• Police: Woman rams squad car while taking topless selfie

    Police say a 19-year-old Texas A&M University student who rear-ended a squad car told an officer she was taking a topless selfie. Miranda Kay Rader posted $200 bond after she was charged with drunken driving and possessing alcohol as a minor.

    The Canadian Press
  • Filipino mayor among 10 dead in clash with anti-drug police

    Philippine anti-narcotics officers gunned down a town mayor and nine of his men in a clash Friday in one of the bloodiest operations since President Rodrigo Duterte launched a crackdown on illegal drugs. Mayor Samsudin Dimaukom of Datu Saudi Ampatuan town, who was killed with the nine others, has been publicly named by Duterte among many politicians he accused of involvement in illegal drugs as part of a shame campaign. In August, Duterte read out the names of more than 150 officials allegedly linked to illegal drugs.

    The Canadian Press
  • Canadian parka company giving them the cold shoulder, customers say

    Some customers who ordered winter jackets through a successful Canadian crowd-funding campaign feel they're being left out in the cold, due to delays in getting the merchandise they ordered and because they feel the company has broken the promises it made.

  • Canada's Patrick Chan adds another quadruple jump to his repertoire

    Launching a comeback after an 18-month hiatus, Patrick Chan had been frustrated to find his sport had become figure skating's version of a slam dunk contest. The three-time world champion from Toronto will attempt three quadruple jumps in his long program for the first time at this week's Skate Canada International, in an effort to be more competitive with the world's top skaters. "He is the epitome of what skating has become," Chan said.

    The Canadian Press
  • Taking on the overdose crisis in B.C.

    Premier Christy Clark and a number of drug advocates met in Vancouver Tuesday to talk about how to tackle the overdose crisis in B.C. As Nadia Stewart reports, they’re calling for more than just a bump in the number of treatment beds.

    Global News
  • With the world on track to lose two-thirds of global wildlife, Canada has a huge responsibility

    The world has lost nearly 60 per cent of the global wildlife population since 1970 due to human activity and is on track to lose more than two-thirds by 2020, says the World Wildlife Fund in a shocking report. Canada is faring better than many countries but it has an enormous share of the world's biodiversity and it's falling short of protecting it, says the report by the conservation group. James Snider, vice-president of science at WWF Canada, says the global trends are very drastic. "In Canada the reductions may be not quite as severe and I think that is evidence of the unique role that Canada can play on a global stage, given the vast natural resources and wildlife that we do have," Snider told Yahoo Canada News. "But that is not to say there are not individual concerns here in Canada." This country has about 20 per cent of the world's freshwater supply and one quarter of the world's remaining wetlands. Globally, freshwater wildlife populations have declined 81 per cent over the past four decades. In Canada, seven of eight species of freshwater turtle are at risk, along with freshwater mussels in southern Ontario, Snider points out, along with several species of fish. Yet there is not a consistent monitoring program for freshwater species, he said. This country protects about 1.05 million square kilometres of land and freshwater habitat - covering about 10.6 per cent of the total, according to Environment Canada. It's a big number but falls far short of the 17 per cent target laid out in the international Convention on Biological Diversity, says WWF Canada. Canada is home to 10 per cent of the world's remaining forests, a "global responsibility," Snider said. It also has the longest coastline of any nation on Earth. Around the world, there has been a 36 per cent decline in ocean species since 1970, due mainly to overfishing, habitat loss and climate change. ALSO READ: Researchers say the near total destruction of a massive starfish is changing the ocean off the B.C. coast This country is not immune. Cod stocks off of Newfoundland collapsed three decades ago and today the WWF warns that forage stocks such as capelin, herring and mackerel are in trouble and are not being properly monitored. "Canada has not done a very good job in terms of protecting our oceans," Snider said. About 0.9 per cent of Canadian ocean territory is protected - far short of the 10 per cent target in the international Convention on Biological Diversity. Species such as beluga and North Atlantic right whales ply Canadian waters, Snider points out. "These populations, really kind of majestic species, would benefit from increased levels of marine protection," he said. This country is home to about 70,000 species, 739 of which are deemed at risk by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. The report says habitat loss is the biggest threat, citing the decline in caribou. Once found in 80 per cent of the country, some herds have declined more than 95 per cent. In the Arctic, Canada is already experiencing some of the most dramatic effects of climate change. Even if the nations of the world manage to hold the global temperature increase to between 1.5C and 2C, that will mean between 3.5C and 5C warming in the Arctic. David Miller, president of WWF Canada, said the report is a reminder that people are pushing the planet into dangerous new territory. "We know that here in Canada, our wildlife and their habitats are under increasing pressure from climate change and other human activities," he said in a statement. "We have a unique responsibility to help protect the world's biodiversity."

