• Feds To Spend $60M For School Retrofits In Provinces That Opposed Carbon Tax
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    HuffPost Canada

    Feds To Spend $60M For School Retrofits In Provinces That Opposed Carbon Tax

    The federal government will spend $60 million in revenue from its carbon pricing system to help elementary and secondary schools in Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and New Brunswick become more energy efficient.Speaking outside a school in Ottawa Tuesday, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna framed the funding as a response to "provinces that have stepped back and made it free to pollute." Those four provinces are fighting the carbon pricing system in court. All had a federal carbon tax of $20 per tonne forced on them in April because they lacked their own carbon-pricing system that met federal standards. Alberta, which scrapped its carbon tax weeks ago, will have the price imposed on it in January."I know that young people care about taking action on climate change," McKenna said. "We've seen them marching in the streets demanding action and wanting to be part of the solution."Watch: McKenna says Liberals won't raise carbon price after 2022 Liberals have said 90 per cent of the proceeds from the carbon tax will go back to Canadians in those jurisdictions in the form of income tax rebates.The remaining 10 per cent of revenue will fund green projects for schools, hospitals, small businesses, and other jurisdictions. The funding announced Tuesday is from that pool of money."How great would it be to see solar panels on every school, more energy-efficient windows, better lighting, better heating and cooling systems," she said."This will improve the learning environment for students. It does right by the planet and it also helps schools save money, which they can re-invest in students."Ontario will receive $41 million, while $12 million will be dedicated to Saskatchewan, $5 million for Manitoba, and $2 million for New Brunswick. The minister said almost 6,000 schools would be eligible for the funding.Since education is a matter of provincial jurisdiction, McKenna said she wrote to each of those provincial governments to say the funding is there for the taking and will not need to be matched by the provinces. RELATED * Scheer Says Climate Plan Will Force Big Polluters To Invest In Green Tech * And Now A Group Called 'Ontario Strong' Is Sending Mass Anti-Carbon Tax Texts * Tories 'Playing' With Lives Of Future Generations In Carbon Fight: Grit MP McKenna also used the opportunity to criticize Tory Leader Andrew Scheer's just-released climate plan, which would scrap carbon pricing and instead ask big polluters to pay into a fund for green technology."Conservatives don't take the science behind climate change very seriously," McKenna said. "They don't take very seriously the need to have an ambitious plan to tackle climate change and grow the economy."She also took some swipes at Ontario Premier Doug Ford, whose dismal approval numbers could complicate matters for federal Tories in the battleground province during this fall's federal election."We've seen that when Premier Ford cut so many programs it created great uncertainty," she said. "We need to come together to take climate action."Earlier this month, McKenna announced Ottawa would spend $15 million over four years to save a tree-planting program axed by Ford's government. John Yakabuski, Ontario's natural resources minister, told The Canadian Press at the time that it is "pretty obvious that the federal government wants to campaign against us in this federal election." Liberals criticized over Loblaw Co. fundingLiberals are no doubt hoping Tuesday's announcement will be received more warmly than the $12 million in funding Liberals gave to Loblaw Co. in April to help the company upgrade to more energy-efficient fridges at 370 stores owned by the company.Loblaw Co. has fought against minimum wage hikes and revealed in 2017 that it was part of a multi-year conspiracy to fix the price of bread, along with other food retailers in Canada.Federal Conservatives and New Democrats blasted that funding as little more than a taxpayer "handout" to a profitable company. The controversy spurred a hashtag --LoblawsGiveItBack -- calling on the company to reject the funding. With files from Dan Tencer, The Canadian Press

  • $60 million from federal carbon tax to go to green projects in schools
    News
    The Canadian Press

    $60 million from federal carbon tax to go to green projects in schools

    OTTAWA — A portion of the proceeds of the federal carbon tax will go to fund green projects at schools in four provinces, but the fate of the program depends on the co-operation of those provinces' conservative premiers.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna announced Tuesday $60 million of the revenue from the federal price on carbon will be spent on elementary and secondary schools in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.Those four provinces are subject to the national carbon price because they do not have their own carbon-pricing systems that meet federal standards.The Liberals previously promised that 90 per cent of the revenue from the carbon tax is going back to individuals through rebates on their income taxes.The money announced Tuesday is part of the remaining 10 per cent, which is to go to schools, hospitals, small businesses and other institutions — which can't pass on their own carbon-tax expenses through higher prices — to help develop green projects."This will improve the learning environment for students, it does right by the planet, and it also helps schools save money that they can reinvest in students," said McKenna, outside a school in her Ottawa Centre riding.McKenna said replacing old windows and installing solar panels are possible projects for the roughly 6,000 schools that are eligible for a cut of the $60 million, $41 million of which will go to Ontario. Schools in Saskatchewan are set to receive $12 million, Manitoba schools $5 million, and New Brunswick schools $2 million.But whether the money will be spent as promised depends on the goodwill of conservative premiers in the four provinces affected. Education spending is part of provincial jurisdiction.McKenna said she had sent a letter to those provincial governments informing them of the decision, and emphasized that the federal government doesn't expect matching funds from the provinces. Federal infrastructure programs usually require provinces to put up a share of projects' costs."What we need is an agreement that the provinces will work with the school boards so that we can flow this money," McKenna said."We're hopeful that provinces will recognize this is a good thing."At least one provincial government will be taking the money, though it did not confirm what exactly it would be used for.In an emailed statement, Saskatchewan's Education Minister Gordon Wyant said "it will take some time to determine how — specifically — this funding may benefit" school boards in the province.He said that though "the intent of this funding is helpful," school boards in Saskatchewan are currently calculating how much the federal carbon tax will cost them, calling it a "significant financial burden."Saskatchewan has led provinces in opposing the federal carbon tax. It lost a constitutional challenge in a 3-2 decision at the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal in May, but that challenge in heading to the Supreme Court later this year.Ontario is awaiting a ruling on its own constitutional challenge, launched after Doug Ford won the premiership there last summer.Ford also scrapped the province's cap-and-trade program, and in doing so ended a $100-million program for energy-efficiency retrofits in schools — a fact McKenna highlighted Tuesday.Provincial governments in both Manitoba and New Brunswick both have pending court challenges to the federal carbon tax.Premier Jason Kenney of Alberta also launched a court challenge last week, after the federal government said it would impose the federal carbon tax on Alberta starting next year.Christian Paas-Lang, The Canadian Press

