• Almost every part of Canada's largest national park deteriorating: federal study
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Almost every part of Canada's largest national park deteriorating: federal study

    An exhaustive federal study of Canada's largest national park concludes almost every aspect of its environment is deteriorating. The 561-page report on Wood Buffalo National Park says industry, dams, climate change and natural cycles are sucking the watery lifeblood from the vast delta of northeastern Alberta's Peace and Athabasca rivers. It was prepared after concerns were raised over the park's UNESCO World Heritage status and backs most of them up.

  • Trump names EU a global foe, raps media before Putin summit
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trump names EU a global foe, raps media before Putin summit

    President Donald Trump named the European Union as a top adversary of the United States and denounced the news media as the "enemy of the people" before arriving in Helsinki on Sunday on the eve of his high-stakes summit with Russia's Vladimir Putin. Trump and his top aides were downplaying expectations for Monday's summit as Trump continued to rattle allies by lumping in the EU with Russia and China after barnstorming across Europe, causing chaos at the recent NATO summit and in a trip to the United Kingdom.

  • Immigration critics urge Liberals to come up with answers on asylum issue
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Immigration critics urge Liberals to come up with answers on asylum issue

    With tensions over asylum seekers mounting between Ottawa and Ontario Premier Doug Ford's new PC government, Conservative MP Michelle Rempel wants to give provincial immigration ministers another chance to air their grievances — and Lisa MacLeod says she'd happily do so. As Ford's community and social services minister, MacLeod is butting heads with the Liberal government over its handling of the asylum-seeker issue, and she was at it again Friday after the main federal, provincial and territorial players gathered for a meeting on the matter in Winnipeg.  She walked out of the meeting after a testy exchange with federal Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, who later publicly accused Ontario of fear-mongering on asylum seekers. She called his comments "mean-spirited" and demanded an apology.

  • Calgary Stampede's Indian Village renamed Elbow River Camp
    News
    CBC

    Calgary Stampede's Indian Village renamed Elbow River Camp

    The Calgary Stampede's Indian Village has been renamed Elbow River Camp, the organization announced Sunday. "The name Indian Village is no longer accepted by some people, so it is time for a change," village teepee owner representative Michael Meguinis said in a statement issued by the Calgary Stampede.

  • B.C. economy would take hit if province lost international students, report says
    News
    CBC

    B.C. economy would take hit if province lost international students, report says

    International post-secondary students contribute big bucks to B.C.'s economy, a new report says, but that cash could be at risk due to rising tuition fees. The B.C. Federation of Students released a report this week that found international students spend over $3.1 billion in B.C. each year, creating more than 26,000 jobs and contributing more than $1.7 billion to the provincial GDP. Under provincial policy, tuition rates for domestic students can't be increased by more than two per cent each year, but there are no controls dictating tuition increases for international students.

  • News
    CBC

    Change 'outdated' zoning policies and densify housing, says Victoria urban planner

    Despite record construction activity in downtown Victoria, B.C., the city's housing crisis persists, and one affordable housing organization is pushing to make zoning policy changes a priority in the upcoming municipal elections. Cities for Everyone would like to see those zoning codes changed to make it easier for developers to build these type of housing units.

  • Syrian forces widen south west offensive, some rebels leave for north
    News
    Reuters

    Syrian forces widen south west offensive, some rebels leave for north

    AMMAN/BEIRUT (Reuters) - Syrian government forces widened their offensive in the country's southwest on Sunday to Quneitra province, a region adjoining the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, a war monitor and rebel sources said. Government forces, backed by the Russian military, have captured most of the southwest's Deraa province in a push that began in June. Rebels still hold a strip straddling Deraa and Quneitra provinces which adjoins the occupied Golan Heights.

  • Yellowknife's Sushi Cafe closes temporarily, after truck crashes into restaurant
    News
    CBC

    Yellowknife's Sushi Cafe closes temporarily, after truck crashes into restaurant

    The windows and exterior walls of Yellowknife's Sushi Cafe have been shattered, and its owner left shocked, after a truck apparently smashed into the business early Sunday morning, forcing it to close for the time being. Anita Wai, who owns the restaurant on the corner of Franklin Avenue and 54 Street, said she noticed she had a missed call from the RCMP around 5 a.m. Sunday.

