• Amid outrage over children, White House defends immigration policy
    News
    Reuters

    Amid outrage over children, White House defends immigration policy

    By Lisa Lambert and Makini Brice WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday defended its hardline immigration policy at the U.S.-Mexico border as criticism mounted over detained immigrant parents being separated from their children, including video of youngsters sitting in concrete-floored cages. While Democrats blasted such treatment as "barbaric" and some Republicans also voiced concerns, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said the administration was only strictly enforcing immigration law. "This administration did not create a policy of separating families at the border.

  • Ford orders public sector hiring freeze, excludes essential frontline staff
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ford orders public sector hiring freeze, excludes essential frontline staff

    Ontario's incoming premier has put the public service under a hiring freeze as part of a series of measures meant to limit spending as he re-examines the province's books, raising concerns among some government workers. A spokesman for Doug Ford said the Progressive Conservative leader has also directed government ministries to cancel "subscription-based services" and to restrict out-of-province travel. "The people of Ontario work hard for their money and they expect their tax dollars to go to the services we all depend on," Simon Jefferies said in a statement.

  • Lack Of Pipeline Consultation Highlights Historical Wrongdoing In B.C. First Nation
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Lack Of Pipeline Consultation Highlights Historical Wrongdoing In B.C. First Nation

    The dirt road leading to High Bar's reserve deep in the Fraser Canyon of B.C. is not for the faint heart. This reserve land was allocated to the community by the federal government in 1881. The community has been trying to get land for their now 164 members to live on ever since.

  • Defeated Ontario Liberals must begin soul-searching: interim leader
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Defeated Ontario Liberals must begin soul-searching: interim leader

    Ontario's Liberals must do some soul-searching in the wake of the devastating defeat they suffered in the provincial election in order to understand where things went wrong, the party's new interim leader said Monday. John Fraser, an Ottawa-are legislator first elected in 2013, said the party respects the electorate's decision and must now look internally for answers. "The people of Ontario sent the Liberal party a very clear message," he said in an interview.

  • Trudeau Pressed On U.S. Migrant Child Policy
    HuffPost Canada Video

    Trudeau Pressed On U.S. Migrant Child Policy

    New Democrats urge the prime minister to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement in light of the separation of migrant kids at the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • TSX rises 0.42 percent as energy climbs
    News
    Reuters

    TSX rises 0.42 percent as energy climbs

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - The Toronto Stock Exchange's S&P/TSX rose 69.21 points, or 0.42 percent, to 16,383.63. The biggest contributor to the TSX gain was TransCanada, while the top sector contributor was energy. Leading the index were Canada Goose Holdings Inc , up 9.8 percent, Bombardier Inc , up 6.4 percent, and Lucara Diamond Corp  , higher by 6.1 percent. Lagging shares were Baytex Energy Corp , down 12.3 percent, Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc, down 12.3 percent, and Raging River Exploration Inc, lower by 10.0 percent. On the TSX 161 issues advanced and 78 declined as a 2. ...

  • News
    CBC

    Conservatives' Richard Martel wins in Chicoutimi-Le Fjord byelection

    Federal Conservative candidate Richard Martel won a byelection in Chicoutimi-Le Fjord, Que., on Monday, taking a seat away from the ruling Liberals. The Conservatives won handily, with 52.7 per cent of the vote to the Liberal's 29.5 per cent. The party attracted just 8.7 per cent of the vote.

  • Jury to decide fate of elderly Mafia boss 'Cadillac Frank'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Jury to decide fate of elderly Mafia boss 'Cadillac Frank'

    It turns out the government, however, wasn't finished with him. Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Tuesday to decide whether Salemme is guilty of ordering the killing of nightclub owner Steven DiSarro in 1993. In his closing arguments Monday, Assistant U.S. Attorney William Ferland urged jurors to believe Salemme's former friend and criminal partner — Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi — who says he witnessed the killing.

