• Range of reactions to possible holiday to mark legacy of residential schools
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Range of reactions to possible holiday to mark legacy of residential schools

    The federal government's intention to enact a statutory holiday aimed at remembering the legacy of Canada's residential school system has drawn mixed reactions from Indigenous Canadians, with responses to the plan ranging from cautious optimism to open disdain. Many have expressed concern that such an occasion — dedicated to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples — could simply devolve into another day off for most Canadians, and note that a lot of work will need to be done if the day is to achieve its goal. "Reconciliation right now is a great buzz word, but that's kind of where it seems to end," said Frances Moore, an Anishinaabe woman from Timiskaming First Nation in Quebec who now lives in London, Ont. "If this truly is about reconciliation, then great.

  • U.S. forces to stay in Iraq as long as needed: spokesman
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. forces to stay in Iraq as long as needed: spokesman

    "We'll keep troops there as long as we think they're needed ... The main reason, after ISIS (Islamic State) is defeated militarily, is the stabilization efforts and we still need to be there for that, so that's one of the reasons we'll maintain a presence," Colonel Sean Ryan told a news conference in Abu Dhabi. The number of American soldiers could go down however, depending on when other forces from the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation deploy to help train the Iraqi army, he said, adding that about 5,200 U.S. troops are currently based in Iraq. NATO defence ministers agreed in February to a bigger "train-and-advise" mission in Iraq after a U.S. call for the alliance to help stabilise the country after three years of war against Islamic State.

  • Wildfire smoke from B.C. gets in the way of mountain scenery for tourists
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Wildfire smoke from B.C. gets in the way of mountain scenery for tourists

    Smoke from wildfires that's blanketing parts of Alberta does more than just irritate the eyes and throats of visitors to the province's mountain parks — it obscures the spectacular scenery that many have travelled thousands of kilometres to see. In Calgary and Edmonton, the tops of downtown highrises get fuzzier the higher up you look.

  • News
    CBC

    Ford once again presses Tory for action on gun violence in new letter

    Premier Doug Ford slammed Toronto Mayor John Tory in an open letter Saturday afternoon saying once again that Tory has refused to bring the issue of guns and gangs before city council. In his latest letter to Tory, Ford reiterated the provincial government's investment of $25 million in funding, which will help in providing tools and resources to combat gun violence, but added that more needs to be done. "As Mayor you have the power to bring this issue before City Council and match our investment, a move that would further assure Toronto residents that their municipal government takes the fight against guns and gangs as seriously as the Province of Ontario does," Ford said.

  • Hong Kong democracy movement bides its time in face of legal onslaught from China
    News
    CBC

    Hong Kong democracy movement bides its time in face of legal onslaught from China

    The ferry ride across Victoria Harbour gives an eyeful of Hong Kong's iconic skyline, with bank towers up to the clouds. "Hong Kong used to be special," said a man who only gave the name Yu. Another passenger, Clara Hu, lamented the threats to the democratic freedoms that once set this former British colony apart from China, including freedom of speech and the right to vote.

  • 118 kg of garbage in 3 hours: How residents are cleaning up the Humber Bay Park pond
    News
    CBC

    118 kg of garbage in 3 hours: How residents are cleaning up the Humber Bay Park pond

    In just three hours on Saturday morning, residents of Humber Bay Park cleared their local pond of hundreds of cigarette butts, plastic bottles, styrofoam and a single cross-country ski. It's terrible," said Irene Jardine, chair of the Friends of Humber Bay Park. The community group, Friends of Humber Bay Park, organizes cleanups several times a year to pick up garbage that found its way into the pond or in the park.

  • Israel closing Gaza crossing after violence along frontier
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Israel closing Gaza crossing after violence along frontier

    Israel's defence minister says he's closing the country's main personnel crossing with Gaza in response to recent violence along the frontier. Avigdor Lieberman says Sunday that he's shutting down the Erez border crossing. Hamas officials have been meeting with Egyptian officials in Cairo to hammer out details of a possible truce with Israel.

  • News
    CBC

    This Ottawa arts centre film program is giving 'newcomer youth a voice'

    An Ottawa arts centre is hoping to inspire young people from the city's refugee and immigrant communities to use video to tell stories — especially their own. Filmmakers Radamis Zaky and Aia Raafat are helping 10 youth conceive, shoot, direct and edit short videos about their experiences as newcomers to Canada. "These young people are excellent in telling stories.

  • Fire destroys home in northeast Calgary
    News
    CBC

    Fire destroys home in northeast Calgary

    One home was destroyed after a fire in northeast Calgary.

  • News
    CBC

    'She's a tough girl:' 16-year-old battles critical injuries, following collision with train

    At 16, Kailynn Bursic-Panchuk is facing the biggest fight of her young life, after she sustained serious injuries in a collision with a train. Following the Thursday night collision she was airlifted from the site of the crash, near Weyburn, to Regina, where she underwent surgery to relieve pressure on her brain. Family friend Taryn Luterbach described Bursic-Panchuk as a thoughtful and mature young woman, and not one to get into trouble.

  • Skateboarding Olympic hopefuls shred at Montreal's Jackalope festival
    News
    CBC

    Skateboarding Olympic hopefuls shred at Montreal's Jackalope festival

    Extreme athletes, including Tony Hawk and Mat Hoffman, gathered this weekend to show off their skills at Jackalope's seventh edition, which took place on the Olympic Stadium grounds. The skateboarding competitions and demonstrations could be a taste of what's to come, with skateboarding slated to make its Olympic debut at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Hawk, who popularized the sport in the 1980s, says he's happy the sport is finally getting recognition but adds that there are mixed feelings about skateboarding in the Olympics.