    Yahoo Canada News
  • 911 caller helps police solve case of missing backup dancer

    After days of police work revealed no leads in the case of the missing backup dancer, it was a 911 caller who helped locate the New Jersey woman who performed with the likes of Beyonce and Rihanna. The caller told police that a woman was wandering in and out of traffic in New York City on Tuesday afternoon, NJ.com reported (http://bit.ly/2eKmPEz). The woman, 32-year-old Shirlene Quigley, was picked up by authorities and admitted to a hospital in New York under a false name she had given.

    The Canadian Press
  • “Alien” life lay be hiding inside Ontario mineshaft

    The age of the waters was first identified by scientists in 2013, reports the National Post, when researchers ran tests in a mine near Timmins, Ont. and discovered that the water had been isolated from the earth’s surface for up to 2.7 billion years. This discovery suggests that the waters may contain organisms that, although not technically alien to Earth, could be similar to what scientists hope to one day find on Mars. The research team, made up of scientists from University of Alberta and McGill University, found that the waters contained far less of the element sulphur than was expected.

    The Daily Buzz
  • Vancouver real estate: Lawsuit claims $6.7M house deal tied to private school entry

    In a notice of civil claim, Mei Han claims an acquaintance who owned a home opposite York House offered to broker an "alternative arrangement" which would see Han buy the property in order to lend or lease it to the school. As a quid pro quo, Han claims the acquaintance — Lili Song — told her Han's daughter Olivia would get a much-coveted spot in York's Grade 4 class. "Lili never discussed with York House, or its official or representative, with regard to the alternative arrangement, and York House never agreed to same," the notice of claim says.

  • Cranberries squashed as folk remedy for urinary infections

    Cranberry capsules didn't prevent or cure urinary infections in nursing home residents in a study challenging persistent unproven claims to the contrary. The research adds to decades of conflicting evidence on whether cranberries in any form can prevent extremely common bacterial infections, especially in women. Many studies suggesting a benefit were based on weak science, but that hasn't stopped marketers and even some health care providers from recommending cranberry juice or capsules as an inexpensive way to avoid these uncomfortable and potentially risky infections.

    The Canadian Press
  • Ex-Bill Clinton aide memo roils wife's campaign over ethics

    A 2011 confidential memo written by a longtime Bill Clinton aide during Hillary Clinton's State Department tenure describes overlap between the former president's business ventures and fundraising for the family's charities. The former aide also described free travel and vacations arranged for the Clintons by corporations, reinforcing ethics concerns about the Democratic presidential nominee. The 13-page memo, by Doug Band, was included in hacked emails from the private account of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta that were released by WikiLeaks.

    The Canadian Press
  • Mark Lindsay to serve life sentence with no chance of parole for 16 years

    Mark Lindsay, the son of a former Edmonton police chief, has been sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 16 years in the horrific 2011 killing of his former girlfriend, Dana Turner. Lindsay sobbed in the prisoner's box as he listened to victim impact statements read aloud by members of Turner's family, including her mother and her sister. Lindsay was convicted earlier this year of second-degree murder.

  • Former GOP congressman: Grabbing my musket if Trump loses

    A former Republican congressman from Illinois says he plans to grab his musket if GOP nominee Donald Trump loses the presidential election. Former U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh tweeted Wednesday afternoon : "On November 8th, I'm voting for Trump. On November 9th, if Trump loses, I'm grabbing my musket.