  • David Saint-Jacques doing well after space flight: Canadian Space Agency
    News
    The Canadian Press

    David Saint-Jacques doing well after space flight: Canadian Space Agency

    MONTREAL — Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques is doing well as he continues his long journey home after a six-month stint aboard the International Space Station, the Canadian Space Agency said Tuesday.The 49-year-old Quebec native boarded a NASA plane after landing in Kazakhstan late Monday and was expected to arrive in Houston Tuesday after a brief stopover in Scotland.The agency said Saint-Jacques is in good health despite suffering the effects of a 400-kilometre drop to Earth."Despite experiencing typical post-flight symptoms like nausea, he is well," agency spokeswoman Marie-Andre Malouin wrote in an email.The married father of three was able to speak with his wife and parents after landing, Malouin added.Former astronaut Robert Thirsk, who co-hosted a viewing party at the Canadian Space Agency headquarters in Longueuil, Que., Monday night, said descending from space in the capsule is a shock to the body comparable to a car crash."In descending, the force of gravity is strong. It's like having four people sitting on your chest," he told the audience, which included members of Saint-Jacques' family. "It's hard to breathe, but you have to concentrate to make sure you breathe well and don't get hurt."He added that when the parachute opens before landing, "there is a big movement like a pendulum, left to right, and the landing is a crash like a car accident."Thirsk, who spent 188 days on the space station in 2009, said despite the jarring impact, injuries are rare because the seats in the capsule are designed to keep the astronauts protected.Saint-Jacques, along with NASA astronaut Anne McClain and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, returned to Earth aboard a Soyuz capsule. He gave a thumbs-up as he was carried from the capsule following what NASA described as a "picture perfect" landing at 10:47 p.m. ET.During a mission that began Dec. 3, Saint-Jacques took part in a six-and-a-half hour spacewalk and set a record for the longest single space flight by a Canadian at 204 days. He also became the first Canadian astronaut to use the Canadarm2 robotic arm to perform a so-called "cosmic catch" to snag a SpaceX cargo capsule.The engineer, astrophysicist and family doctor also oversaw science experiments and had numerous discussions with children across the country during his mission.His next few weeks will be spent recovering from the physical challenges of the flight and readapting to life on Earth after months in zero gravity.Saint-Jacques is expected to spend weeks or months recovering from the after-effects of the flight, which could include blood circulation problems, muscle pains and an elongated spine that will eventually return to normal.Raffi Kuyumjian, a doctor with the Canadian Space Agency, has said spending six months in space is "a little like having spent six months in bed without moving."In a recent interview, he told The Canadian Press that Saint-Jacques is likely to struggle with balance and co-ordination, as well as a loss of bone density.Kuyumjian said Saint-Jacques will work with specialists in the gym to help him regain his muscle tone, cardio fitness, and endurance. He will also undergo a separate series of tests for research purposes, to measure how the human body reacts to space flight.Beyond the muscle and balance issues, it's likely Saint-Jacques could suffer from a type of reverse motion sickness Kuyumjian dubs "Earth sickness.""So the symptoms of nausea that generally come when astronauts arrive in space, there is the equivalent when they return to Earth," he said.\--With files from Ugo GiguereMorgan Lowrie, The Canadian Press

  • Vancouver police ask for help over theft of high-end snake chairs
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Vancouver police ask for help over theft of high-end snake chairs

    VANCOUVER — A pair of unusual armchairs valued at about $40,000 each were taken from a high-end furniture store and Vancouver police are asking for the public's help in finding them.Police say the chairs were taken during a 3 a.m. break-in at the Lloyd Bruce Home Collections store on May 13.The deco-style, off-white chairs designed by Roberto Cavalli have gold coloured metal arms shaped like snakes.Two male thieves were involved and police say they left in a white, Ford F-150 pickup.Investigators say it's clear the suspects targeted that particular store specifically to take the chairs.Sgt. Jason Robillard says they hope someone will recognize the unique furniture and call police. The Canadian Press

  • Haida man aims to save endangered language through educational podcast
    News
    CBC

    Haida man aims to save endangered language through educational podcast

    No one should be embarrassed about stumbling when trying to learn a new language, especially if that language is as old as the land itself, says podcaster James McGuire.He's the creator of the Haida Gwaii Mentor Apprentice Program Podcast, recorded in a studio on the B.C. archipelago, which aims to connect the Haida people with their language.The Haida language is critically endangered, with only 24 fluent speakers left, according to the council of the Haida Nation."It's our duty and responsibility as Haidas to do what we can to try to save the language that was born and raised inside the land we were born in raised in," says McGuire, who also goes by his Haida name of SGaan Kwahagang.Growing up, McGuire split his time between Haida Gwaii and Vancouver. He says living in an urban environment can make it even more difficult to practise Haida language skills."Growing up away from your own community, it can be really hard to stay connected to your culture and your language," McGuire told Carolina de Ryk, host of Daybreak North.The Haida podcast, which launched in early June, aims to solve that problem. Released through the Haida Gwaii Radio Society, the podcast features interviews and lessons with Haida learners, teachers and elders. Language revitalization efforts are underway in Canada. The 2017 federal budget committed $89.9 million over a period of three years for Indigenous languages, an increase from the $5 million for the Aboriginal Languages Initiative in the 2016 budget.As well, the United Nations declared 2019 the international year of Indigenous languages.McGuire hopes the push for language revitalization has a long-lasting effect on the Haida community. He says there is a sense of urgency over saving the Haida language and experiencing it through as many different media as possible."One of the main things for sure is to try to get language in songs on the radio or on podcasts, so that we can, as urban Haidas or Haidas at home, just plug in and kind of just always be learning."Listen to the full story here:With files from Daybreak North and Chantelle Bellerichard.

