• Canada hoping U.S. gets on board as it moves to update gender info on NEXUS cards
    News
    CBC

    Canada hoping U.S. gets on board as it moves to update gender info on NEXUS cards

    Canada's border agency is about to shake up the way it tracks sex and gender information — which could lead to some awkward conversations with Washington. For the past two years, the federal government has been looking into how to introduce a third gender identifier across federal departments — something beyond checking off "male" or "female" on a form. The new plan includes displaying gender information (how someone identifies) instead of sex information (biological characteristics) unless absolutely necessary, says an interim report prepared for the clerk of the Privy Council, a copy of which was obtained under access to information.

  • Could a redfish trawling bonanza zap the Maritime Link?
    News
    CBC

    Could a redfish trawling bonanza zap the Maritime Link?

    Owners of the Maritime Link are exploring whether the two subsea electrical cables between Newfoundland and Nova Scotia will need to be better protected from fishing gear when seafood companies begin harvesting an exploding biomass of redfish in the region. Scientists say there are at least 2.5 million tonnes of redfish in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and that is expected to trigger an Atlantic Canadian fishing bonanza — including more bottom trawling — when the fish reach harvest size in a year or two. The subsidiary of Halifax-based Emera Inc. disclosed in a first-quarter update filed with the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board that it was evaluating whether the cables that cross the Cabot Strait needed additional protection from fishing gear.

  • Foxconn says it remains committed to Wisconsin investment project
    News
    Reuters

    Foxconn says it remains committed to Wisconsin investment project

    Taiwan's Foxconn said on Friday it remains committed to its contract to build a display plant and tech research facilities in Wisconsin, days after the U.S. state's governor said he wanted to renegotiate the deal. Democratic Governor Tony Evers, who inherited a deal to give Foxconn $4 billion in tax breaks and other incentives when he took office in January, said on Wednesday he wanted renegotiation because the firm is not expected to reach its job creation goals for the state. Foxconn's proposed 20-million-square-foot Wisconsin campus, announced at a White House ceremony in 2017, marks the largest greenfield investment by a foreign-based company in U.S. history and was praised by President Donald Trump as proof of his ability to revive American manufacturing.

  • New part-time B.Ed. program aims to tackle looming rural teacher shortage
    News
    CBC

    New part-time B.Ed. program aims to tackle looming rural teacher shortage

    A new part-time bachelor of education program aimed at people with full-time jobs in other fields will begin in September, part of an effort to address a looming teacher shortage in rural Nova Scotia. More than 200 people have already expressed interest in the program being offered by St. Francis Xavier University and the Chignecto Central Regional Centre for Education. The goal is to recruit people who live in rural communities that will want to stay and teach there after completing their B.Ed.

  • Historic Chatham drug bust could have serious implications on drug users
    News
    CBC

    Historic Chatham drug bust could have serious implications on drug users

    The Chatham-Kent Police Service seized an estimated $2.6 million worth of drugs April 10 as part of Project 'Fresh'. Tuesday they seven people in connection with that operation, taking more drugs off the street.Caress Lee Carpenter, the community outreach and public relations officer with Chatham-Kent Public Health Unit said the large seizure has the potential to prompt those who use substances to look outside of their normal drugs of choice for a high. And that can be dangerous."Of course [this] can result in increased harm due to unfamiliarity with potency," she said.Drug users may think they need more of a different drug to get a similar high, leading to overdoses. Carpenter said the public health unit is prepared should this happen."We are equipped with resources that support overdoses, if that does occur," she said. "We also supply Naloxone kits to be administered in case of overdoses."RehabilitationDrug users may also choose to seek treatment. Mike Hannon, the director of the substance abuse disorder program at Westover Treatment Centre, said there's a lot of places to get help."Help is immediately available at any 12 step program, either AA or NA,"  he said. "So that's immediately available."The region's drug of choice right now is crystal meth, which is inexpensive with a longer lasting high, said Hannon. Sometimes its laced with fentanyl, which causes many overdoses.The centre requires people to be free of drugs and alcohol for a week before they can enter the 19-day program. There are signs that show drug users are going through a withdrawal, like sweating and irritability, but said often you have to be very close to the person to see the symptoms."The person basically has to reach out to let them know things aren't going well," Hannon said. "It's hard to pick that up by just observing them unless you're basically living with them."Depending on the type of substance and how severely they are dependent on it, will impact their withdrawal effects. "If you're dealing with a withdrawal from opiates, it is best they get connected with withdrawal management, because there are some pretty severe physical signs of what's going to happen with that."

