• Barry and Honey Sherman were murdered by multiple killers, private investigators believe: source
    News
    CBC

    Barry and Honey Sherman were murdered by multiple killers, private investigators believe: source

    Private investigators believe that the billionaire Toronto couple found dead at their home in December were murdered by multiple killers, a source with direct knowledge of the parallel probe into their mysterious deaths told CBC Toronto. The new information contradicts a widely circulated theory that Barry and Honey Sherman died as a result of a murder-suicide — a notion that is regarded as fiction by those who knew the Shermans well. Barry, 75, and Honey, 70, were found dead by a real estate agent in the basement of their Toronto mansion on Dec. 15.

  • News
    CBC

    A tale of 2 friends with breast cancer; 1 has coverage for costly drug, the other forced to pay

    Karen McLaren, 42, and Ashley McDonald, 38, have a lot in common. The two friends attended Terry Fox Secondary School in Port Coquitlam, B.C., and worked together at Milestones restaurant in their early 20s. McDonald, who is a dual citizen of the U.S. and Canada and receives medical coverage through her employer, a major American airline, was put on a drug called Ibrance, which put her into remission.

  • 'He had no regrets': Friends, family remember whistleblower Shiv Chopra
    News
    CBC

    'He had no regrets': Friends, family remember whistleblower Shiv Chopra

    Dr. Shiv Chopra's fight to preserve the sanctity of Canada's food system might have cost him his job, but he always believed that fight was worth it. The prominent food safety advocate, perhaps best known for blowing the whistle on Health Canada's drug approval process in the 1990s, died on Jan. 7 at the age of 84. "He would do it all over again in a heartbeat," said his son Anil Chopra, before the ceremony.

  • Meet the man who lives in a sandcastle
    BBC News

    Meet the man who lives in a sandcastle

    His friends call him King Marcio. Marcio Matolias has lived in a sandcastle for 22 years in a posh neighbourhood of Rio De Janeiro.

  • 'Sorry' not enough: Province starts hearing from Sixties Scoop survivors on apology wording
    News
    CBC

    'Sorry' not enough: Province starts hearing from Sixties Scoop survivors on apology wording

    The Alberta government is drafting an official apology about the Sixties Scoop and wants help from survivors to get it right. During the period known as the Sixties Scoop, child intervention services in Canada separated Indigenous children from their families and placed them in non-Indigenous homes. Thursday in Peace River, Children's Services Minister Danielle Larivee launched the public engagement, sitting with about 75 survivors from the Peace region to hear their stories.

  • Governor denies parole for Manson follower Leslie Van Houten
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Governor denies parole for Manson follower Leslie Van Houten

    The governor of California once again denied parole Friday for Leslie Van Houten, the youngest follower of murderous cult leader Charles Manson who blamed herself at her parole hearing for letting him control her life. Gov. Jerry Brown said in his decision that Van Houten still lays too much of the blame on Manson, who died two months ago at 83. Brown acknowledged that Van Houten's youth at the time of the crime, her more than four decades as a model prisoner and her abuse at the hands of Manson make it worth considering her release.

  • 'He was a good kid': Bells Corners family mourns teen killed in collision
    News
    CBC

    'He was a good kid': Bells Corners family mourns teen killed in collision

    The family of the Bells Corners teen who died after being struck by a vehicle says they're dealing with the pain of losing someone with so much potential — and struggling to understand how it happened. Nick Hickey, 17, died after he was hit while walking along Seyton Drive, near Moodie Drive and Robertson Road, shortly before 9 p.m. Wednesday. Mellon said she couldn't initially believe the news, thinking that it was some kind of sick joke.

  • Gunmen assault luxury hotel in Afghan capital, 5 dead
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Gunmen assault luxury hotel in Afghan capital, 5 dead

    Gunmen stormed the Intercontinental Hotel in Kabul, killing at least five people, including a foreigner, and setting off a 12-hour gunbattle with security forces that continued into Sunday morning, as frantic guests tried to escape from fourth and fifth-floor windows. Six other people, including three security forces, were reported wounded, and more than 150 people, including 41 foreigners, have been rescued from the hotel, said Interior Ministry spokesman Najib Danish. The bodies of three attackers were recovered as security forces continued to clear the landmark building, he said.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    B.C. school trustee vows to stay following controversial LGBTQ remarks

    A school board trustee in British Columbia is vowing to stay in his job, despite calls that he resign over controversial remarks he made about LGBTQ issues. The statement comes after the board passed a motion on Thursday asking him to resign, saying he has publicly made statements expressing "strong opposition" to the expansion of the B.C. Human Rights Code to include sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as curriculum initiatives on the same subjects.