  • News
    CBC

    'Come with an open heart': Bay St. George Mi'kmaq Powwow reviving culture

    Three days of music, dance and celebration wrap up Sunday afternoon at the annual Bay St. George Mi'kmaq Powwow in Flat Bay, on Newfoundland's west coast. 

  • Escuminac Disaster survivors among 5 honoured with Senate medals
    News
    CBC

    Escuminac Disaster survivors among 5 honoured with Senate medals

    "They deserve all the recognition they get for a lifetime of service, to not only the Miramichi, but to the province," Richards said. While both men say they were honoured to receive the medals, they argue they aren't heroes for what they did during the fierce hurricane that devastated the small port of Escuminac on June 19, 1959, sinking 22 fishing boats and drowning 35 men.

  • Box Office: 'Skyscraper' Gets Rocky Start as 'Hotel Transylvania 3' Checks In at No. 1
    News
    Reuters

    Box Office: 'Skyscraper' Gets Rocky Start as 'Hotel Transylvania 3' Checks In at No. 1

    By Rebecca Rubin LOS ANGELES (Variety.com) - It turns out Dwayne Johnson was no match for Dracula and company. "Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation" topped the domestic box office charts with $44 million from 4,267 locations, while Dwayne Johnson's "Skyscraper" washed up with a paltry $25.5 from 3,782 theaters. Sony's animated family feature picked up $46.4 million overseas this weekend for a global start of $100 million, including Amazon Prime showings.

  • Hockey camp brings Yukon kids from far and wide, to skate with pros
    News
    CBC

    Hockey camp brings Yukon kids from far and wide, to skate with pros

    Five-year-old Isaiah Frost chomps down on a bag of Cheetos. Frost is one of five young hockey players from Old Crow who took part in the 16th annual "Learning to Lead" hockey camp, which wrapped up on Friday. The camp teamed young players up with some seasoned professionals.

  • News
    CBC

    Alberta Podcast Network rolls out in time to curate your road trip

    Karen Unland, founder of the Alberta Podcast Network, joined The Homestretch on Monday to talk about some of her favourite podcasts. "A podcast is a piece of audio on the Internet, and what makes it unusual is that you can subscribe to it, so whenever there's a new episode of that show, it automatically appears in your app, so you can listen to it," Unland said. Over the summer, Unland will appear periodically on The Homestretch with a variety of recommendations for listeners looking for some guidance through the world of podcasting, where each listener is also their own program director.

  • They died doing what they loved: When words meant to soothe fail to comfort
    News
    CBC

    They died doing what they loved: When words meant to soothe fail to comfort

    In the days after the deaths of three hikers at B.C.'s Shannon Falls Provincial Park earlier this month, many friends and family described Alexey Lyakh, Ryker Gamble and Megan Scraper as an adventurous trio who died doing what they loved. While it may offer a level of comfort to some, others feel the phrase is a tired, oversimplification of the emotional toll extreme adventure can take on those left behind after a tragic accident. In the 36 years since Maria Coffey's boyfriend disappeared on Mount Everest, she's grown to despise the phrase, though she understands why it's used.

  • Jailed Reuters journalists to testify in Myanmar court
    News
    Reuters

    Jailed Reuters journalists to testify in Myanmar court

    Two jailed Reuters reporters on trial in Myanmar accused of obtaining secret state documents will testify in court from Monday, in a case that is seen as a test of press freedom in the fledgling democracy. Journalists Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, were last week charged with breaching the colonial-era Official Secrets Act after six months of pre-trial hearings. Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo will testify on Monday and Tuesday respectively - the first time since being detained in December that they have had the opportunity to fully tell their version of events in public.

