• Yellow Vests, United We Roll Aren't Just A Pipeline Movement: Experts
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Yellow Vests, United We Roll Aren't Just A Pipeline Movement: Experts

    As United We Roll organizers drive home the message that Canada needs more pipelines, experts warn it's a dangerous movement that cannot be separated from xenophobia and hatred.The convoy of a couple hundred trucks that began in Red Deer, Alta. last week arrived in Ottawa Tuesday, with the support of Conservative politicians, including party leader Andrew Scheer, People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier, and white nationalist Faith Goldy. Watch my short speech about pipelines and equalization at the UnitedWeRoll rally on Parliament Hill. Regardez mon court discours sur les pipelines et la perequation a la manif UnitedWeRoll sur la colline parlementaire. https://t.co/k5WMcoobX2 -- Maxime Bernier (@MaximeBernier) February 19, 2019"It is time Canada has a prime minister who is proud of our energy sector ... that fights for it and fights to get you back to work," Scheer told the convoy. "Conservatives support our energy sector. We want to get our pipelines built again."We celebrate what you've done to build this country, benefitting every single region."United We Roll was called the Yellow Vest Convoy less than a month ago, and is directly linked to the movement whose members propagate fear-mongering, and hateful rhetoric about immigrants, particularly Muslims."There are racist elements within the movement. It is reflective of Canada as a whole and has some bad apples," said Mark Friesen, an administrator for Yellow Vests Canada's Facebook page, which has more than 110,000 members.Friesen, who arrived in Ottawa Tuesday morning as part of the convoy, told HuffPost Canada he tries to keep the online community focused on the group's mission to educate Canadians about the need to quell immigration, not sign the United Nations' migration pact, and stop carbon taxes and a sustainable development agenda, but "you can't control all of it."Yellow Vests and United We Roll remain major concerns to McMaster University Prof. Ameil Joseph, who specializes in race theory, immigration and mental health."A movement may try to distance itself and claim a project they think is innocent, but when you scratch the surface you realize it's a vehicle of hate," said Joseph. He described yellow vests as "a revisioned white nationalist, white supremacist movement.""It's terrifying," Joseph said.Since December, members have posted conspiracy theories about Muslims to the Facebook page, and refer to them using derogatory terms.There is a post calling for Liberal MP Iqra Khalid to be deported, another saying "euro-Canadians" should advocate for their "ethnic interests." Last month Facebook began removing comments from the page after Global News reported members were making death threats against Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.A blog written by an organizer from a Sault. Ste. Marie, Ont.'s chapter of Yellow Vests, calls for specific politicians to be killed and refers to visible minorities as "sub-human." Another Yellow Vest organizer, Jason Corbeil, told The Canadian Press the organization is no longer associated with the chapter.Yellow Vests Canada was inspired by a French movement of the same name that's gained momentum in recent months in response to rising fuel prices. However, Canada's ambassador to France, Isabelle Hudon, said Canada's version bears little resemblance and has been taken over by far-right extremists.Watch the Yellow Vests movement in France. Story continues belowCanadian Anti-Hate Network has been monitoring the "overtly hateful movement" on social media, the politicians who've come to support United We Roll, and the media's coverage, said executive director Evan Balgord.He is concerned the movement could inspire an angry person to resort to violence, similar to how Alexandre Bissonnette murdered six men in a Quebec mosque two years ago after following right-wing commentators, alt-right figures and President Donald Trump. More from HuffPost Canada: * Ottawa Street Closures Planned For 'United We Roll' Convoy * How Ontario's Proposed Carbon Price Is Not A Carbon Tax (Probably, Maybe) * Trudeau's Rebate Announcement Sweetened Carbon Tax For Canadians: Poll "There's no excuse for politicians supporting this thing," Balgord said. "The mainstream media's coverage has been very disappointing, white washing everything we've discussed."It's not first and foremost a pro-pipeline movement."In the coming days, Joseph said he wants to see politicians speak out against Yellow Vests, so that people hear an alternative voice."If there is a conversation about pipelines, it should be happening within a discussion of ways to collaborate internationally and locally on climate change as well as with indigenous people who have been raising concerns about pipelines and ongoing colonization for years," he said.

  • Saskatoon police plane finds missing North Battleford, Sask. man in wooded area using thermal imaging camera
    News
    CBC

    Saskatoon police plane finds missing North Battleford, Sask. man in wooded area using thermal imaging camera

    RCMP say the Saskatoon Police Service's Air Support Unit was instrumental in saving the life of a 66-year-old man in North Battleford, Sask. On Monday, Gordon Bingham, 66, was reported missing after leaving his home on that morning at around 7 a.m. CST. Bingham is legally blind, and police were called when he did not return home.

