• AP FACT CHECK: Trump, AG spread untruths on Mueller report
    News
    The Canadian Press

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump, AG spread untruths on Mueller report

    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is still distorting the truth about the Russia investigation , claiming exoneration from a special counsel's report that he is also assailing as hopelessly biased.Confronted with unflattering details in the report about his monthslong effort to undermine federal investigators, Trump over the weekend blasted special counsel Robert Mueller's appointment as "highly conflicted." In fact, the Justice Department's ethics experts cleared Mueller to run the two-year investigation and Trump's own aides previously dismissed the president's complaints as "ridiculous" and unfounded.Trump is also claiming full vindication by the report. But while clearing Trump of criminal conspiracy, Mueller all but boldfaced this other finding in the 400-plus page report: No exoneration for Trump on obstruction of justice.The statements were among many misrepresentations spread over the past week by the president's team, including Attorney General William Barr, who declared Trump innocent and suggested, inaccurately, that Congress had no role in deciding the matter.A review:RUSSIA INVESTIGATIONTRUMP: "The Mueller Report ... was written as nastily as possible by 13 (18) Angry Democrats who were true Trump Haters, including highly conflicted Bob Mueller himself." — tweet Saturday.THE FACTS: Trump repeats a baseless charge that Mueller is a "highly conflicted" prosecutor, something that Trump's own aides have debunked.Trump has previously tweeted and complained to aides that Mueller would not be objective, saying Mueller had interviewed for the FBI director position shortly before being named as special counsel and that Mueller had disputed some fees relating to his membership at a Trump golf course.But the president's aides, including then-White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, then-White House counsel Don McGahn and Reince Priebus, the chief of staff at the time, rejected those complaints as not representing "true conflicts," according to the special counsel's report. Bannon also called the claims "ridiculous." Bannon indicated that while the White House had invited Mueller to speak to the president about the FBI and thought about asking him to become director, Mueller did not come in looking for a job.Mueller, a longtime Republican, was cleared by the Justice Department to lead the Russia investigation. The department said in May 2017 that its ethics experts "determined that Mr. Mueller's participation in the matters assigned to him is appropriate." The issue had come up because of his former position at the WilmerHale law firm, which represented some key players in the probe.Mueller was appointed as special counsel by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, a Trump appointee.___TRUMP: "The Mueller Report should not have been authorized in the first place." — tweet Saturday.THE FACTS: Trump is entitled to that opinion. The grounds he has given, though, are at odds with some facts.He claimed as recently as last month that the probe was hatched by Democrats after losing the 2016 election. As evidence, Trump often points to a dossier of anti-Trump research financed by the Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton's campaign. The research that was ultimately compiled into the dossier was initially financed by anti-Trump conservatives, and later by the Democrats.But the Mueller report makes clear that the FBI's investigation actually began months before it received the dossier.The report notes the investigation was initiated after the FBI received information related to Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, not the dossier. Last year, the Republican-controlled House Intelligence Committee made the same finding.In late July 2016, days after WikiLeaks released thousands of internal Democratic National Committee documents that proved embarrassing to Clinton, the FBI became aware of a meeting two months prior between Papadopoulos and a representative of a foreign government, according to Mueller's report. Papadopoulos claimed the Trump campaign had received "indications" from Moscow that it could assist the campaign by anonymously releasing political dirt on Clinton."Within a week of the (WikiLeaks) release, a foreign government informed the FBI about its May 2016 interaction with Papadopoulos," the report stated. "On July 31, 2016, based on the foreign government reporting, the FBI opened an investigation into potential co-ordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump Campaign."