• Saint John tea producer's $100K Dragons' Den deal falls through
    News
    CBC

    Saint John tea producer's $100K Dragons' Den deal falls through

    A Saint John couple who successfully pitched their tea business on the CBC Dragons' Den episode that aired Thursday night says their $100,000 deal has fallen through because of a previous agreement their investor had. At that time, Dragon Jim Treliving agreed to invest $100,000 in exchange for 20 per cent of the company that uses an innovative flash-freezing technique to seal in the nutrients of loose-leaf tea. At the end of the summer, however, they found out another tea company Treliving was already invested in has a non-compete clause.

  • Young mom dies of infection week after giving birth to 3rd child
    News
    CBC

    Young mom dies of infection week after giving birth to 3rd child

    A Winnipeg family wants to know why a 25-year-old mother died a week after being admitted to hospital to give birth to her third child, and an epidural catheter was left in her back for 28 hours. Chelean Eaton was treated for meningitis days after giving birth. "I don't want this to happen to another family, it's terrible what we are going through," said Cynthia Eaton, Chelean's mother.

  • Former Stock drivers say they are paying the price for whistle-blowing
    News
    CBC

    Former Stock drivers say they are paying the price for whistle-blowing

    Two former Stock Transportation drivers say they were "heartbroken" to lose jobs they loved after refusing an order to drive beyond the allowable time limit. But they say they're happy that the provincial regulator used their information to crack down on the company that ordered them to break the law. "We said it from the get-go — we've got to do something," Kelly Bishop told CBC News about a decision by her and co-worker Andrew LePage to blow the whistle on the company. In a decision issued Thursday, Nova Scotia's Utility and Review Board slammed Stock, the province's largest school bus operator, for running a charter service without a licence and a series of other infractions.

  • News
    CBC

    Alberta high school students and parents upset over gender-neutral bathrooms

    When 16-year-old Evan Gabbey arrived for his first day of Grade 11 this year at Sturgeon Composite High School in Namao, he was shocked at some changes to the washroom facilities. While in the past there were separate washrooms for males and females, some new multi-stalled bathrooms were built to be shared by both genders in order to accommodate all gender identities. "We had a renovation that happened and with those renovations there was a lot of new gender-neutral bathrooms," said Gabbey, adding students at the school just north of Edmonton weren't notified of the changes beforehand.

  • What happens when the Calgary Flames leave the Saddledome
    News
    CBC

    What happens when the Calgary Flames leave the Saddledome

    Imagining what might happen to the Saddledome when the Calgary Flames are no longer the primary tenant is the basis of a new report. The document, titled Calgary Saddledome Potential Future Uses Study, was obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) through a Freedom of Information request. Transforming the Saddledome into a recreation centre could turn a profit, while the other options are anticipated to be money losers for the city, to the tune of roughly $1 million or more per year.

  • 'We're a long way from Washington': A Missouri corn farmer frets about NAFTA talks
    News
    CBC

    'We're a long way from Washington': A Missouri corn farmer frets about NAFTA talks

    Sitting in a combine, hour after hour, gives Blake Hurst a lot of time to worry. Hurst is worried about NAFTA and what could happen to his farm, his family and his community if the U.S. pulls out of the trade agreement, as President Donald Trump has threatened to do. Four generations of the Hurst family have farmed in northwestern Missouri, near Tarkio.

  • New Indian grocery store brings comfort to growing population
    News
    CBC

    New Indian grocery store brings comfort to growing population

    There's nothing like the taste of something familiar from your childhood — and one newcomer is hoping to bring that comfort to others with her new Indian grocery store in Charlottetown — the Spice Store. 

  • Controller who cheated hotel out of $134K spared jail
    News
    CBC

    Controller who cheated hotel out of $134K spared jail

    Christopher Banks, a former controller and accounts manager with Four Points by Sheraton Winnipeg South, previously pleaded guilty to one charge of fraud over $5,000. Prosecutors had urged Judge Sandy Chapman to sentence Banks to 18 months in jail. Chapman said Friday she was impressed by the "significant effort" Banks has made to rehabilitate himself and repay the money he took, and ruled a non-custodial sentence would meet the ends of justice.

  • 'There's hope for everybody': Brandon business owner shares story of addiction, recovery to inspire others
    News
    CBC

    'There's hope for everybody': Brandon business owner shares story of addiction, recovery to inspire others

    Michelle Budiwski has been a successful businesswoman for nearly two decades, first managing major bars and hotels in Manitoba and then owning her own popular business in Brandon. "I chose to use cocaine and I chose to use it often," says Budiwski, a mom of four who owns the successful Escape: The Final Countdown escape room business in Brandon, Man. For years, she kept her story of drug use and mental illness largely to herself, telling just a select few.