  • Visits to Montreal's supervised injection sites more than doubled in first year
    News
    CBC

    Visits to Montreal's supervised injection sites more than doubled in first year

    The number of visits to Montreal's supervised injection sites more than doubled since the facilities first opened last summer. Officials recorded more than 2,500 visits to the city's four safe injection sites last month, compared to 1,189 visits in July of last year, according to data released by the regional health authority (CIUSSS). "We had over 20,000 injections in the injection rooms since we started the project," said Dr. Carole Morissette, the medical chief for Montreal Public Health, during a press conference at a downtown CLSC on Monday.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Federal judge again blocks Arkansas medication abortion law

    A federal judge on Monday again blocked Arkansas from enforcing a law that critics say makes the state the first in the nation to effectively ban abortion pills. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker granted a 14-day temporary restraining order preventing Arkansas from enforcing the restriction on how abortion pills are administered. The U.S. Supreme Court last month rejected Planned Parenthood's appeal to reinstate Baker's earlier order blocking the law.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Musician wins suit against ex who sabotaged his scholarship

    A woman has been ordered to pay more than $200,000 to her ex-boyfriend for sabotaging his opportunity at a prestigious scholarship because she didn't want him to leave. Eric Abramovitz, currently with the Nashville Symphony in Tennessee, is a Canadian clarinetist who in 2013 applied to study at Los Angeles' Coburn Conservatory of Music. According to the lawsuit filed in Canada's Ontario Superior Court of Justice, he had been studying the clarinet since he was seven years old and had won many awards.

  • News
    Reuters

    Beijing subway to get 'bio-ID' tracking systems: China Daily

    The Chinese capital, Beijing, is looking at introducing "bio-recognition technology", including palm scanners and facial recognition cameras, to speed up passenger flow through subway stations at peak times, state media reported on Tuesday. China is increasingly using surveillance technology for everything from bolstering domestic security to speeding up orders at fast-food restaurants. Beijing's sprawling underground transport system plans to introduce the technologies this year, the state-run China Daily newspaper said, citing Zhang Huabing, head of enterprise development for the main operator, Beijing Subway.

  • News
    CBC

    Father, son hurt when driver brakes to avoid ducks

    A man and his 10-year-old son were sent to hospital Sunday after the car in front of them swerved to avoid a family of ducks crossing a highway in Kingston, Ont. Around 8:50 a.m. Sunday a white vehicle — possibly a Kia — was eastbound on Highway 401 near Joyceville Road when it made a sudden stop in an apparent effort to avoid hitting a family of ducks, OPP said. The man and his son were taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

  • News
    CBC

    How 5 Alberta First Nations are helping shape the future of Indigenous education in Canada

    A new northern Alberta school district is blazing a trail for Indigenous-led education in Alberta and the rest of Canada. The Kee Tas Kee Now Tribal Council Education Authority was formed for the current school year by five First Nations which are home to six schools. Up to this year, the nations involved — Loon River First Nation, Lubicon Lake Nation, Peerless Trout First Nation, Whitefish Lake First Nation and Woodland Cree First Nation — each had their own curriculum in their schools.

  • Downtown BIA plans town hall to talk concerns about Downtown Mission's relocation
    News
    CBC

    Downtown BIA plans town hall to talk concerns about Downtown Mission's relocation

    The head of the Downtown Windsor Business Improvement Association (BIA) says it's "extremely frustrating" that the public was not consulted when the the Windsor Public Library sold their location in the city's core to the Downtown Mission. 

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Quarter of seafood sold in Metro Vancouver is mislabelled: researchers

    Catfish is passing as cod and tilapia is masquerading as snapper in Metro Vancouver, says a new study that found up to a quarter of seafood sold in the region was mislabelled. Researchers at the University of British Columbia collected 281 samples of fish and other seafood from restaurants and grocery stores, then tested the DNA to determine the true species. The results are comparable with another study done by the school almost 10 years ago, said Yaxi Hu, a PhD candidate at UBC and the latest study's lead author.

  • B.C. and U.S. should work together to crack global wine market, U.S. industry expert says
    News
    CBC

    B.C. and U.S. should work together to crack global wine market, U.S. industry expert says

    Washington and British Columbia have more similarities than differences when it comes to winemaking and need to stand together, says the president of Washington State Wine. "We are so much alike in the sense that we are making world class wines. We have very unique wine growing regions," he told Chris Walker, the host of CBC's Daybreak South. The biggest challenge at the moment, Warner said, is becoming better known on the world wine market.

