• Prince charming: Kate gives birth to boy, home by suppertime
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Prince charming: Kate gives birth to boy, home by suppertime

    The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth Monday morning to a new prince who is fifth in line to the British throne — and she was home by suppertime. The duchess and husband Prince William drove to St. Mary's Hospital in London early in the morning, and Kate's 8 pound, 7 ounce (3.8 kilogram) boy was born at 11:01 a.m., with royal officials announcing the birth about two hours later. In late afternoon, elder siblings Prince George and Princess Charlotte were brought to meet their baby brother.

  • Sask. introduces 'last resort' legislation that would restrict energy products to B.C.
    News
    CBC

    Sask. introduces 'last resort' legislation that would restrict energy products to B.C.

    The Saskatchewan government has introduced a law that, if passed, would restrict energy exports to British Columbia. The proposed law would establish a permitting process for individuals or corporations seeking to export energy products outside Saskatchewan. "Our government will always stand up for Saskatchewan and defend the people and businesses that rely on our oil and gas industry," said Minister of Energy and Resources Bronwyn Eyre.

  • Etiquette and protocol highlights for royal wedding guests
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Etiquette and protocol highlights for royal wedding guests

    You'll be at a royal wedding, after all. While the May 19 nuptials of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will be a lower key affair than those of Will and Kate, guests at St. George's Chapel will still be expected to follow church and royal protocol, or at the very least basic British tradition, etiquette pros said. The invitations to 600 guests described the high church dress code thusly: For men, military uniforms, morning coats or lounge suits, otherwise known as business suits in not-wacky colours .

  • A Cold War poison resurfaces in a quiet English town
    News
    The Canadian Press

    A Cold War poison resurfaces in a quiet English town

    During the Cold War, Soviet scientists at a secret, high-security lab worked frantically to counter the latest U.S. chemical weapons. More than four decades later, the nerve agent they developed apparently turned up in a quiet English town, where it nearly killed a former Russian spy and his daughter. Vladimir Uglev said he was the scientist who in 1975 first synthesized A-234 — an odourless liquid deadlier than any other chemical weapons that existed at the time.

  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts NKorea aim to 'denuclearize'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts NKorea aim to 'denuclearize'

    President Donald Trump and his aides are leaving a false impression about the extent of North Korea's plans to give up its nuclear weapons. There is no mention by North Korea of full nuclear disarmament. Meanwhile, Trump offered a shifting rationale in recent days for his firing of FBI Director James Comey and joined other Republicans in exaggerating how much simpler it will become for Americans to file their taxes next time.

  • Liberal MP Drouin says allegation made against him at party's Halifax convention
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Liberal MP Drouin says allegation made against him at party's Halifax convention

    Liberal MP Francis Drouin says an allegation has been made against him following an incident at the party's convention in Halifax this weekend. Drouin, a 34-year-old MP from eastern Ontario, was described earlier this year as a rising star in the Liberal Party, with a firm grip on the agriculture file and standing as the most-lobbied backbencher on Parliament Hill. In a statement released to the media and sent to Liberal MPs and staff Sunday, Drouin said he wanted to address "reports of an incident" in Halifax.

  • News
    CBC

    P.E.I. Grain Elevators Corporation looking to double storage site in Kensington

    Neil Campbell, the general manager of the corporation, says it's currently paying hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to store grain at the port in Halifax. Campbell said the current infrastructure is aging, and there's difficulty in separating different grains and soybeans.

  • Historic Belle River cabin to be partially saved by new owner
    News
    CBC

    Historic Belle River cabin to be partially saved by new owner

    A log cabin, with significance for Essex County's Francophone community, will be dismantled and rebuilt in the Staples area. This will mark the end of a 12-year saga to preserve Saint-Pierre House. The cabin, located on West Belle River Road, belonged to Elizabeth McInnis, who grew up in the home.