  • Are Toronto and Vancouver headed for a housing boom?
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Are Toronto and Vancouver headed for a housing boom?

    October CREA numbers show home sales are up, and so are prices across the country. One expert says we may be headed for a boom in some of Canada's biggest markets.

  • News
    CBC

    'Canada does not engage in death squads,' while allies actively hunt down their own foreign fighters

    Stewart, a former diplomat, continued: "These are people who are executing people … who have held women and children hostage, who are torturing and murdering, trying, by violence, to impose their will. The British government has co-operated with the U.S. on drone strikes that killed two of Britain's most notorious ISIS members: Mohammed Emwazi (aka Jihadi John) and Junaid Hussain.

  • News
    CBC

    'A crackling noise': Accused killer Mark Smich's ex girlfriend saw animal incinerator in use

    The ex-girlfriend of accused killer Mark Smich told jury members at the Laura Babcock murder trial about a night when Smich and co-accused Dellen Millard told her they were testing out a towering animal incinerator. After four weeks of testimony, Meneses is one of the Crown's final witnesses. Millard, 32, of Toronto, and Smich, 30, of Oakville, Ont., have both pleaded not guilty to a charge of first-degree murder.

  • 'Cone Weed' gets Christmas makeover in North Carolina town
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Cone Weed' gets Christmas makeover in North Carolina town

    Now, the roadside attraction dubbed "Cone Weed" is something of a Christmas miracle to locals. The weed has been growing unencumbered across from the Huntersville Fire Station for a year and has amassed a cult following. A graphic designer has created a line of Christmas clothes and has sold more than 200 shirts, with proceeds helping local families through HopeMatch.org.

  • Coroner's jury calls for changes to ambulance design after B.C. man falls out of vehicle and dies
    News
    CBC

    Coroner's jury calls for changes to ambulance design after B.C. man falls out of vehicle and dies

    A coroner's jury has called for changes to the design of B.C. ambulances following the death of man who fell out of an emergency vehicle and died in Quesnel last year. Ebony Aaron Wood, 36, was being transported to hospital in Quesnel after a motor vehicle accident when he fell out of the ambulance, suffering blunt force trauma. Following a three-day coroner's inquest this week, a jury made six recommendations to BC Ambulance Services and two to RCMP on how to prevent similar deaths in the future.

  • St. Clair 'not watering down' education as colleges prepare to make up for strike time
    News
    CBC

    St. Clair 'not watering down' education as colleges prepare to make up for strike time

    St. Clair College won't be "watering down anything" to try to make up for the five-week faculty strike, according to a school spokesperson, but students are still stressed about making up for lost time. Premier Kathleen Wynne tabled back-to-work legislation Thursday in an attempt to end the work stoppage, but the provincial NDP have continued to block Liberal efforts meaning students will most likely be back next week — it's just not clear exactly when, explained John Fairley. "Come on back, the bell's ringing for school," said the St. Clair spokesperson.

  • Dementia patient found dead had wandered from home before
    News
    CBC

    Dementia patient found dead had wandered from home before

    A dementia patient who wandered away from an Orléans seniors' home and was later found dead had left the facility once before, according to an inspection report submitted after his death. Jean Proulx, an 80-year-old resident of Moments Manor who suffered from dementia and diabetes, disappeared on the evening of July 5. Moments Manor, which claimed to specialize in memory care, has since changed its name to Forest Valley Terrace, and is operated by Symphony Senior Living.

  • Notorious Mafia 'boss of bosses' Toto Riina dead at 87
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Notorious Mafia 'boss of bosses' Toto Riina dead at 87

    Cosa Nostra's "boss of bosses," who was serving 26 life sentences as the convicted mastermind of dozens of murders of rivals for power on his Sicilian turf as well as prominent anti-Mafia heroes, died Friday in an Italian hospital prison ward. Salvatore "Toto" Riina's passing, a day after his 87th birthday, is likely to trigger a scramble for power among Mafia clans in Palermo, the traditional hub of the crime syndicate's leadership. Nicknamed "the beast" for his ferocity, Riina leaves behind a significantly weakened Cosa Nostra after his ferocious killing campaign eventually backfired, triggering a fierce government crackdown aided by a small army of turncoats who broke with the centuries-old Mafia " honour " code and started collaborating with authorities.