  • Kindness of students in Souris helps CBC journalist win international award
    News
    CBC

    Kindness of students in Souris helps CBC journalist win international award

    As soon as CBC's Sarah Keaveny-Vos landed on P.E.I. with an international award, she went to share it with the kids who inspired the story she told.Keaveny-Vos' story was simple in premise — it was about kindergarten students in Souris, P.E.I., showing kindness to one another and it won her the Gabriel Award for single news story.The Gabriel Awards honour excellence in film, broadcast, and cross-platform media productions released in the United States and Canada."They earned it, they won it," Keaveny-Vos said.Her story was about a group of kindergarten students at Souris Regional School. When one girl had her shirt on backwards and another student laughed, her friend flipped her own shirt inside out. The rest of the kids did the same in solidarity — without speaking a word to one another.When Keaveny-Vos pulled the award out of its gold box to show the kindergarten students earlier this week, they were "thrilled," she said."It's like something out of a princess tale."She said the room filled with gasps of excitement."They won this award. I want them to know for the rest of their lives that that kind act they did that day inspired an entire continent of people," Keaveny-Vos said."The bright and compelling storytelling lures a listener in, making us want to hear those children's voices and sit alongside them during their circle time," a judge at the award show said.World is full of bad newsKeaveny-Vos brought cupcakes and celebrated with the students — winning a Gabriel was like winning an Oscar, she said. "It was the honour of my career, I was incredibly humbled by it."Keaveny-Vos writes human interest stories in an industry littered with hard news and tragedy. They are from a community where people care about each other. That's how they roll in Souris. — Sarah Keaveny-Vos, CBC"As a society we're hearing bad news all the time and it can really wear us down."She said while those stories are important — human interest stories really allow the audience to connect to people."What I have found for my own life is I want to connect with people and I want to share their stories and shine a light on — sometimes — the little smaller stories that don't always get noticed or picked up," she said.Receiving the newsKeaveny-Vos said the story did well online and the radio treatment got national play. So, when the opportunity was presented to submit the story for a Gabriel Award she didn't pass it up. She said the students were just as happy to win the award as she was.Charlotte Garrett was one of the young students in the room to see the award unveiled."When we won the award I felt happy because when Charley put her shirt around everyone laughed at her and she felt sad. So, me and Faith did it to make her happy and then everybody did it and everyone was happy."Charley O'Keefe, the student who originally had the backwards shirt said it is important to support your friends."Then the other person that did something wrong will feel sad and then feel happy because they did the same thing as them."Other children in the class said it felt good to be recognized for doing something kind.Easy to find good newsLiving on P.E.I., Keaveny-Vos said she doesn't have to search far for positive stories. She said the community of Souris and the students at the school are evidence of that."They are from a community where people care about each other. That's how they roll in Souris."More P.E.I. news

  • News
    CBC

    Edmonton police, nurses team up to discourage teens from vaping

    Police office and nursing students are teaming up to encourage Edmonton students to put down their vaping devices, or hopefully never pick them up in the first place. "We're seeing a dramatic increase in vaping among teens in junior high and high school, even pre-teens in elementary school are trying out their older siblings' vapes," said Const. Joshua Maeda, EPS school resource officer for M.E. LaZerte High School, in a news release."It's very disruptive to the school environment. I've seen numerous students get caught and suspended for vaping in school, and this year I've seized close to 50 vaping devices with vape juice totalling over $1,500." While it's illegal in Alberta to sell vaping products to minors, police say most underage users report buying their products from vape shops or convenience stores.EPS is a planning a summer blitz of vape retailers to speak to owners and check for compliance to regulations. Meanwhile, nursing students from the University of Alberta will visit Edmonton schools this fall to educate teens on the health risks of vaping. "The main reason teens start to vape is because of the flavoured nicotine, which not only tastes good, but gives them a head rush that feels good," said Nancy Barnes, a lecturer with U of A's faculty of nursing."But the effects of nicotine and vaping are toxic to a developing brain and body, so we have to take action before the nicotine addiction kicks in."A recent study published in the British Medical Journal found a 74-per-cent increase in vaping among youth aged 16 to 19 in Canada from 2017 to 2018.

  • Bauline to get cell service thanks to 3-way partnership with government and Bell
    News
    CBC

    Bauline to get cell service thanks to 3-way partnership with government and Bell

    Six years after it started planning to get cell service, the Town of Bauline has the funding to do it.The town will partner with the province and Bell Canada on the $466,000 project to bring 4G LTE (long-term evolution) coverage to the area. Bell will put up 50 per cent of the money, with the municipal and provincial governments splitting the rest.For Mayor Craig LeGrow, it's a big get."We're trying to set up an industrial area in the town," he said. "Businesses have looked at coming here, but because of no cell service, you know, cell service is everything to a business."The majority of the town doesn't have any service, including the new community centre built two years ago.LeGrow said they've lost weddings and events at the centre — key revenue for the community — because it didn't have cell service.Kimberly Janes is a mother of teenage kids and a lifelong resident of Bauline.Like any parent, she worries about her kids when they leave the house and go out on the roads. In her case, however, she's especially worried something could happen to them and they'd have no way to call for help."You could go off the road and you don't know how long you'll be there until someone comes along to help you out," she said.Once 4G coverage is in place, contacting her kids is not something she'll have to worry about anymore."Provided they answer their phones," she laughed.It's expected the work will take about 18 months to complete.Minister of Tourism, Culture, Industry and Innovation Chris Mitchelmore said Bauline is the eighth community to benefit from the province's cellular expansion project. More could come in the future."Should the budget pass this year, we have another commitment to invest in cellular service moving forward," he said. "So we look forward to opening up applications soon."Most recently, two towns on the Port au Port Peninsula raised money through things like talent shows and dances to raise their portion of the partnership.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Ness Creek offers naloxone training for festival goers

