• Reunited: Chatham mother holds her boys for first time after a long, painful separation
    News
    CBC

    Reunited: Chatham mother holds her boys for first time after a long, painful separation

    A Chatham mother is overjoyed after being reunited with her two young sons on Sunday, after two and a half years. In 2015, Jolly Bimbachi's then husband took the boys to Lebanon for a family trip and never returned. Bimbachi's been fighting to get her sons back ever since.

  • Trump voices doubt about trophy hunting policy
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trump voices doubt about trophy hunting policy

    President Donald Trump on Sunday expressed more doubts about a new policy allowing trophies of African elephants shot for sport to be imported, appearing to question whether "this horror show" would actually aid in the conservation of any animal. The trophy policy was among issues Trump cited in a series of tweets. The death of a Customs and Border Protection agent in Texas brought a message of condolence.

  • News
    CBC

    'Talking will help': Edmonton man speaks out about recovery from childhood sexual abuse

    Neil Campbell was 12 years old and sitting in bed reading a comic book when he was suddenly crushed by a wave of fear, anger and confusion. The teen admitted his guilt, and Campbell's family discussed pressing charges against him. Police told them it would be best if they didn't — it would save Campbell from an embarrassing trial and teasing from other kids in his Edmonton neighbourhood. "[It's] kind of the pattern that most sexual abuse victims go.

  • Here's how to avoid a $110 fine on King Street starting Monday
    News
    CBC

    Here's how to avoid a $110 fine on King Street starting Monday

    Police will now ticket drivers who disobey the new rules of the road introduced as part of the King Street pilot project. Officers in the area have kept busy over the last week warning drivers — time and time again — not to drive straight through any intersection on King Street between Bathurst and Jarvis Streets. Clint Stibbe says police have stopped about 2,000 motorists since the project began last Sunday.

  • A Canadian conundrum: why won't Toronto accept 120 pairs of free ice skates?
    News
    CBC

    A Canadian conundrum: why won't Toronto accept 120 pairs of free ice skates?

    Jutta Mason has a deeply Canadian problem. "Frustrated, I feel frustrated," Mason told CBC Toronto while looking over the prepped but not yet flooded rink in Dufferin Grove Park. In 2005, Mason and a group of outdoor rink enthusiasts (who also run a website devoted to skating and shinny hockey in the city) helped the city set up a skate-lending program in the west end park.

  • 'Critical shortage' of daycare workers forecast after immigration error
    News
    CBC

    'Critical shortage' of daycare workers forecast after immigration error

    Anna-Kay Clarke is cleaning clothes out of her dresser, hoping someone will buy the furniture she has posted to Kijiji. 

  • OPP seeks help to identify male pedestrian killed on highway north of Toronto
    News
    CBC

    OPP seeks help to identify male pedestrian killed on highway north of Toronto

    Ontario Provincial Police are appealing to the public for help to identify a man who was killed overnight while pushing a bicycle on a highway in York Region. Sgt. Kerry Schmidt, spokesperson for the OPP's Highway Safety Division, said the OPP received a call about the fatal pedestrian crash on Highway 48 near Davis Drive around midnight on Sunday.

  • Apology to Canadians persecuted for being gay coming Nov. 28: Trudeau
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Apology to Canadians persecuted for being gay coming Nov. 28: Trudeau

    Martine Roy was just 20-years-old and less than a year into her chosen career as a medical assistant with the Canadian Armed Forces at CFB Borden when military police suddenly showed up at her workplace to arrest her. Thirty-three years later she cannot hold back the tears as she prepares to hear an apology from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in the House of Commons. "On November 28, the Government will offer a formal apology to LGBTQ2 Canadians in the House - for the persecution & injustices they have suffered, and to advance together on the path to equality & inclusion," Trudeau wrote on Twitter.