  • Egg hunts, a gallery's final show and Nietzsche for the weekend
    News
    CBC

    Egg hunts, a gallery's final show and Nietzsche for the weekend

    Take a long, lingering look at the art-covered walls of The Cube Gallery — owner and curator Don Monet has hung his last show. The final show, called Threshold: A Beginning, is a survey of local artists who have become friends with the owner over the years.

  • News
    CBC

    Easter 2019: What's open, closed in Windsor

    Looks like a rainy long weekend is in store. Here's what's open and closed in Windsor.City servicesThe 311 Call Centre will be closed Friday and Monday for the Easter holidays. Regular services resume Tuesday.211 Windsor-Essex will remain open 24 hours a day throughout the weekend. There will be no garbage or recycling on Friday or Monday. Refer to the 2019-2020 waste collection calendar for details and adjustments.The public drop offs are closed Friday and Monday but open Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.Parks and recreationAll community and customer care centres are closed Friday and Sunday except for previously scheduled rentals. The WFCU Centre and arenas are closed Friday and Sunday. Arenas will also be closed Monday except for previously scheduled rentals. The Windsor International Aquatic and Training Centre will have limited access for both the pool and the fitness centre, but both are closed entirely on Sunday. Adventure Bay is open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday but closed Sunday. On Monday, the water park is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.Libraries and museumsAll locations of the Windsor Public Library are closed Friday through Monday, with the exception of Central, Budimir and Riverside branches. Those three locations will be open only on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Chimczuk Museum will be closed Friday and Monday but open Saturday and Sunday. The Francois Baby House is closed Friday through Monday. Transit WindsorBuses will run on a regular schedule on Saturday and Sunday. Holiday schedules will be used for Friday and Sunday. The tunnel bus will remain on its regular schedule. Enwin call centreThe Enwin call centre will be closed Friday and Monday, with regular hours resuming Tuesday. The emergency phone line remains available at 519-255-2727.ParkingThere is no municipal parking enforcement on Good Friday or Easter Monday. Beer and wineThe Beer Store will be closed Friday and Sunday, with regular hours Saturday and Monday. The LCBO will be closed Friday and Sunday. Regular hours of operation will take place on Saturday. All LCBO stores in Windsor will be open on Monday, but stores in Essex County may not be open.

  • Interior painting tips from a P.E.I. pro
    News
    CBC

    Interior painting tips from a P.E.I. pro

    The longer days mean the sunshine is streaming into your home and perhaps the need for some fresh paint is more evident than it was in the short, dark days of winter. "It's just experience — just run your brush along and hopefully get 'er straight," he said.

  • Here are the road closures for your Easter long weekend
    News
    CBC

    Here are the road closures for your Easter long weekend

    Toronto commuters will have to plan ahead this Easter weekend, as many areas of the city will have road closures. Bremner Boulevard will be closed from Lakeshore Boulevard West to the east side of 25 York Street for the Toronto Maple Leafs and Raptors tailgates and viewing parties. A portion of College Street and Dundas Street West between Bathurst Street and Ossington Avenue, will be closed on Friday, from approximately 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday for Good Friday procession.

  • Qualcomm's joint venture with Chinese province to shut down: The Information
    News
    Reuters

    Qualcomm's joint venture with Chinese province to shut down: The Information

    A joint venture between U.S. smartphone chipmaker Qualcomm Inc and China's Guizhou province will shut down by the end of the month, The Information reported on Friday, citing employees at the venture. The joint venture, Huaxintong Semiconductor (HXT), was formed in 2016 for the design, development and sale of advanced server technology. Executives at the venture said in internal meetings on Thursday that it would close by April 30, The Information said, adding that Qualcomm and Guizhou province had invested a combined $570 million in HXT as of August 2018.