___TRUMP: "The end result of the greatest Witch Hunt in U.S. political history is No Collusion with Russia (and No Obstruction). Pretty Amazing!" — tweet Saturday.VICE PRESIDENT MIKE PENCE: "Today's release of the Special Counsel's report confirms what the President and I have said since day one: there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia and there was no obstruction of justice." — statement Thursday.KELLYANNE CONWAY, White House counsellor: "What matters is what the Department of Justice and special counsel concluded here, which is no collusion, no obstruction, and complete exoneration, as the president says." — remarks Thursday to reporters.THE FACTS: The special counsel's report specifically does not exonerate Trump, leaving open the question of whether the president obstructed justice."If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state," Mueller wrote. "Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment."The report identifies 10 instances of possible obstruction by Trump and said he might have "had a motive" to impede the investigation because of what it could find on a variety of personal matters, such as his proposal to build a Trump Tower in Moscow."The evidence does indicate that a thorough FBI investigation would uncover facts about the campaign and the President personally that the President could have understood to be crimes or that would give rise to personal and political concerns," the report states.In explaining its decision, Mueller's team said reaching a conclusion on whether Trump committed crimes would be inappropriate because of a Justice Department legal opinion indicating that a sitting president should not be prosecuted. It nevertheless left open at least the theoretical possibility that Trump could be charged after he leaves office, noting that its factual investigation was conducted "in order to preserve the evidence when memories were fresh and documentary material were available.""Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him," the report states.___SARAH SANDERS, White House press secretary, on her statements from 2017 that many people in the FBI wanted James Comey, the director, fired: "The sentiment is 100% accurate." — "CBS This Morning," Friday.THE FACTS: Her answer on this subject was far different when she gave it under oath.After Trump fired Comey, she told reporters on May 10, 2017, that "the rank and file of the FBI had lost confidence in their director" and "accordingly" the president removed him. When a reporter said most FBI agents supported Comey, Sanders said, "Look, we've heard from countless members of the FBI that say very different things."But when Mueller's team interviewed her under oath, she backed off that story. According to the Mueller report, she said it was a "slip of the tongue" to say that countless FBI people wanted Comey out, that her statement about the rank and file losing confidence in him was offered "in the heat of the moment" and that, in the report's words, it "was not founded on anything."Now she's back to suggesting that Comey was in fact unpopular in the FBI. "I said that it was in the heat of the moment, meaning it wasn't a scripted thing," she said Friday. "But the big takeaway here is that the sentiment is 100% accurate."The Mueller report says there is "no evidence" that Trump heard complaints about Comey's leadership from FBI employees before firing him.Mueller evaluated nearly a dozen episodes for possible obstruction of justice and said he could not conclusively determine that Trump had committed criminal obstruction. Among those episodes was his manner of firing Comey. Mueller found "substantial evidence" corroborating Comey's account of a dinner at which he said Trump pressed him for his loyalty.Although Sanders attributed her remark about Comey's unpopularity to "heat of the moment," Trump has voiced the same sentiment. As recently as January, he tweeted: "The rank and file of the FBI are great people who are disgusted with what they are learning about Lyin' James Comey and the so-called 'leaders' of the FBI."__ATTORNEY GENERAL WILLIAM BARR, asked if Mueller intended for Congress, not the attorney general, to decide whether Trump obstructed justice: "Well, special counsel Mueller did not indicate that his purpose was to leave the decision to Congress. I hope that was not his view. ... I didn't talk to him directly about the fact that we were making the decision, but I am told that his reaction to that was that it was my prerogative as attorney general to make that decision."THE FACTS: Mueller's report actually does indicate that Congress could make that determination.The report states that no person is above the law, including the president, and that the Constitution "does not categorically and permanently immunize a President for obstructing justice."In his four-page memo last month, Barr said while Mueller left open the question of whether Trump broke the law by obstructing the investigation, Barr was ultimately deciding as attorney general that the evidence developed by Mueller was "not sufficient" to establish, for the purposes of prosecution, that Trump obstructed justice.But the special counsel's report specifies that Congress can also render a judgment on that question.It says: "The conclusion that Congress may apply obstruction laws to the President's corrupt exercise of the powers of office accords with our constitutional system of checks and balances and the principle that no person is above the law."