    Offering naloxone training at this year's Ness Creek Music Festival just makes sense, says one of the festival's organizers.While many staff and volunteers at the northern Saskatchewan music festival already carry naloxone with them, organizer Dylan Lambi-Raine says Ness Creek thought it would be a good idea to spread the initiative out as far as they could."The more people who have the training, the more people who have naloxone kits on them, the better," she said.  Naloxone kits are increasingly seen as a powerful weapon in the battle against opioid overdoses. The kits allow people to stabilize a person suffering from an overdose until they can receive proper medical treatment.The Ness Creek initiative is part of Safe Haven, a harm reduction program launched by the festival three years ago. The program offers a wide variety of programs — from workshops on sexual consent to free food and safe lodgings for festival goers."We find it really important to be multipronged," said Lambi-Raine. "We offer daily workshops on important information that we believe not only the necessary community, but the community as a large, could benefit from."Opioids, especially fentanyl, have become a major concern throughout the province as a number of high-profile overdose deaths have swept across Saskatchewan.Last year, a regulatory change means naloxone kits are much easier for the general public in Saskatchewan to access. The drug is available as a nasal spray or as an injectible."If you misread the situation to somebody who actually isn't having an opioid overdose, naloxone will not harm them in any way," Lambi-Raine said. "It's just going to save people."The training will be made available in workshops at Ness Creek on July 19 and 20. Space is limited and festival attendees are asked to sign up in advance.The Ness Creek Music Festival will be held from July 18-21 near Big River, Sask., about 110 kilometres northwest of Prince Albert.

  • News
    CBC

    Wanda Pascal re-elected chief of Tetlit Gwich'in Council

    Wanda Pascal has been re-elected chief of the Tetlit Gwich'in Council in Fort McPherson.Pascal had 151 ballots cast in her favour on Monday, beating candidates Ruby McDonald who got 119 votes and Connie Alexie who received 29 votes."I guess that means to me that my people have confidence in me and they're happy with the work I'm doing," said Pascal. "That gives me more strength, that gives me encouragement to move forward and keep doing what I'm doing."Electoral officer Grace Martin has been involved with elections for nearly two decades.She said to her knowledge, Monday's election was the first all female race for chief of the Tetlit Gwich'in Council.Pascal was pleased to see an all-women slate of candidates. "It was really good," she said. "I see a lot of woman stepping up lately to do stuff, not only in our community, but other communities." I see a lot of woman stepping up lately to do stuff, not only in our community, but other communities. \- Tetlit Gwich'in Council Chief Wanda PascalThe chief encouraged women to run in the upcoming Northwest Territories election. "If you are thinking about it, go for it," she said. "Go and do it. It's nothing to just put your name forward and see what happens."Pascal said she plans to stand up for the Gwich'in people and fight to protect the caribou for future generations. She wants to preserve traditional knowledge, as well.Six councillors were also elected on Monday.Phillip J. Kay received 218 votes, followed by Richard John Blake with 188 votes, Stanley Snowshoe, who got 177 votes, Richard Wilson with 141 votes, Willie Blake with 123 votes and Billy Wilson, who got 110 votes.A total of 14 people ran for seats on council.

  • Province looks to wood as heat source for public buildings
    News
    CBC

    Province looks to wood as heat source for public buildings

    The provincial government has identified about 100 public buildings that could be heated by wood in the future.Exploring the use of district heating, or heat networks, fuelled by low-grade wood was one of the recommendations in University of King's College president Bill Lahey's review on forestry practices.Among other things, the report called for a major reduction in clear cutting on Crown land and a shift in favour of ecological forestry.Julie Towers, Lands and Forestry deputy minister, told a crowd of about 100 people gathered Tuesday in Truro for a meeting on ecological forestry that six public buildings will be converted ahead of the next heating season as a pilot project.To underscore just how serious the province is about the plan, Towers said the file involves 11 provincial government departments and ACOA. The province is using Prince Edward Island and Vermont as examples to follow during the process.A call to end biomassLands and Forestry Minister Iain Rankin told reporters the heating systems would use boilers and be fuelled by products that wouldn't make it to sawmills for timber or saw logs. Heating systems he's toured have 90-95 per cent efficiency, said Rankin.The minister said the tender for the six buildings, which the government is not identifying at this time, would have the successful bidder design, build, operate and maintain all aspects of the heating system.While the intent is to provide a new business opportunity for forestry operators, Rankin said district heating would not come close to addressing the glut of chips that would become available should the Northern Pulp mill in Pictou County stop operating next year."You wouldn't have enough public buildings to even come close to that," he said.Ray Plourde, Ecology Action Centre wilderness co-ordinator, said his organization is open to district heating if it's using waste such as bark and thinnings, but he said the biomass generators in Liverpool and Port Hawkesbury should be shut down in conjunction."We think the forest has already been pounded pretty heavily for pulp and paper and lumber and other things and adding damage upon damage by burning trees, particularly for electricity, is foolish in this age of climate change and it's wasteful of our already beleaguered forests."Tuesday's meeting was dubbed as a chance for people consulted during preparation of the Lahey report to hear about the government's progress to date on implementing its recommendations.Rankin reiterated plans to have a new new forest management guide in place by the end of the year. Participants then broke into working groups to discuss eight components of the report: * Forest management guide. * High production forestry. * Natural disturbance regimes. * Old forest. * Outcomes-based forest management. * Reporting on the state of the forest. * Small scale wood energy initiative. * Species at risk program renewal.Rankin and Towers both said one of the aims of the meeting was to make the department more transparent about what it's doing and include people along the way to gather input and feedback."We're not saying, 'Here's all the answers,'" Towers said during her presentation."We're saying, 'Here's the directions we're heading, what do you think?'"Jeff Bishop, executive director of Forest Nova Scotia, called the meeting a good first step as the government works to do a better job keeping people in the loop before decisions are made.While there were concerns within the industry when the report was first released, Bishop said that has eased as people have had time to digest the recommendations and talk with Lahey and others who produced the report."Broadly, there's an understanding that they think the spirit of what is intended there is achievable."One area that did raise concern from some in attendance Tuesday was the fact the work is centring on Crown land.While the minister has said that's for the sake of making some changes as soon as possible, Andy Kekacs, executive director of the Nova Scotia Woodlot Owners and Operators Association, said they're taking steps now to work with private landowners.Kekacs said a lot of education about the Lahey report needs to be provided for people his organization and others like it serve and they're starting a family forestry centre to promote ecological forestry management to landowners."We need to help them begin to understand what these recommendations mean for their own personal holdings."MORE TOP STORIES