  • Rolls-Royce plans for take-off in flying taxi market
    News
    Reuters

    Rolls-Royce plans for take-off in flying taxi market

    British jet engine maker Rolls-Royce has designed a propulsion system for a flying taxi and is starting a search for partners to help develop a project it hopes could take to the skies as soon as early next decade. Rolls-Royce said on Sunday it had drawn up plans for an electric vertical take-off and landing (EVTOL) vehicle, or flying taxi, which could carry four to five people at speeds of up to 250 miles per hour for approximately 500 miles. Long the stuff of science fiction and futuristic cartoons such as "The Jetsons", aviation and technology leaders are working to make electric-powered flying taxis a reality, including Airbus, U.S. ride- sharing firm Uber and a range of start-ups including one backed by Google co-founder Larry Page, called Kitty Hawk.

  • Will on-demand electric scooters be a hit?
    BBC News

    Will on-demand electric scooters be a hit?

    Kyle Ramirez has surrendered his entire living room to electric scooters. The 30-year-old tattooist’s apprentice spends his evenings collecting them from around the city of Oakland, California - one of more than a dozen across the US that have seen an invasion of the on-demand vehicles - before taking them back to his house to be put on charge.

  • 7 things to know about the N.W.T.'s new carbon tax
    News
    CBC

    7 things to know about the N.W.T.'s new carbon tax

    The Northwest Territories government unveiled its version of the federally-mandated carbon tax this week. The carbon tax takes effect July 1, 2019 and, right away, you'll feel it at the pump. The tax also increases over time, meaning that by 2022, the carbon tax will add 11.7 cents per litre to the cost of gasoline and 13.7 cents per litre to diesel.

  • News
    CBC

    Gas, furnace oil, diesel prices down on P.E.I.

    Petroleum prices on P.E.I. took a tumble Sunday morning.

  • News
    CBC

    As she turns 100, 'there's no stopping' trailblazing Montreal neuroscientist Brenda Milner

    Brenda Milner has retained an "insatiable curiosity" for life. Literature, cricket, cheese, The New Yorker magazine, Manchester City's soccer team, and of course, science — the world-renowned, Montreal-based neuroscientist is passionate about it all. Milner shook up the field of neuroscience with her research in the late 1950s on how brain injuries affect the ability to create and retain new memories.

  • Angel of Montague rises from the ash tree
    News
    CBC

    Angel of Montague rises from the ash tree

    For almost 40 years, David MacCormac admired the enormous white ash tree in his front yard in Montague, P.E.I. — in the spring, when the leaves would bloom, and in the fall when he'd hang ghosts from it at Halloween. "Everybody loves it," MacCormac said. The angel is one of 28 pieces on the Montague Art Trail, which began in 2014 with funding from ACOA and Canadian Heritage.

  • The drag scene in St. John's is coming into its moment of fabulousness
    News
    CBC

    The drag scene in St. John's is coming into its moment of fabulousness

    When Jade Nohels moved back to Newfoundland and Labrador after several years living on the mainland, he says he experienced something of a drag culture shock. Nohels, whose drag persona is Fashionista Jones, started doing drag 14 years ago, first in Toronto and then in Halifax — cities with large, established drag scenes. The local scene has changed significantly in those few years, said Nohels, who feels he can take some credit for that based on what he's heard from other performers and fans.

  • Son with autism stuck in hospital as mom struggles to find accessible home
    News
    CBC

    Son with autism stuck in hospital as mom struggles to find accessible home

    Derek Ridsdale would like to return to life as it was before his surgery, when he lived in a comfortable Calgary townhouse with his mom and spent his spare time volunteering with an autism support organization. Ridsdale, who has autism and cerebral palsy, went into Foothills Medical Centre for back surgery in Nov. 2017 but suffered a rare spinal stroke, initially paralyzing him from the chest down. "It's been tough," said Ridsdale, 20.

  • World Cup 2018: Triumph and tears
    BBC News

    World Cup 2018: Triumph and tears

    Paris erupts into celebration while Zagreb weeps, after France beats Croatia 4-2 in the World Cup final.

  • News
    CBC

    Conception Bay South pool reopens after $740K repair job

    The swimming pool in Conception Bay South reopened this past week after the heating, ventilation and air condition system had to be replaced — to the tune of $740,000. "This kind of system needs to be working at 100 per cent," said Christine Butler, councillor at large for C.B.S.