• Christchurch attack survivors offered New Zealand residency
    News
    Reuters

    Christchurch attack survivors offered New Zealand residency

    New Zealand will grant permanent residency to all survivors of the mass shooting at two Christchurch mosques in which 50 Muslim worshippers were killed, it said on Tuesday. Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with 50 counts of murder for New Zealand's worst peacetime mass shooting in which 50 other people at Friday prayers were wounded. The government had said it was considering giving visas to survivors, but no decision was announced.

  • Down in front! Why U.S. hockey fans aren't happy with this Leafs fan, or his head
    News
    CBC

    Down in front! Why U.S. hockey fans aren't happy with this Leafs fan, or his head

    After watching his beloved team lose a closely fought Game 6 to the Boston Bruins, a Toronto Maple Leafs Fan opened his phone to find an unexpected photo of the action: one obscured by the back of own head. Angry Bruins fans (most Canadian viewers had a clear view thanks to the Sportsnet/CBC feed) and even the actor Rob Lowe were among those who took to Twitter to complain about the obstructed view. Scott was sitting just two rows in front of the cameras at Scotiabank Arena during Sunday's game, he said.

  • Henry Bloch, co-founder of tax company H&R Block, dies at 96
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Henry Bloch, co-founder of tax company H&R Block, dies at 96

    Henry Bloch, who helped found tax preparation giant H&R Block, died Tuesday at age 96, the company announced. Bloch died of natural causes at St. Luke's Hospice in Kansas City. Richard Bloch died in 2004.

  • Premier Scott Moe tells Trudeau Sask. farmers 'need an answer' on cash advances for canola
    News
    CBC

    Premier Scott Moe tells Trudeau Sask. farmers 'need an answer' on cash advances for canola

    Premier Scott Moe is pressuring the federal government to enact proposed changes that would make it easier for canola  farmers affected by Canada's trade dispute with China to get cash advances. 

  • More money for Charlottetown heritage property owners available
    News
    CBC

    More money for Charlottetown heritage property owners available

    "We saw how positive this program was and how much it was used in the past  and we thought by putting some more money into that program would be beneficial to those who have the historic properties that are looking to maintain them or enhance them," said Greg Rivard, chair of the planning committee. The grants help heritage property owners with upkeep on their buildings, which can be expensive, Rivard said.

  • Florida fire crew rescues ducklings from drain
    AP Canada

    Florida fire crew rescues ducklings from drain

    Florida firefighters rescue eight ducklings from a storm drain and return them to their concerned mother. (April 23)

  • Mars lander picks up what's likely 1st detected marsquake
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Mars lander picks up what's likely 1st detected marsquake

    NASA's InSight lander has picked up a gentle rumble at Mars, believed to be the first marsquake ever detected. InSight's quake monitor recorded and measured the faint signal April 6, and scientists announced the finding Tuesday. The Paris Institute of Earth Physics' Philippe Lognonne, who's in charge of the experiment, said it's exciting to finally have proof that Mars is still seismically active.

  • Google completes subsea cable to Chile in global cloud push
    News
    Reuters

    Google completes subsea cable to Chile in global cloud push

    Alphabet Inc's Google has completed a 10,000-kilometer (6,214-mile) subsea cable linking the coast of California to Chile, a key step in its plans to bolster its global cloud computing infrastructure. The cable, dubbed the "Curie" project, arrived at the Chilean port of Valparaiso on Tuesday, Google said in a post on their regional website. Google has been investing heavily in technology infrastructure, especially in vital submarine cables connecting up its global network.

  • China's Tencent backs Argentina mobile banking startup Uala
    News
    Reuters

    China's Tencent backs Argentina mobile banking startup Uala

    Uala founder Pierpaolo Barbieri said the company planned to collaborate with the Chinese social media-to-gaming giant to further develop its app. Chinese tech firms have been ramping up their interest in Latin America, from ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing to telecoms firm Huawei and search engine Baidu Inc. Tencent, one of Asia's most valuable listed companies, announced last year it would boost investments in a number of "key areas" including digital payment, where its service jostles with rival Alipay, backed by Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. Tencent's own messenger-to-payment app WeChat now has more than 1 billion users in China and has launched in-app services that compete with Apple and Google apps.