  • Vehicle that slammed into man on weekend likely has 'significant damage,' police say
    News
    CBC

    Vehicle that slammed into man on weekend likely has 'significant damage,' police say

    Police are releasing a few more details about a hit-and-run collision that seriously injured a pedestrian in downtown Calgary on the weekend. The Calgary Police Service does not have a vehicle description and has not been able to find the driver, so officers are hoping for tips from the public.

  • TV show host Wilkos could have drunken-driving charge erased
    News
    The Canadian Press

    TV show host Wilkos could have drunken-driving charge erased

    TV talk show host and Jerry Springer protege Steve Wilkos will have a drunken-driving charge erased from his record if he completes Connecticut's alcohol education program. The Advocate reports Wilkos was granted admission into the diversionary program on Monday during a hearing in Stamford Superior Court. Police say the 53-year-old Wilkos crashed his sport utility vehicle in Darien in January and his blood-alcohol level was 0.29 per cent , more than three times the legal limit for driving.

  • Meet the 102-year-old nun who shatters stereotypes about advanced age
    News
    CBC

    Meet the 102-year-old nun who shatters stereotypes about advanced age

    Bonia is easily mistaken for a 70-year-old, with her able mind and body and keen interest in current events. A member of the Presentation Order in St. John's, Bonia still teaches, and proudly tells the story about how she recently helped a student get sensation back in her arm even though it was deemed "dead" by doctors.

  • Several pedestrians hit by van in Toronto
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Several pedestrians hit by van in Toronto

    A white van allegedly travelled up the sidewalk in the Yonge and Finch area and hit numerous pedestrians in the area.

  • News
    CBC

    Piece rate for fruit pickers is fairer than hourly wage, B.C. fruit growers maintain

    As the B.C. government considers whether to scrap the piece-rate system of pay for the province's fruit pickers, growers are arguing that it gives their workers a much better wage. Fruit pickers are paid based on the volume of crops they pick instead of an hourly rate, but the province is looking at whether it should get rid of the pay method as it looks to increase minimum wages. The B.C. Ministry of Labour outlined plans for wage increases across five industries last week, including an 11.5 per cent increase in all piece rates beginning on Jan. 1, 2019, with further study to take place.

  • Province's Parlee Beach report could put brake on some development, activist suggests
    News
    CBC

    Province's Parlee Beach report could put brake on some development, activist suggests

    A report on water quality at Parlee Beach has set a valuable baseline for making decisions about any development near Shediac Bay, says the head of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. The report by a steering committee of scientists, engineers and others was released Friday after an 18-month investigation into sources of  E. coli contamination at the popular beach on the Northumberland Strait.

  • News
    CBC

    'I can't imagine anything worse': Victoria schools mourn overdose death of teen

    The Greater Victoria School District will have extra support for students on hand this week, following the death of a Vancouver Island teen who died from an accidental overdose over the weekend.  

  • PHOTOS: Several pedestrians struck by van in Toronto
    Yahoo Canada News

    PHOTOS: Several pedestrians struck by van in Toronto

    Ten people are dead after a vehicle ran into pedestrians at the Yonge and Finch area of Toronto. Toronto Police have confirmed an additional 15 people have been injured by the white van. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre said it has received 10 patients from the scene, two were pronounced dead upon arrival. Police have confirmed the van has been located and the driver has been arrested.

  • Alberta man blinded from 'super-rare' disease regains sight thanks to donations
    News
    CBC

    Alberta man blinded from 'super-rare' disease regains sight thanks to donations

    Kevin Michael-Gagne is thrilled to be able to get lost in IKEA and find his own way out again. The 22-year-old developed a rare eye disorder in 2015 that blinded him. "It was a miracle," Michael-Gagne told CBC's Radio Active.