  • Riverview park honouring teen known for kindness opens
    News
    CBC

    Riverview park honouring teen known for kindness opens

    Anne Schofield leans down, hits a button on a sound box and listens to the voice of her late daughter, Becca."By being kind, we're fighting crime, which essentially means that being kind is like being a superhero," the recorded message says."So the more you are kind, the easier it will become. And if you still find yourself struggling for a reason to be kind, well Becca told you to."  It's what the 18-year-old Riverview teen was known for — kindness.She died after a battle with brain cancer in February 2018 but not before sparking a kindness campaign, which asked people to perform good deeds and post them on social media with the hashtag beccatoldmeto.On Tuesday, a playground named in her honour, officially opened at the Frank L. Bowser School in Riverview.The Rebecca Schofield All World Super Play Park replaces a wooden structure built in 1994. Building the new playground, which is accessible and inclusive, took a huge community-based effort. A fundraising campaign was announced in August of 2018.Brad LeBlanc is part of the group that got the project moving."To have seen the community come together in the way they have, raising the $650,000, which was an impossible feat, everyone said of course. And the community came together the money was raised. "And then 2,000 volunteers came together to actually build the park and it was nothing short of miraculous really, really inspiring incredible."Becca's mother, Anne, said the park is special."I can come over here and have a seat on a bench and just look at the park and remember how much fun she had on this park. Her and her sister loved this park. So it was really a part of her upbringing a part of who she is. So it's wonderful."  Schofield is thankful for everything done by the community, something that reminds her of when the original All World Super Play Park was built 25 years ago.And she thinks her daughter would smile looking at the new version. "She was afraid that she hadn't lived long enough, that she didn't have a legacy, she didn't have a purpose, that she'd be forgotten," Schofield said. "Was she ever wrong. Look at what's going on. Like she won't be forgotten. This is wonderful."  Schofield said it all goes back to Becca's request to simply perform an act of kindness."Her movement was described to me one time by somebody that said it's like it's like a rainstorm on a lake. Each act of kindness is a raindrop and each raindrop has a ripple effect. So her act of kindness has made multiple acts of kindness happen and each of those acts of kindness in themselves has created other acts of kindness. "So this is like a rainstorm on a lake, this park, because all the acts of kindness that have been done to make it happen."

  • 'It's hurting the community': Inuvik daycare disheartened after 17 solar panels damaged
    News
    CBC

    'It's hurting the community': Inuvik daycare disheartened after 17 solar panels damaged

    As Patricia Davison opens the gate and starts pointing at the damage done to solar panels on the side of the Children First daycare, she exclaimed, "It's really high."Davison is the executive director of the Children First Society, which runs a child-care facility in Inuvik, N.W.T. She said they're disheartened after 17 of its solar panels were vandalized sometime around June 15-16.She said the vandalism happened about a week after two of its panels were repaired by Green Sun Rising, the company that had installed them."It was one of those moments that was a little bit unbelievable," she said."In two years we had damage on two panels, which I thought was pretty great, and then when I came in last Saturday, it was 17 panels."She said community and family members came by at around the same time and were wondering how and why the panels were shattered in places or had holes in them.Davison said the organization had the solar panels installed to go more "green" and help save a little bit of money."It is generating a couple of thousand dollars during the months where we have the sunny season," she said.Davison said the panels are insured and the society is working with the insurance company to "find out how that will all work and what it means."Each panel costs $400 to replaceIn total, the daycare has around 70 panels on two sides of its building. The damaged panels are on the side of the building closest to Jim Koe Park.The damaged panels still function, but Davison said if water gets in, that's when they will start to deteriorate. "As soon as one is not functioning, then it can affect the whole system. We are hoping to get it figured out and replaced before too much time passes."Davison said each panel costs about $400, so to replace all 17 it will costs $6,800, and that doesn't include the cost of installation.Aside from the financial hit, Davison said it's a disheartening situation for the community and the children who the daycare serve. Those children don't understand why the damage was done."Our organization is for the community so anytime something like this happens, it impacts the community, and it's hurting the community. And I think that's … the saddest part of this type of damage."Davison said the building already has security cameras. She said there have been discussions of adding more, but no decisions have been made yet.The RCMP is investigating the incident.

  • Canada Day cancelled: Ford government says no to annual Ontario bash
    News
    Yahoo Canada News

    Canada Day cancelled: Ford government says no to annual Ontario bash

    With Canada Day less than a week away, Doug Ford's Ontario government has decided to cancel the celebration at Queen's Park this year.

  • Vancouver Aquarium agrees to cetacean ban in new 35-year lease agreement
    News
    CBC

    Vancouver Aquarium agrees to cetacean ban in new 35-year lease agreement

    The Vancouver Aquarium has agreed to a cetacean ban as part of a new 35-year lease agreement with the Vancouver Park Board.It's also dropping its legal action against the park board over lost revenue because of the ban.In 2017, the Vancouver Park Board voted to ban keeping whales and dolphins in captivity at the aquarium. Ocean Wise followed with a lawsuit against the city, claiming the ban resulted in millions of dollars in lost revenue and constituted a breach of contract.Ocean Wise said in an emailed statement it has agreed to no longer display cetaceans in Stanley Park.Research will continueAn internal email from the president of the aquarium said the new agreement will allow the organization to launch its five-year strategic plan."Everything we do will be to drive real and practical conservation — whether that's protecting a vital ecosystem, preventing the extinction of endangered species or ensuring our resources are managed sustainably for future generations."The aquarium also promises to continue research programs it says have contributed to the global knowledge of marine wildlife.The Vancouver Aquarium has been operating in Stanley Park since 1956.It has not kept orcas in captivity since 2001 and has pledged to rely exclusively on captive animals for breeding.Earlier this month, Ottawa passed legislation banning whale and dolphin captivity in Canada.