___BARR: "These reports are not supposed to be made public." — remarks Thursday at the Justice Department.THE FACTS: The attorney general is not going out on a limb for public disclosure.Justice Department regulations give Barr wide authority to release a special counsel's report in situations it "would be in the public interest." Barr had made clear during his Senate confirmation hearing in January that he believed in transparency with the report on Mueller's investigation into Russian election interference during the 2016 campaign, "consistent with regulations and the law."___BARR, saying it was "consistent with long-standing practice" for him to share a copy of the redacted report with the White House and president's attorneys before its release: "Earlier this week, the president's personal counsel requested and were given the opportunity to read a final version of the redacted report before it was publicly released. That request was consistent with the practice followed under the Ethics in Government Act, which permitted individuals named in a report prepared by an independent counsel the opportunity to read the report before publication." — remarks Thursday.THE FACTS: Barr's decision, citing the Ethics in Government Act, is inconsistent with independent counsel Ken Starr's handling of his report into whether President Bill Clinton obstructed and lied in Starr's probe.On Sept. 7, 1998, Clinton's attorney David Kendall requested that Starr provide him an opportunity to review the report before it was sent to Congress. Starr quickly turned him down."As a matter of legal interpretation, I respectfully disagree with your analysis," Starr wrote to Kendall two days later. Starr called Kendall "mistaken" regarding the rights of the president's attorneys to "review a 'report' before it is transmitted to Congress."Starr's report was governed by the ethics act cited by Barr as his justification for showing the report to the president's team. It has since expired. Current regulations governing Mueller's work don't specify how confidential information should be shared with the White House.Starr's report led to the impeachment trial of Clinton in 1999.___ECONOMYTRUMP: "I have never been happier or more content because your Country is doing so well, with an Economy that is the talk of the World and may be stronger than it has ever been before." — tweet Sunday.TRUMP: "I believe it will be Crazy Bernie Sanders vs. Sleepy Joe Biden as the two finalists to run against maybe the best Economy in the history of our Country." — tweet Tuesday.TRUMP: "We may have the best economy we've ever had." — remarks on April 15 in Burnsville, Minnesota.THE FACTS: The economy is healthy but not one of the best in history. Also, there are signs it is weakening after a spurt of growth last year.The economy expanded at an annual rate of 2.9 per cent last year, a solid pace. But it was just the fastest in four years. In the late 1990s, growth topped 4 per cent for four straight years, a level it has not yet reached under Trump. And growth even reached 7.2 per cent in 1984.Independent economists widely expect slower growth this year as the effects of the Trump administration's tax cuts fade, trade tensions and slower global growth hold back exports, and higher interest rates make it more expensive to borrow to buy cars and homes.___TRUMP: "We cut your taxes. Biggest tax cut in history."— Minnesota remarks.THE FACTS: His tax cuts are nowhere close to the biggest in U.S. history.It's a $1.5 trillion tax cut over 10 years. As a share of the total economy, a tax cut of that size ranks 12th, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. President Ronald Reagan's 1981 cut is the biggest followed by the 1945 rollback of taxes that financed World War II.Post-Reagan tax cuts also stand among the historically significant: President George W. Bush's cuts in the early 2000s and President Barack Obama's renewal of them a decade later.___Associated Press writers Eric Tucker, Josh Boak and Darlene Superville contributed to this report.___Find AP Fact Checks at http://apne.ws/2kbx8bdFollow @APFactCheck on Twitter: https://twitter.com/APFactCheckEDITOR'S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figuresHope Yen And Calvin Woodward, The Associated Press