    The Canadian Press
  • Sens goalie Anderson granted leave of absence for 'personal matter at home'

    Anderson has a 4-1-0 record with a 2.94 goals-against average and a .903 save percentage with a shutout this season. The Senators recalled Chris Driedger from the American Hockey League's Binghamton Senators to tend goal along with Andrew Hammond in Anderson's absence.

    The Canadian Press
  • Frequent fatal casino bus crashes draw attention from feds

    Rosa Ruiz returned from a gambling jaunt to San Diego before dawn Saturday and was back on another bus that evening, headed for a desert casino. Ruiz was killed along with 12 others, including the bus driver who also owned the USA Holiday bus. Fatalities involving casino buses have become so frequent that the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates major crashes, is studying them for common patterns, said Earl Weener, an NTSB board member overseeing the crash probe of the USA Holiday bus.

    The Canadian Press
  • Caribou Legs, Indigenous ultra-marathoner, gets warm welcome in Nova Scotia

    His name is Brad Firth, but he goes by "Caribou Legs."

  • RCMP arrest taxi driver accused of groping woman

    A Charlottetown taxi driver charged with sexually assaulting a passenger in his cab is now in police custody. Paramveer Singh Bhurjee, 31, was scheduled to appear in P.E.I. Provincial Court on Oct. 12, but failed to show up.

  • Former MLS doormat Toronto FC finally making history for all the right reasons

    When Toronto FC made history in the past, it was usually all bad. Manager Ryan Nelsen complained in 2013 of inheriting "probably the worst put-together squad in the history of the league." Then there was star striker Danny Koevermans who lamented being part of "setting a record for the worst team in the world" as Toronto opened the 2012 MLS season with a record-setting nine straight losses. Koevermans, to his credit, scored the goal that finally ended the record slide.

    The Canadian Press
  • International student arrested for allegedly threatening to harm teacher

    RCMP are also investigating a second international student in connection with the same incident. Police are not releasing the name, age, grade or nationality of either students to protect their privacy, but say they are taking the incident very seriously.

  • Countries OK world's largest marine reserve in Antarctica

    The countries that decide the fate of Antarctica reached an historic agreement on Friday to create the world's largest marine protected area in the ocean next to the frozen continent. The agreement comes after years of diplomatic wrangling and high-level talks between the U.S. and Russia, which has rejected the idea in the past. The deal was clinched after 24 countries and the European Union met in Hobart, Australia, this week.

    The Canadian Press
  • Michael Phelps, Nicole Johnson secretly married in June

    Michael Phelps can add getting married to his long list of accomplishments this year. The Arizona Republic reports the 31-year-old Olympic swimming champion secretly married longtime girlfriend Nicole Johnson on June 13, a little more than a month after the former Miss California USA gave birth to their son, Boomer. The newspaper has posted a copy of a marriage license that shows Phelps and Johnson were married in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

    The Canadian Press
  • Firearms trafficking ring targeted in west Edmonton, 5 men charged

    Five Edmonton men are facing a series of charges after a black market firearms trafficking ring was targeted by ALERT. Eight firearms were seized Sept. 23 as four search warrants were executed on homes across west Edmonton. The Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams' gang unit recovered three rifles, five handguns, body armour, silencers, and a crate containing various rounds of ammunition.

  • Premier doesn't rule out 2nd Fort McMurray highway

    Premier Rachel Notley hasn't ruled out supporting a $1.5-billion highway that could serve as a second evacuation route out of Fort McMurray. Notley said Wednesday her government would consider the need for a second major north-south roadway as it reviews the response to the May wildfire that forced a mass evacuation.

  • Parents on hook for school earthquake supplies, PAC member says

    When the Big One hits, will your local school be stocked with the emergency supplies that children will need to stay safe and warm in the aftermath? According to Marketa Lund, It depends on how successful the parents are at fundraising.

  • Unions, government duke it out on Bill 7

    Union leaders from across the province met at the Manitoba Legislature Thursday for the latest in a heated, months-long battle against a government bill they say is an attack on workers. Bill 7, the proposed labour relations amendments act, makes good on Premier Brian Pallister's campaign promise to restore democracy to the workplace and end "forced unionization," but opponents say it opens the door for employers to intimidate and threaten workers out of forming a union.



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