  • 'We're doing all the right things': Homan, Courtney curling while pregnant at Scotties
    News
    CBC

    'We're doing all the right things': Homan, Courtney curling while pregnant at Scotties

    SYDNEY, N.S. — Rachel Homan's Ontario rink has two extra members on the ice at this year's Scotties. Both the skip and the team's second, Joanne Courtney, are playing while pregnant. Homan's due date is June 14 and Courtney's is July 11.

  • Wilson-Raybould to testify in parliamentary probe of SNC-Lavalin scandal, but no witnesses from PMO called
    News
    CBC

    Wilson-Raybould to testify in parliamentary probe of SNC-Lavalin scandal, but no witnesses from PMO called

    Former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould will be called to testify before a parliamentary committee probing the SNC-Lavalin scandal — but opposition critics are furious that no past or current aides in the Prime Minister's Office will be invited to appear. After a two-hour closed door meeting, members of the justice committee emerged today with a list of witnesses that includes a handful of academics and Justice Minister David Lametti, in addition to Wilson-Raybould.

  • Alberta announces deal with CN, CP to ship crude by rail
    News
    CBC

    Alberta announces deal with CN, CP to ship crude by rail

    The Alberta government has signed contracts with Canadian National and Canadian Pacific to lease 4,400 rail cars to take oilsands crude to American and international markets. The first shipments of 20,000 barrels per day are expected to start by July. Full capacity is expected by mid-2020 when up to 120,000 barrels per day will be shipped by rail.

  • AP Oscar predictions: What will win, what should win
    News
    The Canadian Press

    AP Oscar predictions: What will win, what should win

    Ahead of Sunday's 91st Academy Awards, Associated Press Film Writers Lindsey Bahr and Jake Coyle share their predictions for a ceremony that has few sure things.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Doug Ford clashes with protesting students at Ontario legislature

    TORONTO — Doug Ford admonished protesting students for their "filthy" mouths on Tuesday after a group decrying cuts to post-secondary grants disrupted a session at Ontario's legislature by shouting obscenities at the premier.A handful of student protesters seated in the public gallery interrupted legislators by shouting chants of "free tuition" followed by profanity directed at the premier. Ford chastised the group and blamed the Opposition for influencing them."That's how they train our kids, with a filthy mouth," he said. "They should have their mouths washed out with soap. That's what they should have, because that's embarrassing."The clash comes weeks after the Progressive Conservative government announced that it is ending free tuition for low-income students as it attempts to trim a $13.5 billion deficit. Critics say the move — which is being made in conjunction with a 10 per cent tuition fee cut — is harmful to those it purports to help.The government has said grants under the Ontario Student Assistance Plan had become unsustainable and it was time to refocus the program to provide help to students in the most financial need.Under the Liberal OSAP program, families earning up to $175,000 could qualify for some funding and that threshold is now reduced to $140,000. Low-income students could qualify for grants large enough to cover the full cost of tuition under the previous plan, but now a portion of the funding they receive will be a loan.The government also plans to make some fees paid by Ontario college and university students optional instead of mandatory, including those to student governments. Critics have slammed that move as an attack on free speech on campuses.Students rallying outside the legislature Tuesday said the changes will increase student debt and limit access to higher education for many."We the students will defend access to education against these attacks," said Nour Alideeb, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students Ontario. "The government's plans to slash OSAP ... has devastated students and families across the country."The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario and the Ontario Public Sector Employees Union joined the students in their call for a rollback of the planned changes.Training, Colleges and Universities Minister Merrilee Fullerton said she respects the students' right to protest on the grounds outside the building but criticized those who disrupted the legislative session earlier in the day."In the chamber, I think we need to demonstrate respect all different ways," she said. "And make sure that people are heard and that they have an opportunity to protest outside if they wish but to maintain respect for the processes within the chamber."The protest comes a week after Ford accused student unions of getting up to "crazy Marxist nonsense" as he appealed for donations to his Progressive Conservative party in a fundraising email.NDP Leader Andrea Horwath said Ford should be more mindful of his own conduct in the house, chastising him for getting into a shouting match during the morning session with several NDP legislators."Mr. Ford doesn't like to be held to account," she said. "He thinks he's the king of Ontario. Well, he's not the king of Ontario. Whether you're a student protesting outside or inside ... people have a right to be here and to show their displeasure in terms of the government's behaviour."Interim Liberal leader John Fraser said students are upset with the changes for good reason."I think it's fair," he said. "(The government is) touting a 10 per cent cut which is actually just a reduction in resources to universities."Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