  • Abbotsford, B.C., officer didn't like guns, but didn't hesitate when call came
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Abbotsford, B.C., officer didn't like guns, but didn't hesitate when call came

    An Abbotsford, B.C., police constable killed in the line of duty was remembered as dedicated and caring, a man who had a gut-busting sense of humour and a dislike for guns. Renae Williams, described Davidson as a man with a sense of humour who took far longer to get coffees because staff at the coffee shop couldn't understand his thick Scottish accent. Davidson got his start in policing in Northumbria in the United Kingdom in 1993, where few police officers carry guns.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    NDP's Malcolmson seeks secret ballot vote of MPs to save bill on abandoned boats

    In a show of backbencher strength, NDP MP Sheila Malcolmson could become the first MP in history to force her colleagues in the House of Commons into a secret ballot to save a piece of legislation. Malcolmson plans to appeal directly to House of Commons Speaker Geoff Regan today hoping he'll let her private members' bill to establish a national strategy on abandoned vessels proceed to debate. The bill, first introduced in 2016 and then updated last spring, was deemed earlier this month to be "non-votable" by the House of Commons procedural committee because it deals with the same issue now being dealt with by a government bill.

  • Zimbabwe's week of upheaval
    BBC News

    Zimbabwe's week of upheaval

    What happened - in under two minutes.

  • Women of colour face different battle in sexual harassment scandal
    News
    CBC

    Women of colour face different battle in sexual harassment scandal

    In the overwhelming number of sexual harassment and assault complaints being revealed en masse, it's easy to overlook. Since allegations surfaced against disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, provoking a landslide of more high-profile perpetrators including James Toback, Kevin Spacey, Brett Ratner and Louis C.K., few minority voices have come forward. "That there are obstacles due to race and gender are still a surprise, a shock to a lot of people," says Phani Radhakrishnan, a professor of organizational behaviour and human resources at the University of Toronto.

  • Endangered orcas compete with seals, sea lions for salmon
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Endangered orcas compete with seals, sea lions for salmon

    Harbour seals, sea lions and some fish-eating killer whales have been rebounding along the Northeast Pacific Ocean in recent decades. Competition with other marine mammals for the same food may be a bigger problem than fishing, at least in recent years, for southern resident killer whales that spend time in Washington state's Puget Sound, a new study suggests. Researchers used models to estimate that from 1975 to 2015, marine mammals along the U.S. West Coast ate dramatically more chinook salmon - from 6,100 metric tons to 15,200 metric tons, according to a study published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports.

  • Tuition refunds offered to students as Ontario college strike ends
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Tuition refunds offered to students as Ontario college strike ends

    The Ontario government is offering a full tuition refund to students who withdraw from this semester because of the province's five-week-long college strike. The Ministry of Advanced Education says students will have two weeks from the resumption of classes tomorrow to decide whether or not they want to continue with the condensed semester. The government says students will also be eligible to receive up to $500 for unexpected costs they incurred because of the labour dispute, such as childcare fees, rebooked train or bus tickets, or rent.

  • Tie new affordable housing money to outcomes, former watchdog tells Liberals
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Tie new affordable housing money to outcomes, former watchdog tells Liberals

    In an analysis published today, former parliamentary budget officer Kevin Page says Ottawa currently doesn't tie homelessness and housing funding to any outcomes, meaning the money flows whether the results are good or bad. Page and two co-authors argue that when provinces, territories and municipalities have to report on how they spend federal money, they each use their own benchmarks and present them without any  context. The research from Page's team at the University of Ottawa's Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy comes days ahead of the scheduled unveiling of the Liberals' national housing strategy.

  • Vehicles shouldn't be the priority for Victoria road, community group says
    News
    CBC

    Vehicles shouldn't be the priority for Victoria road, community group says

    The group has proposed redesigning the roadway to make pedestrians, cyclists and mobility scooters the priority. "Essentially what we've done in the past, as a society, is paving paradise and putting up a parking lot," said Lorne Daniel, the vice-president of the Greater Victoria Placemaking Network. Daniel would like to see narrower and slower lanes for cars on Dallas Road in order to make room for a protected bike lane and a path for pedestrians and mobility scooters.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Disabled groups fight immigration law they say is 'demeaning'

    A national advocacy group is pushing for the government to repeal immigration criteria that it calls discriminatory toward people with disabilities. The Council of Canadians with Disabilities is calling for the repeal of a provision that bars immigrants with disabilities from settling in Canada on grounds that they could place too much demand on the country's medical system. The council wants the government to drop the requirement from the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and to make sure disabled people are included in crafting a new, more inclusive procedure.