  • Alcohol on BC Ferries: dangerous or delicious? Critics and advocates weigh-in
    News
    CBC

    Alcohol on BC Ferries: dangerous or delicious? Critics and advocates weigh-in

    The announcement that BC Ferries will serve beer and wine on certain sailings as part of a pilot project this June has been met with concern by some questioning whether it creates the potential for increased impaired driving. Tracy Crawford, Western Canada general manager for Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), says BC Ferries' rules aren't strong enough. As part of the pilot, beer and wine can only be purchased with a meal, with a maximum of two drinks per passenger and sales will only start after 11 a.m. Also, passengers will only be able to buy drinks inside the Pacific Buffet, available on certain ships travelling between Tsawwassen, south of Vancouver, and Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island.

  • Flexible work — for everyone — is key to keeping women in the workforce, experts say
    News
    CBC

    Flexible work — for everyone — is key to keeping women in the workforce, experts say

    Leigh Mitchell left a traditional office job in September 2017, after finding the culture and work structure incompatible with raising her two busy kids, then 13 and eight. In addition, she said, it was an old-fashioned work environment — "nothing was on the cloud." If one of her kids woke up sick on a school morning, Mitchell would still have to find a way to get into the office and put the files she needed onto a memory stick so she could work from home. Today, Mitchell has a 25-hour-per-week job working remotely from home as a website editor, and runs a network for self-employed women on the side.

  • Muskrat Falls: A story of unchecked oilmen and their boondoggle hydro project
    News
    CBC

    Muskrat Falls: A story of unchecked oilmen and their boondoggle hydro project

    Muskrat Falls was billed as a strategy to meet the electricity needs of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador with environmental friendly, stable and competitively priced power. More than six years after it was sanctioned, however, the focus now is trying to complete the project without inflicting any more pain on the province. After months of public hearings before Justice Richard LeBlanc, the answer to that very complex question has slowly been stitched together.

  • Climate protesters are blocking Ministry of Ecology and headquarters of multinationals at La Défense
    euronews Videos

    Climate protesters are blocking Ministry of Ecology and headquarters of multinationals at La Défense

    Hundreds of climate activists are blocking access to the French Ministry of Ecology, Energy and Sustainable Development and the headquarters of Société Générale, Total and EDF in Paris. As part of the International Rebellion Week led by Extinction Rebellion, more than 14 climate groups called to ‘block the Republic of Polluters’. They denounce the ‘immobility’ of President Macron and his ‘toxic alliances with big polluters’. This is one of the biggest civil disobedience mobilisations ever organised in France. Since the beginning of the week, thousands of Extinction Rebellion protesters have blocked roads, bridges and headquarters in England. A similar disobedience action was organised in London on Wednesday, when climate protesters glued themselves to a train.

  • How First Nations are leaving their mark on the cannabis industry
    News
    CBC

    How First Nations are leaving their mark on the cannabis industry

    Delbert Wapass will be paying close attention when two new Prairie Records cannabis shops open up in Saskatoon on April 20 — also known as 4/20. The business advisor for Thunderchild First Nation was chief when the reserve became the biggest investor in Westleaf, the company opening both locations. The $8 million investment, made more than a year ago, came with an announcement that Westleaf is building a 10,700-square-metre production facility on Thunderchild-owned land near North Battleford.

  • If you build it, they will come: Blue Jays building $150K baseball field in Pond Inlet
    News
    CBC

    If you build it, they will come: Blue Jays building $150K baseball field in Pond Inlet

    Kids in Pond Inlet, Nunavut, are going to be playing on a big league-quality field when they suit up for baseball this summer. The Toronto Blue Jays are installing a new state-of-the art baseball diamond in the hamlet, complete with artificial turf, a new backstop and bleachers. The team is paying for the $150,000 diamond through the Jays Care Foundation and its Field of Dreams program, which is supporting 15 projects across Canada this summer.