  • News
    CBC

    Doctor giving up medical licence because of frustration with health authority

    A Cape Breton palliative care doctor is giving up his medical licence next month because he says the way palliative care is provided in Richmond County is forcing more and more people to die in hospitals, rather than at home. Dr. Bob Martel lives in West Arichat and has practised medicine for almost 35 years in Nova Scotia, the last four of which have been providing palliative care in Richmond County. Martel, 67, said the way the system is structured by the Nova Scotia Health Authority, it forces people to visit emergency rooms rather than be seen by a doctor or nurse at home.

  • Women march a year after Trump inauguration with renewed calls for equality
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Women march a year after Trump inauguration with renewed calls for equality

    Thousands of Canadian women looked to the future while acknowledging the past on Saturday as they took to the streets for a second co-ordinated round of protest marches. The scenes in dozens of communities coast to coast were reminiscent of the women's marches that sprang up around the globe a year ago this weekend in the wake of Donald Trump's inauguration as U.S. president. Fuelled by anger over Trump's divisive policies and boasts of sexual misconduct, hundreds of thousands of people organized marches around the world and used the events to proclaim messages of inclusion, equality and empowerment.

  • Want to understand the problems with minimum wage? Talk to people who earn it
    News
    CBC

    Want to understand the problems with minimum wage? Talk to people who earn it

    There are more than a million Canadians who work minimum wage jobs — they make up 8 per cent of the country's salaried employees. The hourly rate they earn varies across the country, from a low of $10.85 in Nova Scotia, to Alberta where the minimum wage is set to increase to $15 in October 2018. Numbers and statistics aside, one of the best ways to understand the issues around minimum wage is to talk to the people who earn it.

  • 10 things you always wanted to know about being non-binary but were afraid to ask
    News
    CBC

    10 things you always wanted to know about being non-binary but were afraid to ask

    Non-binary is a term used by those whose identities do not fit into a strictly male/female binary. While more people are educated about what it means to be gay or transgender, the idea of being non-binary was totally new to me. Rory Starkman, 28, and Russell Louder, 22, are both trans non-binary Islanders, and they agreed to sit down with me and patiently answer my politically incorrect questions.

  • Cardinal rebukes pope over Chile 'slander' comments on abuse
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Cardinal rebukes pope over Chile 'slander' comments on abuse

    Francis set off a national uproar upon leaving Chile on Thursday when he accused victims of the country's most notorious pedophile priest of having slandered another bishop, Juan Barros. The victims say Barros knew of the abuse by the Rev. Fernando Karadima but did nothing to stop it — a charge Barros denies.

  • News
    CBC

    'Best of all cultures' to hit the stage at Regina's Chinese New Year party

    The lion dance and songs may be ushering in the Chinese New Year in Regina on Saturday night, but the celebration is one that organizers say is for all Canadians. Eng said guests will be treated to not only the signature lion dance that heralds the start of a new year, but also to singing and performances from special guests. Some are coming from as far as Vancouver and China to perform at Casino Regina's show lounge, he said.

  • Thousands rally at Women's March in Ottawa, demand a 'better world'
    News
    CBC

    Thousands rally at Women's March in Ottawa, demand a 'better world'

    The event marks the anniversary of last year's march in Washington, D.C., but women at this year's demonstration say the #MeToo movement has clearly shown their struggle for equality is far from over. Ottawa police say between 6,000 and 8,000 people took part in this year's march, which left Parliament Hill around 1 p.m. before winding its way through downtown Ottawa. While last year's march focused intensely on U.S. President Donald Trump, many of the marchers this year said they were more concerned with what they could do here at home.

  • Brandon city council holds property tax increase at 0.42 per cent
    News
    CBC

    Brandon city council holds property tax increase at 0.42 per cent

    After a marathon two days of debating, Brandon's city council has passed this year's budget, holding property taxes to an increase of 0.42 per cent. This means the average Brandon homeowner will see an increase of about $8 on their property tax bill. "This is, I think, the fourth year in a row where we've been able to keep property tax increases aligned — I think it's been 2.04 per cent combined over our four years," said Brandon mayor Rick Chrest.