  • Hundreds of Canadian troops deployed to flood zones in Quebec and N.B.
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Hundreds of Canadian troops deployed to flood zones in Quebec and N.B.

    MONTREAL — Quebecers whose homes are repeatedly flooded may eventually be forced to move, Premier Francois Legault said Sunday as he toured an area enduring its second bout of spring flooding in three years.Legault visited Laval's Ile Bigras, where soldiers from the Canadian Armed Forces were busy stacking sandbags up a barrier along the shore's edge as the already-swollen river threatened to further spills its banks.He noted that many residents in the same areas were still in the midst of renovating their homes after flooding in 2017.As a result, Legault said the government was reviewing its programs to ensure that those who need compensation get it earlier, but also that there are incentives in place for those who want to move to higher ground."We have to adjust our programs to rapidly compensate people who have cleanup, renovations to do," he told reporters. "But we have to be clearheaded, and if its necessary to force people to move, we'll do it."Legault said he doesn't want taxpayers to be on the hook for repairing the same homes over and over again, especially when such events appear to be happening more frequently, possibly due to climate change.He did not specify how the program would work, but said the government may put a limit on the amount of repair money a homeowner can receive before they are asked to move.Near the entrance to the island on the southwest edge of Laval, several roads were closed due to flooding and one home appeared partially surrounded by water as small waves lapped at a picnic bench and a "For Sale" sign on the lawn.But Legault said he hoped the current flood would be less catastrophic than in 2017 due to better preparation, which included delivering sandbags to homes at risk of flooding and the government's decision to call in the army before the situation got out of hand.But the positive words didn't lessen the anxiety for homeowners Anna Lin and Eddy Girard, who on Sunday afternoon watched the river rushing along the edge of their lawn on Ile Bigras.Since the 2017 floods, the couple has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on major renovations, including raising the entire home and building a waterproof basement.Now, they're worried it won't be enough."It's discouraging, hard on the morale, hard on the family," said Girard. "Do we rebuild, do we let it go? We have to look to the future."Lin and Girard said that many of their neighbours are still in the process of rebuilding from the last floods, after having to wait months or years for government compensation or simply the permission to rebuild. The house next to theirs was demolished and the one next to that is still under construction.The couple has spent the last few days laying down sandbags, sealing windows moving items to higher ground. They say municipal and provincial officials appear much better prepared this time, and are hopeful the water will stay out their home. If it doesn't, they're not sure what they'll do."We're in a 100 year flood zone, and in three years, we've been hit two times," Girard said.Many people across Quebec and New Brunswick have been filling sandbags in an effort to protect their homes, as officials warned water levels are expected to rise in many regions due to warming temperatures that contribute to snowmelt and ice movement.About 200 soldiers started filling sandbags and carrying out evacuations in Quebec's Outaouais and Mauricie regions overnight, and by Sunday afternoon about 600 were on the job across the province.Public affairs officer Pierre Leblanc said the army’s priority in the Laval area would be filling and stacking sandbags and protecting critical infrastructure near the river, which he said was rising about one centimetre each hour.Urgence Quebec said that as of Sunday afternoon, 1,280 residences across the province had been flooded and more than 1,500 people had left their homes.Five major floods were identified as threatening thousands of Quebecers, and so far one death has been blamed on the high water.Police say 72-year-old Louise Seguin Lortie died Saturday morning after driving her car into a sinkhole caused by flooding in the Pontiac area, about 30 kilometres northwest of Ottawa.Some of the worst flooding has been in the Beauce region south of Quebec City, where 883 homes were swamped and 765 people evacuated by Sunday morning, up from 94 the previous day.Meanwhile, about 120 Canadian soldiers were being deployed across western New Brunswick to help residents threatened by rising floodwaters.Fifteen communities in that province have been warned to remain on high alert. Morgan Lowrie, The Canadian PressNote to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said several roads were closed near the southeast edge of Laval.

  • Grassy Narrows worries about fate of Trudeau Liberals' promised treatment home
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Grassy Narrows worries about fate of Trudeau Liberals' promised treatment home

    The chief of a First Nation in northwestern Ontario long-plagued by the debilitating impacts of mercury contamination says he is worried about the fate of a federally promised treatment facility as the calendar speeds towards this fall's election without any signs of progress. Grassy Narrows First Nation has suffered from the health impacts of mercury contamination stemming from when a paper mill in Dryden, Ont., dumped 9,000 kilograms of the substance into the English-Wabigoon River system in the 1960s. Help for those residents appeared a certainty two years ago when the minister in charge of the file promised a specialized treatment facility on the reserve.

  • Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

    Accidental suffocation is a leading cause of injury deaths in U.S. infants and common scenarios involve blankets, bed-sharing with parents and other unsafe sleep practices, an analysis of government data found. Half of these soft bedding-related deaths occurred in an adult bed where most babies were sleeping on their stomachs.

  • Huawei first-quarter revenue grows 39 percent to $27 billion amid heightened U.S. pressure
    News
    Reuters

    Huawei first-quarter revenue grows 39 percent to $27 billion amid heightened U.S. pressure

    Huawei Technologies said on Monday its first-quarter revenue jumped 39 percent to 179.7 billion yuan ($26.81 billion), in the Chinese technology firm's first-ever quarterly results. The Shenzhen-based firm, the world's biggest telecoms equipment maker, also said its net profit margin was around 8 percent for the quarter, which it added was slightly higher than the same period last year. Huawei did not disclose its actual net profit.