  • The Latest: Smollett's attorneys call lawsuit 'ridiculous'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    The Latest: Smollett's attorneys call lawsuit 'ridiculous'

    CHICAGO — The Latest on a lawsuit filed against Jussie Smollett's attorneys (all times local):1:50 p.m.Jussie Smollett's attorneys say a lawsuit accusing them of defaming two brothers who say they helped the "Empire" actor stage an attack against himself is "ridiculous."Attorneys Mark Geragos and Tina Glandian say they initially thought the federal lawsuit filed Tuesday by lawyers for Olabinjo and Abimbola Osundairo was a parody and that they view it as "comical" and "lawyer driven nonsense."The brothers accuse Smollett's attorneys of defamation by continuing to assert that they carried out a real and bigoted attack against Smollett despite knowing that's not true.Geragos and Glandian say they think the lawsuit will be dismissed because it "lacks any legal footing." They also say they "look forward to exposing the fraud the Osundairo brothers and their attorneys have committed on the public."Police allege that Smollett paid the brothers to help him stage the Jan. 29 attack in downtown Chicago. Smollett maintains that he was really attacked.___10:55 a.m.Two brothers who allege that they helped Jussie Smollett stage an attack on himself say they are suing the "Empire" actor's attorneys for spreading lies that are destroying the brothers' character and reputations.Attorneys for Olabinjo Osundairo and Abimbola Osundairo held a news conference Tuesday after filing the defamation lawsuit against Smollett's attorney, Mark Geragos, and his law firm. The brothers didn't appear at the news conference but said in a statement that they "have sat back and watched lie after lie being fabricated" about them. Their attorneys say the pair can't get jobs and are having trouble making ends meet.One of their attorneys, Gloria Schmidt, says the Osundairos have already apologized for their role in the Smollett case.The lawsuit alleges that Smollett's attorneys say the Osundairo brothers carried out a real, bigoted attack on the actor, even though they know that isn't true.___9:55 a.m.Two brothers who said they helped Jussie Smollett stage a racist and homophobic attack against himself are suing the "Empire" actor's attorneys for defamation.A lawyer for Olabinjo Osundairo and Abimbola Osundairo filed the federal lawsuit Tuesday in Chicago on behalf of the brothers. It names Mark Geragos and his law firm as defendants.The suit alleges that Geragos and his firm continued to say publicly in widely reported statements that the brothers "led a criminally homophobic, racist and violent attack against Mr. Smollett," even though they knew that wasn't true.Police allege that Smollett paid the brothers to help him stage a Jan. 29 attack in which he said two masked men beat him, hurled racist and homophobic slurs at him, doused him with some sort of chemical substance and looped a rope around his neck.Smollett, who is black and gay, maintains that the attack wasn't staged.___12:05 a.m.Chicago's top prosecutor drew heavy criticism after she recused herself from the case against Jussie Smollett and then complained in text messages to a subordinate that her office had overcharged the "Empire" actor.But anyone who has followed Kim Foxx's work recognized in the texts the same reforms she's tried for years to implement. Those changes include not overcharging for nonviolent crimes and offering alternatives to taking a suspect to court.Anger about the decision has also resulted in threats of physical harm to the prosecutor. Chief of staff Jennifer Ballard Croft told the Chicago Sun-Times the threatening messages came in the form of emails and calls, with some containing "racially-charged language."Critically, dropping the charges could undermine Foxx's efforts to overhaul the nation's second-largest district attorney's office. For decades, it has been seen as too aggressive and reliant on abusive police practices.___Check out the AP's complete coverage of the Jussie Smollett case.The Associated Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Nielsen's top programs for April 15-21

    Prime-time viewership numbers compiled by Nielsen for April 15-21. Listings include the week's ranking and viewership.