  • 'We have far more pressing issues,' says Inuk who backs Edmonton Eskimos name
    News
    CBC

    'We have far more pressing issues,' says Inuk who backs Edmonton Eskimos name

    If you think all Inuit are insulted by the Edmonton Eskimos name, think again. Kenneth Ruben, in Paulatuk, N.W.T., posted a message to politicians on Facebook, saying "We as 'the real Eskimos,' want the name to remain!!" His post has since been shared nearly 600 times. "I just really thought it was kind of a ridiculous platform for the politicians to jump on, seeing that we have far more pressing issues in both the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and any of our native Eskimo communities," he told CBC.

  • Baffin Fisheries ex-CEO denies fraud accusations; countersues for $20M
    News
    CBC

    Baffin Fisheries ex-CEO denies fraud accusations; countersues for $20M

    The former CEO of the Baffin Fisheries Coalition (BFC) says he never defrauded the company, and is now countersuing the BFC for breach of contract and defamation. Last month, BFC launched a $1.4 million lawsuit against Garth Reid, alleging he was building on his private land in Winterton, N.L., and invoicing the work to BFC, and its subsidiary Niqitaq Fisheries, claiming it was for a project in Pond Inlet, Nunavut. The Baffin Fisheries Coalition is the largest harvester of shrimp in Canada's North.

  • Downtown businesses still uneasy about 'big dig' re-jig on Water Street
    News
    CBC

    Downtown businesses still uneasy about 'big dig' re-jig on Water Street

    The City of St. John's announced a 'big dig' re-jig aimed at being easier on businesses, but some owners still aren't totally digging it. "I think it's going to be a struggle and we're a little worried about how it will affect us for the future," said Jill Evely, manager of Starbucks on Water Street. The original plan — the "big dig" —  was to tear up Water Street and replace the century-old sewer and water pipes beneath the road.

  • Teghan's top 5 things to do in Winnipeg this weekend (Nov. 17-19)
    News
    CBC

    Teghan's top 5 things to do in Winnipeg this weekend (Nov. 17-19)

    My top pick this weekend is at Forth, where Lev Snowe is doing a live music video shoot paired with psychedelic lights and fancy cocktails.

  • News
    CBC

    5 years of making music in Jeff Boudreau's backseat

    Jeff Boudreau knows there is something magical about singing along to your favourite song in the car, with the windows down. Boudreau credits the success of the  web series to its simplicity. "I love music and part of the fun thing is I get to meet all these really cool musicians … that a lot of people would never get to meet — let alone have them play music in your backseat," Boudreau said.

  • Jaguar Land Rover tests first driverless vehicle on public roads
    News
    Reuters

    Jaguar Land Rover tests first driverless vehicle on public roads

    By Costas Pitas LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's biggest automaker, Jaguar Land Rover (JLR), has tested its first driverless car on public roads, it said on Friday, as carmakers race against each other and tech firms to tap into new technologies. Last October, a pod heavily adapted from a compact Renault car was the first autonomous car to take to Britain's streets as part of government-backed trials aimed at seeing more widespread use of such vehicles by 2020. Politicians are trying to make it as easy as possible to test new driving technologies in Britain, seeking to build an industry to serve a worldwide market expected to be worth around 900 billion pounds ($1.2 trillion) by 2025.

  • SAP sees margins flattening out in fourth quarter: CFO
    News
    Reuters

    SAP sees margins flattening out in fourth quarter: CFO

    By Douglas Busvine and Eric Auchard BARCELONA (Reuters) - Europe's biggest technology company SAP expects profit margins to flatten out during the fourth quarter after three years of declines, with improving margins to begin to show up in 2018, Chief Financial Officer Luka Mucic said on Friday. The German software maker is in the midst of a transition to offer cloud-based services to business customers, and management have flagged that 2017 would be the low-water mark for margins as it invested in datacenters and redeployed staff. "We see now the advent of a period when the margin inflection point should be reached soon," Mucic told investors at the annual Morgan Stanley European Technology, Media and Telecoms conference in Barcelona.

  • Norwegian billionaire hit with $30,400 drunken driving fine
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Norwegian billionaire hit with $30,400 drunken driving fine

    Norwegian heiress Katharina G. Andresen, 22, received a fine based on her income, as per Norwegian law. Andresen is the world's second youngest billionaire and Norway's richest woman, with a fortune estimated by Forbes at $1.23 billion.