  • Cowichan Tribes could take land and resource control back from Ottawa
    News
    CBC

    Cowichan Tribes could take land and resource control back from Ottawa

    The largest single First Nation band in British Columbia is asking its members to decide if they want to take away control of their land and natural resources from Ottawa. The Cowichan Tribes, located north of Victoria in the Cowichan Valley, have developed a local land code that would replace the land management provisions of the Indian Act. If it gets band approval in September, the code will carry the same weight as the Indian Act in court and put the Cowichan people in charge of their land-use decisions.

  • Samsung Electronics delays Galaxy Fold media events in China
    News
    Reuters

    Samsung Electronics delays Galaxy Fold media events in China

    Smartphone maker Samsung Electronics Co Ltd has postponed media events for its Galaxy Fold planned for this week in Hong Kong and Shanghai, a company official said, days after reviewers of the foldable handset reported defective samples. Samsung said it received "a few" reports of damage to the displays of samples of the $1,980 handset, raising the specter of the combustible Galaxy Note 7 three years ago which the firm ultimately pulled from shelves at massive cost. Samsung has hailed the folding design as the future in a field that has seen few surprises since Apple Inc's iPhone in 2007.

  • Leafs facing the pressure as another Game 7 in Boston awaits
    News
    CBC

    Leafs facing the pressure as another Game 7 in Boston awaits

    Game 7 in Boston is not a comfortable position for long-suffering Leafs fans. Toronto endured embarrassing come-from-behind defeats on both occasions. Whether or not the Standell's Dirty Water — the Bruins' victory song — will blare over the sound system at TD Garden on Tuesday evening is anyone's guess.

  • 'A really magical food': Bread lovers and bakers in Sask. share their tips and favourites
    News
    CBC

    'A really magical food': Bread lovers and bakers in Sask. share their tips and favourites

    For some, there is nothing better than the smell of freshly baked bread. Mark Dyck used to own the Orange Boot Bakery and currently hosts a podcast called Rise Up, dedicated to breadmakers around the world. "When I was a little kid, I would bake with my grandma," Dyck said.

  • Husky refuses to allow her owner to go to work
    Rumble

    Husky refuses to allow her owner to go to work

    Mila the husky gets in the way when it's time for her own to go to work!

  • Beaches Easter Parade attracts large crowds along Queen Street East
    News
    CBC

    Beaches Easter Parade attracts large crowds along Queen Street East

    The parade, which got underway at 2 p.m., ran along Queen Street East from Munro Park Avenue to Woodbine Avenue. Andre Buhot, Beaches Lions Club secretary and past president, says the Easter Parade is the largest and longest running Easter Parade in the world.

  • 'All around good person': Josh Underhay and son, Oliver, remembered by P.E.I. community
    News
    CBC

    'All around good person': Josh Underhay and son, Oliver, remembered by P.E.I. community

    Family, friends and the wider P.E.I. community are remembering father and son Josh and Oliver Underhay, who died Friday. Josh Underhay was a Green Party candidate in District 9, Charlottetown-Hillsborough Park in the upcoming provincial election. Mike Connolly remembers Underhay as "a man of action," and an "all around good person." Connolly is the executive director of Cycling P.E.I., and witnessed Josh's enthusiasm for biking, as well as his commitment to living an active, environmentally-conscious life.

  • Downtown Vancouver alley to be transformed into public art walk
    News
    CBC

    Downtown Vancouver alley to be transformed into public art walk

    Another downtown Vancouver alley is about to get a facelift. The Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association (DVBIA) is planning to transform the two-block section of Eihu Lane between Burrard and Bute streets into a public art walk called Canvas Corridor. The plan is to cover approximately 50 doors along Eihu Lane with artwork by the end of the summer, making the alley feel safer and more inviting.