  • Beaverbrook Art Gallery collection high and dry, safe from floodwaters
    News
    CBC

    Beaverbrook Art Gallery collection high and dry, safe from floodwaters

    Staff at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery were busy over the holiday weekend keeping its art collection high and dry, safe from rising floodwaters. Water levels in the Fredericton area are hovering at around 8.35 metres, officially surpassing last year's historic record of 8.258 metres, officials confirmed on Tuesday afternoon.

  • Ottawa spending $277M to renovate federal building in midtown Toronto
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa spending $277M to renovate federal building in midtown Toronto

    The Canadian government is spending $277 million to renovate a federal building in midtown Toronto to make it as energy efficient as possible and more accessible to people with disabilities, a federal cabinet minister said in Toronto on Tuesday. Public Services Minister Carla Qualtrough told reporters that the renovation of the Arthur Meighen Building, on St. Clair Avenue East near Yonge Street, is underway and is expected to be completed by 2022. The building was built in the 1950s.

  • Mohawk police investigating after Kahnawake couple reported missing in U.S.
    News
    CBC

    Mohawk police investigating after Kahnawake couple reported missing in U.S.

    The Kahnawake Mohawk Peacekeepers are searching for two people from Kahnawake, Que., who have been missing for a week. Jadie Kaylin Diabo, 28, and David Michael Montour, 43, were last heard from on April 16.

  • Health authority under fire over doctor recruitment in Cape Breton
    News
    CBC

    Health authority under fire over doctor recruitment in Cape Breton

    The Nova Scotia Health Authority is under fire over family doctor recruitment in Cape Breton. Keith Bain, the Progressive Conservative MLA for Victoria-The Lakes, said last October several Dalhousie medical students showed interest in visiting the region to learn about family medicine. An event was suggested for the end of April, but Bain said it was cancelled recently after the health authority failed to notify local doctors and took too long getting back to the students.

  • Singh says childhood abuse steeled him for scrutiny and stress of politics
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Singh says childhood abuse steeled him for scrutiny and stress of politics

    OTTAWA — Political life means signing up for a high degree of public scrutiny, but NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says the pain he endured in his childhood — including an experience with sexual abuse — reminds him he has gone through far worse.Since taking over the reins of the NDP in October 2017, Singh has faced multiple challenges, including winning a seat in the House of Commons in the riding of Burnaby-South, poor party fundraising and slumping morale that combined raised questions about his own leadership abilities.Through all of it, the 40-year-old has seemed surprisingly calm even when those around him are rattled.At least on the outside, he has put on a brave face. His book released Tuesday, "Love & Courage", begins to explain why."It is tough to be in the public eye, particularly as a politician so my heart goes out to anyone who takes the plunge because it is difficult," he said in an interview."I sometimes think that a part of being able to do this is because of my life experiences. I've gone through a lot of difficult moments."The "difficult moments" he referred to include privately enduring sexual abuse at the hands of a martial arts instructor at age 10 in Windsor, Ont.— a story he decided to share for the first time in hopes of helping other victims."Mr. N abused me," Singh wrote. "He tied his perversion to my performance, which was my primary motivation. And as the weekend sessions continued on top of my weekly training, I convinced myself that I was improving at tae kwon do."Singh said Tuesday he felt a "responsibility" to use his national platform in a positive way."I thought, what can I do? What story can I tell that would actually have a positive impact or maybe help people out that need it?" he said."Maybe it could help folks feel less alone. Maybe it could help folks have the courage to love themselves and to love others because I know that for me, suffering from abuse makes you feel like you don't deserve happiness, and you stop loving yourself."Statistically, Singh's story of being able to overcome the long-standing impacts of sexual abuse is rare. Many victims are plagued by debilitating mental health challenges, substance abuse issues, and suicidal thoughts.The NDP leader said he personally has drawn strength from his spirituality, meditation and a support network."That's also what this story is about," he said."I could not have made it alone. I don't think anyone makes it alone ... A whole bunch of people, some who knew I was in a tough spot and many who probably didn't know that I was a kid that was almost down and out, stepped in and helped me out."Singh's book also details his father's struggle with alcoholism, including time in rehab and having to support his family.He said that his father ultimately turned to a modest, publicly-funded rehabilitation centre in Windsor after losing insurance after he could no longer work.Singh said the program ultimately saved his father's life and his family in many ways."I am really grateful to all the folks, all the services that people can count on that were there for me," he said. "That's why I'm here."—Follow @kkirkup on TwitterKristy Kirkup, The Canadian Press