  • Warming to make thunderstorms larger and more frequent
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Warming to make thunderstorms larger and more frequent

    Summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 per cent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding, a new study says. By the end of century if emissions aren't curbed, these gully washers will be much worse because they will get bigger, said Andreas Prein, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, who led the study. Prein and colleagues used high-resolution computer simulations to see how global warming will likely change the large thunderstorms that are already daily summer events in North America.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Report sets exercise guidelines for young kids, including 'tummy time' for babies

    New guidelines set the minimum amount of activity that toddlers, preschoolers and even babies should get each day. The "24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years" suggests kids aged one to four should get at least three hours of physical activity spread throughout the day. Researchers suggest those younger than 12 months get at least 30 minutes of "tummy time" spread throughout the day.

  • News
    CBC

    Laura Babcock murder trial expected to hear from final witnesses as it enters 5th week

    Marlena Meneses, 23, provided insight on the dynamics between Millard and Smich, and claims she saw a towering animal incinerator smoking and heard a "crackling noise" when she made a late-night trip to Millard's airport hanger in the Waterloo Region. The Crown alleges an animal incinerator, dubbed The Eliminator by its manufacturer, was used to burn Babcock's body after she was killed. While Meneses couldn't give the court an exact date when she first saw the animal incinerator, the Crown contends Babcock was killed on the evening of July 3, 2012, or the morning of July 4, 2012.

  • Edmonton's Jason Maas doesn't regret decision in loss to Stampeders
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton's Jason Maas doesn't regret decision in loss to Stampeders

    Jason Maas doesn't regret his decision to send out Sean Whyte to kick a field goal down seven points with under two minutes to go in Sunday's West Division final. Maybe, but I won't ever regret it because I have faith in our football team," said Maas. Maas' decision had the potential to pay off as the Eskimos forced Calgary to punt with 24 seconds remaining, but Edmonton's Jamill Smith fumbled the ball on the return and the Stampeders recovered to close out the win.

  • Charles Manson dies in hospital
    BBC News

    Charles Manson dies in hospital

    He was the head of a cult, known as the Manson family, which he directed to commit murders.

  • News
    Reuters

    Three dead after suspected gas leak at PetroChina refinery: media

    Three workers were killed and six others injured during a suspected gas leak at a PetroChina-operated refinery in Dalian on Saturday evening, state media said on Monday. The men working for Henan Yanling Jingshun Petrochemical Machinery Equipment Co Ltd were carrying out maintenance at the West Pacific Petrochemical Corp (WEPEC) plant, in northeast Liaoning province. A WEPEC official said production at the 200,000-barrels per day plant had not been affected by the accident.

  • Satellite calls yield no clues on missing Argentine submarine
    News
    Reuters

    Satellite calls yield no clues on missing Argentine submarine

    By Walter Bianchi MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (Reuters) - A storm on Sunday complicated efforts to find an Argentine navy submarine missing in the South Atlantic with 44 crew members, while satellite calls thought to come from the vessel did not help searchers identify the vessel's location. The defense ministry has said the ARA San Juan appeared to try to make contact through seven failed satellite calls on Saturday between late morning and early afternoon. The vessel was 432 km (268 miles) off Argentina's coast when its location was last known early on Wednesday.

  • Male artists win big but female singers dominate American Music Awards stage
    News
    Reuters

    Male artists win big but female singers dominate American Music Awards stage

    By Piya Sinha-Roy LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Pink, Lady Gaga and Christina Aguilera led female artists of pop music dominating the American Music Awards stage on Sunday with powerful performances, despite being edged out by male artists in most award categories this year. Bruno Mars won Artist of the Year, former One Direction member Niall Horan won New Artist of the Year and Puerto Rican singer Luis Fonsi, Justin Bieber and Daddy Yankee won Collaboration of the Year for the catchy "Despacito." The women of pop delivered the night's biggest moments.