  • Hulu show features Windsor comic Dave Merheje
    News
    CBC

    Hulu show features Windsor comic Dave Merheje

    It's been a good year for Dave Merheje.Not only did the Windsor comic recently take a home a Juno after winning comedy album of the year, but he's also starring in a new show on Hulu.It's called Ramy — described by Hulu as a show "about a first-generation Egyptian-American which explores the challenges of being caught between a Muslim community that thinks life is a moral test and a millennial generation that thinks life has no consequences."Merheje plays the role of Ramy Youssef's friend, Ahmed — a character whose background shares parallels with Merheje's own upbringing."I grew up around Muslim friends. I have Muslim friends. It wasn't foreign to me. I understood the experiences, not 100 per cent fully because I'm not Muslim, but I had friends and you learn and experience things through them."He added it's important for people who have not grown up around Arabic people to watch the show, because it provides  a unique perspective into their lived experiences that do not conform to racial stereotypes."They're not always portrayed in a positive light. Usually, they're portrayed as terrorists ... They look scary," said Merheje."Imagine not really knowing or hanging out with Arabs and then your base is just in movies. It's not a proper representation at all."Tap on the player below to hear the full interview with Dave Merheje on the CBC's Afternoon Drive:

  • British Columbia's Sri Lankan community reacts to deadly Easter Sunday explosions
    News
    CBC

    British Columbia's Sri Lankan community reacts to deadly Easter Sunday explosions

    Members of British Columbia's Sri Lankan community say they are standing in solidarity with the victims of Sunday's deadly explosions in the South Asian country. More than 200 people were killed and at least 450 hospitalized after a series of bombings on Easter Sunday. Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe says eight people have been arrested in connection with the near-simultaneous blasts in and around the capital of Colombo and the town of Batticaloa.

  • Calgarian relentlessly campaigns to find friend an organ donor
    News
    CBC

    Calgarian relentlessly campaigns to find friend an organ donor

    A Calgary man has been on a mission for nine months to find a kidney for a sick friend and he hopes National Organ and Tissue Donation Week, which begins Sunday, will motivate people to sign up to be living donors. Mohan Balachandran has put up dozens of signs around the city, and handed out bumper stickers to try and find a donor for his friend Sarjoon Abdul-Cader. "Kidney donor needed.

  • Montreal Yoko Ono exhibit launches in time for bed-in's 50th anniversary
    News
    CBC

    Montreal Yoko Ono exhibit launches in time for bed-in's 50th anniversary

    A new exhibition by and about Yoko Ono brings its historical, political and artistic notes together in one place as it opens this week in Old Montreal. It also offers participatory works created by Ono and a large, submission-based work focused on stories by other women. The Ono trifecta is composed of three parts called Growing Freedom, The instructions of Yoko Ono, and The art of John and Yoko.

  • Elizabeth May's wedding dress a 'walk through a garden' on Earth Day
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Elizabeth May's wedding dress a 'walk through a garden' on Earth Day

    VICTORIA — When Elizabeth May walks down the aisle, she'll be dressed for her wedding along with Earth Day.The Green party leader and British Columbia entrepreneur John Kidder will exchange wedding vows Monday afternoon at Christ Church Cathedral in Victoria, and May will be adorning more greenery than just a bouquet."She had an idea for a dress and she sketched it out for me," said May's dress designer Sue Earle of Salt Spring Island. "She wanted it to feel like spring. She said she would like to have some greenery on the bottom of it so it looked like she just walked through a garden."Earle said she got to work on May's dress over the winter. She said she used old bed sheets for a mock dress she used in a fitting with May that included the placement of handmade tulips, peonies and ferns on the dress.The two-piece, ivory-coloured dress also comes with a jacket with three-quarter-length sleeves, Earle said.Earle, a long-time Green party supporter, said May was pleased with her seasonally-themed wedding dress."She was very happy with it, which made me very happy with it," said Earle. "You want the person to feel like a million bucks, and that it embodies everything she is in terms of a goddess in the spring, celebrating love. That's what I was aiming for."She said the dress received a pre-wedding blessing on a recent ferry voyage from Salt Spring Island to Sidney as Earle delivered the dress to May.Earle said she and a few others held a moment of silence to bless the dress and ensure May has a full day of happiness.May announced her engagement to Kidder last November. She said she knew Kidder for about five years, but sparks flew at a Green Party convention last September.Kidder, 71, who is from Ashcroft, B.C., popped the question about a month later, May has said.Kidder has deep roots in the Green party, having run federally for a seat in B.C., and is a founder of the provincial party. May said he is a retired technology entrepreneur who operates a hops farm in Ashcroft, but also spends time in Vancouver.Kidder is the brother of the late actress Margot Kidder and has three children and four grandchildren. May has a daughter, three stepchildren and seven grandchildren.Wedding guests Monday are encouraged to arrive by bicycle, bus, train or ferry to minimize their carbon footprint. The newlyweds will then spend their honeymoon on the train from Vancouver to Ottawa.Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press