  • Hear me roar: Royal Sask. Museum looking for T-rex star for summer show
    News
    CBC

    Hear me roar: Royal Sask. Museum looking for T-rex star for summer show

    The Royal Saskatchewan Museum is looking for someone to star in its new Tyrannosaurus rex stage show this summer. The timing is linked to the latest exhibit to come to the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Scotty the T-rex, with the T-rex gallery opening on May 17. Applications for the T-rex stage actor are due on April 28. The costume depicts a younger T-rex, aged about two to three-years-old.

  • FAA paves way for Alphabet unit to make first U.S. drone deliveries
    News
    Reuters

    FAA paves way for Alphabet unit to make first U.S. drone deliveries

    Wing Aviation plans to start commercial package delivery in Blacksburg, Virginia, later this year. Wing partnered with the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership and Virginia Tech as one of the participants in the Transportation Department’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot Program. Safety continues to be our Number One priority as this technology continues to develop and realize its full potential,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.

  • Calgarians rack up $1.9M in parking fines in first 3 weeks of street sweeping
    News
    CBC

    Calgarians rack up $1.9M in parking fines in first 3 weeks of street sweeping

    Calgary drivers who failed to move their cars for scheduled street sweeping have now amassed 23,672 parking tickets in the first three weeks of April. Oh, and did we mention street sweeping runs until June 30? The parking authority's mobile enforcement vehicles now typically roam through an area that is due to be swept before the sweepers come by, photographing licence plates of vehicles that are left on the street.

  • Protecting nature also fights climate change, says federal environment minister
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Protecting nature also fights climate change, says federal environment minister

    Carbon taxes aren't the only way to fight climate change, says federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna.Speaking ahead of an international conservation conference, McKenna said protecting natural areas can go a long way toward slowing the progress and mitigating the impact of global warming."Nature isn't linked to climate as much as it should be," she said Tuesday, the day before the opening of the Nature Champions Summit in Montreal, which will bring together governments, businesses, Indigenous communities and non-governmental organizations."We're connecting it to climate."Intact ecosystems can help protect communities against some of the worst impacts of climate change. Scientists often point to the role of wetlands in absorbing heavy rains or snowmelts, reducing flooding for homes and farms."How do you use natural protections to protect areas?" she asked. "We need to link these agendas a lot better."As well, landscapes such as natural forests store huge amounts of carbon — much more, studies have suggested, than replanted or farmed trees. "We need to look at how we're going to store carbon," McKenna said. "Nature is a very effective way to store carbon, everywhere from grasslands to mangroves."Three protected areas currently under consideration hold the carbon equivalent to 15 years of Canada’s annual industrial GHG emissions at 2017 levels.It's certainly easier politics.The federal carbon tax has been relentlessly controversial. A recent Abacus poll found only 59 per cent of Canadians believed it to be the right direction. Several premiers are lined up against it in court.On the other hand, an Abacus poll released Tuesday found almost nine out of 10 Canadians support federal conservation commitments. The same poll suggests more than two-thirds of Canadians back Indigenous protected areas and Indigenous Guardians programs to help manage protected lands."Conservation unites Canadians," said Abacus CEO David Coletto. "It’s rare to see this kind of consensus on issues, but people overwhelmingly agree the country should do more to conserve nature."Not that McKenna's backing away from the tax."You've got to be doing things across the board. We need to put a price on pollution because if it's free to pollute, there'll be more pollution. But you have to do a whole range of other things." Nature, however, is nicer."Nature is an agenda that everyone can get around," McKenna said.Also on Tuesday, McKenna announced a four-year, $100-million commitment to preserve environmentally valuable areas on private land. That money is to be tripled through matching private donations and is anticipated to protect about 200,000 hectares.The Natural Heritage Conservation Program is expected to save habitat for 25 species at risk not found in any other public or privately protected areas. Most of those new areas will be in the settled landscapes of southern Canada.McKenna said Canada continues to make good progress on its commitments to preserve 17 per cent of its land mass and 10 per cent of its oceans and coastlines by 2020.The Liberal government has increased marine protection to about eight per cent from one. The terrestrial gap is wider, with less than 12 per cent protected — although that doesn't include three large protected areas in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and British Columbia that are close to being finished."We're pretty confident we'll get to 17 per cent by 2020," McKenna said.— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

