call for assistance from senior police and was flown by police helicopter from a suburban Sydney park to a busy Operations Centre at Police Headquarters, Parramatta.

    • Good News
  • Tesla expects to become profitable in 2016, shares surge

    Tesla Motors Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk on Wednesday promised investors that the electric luxury car maker will start making money this year, sending the company's shares up sharply despite a wider fourth-quarter loss. Tesla shares rose more than 10 percent in after-hours trading after the company forecast a 60 to 80 percent increase in vehicle sales this year and promised it would turn a profit on an adjusted basis. Tesla shares are still down more than 30 percent since the beginning of the year, reflecting investor concerns about continued losses.

    • Reuters
  • Military-Grade Flashlight Should Be Banned?

    Just released military technology has just been cleared for public use. Get this flashlight before it's banned! [Limited Supply]

  • B.C. ministers say throne speech comments weren't meant to insult Alberta

    A day after British Columbia suggested Alberta hasn't done a good job of managing its oil revenue, a B.C. cabinet minister blamed it for adding to his province's homeless population. Housing Minister Rich Coleman said Wednesday he agrees with statements in his government's throne speech that Alberta failed to diversify its economy and lost control of spending. "I don't think it's a shot at anybody," said Coleman, who is also B.C.'s deputy premier and natural gas development minister.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Deformed fish found near Lac-Mégantic oil spill disaster

    Scientists have found an “unprecedented” number of fish with deformed fins, tumours and lesions in the river near the Lac-Mégantic oil spill in Quebec. A report for the provincial Environment Department says the scope and level of contamination in the Chaudière River near the site of the July 2013 disaster has decreased.

    • Daily Brew
  • Meet the Canadian contenders at the Westminster dog show

    Canada will be well represented next week at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. “When he walks into a ring, he owns it,” she tells Yahoo Canada News. Robertson suggests that dog lovers should attend the event, rather than participate in it, since it leads to a tremendous amount of stress.

    • Daily Brew
  • Riot at prison in northern Mexico leaves 49 inmates dead

    A brawl between rival drug gangs at an overcrowded penitentiary in northern Mexico turned into a riot Thursday, leaving 49 inmates dead and 12 injured in the country's deadliest prison melee in years. No escapes were reported in the clash at the Topo Chico prison in Monterrey, said Nuevo Leo state Gov. Jaime Rodriguez. The riot took place on the eve of Pope Francis' arrival in Mexico, a visit that is scheduled to include a trip next week to another prison in the border city of Ciudad Juarez.

    • The Canadian Press
  • 5 Hidden Truths About Reverse Mortgages

    Reverse mortgage is quite different from any other loans, and the risks to borrowers are unique. Here are 5 ESSENTIAL facts you need to know about it.

  • Sir Ian McKellen chokes up while reading coming out letter in novel

    The British actor was reading a passage from Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City. In it, a character named Michael Tolliver writes a letter to his parents to  dissuade them from supporting anti-gay politics.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • Obama administration opening 2-front campaign on Syria

    The Obama administration opened a two-front campaign on Syria on Thursday with a push to end one war there and step up another. The United States, Russia and more than a dozen other nations with interests in the Syria conflict, including Iran, gathered to try to agree on a ceasefire in the civil war that might resuscitate stalled peace talks. The gathering occurred amid deep differences between the U.S. and Russia over the timing and conditions of the truce — and a bitter argument over who is to blame for bombing civilian areas around Aleppo, a rebel stronghold.

    • The Canadian Press
  • NB Power's 'no herbicide list' surprises spray opponents

    "If I had known about the list I would have been the first one on it," said Cheryl Webb. Webb lives in Wirral and her property includes sections of transmission lines that NB Power sprayed with the herbicide Vision Max last year. NB Power declined to be interviewed about the existence of the list, but spokeswoman Deborah Nobes provided a statement through email.

    • CBC
  • Yash Pal Sharma, Ward 12 candidate, sued for role in alleged conspiracy to smear local journalist

    Edmonton Ward 12 candidate Yash Pal Sharma is being sued over his involvement in an alleged scheme to smear the reputation of a local Punjabi-language journalist. Sharma is one of eight people named in Edmonton journalist Jarnail Basota's defamation action. In it, Basota alleges Sharma helped "concoct" a scheme to publicly discredit him, using fabricated news articles.

    • CBC
  • The New Way To Pay Off Mortgage

    Before you pay your next mortgage payment, you need to read this: The ingenious way to pay off your mortgage.