  • News
    CBC

    Omnitrax appealing federal order to repair Churchill's severed railway

    Omnitrax Canada will appeal the federal order to repair its railway to the northern Manitoba port of Churchill. The Canadian Transportation Agency ordered the Denver-based company to begin repairs on the Hudson Bay Railway by July 3 and file monthly progress reports beginning in August until the work is complete. Omnitrax reiterated on Monday that they cannot afford the repairs, estimated between $40 million and $60 million in cost.

  • Quebec police officer testifies crash that killed 5-year-old boy was unavoidable
    News
    CBC

    Quebec police officer testifies crash that killed 5-year-old boy was unavoidable

    A Quebec provincial police officer who drove a police cruiser that killed a five-year-old boy on Montreal's South Shore in 2014 has testified that the collision was unavoidable. Patrick Ouellet, a Sûreté du Québec officer on trial for dangerous driving causing death, took the stand Monday in a Longueuil courtroom. Ouellet was driving an unmarked police cruiser on Feb. 13, 2014, when he hit a car that had two children in the backseat at an intersection in the Longueuil borough of Saint-Hubert.

  • News
    CBC

    'It was just the right thing to do:' Crash victim's dad steps up as prom date

    Mackenzie Stewart had no intention of going to prom after her boyfriend, Marshall Curtis, died in a car accident on May 14. "She's been a big part of our family for over two years now and she's Marshall's girl. On Saturday, Curtis and Stewart rolled up to Blackville School in a bright yellow 1965 Volkswagen Bradley.

  • May: Tax rise to help pay for NHS boost
    BBC News

    May: Tax rise to help pay for NHS boost

    Theresa May has said tax rises will be needed to help fund the £20bn boost in NHS funding announced by the government. In a speech in London on Monday, the prime minister said "every penny must be well spent". She said: "Some of the extra funding I am promising will come from using the money we will no longer spend on our annual membership subscription to the European Union after we have left." But she added that "taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more in a fair and balanced way to support the NHS we all use".

  • FOIPP amendments 'long overdue,' UPEI Student Union president says
    News
    CBC

    FOIPP amendments 'long overdue,' UPEI Student Union president says

    The UPEI Student Union says it's pleased to see amendments to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, but added that it's been a long time coming. The act — known at the FOIPP Act — was recently amended to bring some municipalities and post-secondary institutions under its regulations. "It's a great piece of legislation that I think is long overdue," said William McGuigan, president of the student union.

  • Canadian dairy Saputo urges end to pricing system opposed by U.S.
    News
    Reuters

    Canadian dairy Saputo urges end to pricing system opposed by U.S.

    By Rod Nickel WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) - Saputo Inc, one of Canada's largest dairies, supports ending a domestic milk ingredient pricing system that has angered the United States, Chief Executive Lino Saputo Jr. said on Monday, showing a rare crack in solidarity among processors and the country's sheltered dairy farmers. The Class 7 pricing agreement, struck in 2016 between Canadian dairy processors including Saputo and farmers, allowed processors to pay lower prices for domestic milk ingredients used to make cheese and yogurt, and to export the rest. "They want their cake and they want to eat it too," Saputo Jr. said in an interview, referring to farmers.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    The Latest: Fan rushes to scene of XXXTentacion's death

    One Florida fan wasn't content to watch the news of XXXTentacion's fatal shooting through his phone or computer. When 21-year-old Wyatt Rubin learned of the rising star's death Monday afternoon, he jumped in his car and headed to the scene, playing the rapper's songs on the drive over. Authorities say XXXTentacion was shot outside a Deerfield Beach motorcycle dealership Monday afternoon.

  • Geraldine McCaughrean wins Carnegie children's book prize
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Geraldine McCaughrean wins Carnegie children's book prize

    The Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration went to Canada's Sydney Smith for illustrating "Town is by the Sea," a tale of childhood in a Nova Scotia coal-mining community. The Carnegie is Britain's oldest children's book prize, named for Scottish-born U.S. philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.