• Dark family secrets: Anonymous letter uncovers child welfare records
    News
    CBC

    Dark family secrets: Anonymous letter uncovers child welfare records

    Like any other day, Kelly Courtoreille Wright checked her mailbox when she got to work, but what she found inside it changed her life. Courtoreille Wright was a maternal child health worker for the North Peace Tribal Council in High Level, 740 kilometres northwest of Edmonton. "It was like, holy crap," Courtoreille Wright told CBC News.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Man who says wife died on Graceland trip changes story

    An Ohio man who told authorities that his wife died on a trip to Elvis Presley's Graceland and he turned her body over to emergency responders, now says he put her body in the Tennessee River after she died of natural causes, police said Monday. Police in Hartville, about 20 miles (32 kilometres ) southeast of Akron, said 72-year-old Philip Snider had previously told them that Roberta Snider was ill and died in a hotel parking lot in Memphis in early January and he flagged down an ambulance.

  • Owner euthanized dog that left 6-year-old girl with 75 stitches to her face
    News
    CBC

    Owner euthanized dog that left 6-year-old girl with 75 stitches to her face

    The dog that attacked a 6-year-old Windsor girl leaving her with 75 stitches on her face has been voluntarily euthanized by its owner. The young girl's grandmother wrote about the incident in a series of Facebook posts beginning on Jan. 6. The woman wrote her granddaughter was attending a sleepover when she was attacked, leaving her with wounds to her head and leg that required dozens of stitches.

  • Thousands of Sask. patients could benefit from new technology replacing colonoscopies
    News
    CBC

    Thousands of Sask. patients could benefit from new technology replacing colonoscopies

    The $200,000 machine will prevent patients with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, from needing to have invasive colonoscopy procedures. The monitoring they need can now be completed with an intestinal ultrasound, providing instant results at the patient's bedside. Dr. Tom Guzowski, an assistant professor of gastroenterology and internal medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, said intestinal ultrasound is a new technique in Canada that is only being used at two other universities in Calgary and Toronto.

  • N.L. athlete admits to killing man, but argues she is not criminally responsible
    News
    The Canadian Press

    N.L. athlete admits to killing man, but argues she is not criminally responsible

    The jury in the Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court case was told Norris killed 46-year-old Marcel Reardon by striking him multiple times with a hammer. Norris was named to the women's under-19 basketball team competing for Newfoundland and Labrador at the junior national championships in 2005.

  • How Canadians would know about an incoming missile attack
    News
    Yahoo Canada News

    How Canadians would know about an incoming missile attack

    You don’t have cable television and you only listen to live radio in the car. How do you find out about an imminent threat to your life like, say, the nuclear missile attack Hawaiians thought was coming during a false alarm on Jan. 13? Most Canadians have heard the shrill call of the emergency alert tone on television or over the radio.

  • News
    CBC

    Saskatchewan family sells everything, moves to Alberta in search of jobs

    Christine Angst and her spouse, Jeremy Dole, were lifelong Saskatchewan residents until last November, when they decided to sell everything they owned and move to Alberta in search of work. Dole and his nephew decided to combine their money and head to Alberta.

  • Syrian family settling into new Bedeque home
    News
    CBC

    Syrian family settling into new Bedeque home

    It's been a long road from Zabadani, Syria to Bedeque, P.E.I. for Bassam Antoun and his family. The family was forced to flee in 2012 from war-torn Zabadani, a city of 26,000 hit hard hard by the Syrian civil war. Antoun, along with his wife and three children fled to Damascus where they would live for a year before packing up their few belongings and relocating to Lebanon.

  • Guilty plea: Court told man left mother on floor for days before she died
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Guilty plea: Court told man left mother on floor for days before she died

    A Winnipeg man has admitted to leaving his 89-year-old mother, covered in her own feces and urine, lying on the floor of the home they shared for several days until she died. Ron Siwicki, 65, pleaded guilty Monday to criminal negligence causing death, which carries a maximum life sentence. After falling out of bed in November 2014, Littman said the elderly woman suffered some sort of injury and was unable to get up.

  • Frustration grows over derelict boat rusting away on South Shore
    News
    CBC

    Frustration grows over derelict boat rusting away on South Shore

    The Schwalbe docked in Halifax in 2014 after a near-disastrous transatlantic voyage. The boat's owner brought it to Lunenburg in 2015, but hasn't been heard from since. After a storm, the boat came off its moorings and drifted across the harbour to Feltzen South, located in the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg. It's been there ever since.

  • Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination
    News
    CBC

    Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination

    Three servers from 1909 Taverne Moderne, a sprawling new sports bar next to the Bell Centre, have filed complaints with Quebec's human rights commission alleging they were fired last week because of racial discrimination. All three told CBC they were given no clear explanation as to why they were fired. All said the manager who fired them told them their work ethic and appearance didn't compare favourably to two model employees, both white francophone Quebecers.

  • As shutdown deal reached, Trump stays out of sight
    News
    The Canadian Press

    As shutdown deal reached, Trump stays out of sight

    As the shutdown of the federal government lumbered toward an end on Monday, President Donald Trump remained out of sight, suppressing his instincts to make himself part of the story by making a deal or picking a fight. The president limited his public pronouncements to a few Twitter bursts that bashed Democrats. The White House defended Trump's hands-off approach to the negotiations, one out of character for a president who made his reputation as the master of "The Art of the Deal," as he titled one of his books.

  • Wind turbines shut down amid investigation into collapse
    News
    CBC

    Wind turbines shut down amid investigation into collapse

    A company in Chatham-Kent, Ont. has shut down all 51 of its wind turbines as a precaution until an investigation reveals what caused one of the turbines to collapse last Friday. Representatives from the company which owns the turbine, TerraForm Power, were at the site Monday inspecting the damage. "It's a warning to me," said Chatham-Kent Ward 2 Coun.