  • Lyft's IPO banks give troubled stock a flurry of 'buy' ratings
    News
    Reuters

    Lyft's IPO banks give troubled stock a flurry of 'buy' ratings

    Following the required 25-day wait for deal underwriters to issue an investment opinion following an IPO, at least 10 of the banks that brought Lyft public gave positive recommendations on a stock that has slumped 30 percent from its opening price on March 29, its first day of trading. Lyft's stock slump since its IPO has raised concerns about the valuation of larger rival Uber Technologies Inc as it prepares to promote its own long-anticipated public listing, expected next month. Before Tuesday, only banks that had not worked on Lyft's IPO were permitted to offer recommendations on the stock, and the balance of opinion in that group was decidedly more skeptical.

  • P.E.I. students cast ballots in province-wide student vote
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. students cast ballots in province-wide student vote

    Thousands of high school students across the province are participating in the student vote. It's really important and it is part of the social studies curriculum," said Craig Taggart, Grade 9 social studies teacher at Queen Charlotte Intermediate. Taggart's students were broken up, at random selection, into parties and were asked to research the Island's political parties, leaders and campaign platforms.

  • Workers install tarps to protect gutted Notre Dame from rain
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Workers install tarps to protect gutted Notre Dame from rain

    Professional mountain climbers were hired to install synthetic, waterproof tarps over the gutted, exposed exterior of Notre Dame Cathedral, as authorities raced to prevent further damage ahead of storms that are rolling in toward Paris. Architect-in-chief Philippe Villeneuve said he had to rush the installation of the protective covers that started Tuesday. Some of Notre Dame's remaining statues were removed by crane before the tarpaulins were hoisted up.

  • Atlantic Lottery is retiring its balls that pick the winners
    News
    CBC

    Atlantic Lottery is retiring its balls that pick the winners

    The Atlantic Lottery Corporation will retire the lottery balls that generate the winning numbers for Lotto Max and Lotto 649 on May 14, moving instead to a computer program called the random number generator. "They're part of our history but, you know, all good things come to an end and times change and this is all part of that process," Greg Weston, a spokesperson for Atlantic Lottery, told CBC's  Mainstreet on Tuesday. Weston said most of the lotteries across Canada have moved to random number generators.

  • Even light rain increases your risk of a deadly car crash
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Even light rain increases your risk of a deadly car crash

    Even light rain significantly increases your risk of a fatal car crash, a new study finds. The wetter the roads, the deadlier they become, with rain, snow and ice increasing the risk of deadly car crashes by 34%, according to a study this week in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society . Light rain — "We're talking a drizzle, just at the point where you might consider taking an umbrella out," said study lead author Scott Stevens — increased the fatal crash risk by 27%.