  • Victoria makes plans to regulate its medical pot shops with $5,000 licensing fee

    The City of Victoria has laid out some ground rules as it moves to regulate medical-marijuana businesses and included is a licensing fee that is a fraction of the Vancouver charge. The city is asking for public input on more than a dozen proposed regulations, including a fee ranging from $4,000 to $5,000, that no one under the age of 19 be on the premises, that health-warnings signs be posted and that there be no consumption of the product in the store. Vancouver is further ahead in its regulation process and plans to charge $30,000 for a business licence.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Mice, rat calls up 50% as temperatures plummet, says Orkin

    The recent drop in temperature is causing rodents to suddenly seek shelter. Orkin Canada says calls to get rid of mice and rats have increased 50 per cent. When the weather was nice out, up until about a month ago, and then there was a dramatic drop in the temperature, which forced the rodents to come inside and look for a warmer place to live," said Chris Ortner, manager of the Windsor branch of the pest removal company.

    • CBC
  • New England Salt Company eyes PotashCorp's road salt business

    A U.S.-based road salt supplier is setting up shop near the New Brunswick border hoping to cash in on the closing of the PotashCorp mine near Sussex. PotashCorp is a major supplier of road salt in the Maritime provinces. New England Salt Company, based in Winterport, Me., has announced it is setting up an operation at the Eastport Port Authority, hoping to pick up business in eastern Maine and the Maritime provinces.

    • CBC
  • MADD: Car-locking systems stopped 1.77 million drunk drivers

    Car-locking systems have stopped more than 1.77 million people from driving drunk since states first passed laws requiring offenders to install them in 1999, Mothers Against Drunk Driving said in a first-of-its-kind report on the devices nationwide. The data come from the 11 major manufactures of the ignition interlock systems, and the report was released Wednesday. A convicted drunken driver must blow into the device to get a blood alcohol content reading before the vehicle will start.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Do NOT pay your insurance until you try this.

    If you drive less than 55 miles/day OR have no DUI's you can get auto insurance for as low as $29/ Month! See if you qualify.

  • GM's Opel to build next generation electric car in 2017

    General Motors Chief Executive Mary Barra on Thursday said the company's European division Opel would build an affordable five-seater electric car, the Ampera-e, in 2017. The car shares the same underpinnings as GM's other electric car, the Chevrolet Bolt. "Like its twin, the Chevrolet Bolt EV, the Ampera-e promises to transform the electric vehicle market in Europe as the first EV that combines long range at an affordable price," Barra told an industry conference.

    • Reuters
  • Michelin-starred chef Glynn Purnell fights back against negative review ‘littered with lies’

    “This was declined and the lady stated that she would use this site [TripAdvisor] as a tool for being detrimental to our business and 30 members of staff,” he wrote in his response. “If all 4 diners were embarrassed and it was in fact the worst food, I am embarrassed for them not having enough courage to express themselves on the evening,” he wrote.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • 'When fairy tale falls apart:' Couples' status varies by relationship, region

    Elizabeth Abbott, author of A History of Marriage, says couples become so seduced by love itself, they forget there's more to a successful relationship and some of it is, well, unromantic. It's living together, it's having a job, it's spending money," says Abbott, a historian and senior research associate at the University of Toronto. In no situation is that more important than in common-law marriages — especially if the love affair ends or if one person dies.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Yukon climate warming twice as fast as elsewhere, research says

    A comprehensive new report on environmental change in Yukon says the territory's climate is warming faster than much of the planet, and that's not likely to change any time soon. The Northern Climate ExChange at Yukon College compiled research and findings from different sources, in an attempt to offer a thorough "evidence-based" assessment of how the territory's climate is changing. The report has been funded by the Yukon government.

    • CBC
  • Golfers: Hit Straight Every Time

    12-Time PGA Winner Shows You How to Hit Longer, Straighter, More Accurately,…

  • Flames young stars apologize for disciplinary benching

    Wed, Feb 10 : Calgary Flames top two scorers Johnny Gaudreau and Sean Monahan along with forward Lance Bouma apologize to their teammates, fans and dads for their actions that led to Tuesday's benching against the Toronto Maple Leafs. Kevin Smith has more.

    • Global News
  • Group wants to reverse organ rules -- everybody donates unless they opt out

    A group of transplant patients and their families wants the Manitoba government to change the rules so that people don't have to sign up in order to donate their organs after death. Instead, the group wants to switch to a system called "presumed consent," meaning everyone would be considered an organ donor unless they sign up to specifically opt out. The idea is to save more lives by getting more organ donations, with the group called Manitobans for Presumed Consent noting the province has the lowest rates in Canada.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Van Gogh's famous bedroom listed on Airbnb

    The host of the Airbnb ad is named Vincent and features a portrait of the long deceased artist. The museum happens to have a show featuring all three versions the famous paintings depicting the room once inhabited by the artist while he was living in Arles, France.

    • The Daily Buzz
    • The Daily Buzz
  • A New Solution That Stops Snoring.

    Closed airways lead to snoring and sleep apnea. Snoring and sleep apnea can lead to serious health and relationship problems. I found the fix.

  • Grey seal pup hit by vehicle in Nova Scotia, being treated for injuries

    A grey seal pup that was hit by a vehicle on a Nova Scotia road is being treated for serious injuries at a wildlife centre. Hope Swinimer, operator of the facility just outside Halifax, said the marine mammal was found on a road in Pictou County by an RCMP officer late Wednesday.