  • 'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control
    News
    CBC

    'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control

    Volunteers with Four Paws Food Bank in Kamloops, B.C., have been hauling out bags of rotten cat food and feces from a feral cat colony on the city's north shore. Bonnie McBride runs Four Paws Food Bank and says her group was tagged in a Facebook post after someone was walking through the north shore area and spotted a number of sick looking cats. Cat colonies form when a group of feral cats have access to food and shelter, often created when people provide food to the animals.

  • Total calls for service drop 14%: Yellowknife RCMP year-end report
    News
    CBC

    Total calls for service drop 14%: Yellowknife RCMP year-end report

    Yellowknife RCMP say they received fewer calls for service last year compared to 2016. According to its year-end statistics report, the number of calls to RCMP dropped by 14 per cent. Assaults went down by 10 per cent in that same time period and drug possession dropped by 28 per cent. Meanwhile, drug trafficking charges rose by nearly 30 per cent.

  • News
    CBC

    Father and teenaged daughter dead after tragic ATV accident

    The bodies of two missing persons have been recovered after an all-terrain vehicle carrying three people was caught in a deep and fast-moving creek near Campbell River on Sunday. Search and rescue crews from Campbell River, Comox Valley and Port Alberni were dispatched Sunday morning to Woods Creek. "The person recovered yesterday was a young girl, I believe, 15 years of age and was the daughter of the gentleman recovered today," said Daryl Beck with Campbell River Search and Rescue.

  • Suncor will compensate tradespeople stuck in an oilsands work camp during delay
    News
    CBC

    Suncor will compensate tradespeople stuck in an oilsands work camp during delay

    Suncor has agreed to pay missed wages to contractors after complaints that they were asked to show up for work at a new oilsands mine and then told they won't be fully compensated because of unexpected startup delays. The delay has stretched to a week with no end in sight , and, according to several contract workers who reached out to CBC News, workers had been left sitting idle and being paid about 20 per cent of their normal wage. "Basically we are captive workers,"  said one industrial insulator, whose identity CBC News agreed to withhold.

  • Just days after the prime minister of Jamaica declared a state of emergency in the part of his country that includes Montego Bay, Canadians are still travelling there and flights are still departing for the region. Sean O’Shea reports, returning Canadians
    Global News

    Just days after the prime minister of Jamaica declared a state of emergency in the part of his country that includes Montego Bay, Canadians are still travelling there and flights are still departing for the region. Sean O’Shea reports, returning Canadians

    Mon, Jan 22: Just days after the prime minister of Jamaica declared a state of emergency in the part of his country that includes Montego Bay, Canadians are still travelling there and flights are still departing for the region. Returning Canadians say they were never told about the violence or warning to stay indoors. Sean O’Shea reports.

  • Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator
    News
    CBC

    Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator

    More than 2,500 Islanders currently live with dementia and Snow told attendees at P.E.I.'s annual Alzheimer's Awareness Conference in Charlottetown that those lives can be lived to the fullest. One of the biggest misconceptions about Alzheimer's disease is that it is simply a memory problem, Snow said — but it happens to be much more than that.

  • Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies

    Boeing says it has not decided whether to submit its Super Hornet fighter jet as a potential replacement for Canada's aging CF-18s, and is instead waiting to see how the federal government will run the multi-billion-dollar competition. The comments come after government officials briefed dozens of industry representatives and foreign delegates Monday on Canada's plan to purchase 88 new fighter jets in the coming years for an estimated $15 billion to $19 billion. Boeing did not send anyone.

  • Evacuations over but highway remains closed after fire at Port Coquitlam, B.C., train yard
    News
    CBC

    Evacuations over but highway remains closed after fire at Port Coquitlam, B.C., train yard

    Homes and businesses near a Canadian Pacific Railway yard in Port Coquitlam, B.C., were evacuated after a truck and a train car collided Monday night, sparking a large fire. The 6:35 p.m. PT collision caused no injuries, the City of Port Coquitlam said in a statement, and Canadian Pacific says there are no toxic materials on the train. The city said on Twitter that Lougheed Highway — a major route through the city that divides the north and south sides of town — was closed from Shaughnessy Street to the Oxford Connector.

  • Focus shifts to executions in Japan's 1995 sarin gas attack
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Focus shifts to executions in Japan's 1995 sarin gas attack

    More than two decades after poison gas attacks in Tokyo's subways killed 13, the stage has shifted to the execution of 13 people convicted in the crime. When they will be sent to the gallows, though, remains a mystery in Japan's highly secretive death penalty system. The Supreme Court rejected an appeal in the final case last week, so the condemned are no longer needed as potential trial witnesses.

  • Manitoba NDP leader wants Churchill to be hub for northern health care
    News
    CBC

    Manitoba NDP leader wants Churchill to be hub for northern health care

    NDP leader Wab Kinew is joining a chorus of voices calling on governments to invest in Churchill's hospital, developing it into a regional centre for Northerners. The opposition leader recently returned from a trip to the northern town, where he hosted a forum with residents on health care and met with staff at the Churchill Health Centre. The Churchill Health Centre has an emergency room, an operating room and specialists who rotate through the town.

  • News
    CBC

    Three Alberta missing women cases now investigated as homicides

    The unsolved cases of three missing Alberta women — two in the Hinton area and one last seen in Mundare — are now being investigated as homicides, RCMP told an Edmonton news conference Monday. 

  • Reports doctor sexually assaulted RCMP members during medical exams
    Global News

    Reports doctor sexually assaulted RCMP members during medical exams

    A doctor in Atlantic Canada is being accused of sexually abusing some members of the RCMP during medical exams. Ross Lord reports.