  • Albertans walloped with snow on first day of summer
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Albertans walloped with snow on first day of summer

    Parts of the western province received as much as 25 cm of snow on June 21 and over the weekend.

  • Leonard in Lego: Canadian animator recreates Kawhi's famous buzzer-beater
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Leonard in Lego: Canadian animator recreates Kawhi's famous buzzer-beater

    TORONTO — Calgary-raised stop-motion animator Jared Jacobs is a big Toronto Raptors fan and wants star player Kawhi Leonard to stay with the NBA Championship team.So to help convince the soon-to-be free agent, Jacobs has turned to his own area of expertise: Lego.In a stop-motion video that's gone viral, Jacobs used the toy pieces to meticulously recreate Leonard's famous buzzer-beater moment against Philadelphia in Game 7 of the second round. "It was one of those things where I was like, 'Maybe this will make a difference in Kawhi picking Toronto, like the plant guy,'" Jacobs said Tuesday in a phone interview from his home in Boise, Idaho.Jacobs was referring to a Raptors fan who became an Internet sensation for carrying an uprooted large plant in the streets of Toronto after the championship win, telling Global News it was "a housewarming gift for Kawhi ... a Kawhactus.""The Internet is a weird place, so every little bit helps and that was my contribution," said Jacobs, 41."I didn't have any housewarming plants, so I just put a Lego video together for him."Jacobs said he started using Lego in his stop-motion work about five years ago after playing around with his nephews' pieces in his mother-in-law's basement during Thanksgiving.He first used the interlocking plastic bricks and figurines to recreate a scene from the series "Breaking Bad" for his Instagram account, which he says got attention from some of the actors on the show.Jacobs made more Lego videos and gained so much buzz, he quit his job to focus exclusively on them as a freelancer, landing contracts with companies including Bleacher Report, the Golf Channel, and the NHL Network.Jacobs said he wanted to recreate the Leonard buzzer-beater scene earlier but felt it was a conflict of interest because he was doing work for the Golden State Warriors during the Finals.He isn't sponsored by Lego (although he'd like to be) and has to custom-make many pieces.For the buzzer-beater project, his graphic-designer friend created the jerseys."With Kawhi's hair I just had to use a nail file to make it look like it was cornrows, because Lego doesn't make cornrows," Jacobs said."I ruined a couple of my hair pieces trying to get it to look just right."Jacobs made the video in his usual workspace: a corner of his and his wife's bedroom. It's an upgrade from the kitchen table, where he used to work. He said he's soon getting a studio."We have so much Lego now that we feel like we're swimming in it," Jacobs said.Jacobs makes his videos solely himself, using a DSLR camera.The buzzer-beater one took about 40 hours to make, not including the research he put into it.The end where the crowd jumped up and down raising their hands was "painstakingly long," he said, requiring him to move dozens of little people at the same time each frame.Leonard's shot bounced four times, but Jacobs had to take a bounce out in order to properly link the sound up with the visuals."The attention to detail that you have to pay, it's kind of exhausting, actually," Jacobs said."Back when I used to work in construction doing manual labour, this is actually more physically taxing on me.... I think it's just the brainpower that goes into it. It's just that hyper focus."Jacobs said he hasn't heard whether any Raptors players have seen his video, but the team has posted it on its Instagram and Twitter pages."This one is cool just because it's something that has blown up in Canada, which is my homeland," he said."It's just cool to see all the Canadians come out of the woodwork and appreciate my work. That special to me."Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press

  • News
    Reuters

    Telecom Italia studies fiber-only option for broadband merger: sources

    Telecom Italia (TIM) is considering an option to merge its optic-fiber broadband unit, Flash Fiber, with rival Open Fiber as it looks for ways to create a national broadband network, two sources familiar with the matter said. The option is one of two to be discussed at a TIM board meeting on Thursday, with the other being a takeover of Open Fiber and then a merger of the two networks, the sources said. TIM is under pressure from its state shareholder, Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP), to speed up development of a national network, eliminating duplication of infrastructure with Open Fiber and addressing Italy's weak Internet usage.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    The top 10 books on Apple Books-US

    Apple Book charts for week ending June 23, 2019: (Rank, Book Title by Author Name, ISBN, PublisherApple Books US Bestseller List - Paid Books1\. Summer of '69 by Elin Hilderbrand - 9780316419994 - (Little, Brown and Company)2\. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens - 9780735219113 - (Penguin Publishing Group)3\. City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert - 9780698408326 - (Penguin Publishing Group)4\. It's Not You It's Him by Sophie Ranald - 9781786819291 - (Bookouture)5\. The Wolf and the Sheep by Penelope Sky - 9781386243120 - (Penelope Sky)6\. Unsolved by David Ellis & James Patterson - 9780316419840 - (Little, Brown and Company)7\. There Goes My Heart (Maine Sullivans 2) by Bella Andre - 9781945253973 - (Oak Press, LLC)8\. Tom Clancy Enemy Contact by Mike Maden - 9780525541714 - (Penguin Publishing Group)9\. Till There Was You (Butler, Vermont Series, Book 4) by Marie Force - 9781950654321 - (HTJB, Inc.)10\. Running Blind by Lee Child - 9781440634789 - (Penguin Publishing Group)____The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    In pursuit of Poppie: Tiny terrier swims to island and back as she evades rescuers for 4 days