  • Coroner's inquest called into death of Brydon Whitstone, Sask. man shot by RCMP
    News
    CBC

    Coroner's inquest called into death of Brydon Whitstone, Sask. man shot by RCMP

    Saskatchewan's Office of the Chief Coroner will hold a public inquest this winter into the death of a 22-year-old Onion Lake Cree Nation man who was shot dead by an RCMP officer. The family of Brydon Whitstone, who died in North Battleford in October 2017, says the coroner's office flagged the inquest earlier this month. Brydon Whitstone was fatally wounded after leading RCMP officers in North Battleford on a brief police chase on the night of October 21, 2017.

  • Empty hotels, idle boats: What happens when a Pacific island upsets China
    News
    Reuters

    Empty hotels, idle boats: What happens when a Pacific island upsets China

    As China extends its influence across the Pacific, Palau is one of Taipei's 18 remaining allies worldwide and is under pressure to switch allegiances, officials and business people there say. "There is an ongoing discussion about China weaponizing tourism," said Jeffrey Barabe, owner of Palau Central Hotel and Palau Carolines Resort in Koror. Of the 122,000 visitors in 2017, 55,000 were from China and 9,000 from Taiwan, official data showed.

  • Albertans young and old celebrate 111th-annual country fair
    News
    CBC

    Albertans young and old celebrate 111th-annual country fair

    For 111 years, generations of Alberta families have celebrated western heritage at the Priddis and Millarville Fair. The country fair has 1,200 categories, and entrants can compete on everything from whose rooster can crow the loudest, to who has grown the most crooked carrot. Patty Webb first entered to show her dad's dairy cows when she was eight-years-old.

  • News
    CBC

    Sidewalk Labs has unveiled its bold vision for Quayside. Just don't ask how it'll get built

    It would be a neighbourhood unlike anything Toronto, and perhaps the world, has ever seen. "Implementing this is going to be a different challenge and we're working closely to explore a lot of partnerships for how to make that possible," he said, noting that that work is still in its early stages.

  • Prison farm supporters stood their ground until the cows came home
    News
    CBC

    Prison farm supporters stood their ground until the cows came home

    The group Save Our Prison Farms has held a vigil in Kingston, Ont., every single Monday for the last eight years after the federal government cancelled the prison farm program. Over 100 people — and a few animals — gathered one final time to share "lots of hugs, lots of happy faces," said group member Dianne Dowling on CBC's All In A Day. The prison farm program — aimed at rehabilitating inmates by providing them with work experience — was cancelled in 2010 by the then federal Conservative government.

  • How to save money — and your sanity — when shopping for school supplies
    News
    CBC

    How to save money — and your sanity — when shopping for school supplies

    With five kids, Annie Guillemette needs to be organized when it comes to back-to-school shopping, but that does not mean getting it all done in one day. After years of stressful back-to-school shopping experiences, she's found a strategy that works for her family. Guillemette no longer worries about buying the exact brands that may be listed on the school supply list because she knows some of these supplies will go missing during the year anyway, and need to be replaced.

  • Weird new eats at this year's CNE
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Weird new eats at this year's CNE

    The Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto is back, and with some mouthwatering, and puzzling, new street foods

  • In Churchill Square, a neighbourhood hub finally gets its mojo back
    News
    CBC

    In Churchill Square, a neighbourhood hub finally gets its mojo back

    The restaurant is Noodle Nami, which has been running for just a few weeks in the bottom floor of Terrace on the Square, the retail and office complex in Churchill Square that has had a few dark corners lately. Beyond the floor, and the building, there have been lots of other problems in Churchill Square. Rocket Bakery, for instance, is setting up a satellite operation to serve coffee and some food to pedestrians who stroll the Square.

  • News
    CBC

    Meet the 1st woman at the helm of Montreal's Centaur Theatre

    Montreal's oldest English-language theatre is turning 50 and its artistic director is adding another milestone to the mix — it's the first season programmed by a woman. Eda Holmes became the first female artistic director of the Centaur Theatre in Old Montreal last August.

  • 'Goose bumps': CNRL develops oilsands mining idea that eliminates tailings ponds
    News
    CBC

    'Goose bumps': CNRL develops oilsands mining idea that eliminates tailings ponds

    As rock-bottom oil prices dragged into 2016, a team of CNRL employees brought an idea to Joy Romero, vice-president of technology and innovation for the Calgary-based energy company. The employees, led by process innovation manager Vince Wallwork, believed they could extract bitumen from oilsands and then reclaim the land immediately — not years later.

  • News
    CBC

    New Port Union brewery to add electricity to the town

    With the buzz still running strong surrounding craft breweries sprinkled throughout Newfoundland and Labrador, another is set to open in Port Union and housed in the old union electric building, by a company fittingly called the Union Electric Brewing Company. McGrath says she had to get into the industry after falling in love with the brewing process.

  • News
    CBC

    Capital Essentials offers sample of Ottawa's best hip-hop

    You might not think of Ottawa as a hotbed of hip-hop music, but the team over at Shifter Magazine begs to differ. 

  • News
    CBC

    6 tips for taking pictures of interesting characters

    On P.E.I., there are plenty of beautiful landscapes and nature to photograph. The website PetaPixel defines street photography as "a genre of photography usually done candidly without permission and without your subject's knowledge.

  • Ottawa man ordered to pay Saint John company $132K in legislature reno suit
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa man ordered to pay Saint John company $132K in legislature reno suit

    A judge in Saint John has ordered Ottawa-based stonemason Bobby Watt to pay $132,000 to a Saint John subcontractor. The decision concludes a nine-year dispute that followed the awarding of a contract to do restoration stonework on the New Brunswick Legislative Building. It also reveals information about a secret $1,050,000 payment to Watt made by the province as part of a court settlement last October.