  • Alberta Parks campsite booking system opens, offering new backcountry options
    News
    CBC

    Alberta Parks campsite booking system opens, offering new backcountry options

    Camping may be the last thing on your mind in this winter weather, but online reservations for provincial campgrounds opened Tuesday morning. "We're pleased to add to the reservation system 650 new camping options and that includes comfort camping, group camping areas, individual campsites — and completely new to the system this year is Kananaskis backcountry additions," said Tim Chamberlain from Alberta Parks, adding that these are not new campsites but they're new to the online booking system. "Prior to adding them to the [Reserve Alberta Parks] system this year, people had to get their permits through an online process on the website.

  • 27 dogs rescued from northern Sask. up for adoption in Calgary
    News
    CBC

    27 dogs rescued from northern Sask. up for adoption in Calgary

    A Calgary non-profit is looking for forever homes for 27 homeless dogs rescued from the cold in remote, northern Saskatchewan communities. Rory O'Neill of Rocky Mountain Animal Rescue says two Good Samaritans collected the dogs on Saturday, driving all day Sunday with a horse trailer filled with straw, blankets and dog crates (and a few dogs riding up front in the truck, too). O'Neill said other than being cold and thirsty, the dogs were in extremely healthy condition.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Doctors awarded new, four-year contract with fee increases

    An arbitrator has awarded Ontario doctors a new contract in a ruling that puts no hard cap on the physician services budget, a decision that comes after a years-long fracture in doctors' relationship with the government. Placing such a restriction on payments to doctors for publicly insured services would be unfair, arbitrator William Kaplan wrote in the decision released Tuesday. "If the ministry wishes to limit the insured physician services patients receive, it can readily do so.

  • Woman who says she was sexually assaulted by Calgary massage therapist testifies she felt 'scared, frozen'
    News
    CBC

    Woman who says she was sexually assaulted by Calgary massage therapist testifies she felt 'scared, frozen'

    A Calgary woman who says she was sexually assaulted by a massage therapist testified Tuesday she felt "scared, frozen" during the encounter. Angel Tinco Zambrano, 44, is on trial on a charge of sexual assault.

  • Bay Ferries signs $1.3M lease for Bar Harbor terminal
    News
    CBC

    Bay Ferries signs $1.3M lease for Bar Harbor terminal

    The company the Nova Scotia government is paying to run a ferry service to Maine has signed a $1.3-million lease with the Town of Bar Harbor to use its ferry terminal for the next five years. Nova Scotia taxpayers are on the hook to upgrade the facility, fix the dock and build a new loading ramp — but the company won't discuss those plans and has asked the province to keep quiet about them, too. Some of the renovations began before Bay Ferries and the town had a signed agreement.

  • 'It seems impossible': Group that sponsored Syrian refugee family mourns children killed in fire
    News
    CBC

    'It seems impossible': Group that sponsored Syrian refugee family mourns children killed in fire

    The Nova Scotia group that had sponsored the Syrian family who had been living at the home that burned down early Tuesday morning is grieving the seven children who died.

  • Another roundabout proposed for uptown Fredericton
    News
    CBC

    Another roundabout proposed for uptown Fredericton

    The City of Fredericton is considering adding another roundabout on the south side, this one on Route 8 near College Hill Road. City traffic engineer Jon Lewis said a roundabout would provide an easier route for people needing a connection between College Hill Road, Route 7 and Route 8. It would include a pedestrian crossing for residents of Skyline Acres.

  • How the federal government is investing in skills training, and what that could mean for P.E.I.
    News
    CBC

    How the federal government is investing in skills training, and what that could mean for P.E.I.

    A member of a new cross-Canada initiative to develop a skilled workforce wants to see investments made in P.E.I. and across the Atlantic region. Sandy MacDonald, who is also the president of Holland College, is one of 15 members of the Future Skills Council — a component of a federal government program that aims to identify where the Canadian economy is heading and what skills will be required. The government is investing $225 million over four years in the Future Skills program, which started in spring 2018, and $75 million per year thereafter into future skills development.