    A tiny terrier is home safe in Saanich, B.C., after getting the better of rescuers in a four-day adventure that included a swim to an island and back. Poppie, a five-year-old Yorkshire terrier, was with her owners at a beach park in the southeast of the district last Monday when she was spooked by a larger dog and ran off.When they couldn't find the terrier, the family turned to the local pet-finding organization Reuniting Owners with Animals Missing (ROAM B.C.) "We started organizing a search and going around that area," said Terry Mah, who's with ROAM B.C. Bacon baitOn Tuesday afternoon, someone reported they'd spotted a small animal running around on Flower Island, a small island just off the coast, through their binoculars. "Poppie had somehow made it over to the island," Mah told CBC's All Points West."It's quite a ways away, about 50 to 75 feet (15 to 23 metres), and there's quite a current that runs through there."Poppie's owners and volunteers headed over to the island but weren't able to catch the quick little dog. Bad weather forced them to return. On Wednesday, searchers set up remote cameras to see if they could track Poppie's movements and find out whether she was still out there. Mah was looking at the footage when he noticed a little silhouette. "Lo and behold, it was Poppie's face looking out from the bushes, probably 10 feet [three metres] away from the camera," he said. Back on the island, her owners unsuccessfully tried coaxing her out by singing and talking to her until nightfall. "We went back Thursday morning, this time with a camp stove and bacon to try to coax Poppie out with the smell of  frying bacon and sausages," Mah said. While they tried to waft the tempting smell into the bushes, Mah got a call saying someone had spotted a dog of Poppie's description running down a road back on the mainland. "Somehow, she managed to elude our camera and hop back over to the other side," said Mah. 'It takes a village'Everyone hurried back across the water to scour the streets, and eventually Mah and Poppie's owner spotted her sitting in a doorway. Tired and hungry, the little dog gave in to capture and was reunited with her owners.   "You know the old saying 'it takes a village'? In this particular case, it [did]," Mah said.

  • Hyundai dealers to offer customers Lyft rides through CDK app
    News
    Reuters

    Hyundai dealers to offer customers Lyft rides through CDK app

    Dealers who subscribe to Hailer application through CDK Global Inc will be able to offer rides without the customer having to install the Lyft app. Lyft, which debuted on the New York Stock Exchange a couple of months before Uber, has partnered with several companies to offer its services in a bid to gain share in a market dominated by bigger rival Uber Technologies Inc. Last week, the company struck a deal with Agero Inc to provide rides for consumers whose cars need a tow assistance, and has also become the official rideshare of Disney Parks and Resorts.

  • Conveyor broke two times before Wanny Pelletier's fatal mishap at pellet plant
    News
    CBC

    Conveyor broke two times before Wanny Pelletier's fatal mishap at pellet plant

    The conveyor that fatally injured a teenager in Saint-Quentin had broken twice in the days before Wanny Pelletier's accident.That's according to several employees of the Groupe Savoie wood pellet plant who testified Monday at a coroner's inquest in Edmundston.Pelletier was a 17-year-old high school student working a part-time job cleaning at the plant on Dec. 22, 2016, when he was struck in the abdomen by a piece of equipment and his leg got stuck under a conveyor.It took two hours to free him and he died four days later in hospital.The manager of the pellet plant was among the witnesses on the first day of the inquest.The coroner and jurors heard that after the conveyor broke earlier, breaks in a chain were repaired temporarily. The entire chain was to be replaced over the Christmas holidays.After the last repair job, a security piece was not returned to its proper place.Pelletier was found with his leg completely stuck in the conveyor at about 6:30 p.m.He remained conscious for the two hours it took to get him out.Company official Nathalie Savoie testified late in the day.Outside the courtroom, she said representatives of the company were on hand to co-operate fully with the inquest. She declined to make further comment while the inquest is going on.Pelletier's maternal grandfather was the only family member of the victim in the gallery.The inquest is expected to wrap up Wednesday.

  • Mitsubishi Motors to relocate North America HQ to Tennessee
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Mitsubishi Motors to relocate North America HQ to Tennessee

    NASHVILLE — Mitsubishi Motors announced on Tuesday that it is relocating its North America headquarters from California to Tennessee, a move that will bring the Japanese automaker closer to its sister company Nissan and strengthen Tennessee's growing reputation as an epicenter of the automotive sector.Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee and Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bob Rolfe — who made the announcement with Mitsubishi Motors North America — say the headquarters move from Cypress, California, to Franklin, Tennessee, will result in an $18.25 million investment in the region and approximately 200 jobs.Lee and Rolfe added that they met with Mitsubishi's global executives last week to convince them to move to Tennessee while in Japan during the Republican governor's first trade mission. It is unclear what financial incentives state officials offered Mitsubishi to move to Tennessee."As we drive toward the future, this is the perfect time for us to move to a new home. While we say farewell to the Golden State with a heavy heart, we're excited to say hello to Music City," Fred Diaz, Mitsubishi Motors North America's president and CEO, said in a statement.Franklin is located just south of Nashville, also known as "Music City," and is home to the state's most powerful Republicans, ranging from Gov. Lee, U.S. Sen. Marsha Blackburn and House Speaker Glen Casada.Mitsubishi's relocation announcement is the latest move in an industry that has found a warm reception in recent years in the American South, where politicians tend to take a dim view of labour unions and aggressive regulation."Over the years, Tennessee has become the epicenter of the Southeast's thriving automotive sector, and I'm proud Mitsubishi Motors will call Franklin its U.S. home and bring 200 high-quality jobs to Middle Tennessee," Lee, who took over the office this year, said in a statement.Mitsubishi Motors' North America headquarters has been located in California since 1988. The company expects the relocation will begin in August and will be completed by the end of the year. Initially, a temporary office will handle operations to allow the company time to identify a permanent office.Company officials say the move is part an ongoing effort to "reinvent every aspect of Mitsubishi Motors in the U.S.," as well as strengthen the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance.Nissan has a production plant in Smyrna, Tennessee, and owns a 34% stake in Mitsubishi Motors.Last week, Mitsubishi Motors Corp. shareholders approved the ouster of Carlos Ghosn, who was pivotal in the Japanese automaker's three-way partnership with Nissan and French automaker Renault until he was arrested on financial misconduct charges last year. Ghosn says he is innocent.Mitsubishi shareholders then approved the appointment of Renault's chairman Jean-Dominique Senard to replace Ghosn. Renault owns 43% of Nissan.Mitsubishi has also faced its own scandals.In 2016, the company disclosed it falsified mileage data. That followed a massive coverup over decades of auto defects thought to have helped cause a fatal accident. In 2004, its president, Katsuhiko Kawasoe, was arrested. He was sentenced to three years in prison, suspended for five years, and did not serve time in jail.Along with the Nissan plant, German automaker Volkswagen operates a plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee — the state's fourth most-populated city. The company unveiled earlier this year an $800 million expansion at the Tennessee plant, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs for electric vehicle production beginning in 2022. It's set to receive $50 million in state incentives.Recently, Volkswagen workers voted against forming a factory-wide union — handing a blow to the United Auto Workers' efforts to gain a foothold among foreign auto facilities in the South.Meanwhile, General Motors also has a large manufacturing plant in Tennessee. Additionally, more than 900 auto suppliers, including large ones such as Hankook Tire and Bridgestone Americas, operate in Tennessee.Tennessee officials say the state has the fastest rate of headquarter job growth among states in the Southeast.Kimberlee Kruesi, The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    $54M Tecumseh sportsplex fills gap in region