    • The Canadian Press
  • More reliance on Holyrood could be 'perfect storm,' says consumer advocate

    The province's consumer advocate warns that relying more on diesel power from the Holyrood plant would not only cost ratepayers, but would also create extra stress on already-troubled equipment. Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro said Monday that recent dry weather means its hydro reservoirs are at a 20-year low. In order to meet the province's power demands, NL Hydro said it will use more thermal generation from Holyrood and burn diesel at standby generating sources throughout the province.

    • CBC
  • Peladeau will personally pay to find headhunter for sovereignty institute

    Parti Quebecois Leader Pierre Karl Peladeau will personally pay the contract of a headhunter tasked with recruiting a director for a new institute on Quebec sovereignty. Peladeau said the timetable for the creation of the institute, which will produce studies on the advantages of Quebec independence, has not been finalized. "A headhunter has been mandated to find the management (of the institute)," he said.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Australian firefighters to boycott Montreal police and fire games

    Thousands of Australian firefighters will boycott the annual World Police and Fire Games in Montreal next year due to an ongoing dispute between the city and its firefighters over pension reform. Montreal firefighters are also boycotting the games and their union has appealed to their international colleagues to do the same. The Fire Brigade Employees' Union in Sidney, Australia, and the Fire and Rescue New South Wales Sports Association, are also in favour of the boycott, the union says.

    • CBC
  • Looking for the perfect car at the perfect price?

    Compare top makes and models. So you can step on the dealer lot with confidence. Get the right car without all the drama.

  • Experimental farm land deal kept under wraps before announcement, documents show

    Key stakeholders in a controversial decision in 2014 to lease land from the Central Experimental Farm (CEF) to The Ottawa Hospital were kept in the dark in advance of the official announcement, according to recently released documents. Among those left out of the loop in the Agriculture and Agri-Food documents were the CEF Advisory Council, mandated to advise on the future of the farm, as well as scientists doing research on the land offered up for lease. Harvey Voldeng, one of the scientists working at the farm, confirmed he and his colleagues were taken by surprise by the announcement.

    • CBC
  • Students pulled, school council resigns at Beaver Creek, Yukon, school

    All four members of the school council in Beaver Creek, Yukon, resigned this week and parents are withdrawing their children from the one-room schoolhouse, over concerns that the Department of Education isn't working in the best interests of the community. Nelnah Bessie John School, which goes from kindergarten to Grade 9, is the small border community's only school. The council and parents say it's not providing a place where children can learn.

    • CBC
  • Blood, bullet casing found in Tim Bosma's pickup truck, murder trial told

    Family members of Tim Bosma winced and looked away as a police officer told his murder trial the details of a bullet casing and blood she found inside the Hamilton man's pickup truck. Laura McLellan of Halton Regional Police testified Thursday that she and her team of officers didn't initially see the shell casing because it was lodged somewhere behind the truck's rear seat. McLellan said it became dislodged as she snapped hundreds of photographs of the truck and the trailer it was found in — a trailer that was registered to Millardair, an aviation company owned by Dellen Millard — one of the two accused.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Zika virus has phones ringing at pest control, travel firms

    Some small U.S. companies are getting an influx in calls — and in some cases, unexpected business— due to fears about the Zika virus. The virus often produces either no symptoms or mild ones like fever in adults, but an outbreak in Brazil has been linked to a rare birth defect that causes a newborn's heads to be smaller and brain development issues. Pest control companies in Texas are getting a surge in business because of concerns that mosquitoes bearing the Zika virus will arrive from neighbouring Mexico.

    • The Canadian Press
  • Finally, a snoring fix that beats CPAP

    Studies show snoring is far more dangerous to your health most people suspect. It's a real problem that needs a solution. I found THE solution.

  • Science says sighing is actually good for you

    “It’s a behaviour we all do,” co-author of the study, Silvia Pagliardini tells the Edmonton Journal. This unnoticed sighing works as “a healthy way to expand lung capacity,” the Edmonton Journal writes. In a circuit experiment involving rats, slight “tinkering” changed the frequency of their sighs, the Journal reports.

    • The Daily Buzz
  • Honda to start making gasoline-electric cars in China this year

    By Norihiko Shirouzu TOKYO (Reuters) - Honda Motor Co Ltd plans to start making gasoline-electric hybrid cars in China later this year, to meet increasingly stringent fuel economy regulations in a country blighted by worsening air pollution. The Japanese automaker will build hybrid versions of its Accord sedan and Acura compact crossover sport utility vehicle (SUV) in the southern city of Guangzhou, Tokyo-based spokesman Ben Nakamura said on Thursday. It will follow those with a hybrid version of its Spirior sedan, Nakamura told Reuters.

    • Reuters