  • Can judges do better for trans kids in family law cases? Western study aims to find out
    News
    CBC

    Can judges do better for trans kids in family law cases? Western study aims to find out

    Imagine a dispute in which two parents are at odds over whether to let their child transition from the gender they were assigned at birth. 

  • City looks to expand Centretown heritage district
    News
    CBC

    City looks to expand Centretown heritage district

    More properties in Centretown could be designated as heritage buildings, as the city embarks on a heritage study of a much wider area than is currently recognized. The existing Centretown Heritage Conservation District was created in 1997 and is bordered by Kent, Catherine, Elgin and Lisgar streets (though a small section goes as far north as Gloucester Street). The Minto Park Heritage Conservation District was created years earlier, in 1988, and is made up of 24 residential properties and a church surrounding the park that sits between Lewis, Gilmour, Elgin and Cartier streets.

  • In Pointe-Gatineau, residents try to prevent repeat of 2017 floods
    News
    CBC

    In Pointe-Gatineau, residents try to prevent repeat of 2017 floods

    Elyse Lagace hadn't even finished repairing the 2017 flood damage to her Pointe-Gatineau home when she suddenly found herself once again piling up sandbags. The 57-year-old is among dozens of residents who've been racing to protect their properties from what could be the second devastating flood to hit the low-lying Gatineau, Que., neighbourhood in two years. "I'm not [doing] very good," Lagace told CBC News Sunday.

  • Coyote co-existence policies mean pets are never safe, group of homeowners say
    News
    CBC

    Coyote co-existence policies mean pets are never safe, group of homeowners say

    Wayne Burley is on high alert when he takes his new pug Maya for a walk, especially if it's dusky or dark. Until one terrible evening about a year ago, Burley said, he had no idea he had to be so vigilant. Since then he's supported the aims of a group that advocates coyotes be trapped and moved elsewhere.

  • Toyota establishes research institute in China to study hydrogen, green technologies
    News
    Reuters

    Toyota establishes research institute in China to study hydrogen, green technologies

    The initiative, outlined by Toyota's President and Chief Executive Akio Toyoda in a speech at Tsinghua University, is part of the Japanese carmaker's efforts to share more technology with China as it seeks to expand its business in the country by beefing up manufacturing capacity and distribution channels, a source close to Toyota said. The Tsinghua-Toyota Joint Research Institute will conduct research into cars and new technology to solve environmental problems in China, including reducing traffic accidents, Toyota said in a statement. The institute will "cooperate in research not only related to cars for Chinese consumers, but also in research related to active utilization of hydrogen energy that can help solve China's energy problems," the company said.

  • Earth Day is no longer relevant
    News
    CBC

    Earth Day is no longer relevant

    Ah, Earth Day: that one day a year devoted to patting ourselves on the back for recycling our milk jugs and installing LED bulbs. But most of us spend as much time thinking about the Earth on Earth Day as we do woodchucks on Feb. 2.

  • P.E.I. Green Party thankful for non-partisan support after candidate's death
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. Green Party thankful for non-partisan support after candidate's death

    Regardless of their politics, Prince Edward Islanders are coming together around the death of Green candidate Josh Underhay, says Green Leader Peter Bevan-Baker. Underhay, along with his six-year-old son Oliver, died in a canoeing accident Friday. In a statement issued Sunday evening, Bevan-Baker expressed his thanks for the support offered from around the province and across Canada.