    A multi-use sportsplex in Tecumseh has been approved by council — at millions more than originally estimated.Director of Parks and Recreation for Tecumseh, Paul Anthony, said a number of factors played into the higher cost, including a larger facility and rising construction costs.The sportsplex has been on the council's radar since 2016 and, if funding is received, will come in at $54 million."It's something missing in the region," said Anthony. "Council wanted to build something recreation-wise that wasn't duplicated in the region."Anthony said they aren't competing with other arenas, ice pads or swimming pools in the area. In addition to allowing for potential sports tourism-related events in the future, the regulation-sized space will allow for more opportunities in general."We would be able to accommodate some of those youth groups in to play games inside until the weather breaks," said Anthony. "Baseball, disc golf. You could have a trade show inside. There's a number of uses for a facility such as this."The sportsplex will include: * Double gym. * Running track. * Support spaces. * Soccer hall with concrete floor under artificial turf."It could be our emergency evacuation centre," said Anthony. "A number of factors went into this. The community is looking forward to moving forward."Coun. Andrew Dowie said this is a goal the town's residents have had for many years. "Having winter facilities to practice a variety of sports was really top-of-list, so that you didn't have to stop playing pickleball, soccer or baseball just because the weather turned cold," said Dowie. "This is an opportunity to do what you enjoy doing year-round."Dowie said the project has come a long way, and selecting from the four options at town council Monday night was a big step.The plan is contingent on fundraising from upper levels of government, but the town will hold a fundraiser to assist with the $4-million municipal contribution. About 73 per cent of the project is eligible for grant funding. "If that funding doesn't materialize, the project will have to be re-visted," said Dowie. "If we want to build something, we ought to build it right. That's what led to the decision to go with a larger concept."

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario Cannabis Store was government body with most complaints to the ombudsman

    TORONTO — Grievances from frustrated pot customers have given the Ontario Cannabis Store the dubious distinction of being the government organization that was the subject of the most complaints to the province's ombudsman.More than 2,400 Ontario residents complained about the government's online marijuana store in the wake of delays and delivery problems, the ombudsman said in his annual report released Tuesday.The OCS was the single most complained-about government organization of the past fiscal year, with 2,411 concerns filed, Paul Dube said. There were more complaints about correctional facilities — 5,711, up 14 per cent from last year — but they are spread out over various institutions.The ombudsman's office had to establish a dedicated team to handle the volume of cannabis complaints, which included a man receiving an empty box instead of his order and being told he would have to return it."OCS officials told him he could place a new order without charge, but he would first have to print out a return shipping label, attach it to the empty box, and send it back to them," the report said. "Faced with the absurdity of having to return an empty box for a refund, he complained to our office."When recreational marijuana became legal on Oct. 17, 2018, the online store was the only place to purchase legal recreational pot in the province, as brick-and-mortar stores didn't start opening until April.The OCS had warned on its website that delivery times for orders may be longer than expected due to "unbelievably high demand" and labour action at Canada Post.Most of the complaints to the ombudsman about delivery delays, lack of communication and customer service issues came within the first three weeks, Dube said."I don't know if the lead time was insufficient, but they just did not anticipate the demand," he said. "I had the image of a couple of kids on a wharf with a lemonade stand and a cruise ship showing up."A spokeswoman for OCS said now nearly 99 per cent of all orders are delivered within one to three business days.New Democrat Marit Stiles said any government embarking on cannabis legalization should have foreseen what would happen."If you didn't know there was going to be a massive demand for cannabis once this was rolled out, you really missed something big that's been happening in Ontario for a long time," she said.The Ontario Autism Program was one of the other top areas of complaint — 575 complaints were received, with all but six of them coming after the government announced a new program in February.The program gives each family up to $20,000 a year until their child turns six, and $5,000 a year until age 18, and Dube said many of the complaints were about the funding cap.The government has since said it will look at how to provide needs-based supports — and shuffled out the minister — after families protested that the amounts weren't nearly enough, particularly for kids with severe needs whose therapy can cost up to $80,000 a year.In corrections, the ombudsman's office fielded complaints about access to health care, segregation placements, use of force by correctional officers, inmate-on-inmate assaults, a lack of Indigenous services, overcrowding, lockdowns, issues affecting transgender inmates, and voting.Other government organizations that received high volumes of complaints include the Family Responsibility Office, the Ontario Disability Support Program and Tribunals Ontario.The cancellation of an electric vehicle incentive program also led to more than 300 complaints.The ombudsman now has responsibility for oversight of French language services and children and youth, after the Progressive Conservative government eliminated those offices. Those units within the ombudsman's office are largely staffed by employees from the formerly separate bodies, Dube said, and have dealt with hundreds of complaints since May 1. Allison Jones, The Canadian Press