  • Pride flags to be flown at GECDSB elementary schools during Pride month
    News
    CBC

    Pride flags to be flown at GECDSB elementary schools during Pride month

    Four years after they were mandated at every public high school in Windsor-Essex, pride flags will soon be flying above elementary schools in the region during Pride month in June.Julia Burgess, vice-chair of the board and trustee for the towns of Kingsville and Essex, tabled a motion on the matter which passed at Tuesday evening's board meeting."This has grown the same way as the raising of the flag at high schools," Burgess told Afternoon Drive host Chris dela Torre before the meeting. "The kids have asked for it."While some elementary schools raise the rainbow flag already, others hang it indoors, while others don't hang it at all."Administration particularly, and staff, they like to get the direction from policy," Burgess said when asked why some elementary schools currently decline to display the flag at all."When they don't know what to do, they generally defer to something that's safe — in other words, 'we'd better not.'""So this just gives some direction ... this is just another way of having a visible symbol saying that everyone is welcome."Elizabeth Laughton, a student at Giles Campus French Immersion Public School in Windsor, agrees with the proposal."I think it's important to put up the flag," she said. "It represents everybody, and how everybody is different but the same, at the same time."Laughton added she would like to see the pride flag flown all year, instead of just June.With the passing of the motion, Windsor-Essex PrideFest, which currently supplies pride flags for high schools, will provide flags to elementary schools as well.The flags must be raised for a minimum of one week.

  • Venezuela shuts sea, air links to Dutch islands amid turmoil
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Venezuela shuts sea, air links to Dutch islands amid turmoil

    CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuelan officials said Tuesday that the country is banning air and sea trips to and from three Dutch Caribbean islands — a region that has been linked to efforts to undermine President Nicolas Maduro by sending emergency aid to the South American nation.The indefinite shutdown of the "maritime border" applies to commercial and fishing boats between Venezuela and the islands of Curacao, Aruba and Bonaire, said Falcon state's civil protection director, Gregorio Jose Montano.Airspace in the border region was also indefinitely closed to private and commercial flights, said Gen. Miguel Morales Miranda, assistant commander of the Comprehensive Defence Operations Zone.The closure was ordered for the protection of the territory and "in the face of possible unauthorized incursions," the Venezuelan state news agency reported.It comes as opposition leader Juan Guaido has been rallying international support for his challenge to Maduro. Guaido has called for international emergency aid for Venezuela, including from Curacao, about 40 miles (65 kilometres) from Venezuela.Maduro is vowing to block aid from entering Venezuela, saying the effort is part of a U.S.-led coup attempt. Dutch officials have said they are opening Curacao as a hub for emergency shipments.Guaido says he is organizing caravans to try to bring in emergency food and medicine provided by the United States and other countries starting Saturday. Such attempts are also expected to come through Brazil and the Colombian border city of Cucuta, where supplies are being warehoused.Maduro has said the aid is unnecessary, denying a humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, from which more than 2 million people have fled in recent years amid hyperinflation and severe shortages of food and medicine.The Maduro government last year temporarily closed air and maritime ties with the three Dutch islands, saying it was trying to stamp out smuggling of Venezuelan products to the islands.The Associated Press

  • Andrew Scheer comments after question period on SNC-Lavalin controversy.
    Canadian Press Videos

    Andrew Scheer comments after question period on SNC-Lavalin controversy.

    Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer speaks with reporters after question period about SNC-Lavalin.

  • Better late than speeding, police say as another driver has licence suspended
    News
    CBC

    Better late than speeding, police say as another driver has licence suspended

    Another driver has lost his licence for driving too fast, after police caught him travelling at more than 150 km/h on the Trans-Canada Highway near St. John's at noon on Monday. "People will say, 'Well, it's a highway, y'know, it should be 100 kilometres an hour,'" he said.

  • Speaker apologizes for apparent racial profiling incident on Parliament Hill
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Speaker apologizes for apparent racial profiling incident on Parliament Hill

    OTTAWA — House of Commons Speaker Geoff Regan has apologized for an apparent case of racial profiling on Parliament Hill, saying all who visit the precinct must be treated with fairness, dignity and respect.The incident took place earlier this month during an event called Black Voices on the Hill, prompting a complaint to the Speaker from Liberal MP Greg Fergus.The Federation of Black Canadians said several participants in the lobbying event were referred to as "dark-skinned people" and asked to leave a parliamentary cafeteria.The Parliamentary Protective Service apologized at the time and said the force was investigating the incident, adding it has zero tolerance for any type of discrimination.The service has promised to inform the Speaker when its investigation is complete.In a ruling delivered in the Commons on Tuesday, Regan called the service's apology a welcome first step, but said it should not be seen as closing the issue or as a way to erase the harsh and unacceptable reality of what happened."While one transgression does not represent the actions of all, one is too many and none can be overlooked, dismissed or excused," Regan said.Fergus and Halifax MP Andy Fillmore asked Regan to investigate the incident as a violation of parliamentary privilege — the rights of legislators to do their work unimpeded. Regan said the matter was not, strictly speaking, a question of privilege because it did not involve a member of Parliament, nor did it concern the proceedings of the House or a committee.However, Regan said those facts in no way diminished the importance of the matter. If visitors are not treated with respect on Parliament Hill, which is the heart of our democracy, "it is a failure on our part and for that reason, I offer my sincere apologies," he said.The Canadian Press