  • Chocolate Easter egg fundraiser still going strong after 40 years at Lennoxville church
    News
    CBC

    Chocolate Easter egg fundraiser still going strong after 40 years at Lennoxville church

    For the 40th straight year, the basement of St. George's Anglican Church in Lennoxville, just south of Sherbrooke, has been turned into a chocolate Easter egg production factory to raise money for the small parish. The Anglican Church Women's Group makes thousands of decorated chocolate eggs every year over the three weeks leading up to Easter and sells them for five dollars each. Trudy Whittier is one of the "dippers" who coats the moulded batter others teams have made.

  • 'Can't get five cents': Little Harbour fishermen say wharf has big problems
    News
    CBC

    'Can't get five cents': Little Harbour fishermen say wharf has big problems

    Roddy Conrad's been fishing out of Little Harbour, N.S., for 28 years. He says over time the wharf's condition has deteriorated to the point where those who fish from it are concerned about their boats and their safety.

  • As the waters rise, here's where to get sandbags
    News
    CBC

    As the waters rise, here's where to get sandbags

    The Ottawa River is set to rise considerably this weekend, potentially reaching levels last seen during the devastating 2017 floods.

  • 2 injured, several out of their homes as Burnaby firefighters battle house fires
    News
    CBC

    2 injured, several out of their homes as Burnaby firefighters battle house fires

    Two people were taken to hospital and several others were forced out of their homes after two houses caught fire in north Burnaby overnight. Neighbours living near the house on Pender Street, near Boundary Road, called 911 just before 3:00 a.m. PT Friday when they saw smoke and flames coming out of its roof. "Somebody was screaming, 'Fire, fire, fire,'" said Mike Svatek, who lives near the homes that burned.

  • Here are 3 ways to stay safe in a flood
    News
    CBC

    Here are 3 ways to stay safe in a flood

    Here are three ways to stay safe if New Brunswick surpasses record flood levels again. The New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization recommends you create an emergency kit to last you 72 hours in the event of a flood.

  • French interior minister warns of yellow-vest riots on Saturday
    News
    Reuters

    French interior minister warns of yellow-vest riots on Saturday

    The French interior minister warned on Friday that violence could flare up on the 23rd Saturday of yellow-vest protests, as authorities banned marches around the fire-gutted Notre-Dame cathedral. The warning comes after weeks of relative calm, with the marches attracting declining numbers as yellow-vest protesters waited for President Emmanuel Macron's expected response to their various demands which include lower taxes and more government services. Christophe Castaner, the interior minister, said domestic intelligence services had informed him of a potential return of rioters intent on wreaking havoc in Paris, Toulouse, Montpellier and Bordeaux, in a repeat of violent protests on March 16.

  • Inuvialuit woman lead actress in new episode of The Twilight Zone
    News
    CBC

    Inuvialuit woman lead actress in new episode of The Twilight Zone

    It said the Inuvialuit actress was chosen as the lead character of an episode of the rebooted series The Twilight Zone. "I just burst into happy tears," said Sila, who's a hoop dance performer, motivational speaker and budding actress. The original The Twilight Zone was a 1950s and 60s sci-fi, drama and suspense series hit.

  • Climate change protesters descend on France's SocGen, energy companies
    News
    Reuters

    Climate change protesters descend on France's SocGen, energy companies

    Greenpeace said it was protesting against company links to the oil and gas industry, which it calls a driving force in global warming. Protesters plastered giant posters of President Emmanuel Macron carrying the slogan "Macron, President of Polluters" and a banner reading "Scene of Climate Crime" on the glass facade of Societe Generale, Reuters TV images showed. Greenpeace and action group Les Amis de la Terre (Friends of the Earth) have previously criticized Societe Generale for its role in financing oil and gas projects, in particular the Rio Grande LNG gas project in the United States.

  • Laughter is the best medicine for 64-year-old Island comedian
    News
    CBC

    Laughter is the best medicine for 64-year-old Island comedian

    Margaret Macgillivray is just beginning her comedy career at 64 years old and she is piling up the accolades quickly. The Newfoundland native won The Great Upstreet Joke Off in Charlottetown April 4. Although she comes from away, Macgillivray has been living on P.E.I. since she was 11 and raised two kids on the Island. "I said, 'yeah one of these days I might actually be able to get up on stage,'" Macgillivray said.