  • Oil settles higher; fears of Iran sanctions end early slide
    News
    Reuters

    Oil settles higher; fears of Iran sanctions end early slide

    By Jessica Resnick-Ault NEW YORK (Reuters) - Oil prices rebounded from an early slide to finish higher and strengthen further in post-settlement trade, as investors feared U.S. sanctions could dampen Iran's output. "It's tweet by tweet," said Phil Flynn, analyst at Price Futures Group, saying the market is swinging in response to posturing from the United States and OPEC members. Oil prices tumbled early on fears that oversupply could return.

  • Councillor requests meeting with Salvation Army over shelter
    News
    CBC

    Councillor requests meeting with Salvation Army over shelter

    The councillor for Ottawa's Vanier neighbourhood has reached out to the national head of the Salvation Army directly to voice concerns about a controversial shelter complex. Mathieu Fleury sent a letter last week to the charitable organization's territorial commander, Susan McMillan, warning that the 350-bed facility slated for Montreal Road will be delayed by as much as two years as the appeal process takes its course. "During this waiting period, services and living conditions of our shelter users are not improving," wrote Fleury in the letter.

  • Own a bike? Winnipeg wants you to register your ride
    News
    CBC

    Own a bike? Winnipeg wants you to register your ride

    Winnipeg has started a new online bicycle registry in the hopes of returning more stolen bikes to their owners. The Winnipeg Police Service believes this registry will make it easier to match recovered bikes with their rightful owners. ​In 2017, the Winnipeg Police Service received 2,800 reports of stolen bikes, Insp. Chody Sutherland said Monday at city hall.

  • 'Idiotic' amount of paperwork for grants, say Yukon First Nation development corps.
    News
    CBC

    'Idiotic' amount of paperwork for grants, say Yukon First Nation development corps.

    Indigenous-owned development corporations in Yukon say they're dealing with too much paperwork, when applying for grants and other funding. Blair Hogan, owner of Gunta Business Consulting, said the Teslin Tlingit Council has more than 100 contribution agreements which total about $14 million annually.

  • Montreal's first 4 pot stores will be located near Metro stations
    News
    CBC

    Montreal's first 4 pot stores will be located near Metro stations

    Montreal has reached an agreement with the SAQ over the location of the city's first four legal pot shops. The city confirmed they'll be located near four Metro stations: Berri-UQAM, Radisson, Jean-Talon and Lionel-Groulx.

  • Vancouver's empty homes tax to pull in $30M
    News
    CBC

    Vancouver's empty homes tax to pull in $30M

    Vancouver's empty homes tax will generate an estimated $30 million for affordable housing in its first year, Mayor Gregor Robertson announced Monday. The highest tax paid was $250,000 for one home, while the median amount of tax paid was $9,900, Robertson said at city hall. "For those who did not rent their property and chose to pay the empty homes tax, I just want to say thank you for contributing to Vancouver affordable housing funding," said the mayor.

  • India's Infosys to renew focus on digital services
    News
    Reuters

    India's Infosys to renew focus on digital services

    By Sankalp Phartiyal MUMBAI (Reuters) - Infosys Ltd, India's second-biggest IT firm, plans to renew its focus on digital services as it looks to boost growth amid shrinking profit margins in its legacy business and rising competition from local and international rivals. Digital services - such as cloud, big data and analytics which accounted for more than a quarter of Infosys' revenue in year to March 2018 - are a massive opportunity, Chief Executive Salil Parekh said on Monday at the company's first analyst meeting in nearly two years. "The idea is - this is a huge market, how can we be more relevant for our clients' future through this market," Parekh said.

  • Hibernia donates $3.4M to Let's Talk Science
    News
    CBC

    Hibernia donates $3.4M to Let's Talk Science

    Hibernia is donating $3.4 million to the Let's Talk Science program — a national educational initiative that aims to get kids interested in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) — in Newfoundland and Labrador. The oil company announced the news at the annual Let's Talk Science Challenge event at Memorial University in St. John's Monday. Around 150 students from Grade 6 to Grade 8 listened as Hebron officials, Natural Resources Minister Siobhan Coady and Let's Talk Science organizers spoke about what the money will mean for students across the province.