  • LendingClub forecasts bigger-than-expected first-quarter loss
    News
    Reuters

    LendingClub forecasts bigger-than-expected first-quarter loss

    For the full-year 2019, LendingClub forecast a loss that was bigger than Wall Street estimates. LendingClub CEO Scott Sanborn said in an interview that the lower-than-expected guidance was due in part to seasonal weakness in the first quarter and economic uncertainty both in the United States and overseas. "There is a lot of uncertainty both globally and domestically," Sanborn said.

  • TSB says improved tankers involved in Manitoba derailment that spilled crude
    News
    The Canadian Press

    TSB says improved tankers involved in Manitoba derailment that spilled crude

    ST. LAZARE, Man. — Federal investigators say CN railcars that spilled crude after derailing on farm land in western Manitoba were upgraded tankers.The Transportation Safety Board says 37 of 110 cars went off the tracks early Saturday near St. Lazare.The board says the derailed tankers are all Class 117R cars — an upgraded version considered to have improved safety features over the cars that were involved in the 2013 fatal explosion and fire in Lac Megantic, Que.There was no fire or injuries in the weekend derailment and the board says most of the crude has been contained near the tracks.The board says it is still working to determine how much oil spilled and how many of the railcars were breached.Investigators will also review how well the upgraded tanker cars performed in the derailment.The TSB says the Canadian National train was rolling east at around 79 km/h when it experienced a train-initiated emergency brake application.Barry Lowes, reeve of the rural municipality of Ellice-Archie, said the spilled oil was in a small area on top of deep ice and snow on a pond. Crews have built a berm around the area to contain the spill.Some cars that have been pulled from the pileup are full of crude and others are empty, Lowes said. Crews were pumping oil out of the intact rail cars, he added, and vacuum trucks were sucking up the crude from the landscape."They have no idea how much oil has been leaked out," he said Tuesday. "They figure the cars will all be moved and emptied by the weekend."Lowes said he has been told the cleanup will also include scooping soil up from the spill area and ongoing monitoring."They are doing everything that you would want them to," he said. "There are environmental people all over. They are not cutting any corners."The Manitoba government has said there is no danger of the oil entering the nearby Assiniboine River.Jayme Corr, who has 250 cattle on almost 1,000 hectares of land, has said he is depending on the cleanup. He uses the pond to water his cattle in the summer.The Canadian Press

  • And now for the weather on Mars, courtesy of new NASA lander
    News
    The Canadian Press

    And now for the weather on Mars, courtesy of new NASA lander

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — And now for the weather on Mars: NASA's newest lander is offering daily reports on the red planet's frigid winter.Starting Tuesday, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is posting the highs and lows online , along with wind speed and atmospheric pressure from the InSight lander.On Sunday, InSight recorded a high of 2 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 17 Celsius) and a low of minus 138 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 95 Celsius). Compare that with Sunday's coldest U.S. temperature: minus 27 degrees (minus 3 Celsius) in Taylor Park, Colorado.Scientists need to know the local Mars weather to determine if InSight's seismometer is registering real marsquakes or simply wind or pressure changes.InSight landed near the Mars equator in November. NASA's Curiosity rover also gives weather updates, while roaming around Mars about 340 miles (550 kilometres) away.Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

  • Saint John woman tests one of Atlantic Canada's first artificial pancreases
    News
    CBC

    Saint John woman tests one of Atlantic Canada's first artificial pancreases

    The Saint John mother has had trouble managing her Type 1 diabetes for years, despite best efforts by her and her doctors. This new pump technology is giving her more freedom and regulating her blood sugar levels better than anything else has, after only three weeks using it, Hunt said. "Literally, within half an hour of switching to this pump, my blood sugars were down in my target range," she said.

  • Zero-waste pub coming to St-Hubert Plaza later this year
    News
    CBC

    Zero-waste pub coming to St-Hubert Plaza later this year

    The friends are a tight-knit group who decided it was time to offer Montrealers a place to drink that offers reusable napkins, no plastic straws and a minimal amount of food to reduce the pub's impact on the environment. Wine bottles, Gendron said, are another challenge as many are not recyclable. To combat food waste, he said small, medium and large portions will be available.