  • Memorial service held for beloved Michigan airport dog
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Memorial service held for beloved Michigan airport dog

    Hundreds of people have turned out to salute a speedy border collie that became an internet sensation for keeping a northern Michigan airport free of wildlife. People lined up to get inside City Opera House in Traverse City for a memorial service for Piper. The 9-year-old dog was euthanized Jan. 3 after battling prostate cancer.

  • News
    CBC

    Concern about coal dust from passing trains prompts B.C. petition

    A resident of Salmon Arm, B.C., is fighting to get an additional safeguard in place for Interior communities affected by oily, black dust spread by passing coal trains. Canadian Pacific Railway already has two spray stations in B.C. — facilities which spray coal with a glue-like polymer in order to prevent residue from escaping, as seen in the video below.

  • Deported from Belgium, tortured in Sudan
    BBC News

    Deported from Belgium, tortured in Sudan

    Last autumn Belgian authorities invited Sudanese officials to identify Sudanese migrants living in Brussels and speed up deportation. But as reports emerge of torture on return to their home country, has this approach endangered those seeking refuge?

  • News
    CBC

    Edmonton architect proposes multi-use shipping containers in downtown parking lots

    The architect behind some of Edmonton's most iconic buildings, including city hall, has proposed a new project: a mini city made of shipping containers. If chosen as the contest winner, Dub said the development — not to be confused with another project that seeks to build a shipping container park at the old Rossdale power plant site— will give purpose to underutilized space in the downtown core. Dub said the container city could set up shop in parking lots in the area of 96th Street and 103rd Avenue.

  • Missouri governor: 'no blackmail,' 'no violence' in affair
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Missouri governor: 'no blackmail,' 'no violence' in affair

    In his first interview since acknowledging an extramarital affair, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens said Saturday that there was "no blackmail" and "no threat of violence" by him in what he described as a months-long "consensual relationship" with his former hairdresser. Greitens, 43, has remained out of the public eye since shortly after delivering his State of the State address on Jan. 10. Later that night, St. Louis television station KMOV reported that Greitens had an extramarital affair in 2015 as he was preparing to run for governor.

  • Forensic investigators descend on 3rd Toronto property tied to accused killer Bruce McArthur
    News
    CBC

    Forensic investigators descend on 3rd Toronto property tied to accused killer Bruce McArthur

    A forensic team descended Saturday on a third Toronto property associated with Bruce McArthur, the accused killer of two men who vanished from the Gay Village last spring. Resident Stephen Haskett said he first noticed police in the neighbourhood Thursday, but didn't realize at the time why they were there.

  • News
    CBC

    Is Woody Allen finished? Industry watchers, former fans raise question in wake of renewed allegations

    Woody Allen may have never had to face sexual abuse allegations from his daughter Dylan Farrow in court, but in the increasingly important court of public opinion, he seems to be losing. This week, in her first televised interview, Dylan Farrow renewed her allegations of sexual assault by Allen, her adoptive father, when she was seven. For years, Hollywood A-list actors — Kate Winslet, Cate Blanchett, Scarlett Johansson, Penélope Cruz and Joaquin Phoenix, to name a few — have been eager to work with Allen, despite the fact many of his more recent efforts have performed poorly at the box office and earned lacklustre reviews.

  • Manitoba's Crown addictions agency makes changes following audit, employee complaints
    News
    CBC

    Manitoba's Crown addictions agency makes changes following audit, employee complaints

    Manitoba's largest addictions services agency says it has made significant changes following a 2015 audit, and a 2014 incident where employees accused the agency of creating an environment which jeopardized the safety of clients. Ben Fry, the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba's CEO, says the Crown agency has revamped how it keeps records, appraises employees' performances and communicates with staff following an internal government audit — which also uncovered a 2014 letter that was deeply critical of the AFM, and said work conditions at the agency resulted in vacancies that put the people it serves at risk. The objective was to review the financial management practices of the addictions foundation — a Crown agency charged with providing addictions services across Manitoba, including treatment for drug, alcohol and gambling addictions.