• Analysis: Trump bets on Moore and suffers stinging defeat
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Analysis: Trump bets on Moore and suffers stinging defeat

    Rarely has a sitting president rallied behind such a scandal-plagued candidate the way Donald Trump did with Alabama's Roy Moore. Moore's defeat Tuesday in Alabama — as stalwart a Republican state as they come — left Trump unapologetic and his political allies shell-shocked. Trump had dug in on his support for Moore after a wave of allegations about the former judge's alleged sexual misconduct with teenagers when he was in his 30s, becoming one of the candidate's most ardent national supporters in the race's closing days.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Halifax police charge 66-year-old man with manslaughter in manor pushing death

    A 66-year-old man has been charged with manslaughter in relation to a pushing death of a fellow resident at a Halifax apartment complex. Edward Ernest Corbett of Halifax was scheduled to appear in Halifax provincial court today. Halifax police say they first became aware of the case after they were informed of the death of 59-year-old Barry Melvin Jenkins by family members and the medical examiner in August of last year.

  • News
    CBC

    Former Vegreville mayor fighting order to pay $56K in discrimination case

    The company of a former Vegreville mayor is fighting an Alberta human rights tribunal's order to pay a gay, Indigenous prospective employee more than $56,000 in damages for refusing to hire him. In October, tribunal chair Karen Scott found Vegreville Autobody, partly owned by former Vegreville mayor Myron Hayduk, guilty of violating the Alberta Human Rights Act when the company refused to hire Rambo Landry for an office assistant position. Hayduk has declined comment.

  • Sun Youth could soon be looking for a new home
    News
    CBC

    Sun Youth could soon be looking for a new home

    Sun Youth, the community service agency which has had a home in the old Baron Byng High School building since the school closed nearly 40 years ago, may need to move to make way for students once again. The large brick building on St-Urbain Street in Montreal's Plateau neighbourhood is now owned by the Commission scolaire de Montréal (CSDM), the city's largest school board. The CSDM may need to reclaim the building and several other former schools around the city to accommodate an influx of students, said Ernest Rosa, the director of property management at Sun Youth.

  • Playing long game, new NDP leader Singh says of poor byelection showing
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Playing long game, new NDP leader Singh says of poor byelection showing

    NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh isn't reading too much into his party's dismal showing in a series of recent byelections, insisting he's playing a long game as he works to shore up support across Canada in preparation for the 2019 federal election. "I didn't expect that in two months I could turn the ship around," Singh said Wednesday after his party's weekly caucus meeting on Parliament Hill. On Monday, Liberal Jean Yip retained Scarborough-Agincourt, a riding that had been held by her husband, Arnold Chan, until his death from cancer in September.

  • News
    Reuters

    Behind bitcoin boom, Japanese retail investors pile in

    By Hideyuki Sano TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's army of retail investors, no strangers to high risk bets in the past, have emerged as a major force in bitcoin's spectacular rally, now accounting for an estimated 30-50 percent of trading in the cryptocurrency as it spikes to record highs. Once skeptics, Japanese retail investors have been attracted by the digital currency's volatility and inefficiencies in pricing that create opportunities to make money on arbitrage between exchanges. "When I first heard about the bitcoin a few years ago, I thought it was a fraud," said Yoshinori Kobayashi, 39, a former stock trader who took up bitcoin trading two-and-a-half years ago.

  • News
    CBC

    University of Moncton adopts long-awaited sexual violence policy

    The University of Moncton adopted its long-awaited sexual violence policy over the weekend and says such behaviour will not be tolerated on campus. A respectful and safe environment for students, faculty and staff is a priority for the university, said Edgar Robichaud, vice-president of administration and human resources. The new policy covers everything "from sexual harassment to cyber sexual violence, to sexual aggression or rape," said Robichaud, who was part of the working group that developed the policy.

  • News
    Reuters

    Prince Harry's fiancee Meghan Markle to spend Christmas with UK royals

    Prince Harry's fiancee, American actress Meghan Markle, will join Queen Elizabeth and other senior Windsors for their family Christmas celebrations in what commentators said was a break with royal protocol. Last month, Queen Elizabeth's grandson, the fifth-in-line to the British throne, and Markle, who stars in the U.S. TV legal drama "Suits", announced their engagement with the marriage to take place at Windsor Castle in May next year. The queen and her close family usually spend the festive season at her Sandringham estate in eastern England and Buckingham Palace said she and the other senior royals would attend the service at the local church on Christmas Day as they have done for many years.

  • News
    CBC

    No more waiting in the cold: Rural Manitoba school division to start using school bus-tracking app

    Waiting for the school bus if you're on a rural route in Manitoba can be an uncomfortable experience -- possibly even dangerous as temperatures dip. With the SafeStop app, students in the Lord Selkirk School Division will be able to see the exact location of their bus and when it's expected to arrive at their stop. Munday, who is also a parent in the division, says waiting for a school bus in a rural area presents challenges.

  • News
    CBC

    PTSD workers compensation bill passes 3rd reading

    An Opposition bill to provide more support to workers suffering from PTSD passed third reading in the P.E.I. Legislature Tuesday night. The bill, introduced by MLA Jamie Fox, would provide presumptive coverage to anyone filing a PTSD-related claim for Worker's Compensation. Fox, a former police officer, said he has suffered from PTSD himself.

  • News
    CBC

    MP confirms Yukon woman imprisoned in Turkey

    Details about Smith's arrest in Turkey are unclear. Yukon MP Larry Bagnell confirms that Smith was jailed in Turkey, but says he doesn't know many details about her case. "The Canadian officials — as they do in every country — help out Canadian citizens, keep in contact with her, to make sure her health is maintained. I haven't had any negative reports from them," Bagnell said.

  • News
    CBC

    From potash to premium rum: New distillery 'a natural fit' for Sussex

    A Sussex-area group is expanding New Brunswick's selection of craft spirits, hoping to inject more interest in the area, which was dealt a blow with the closure of the Picadilly mine nearly two years ago. "Sussex is more than a mining town, and we considered several things," said John Dunfield, the master distiller and founding member of the Sussex Craft Distillery. "The craft brewing industry has really taken off in the Maritimes — it's a $100 million market.

  • News
    CBC

    6 horses stolen from Alberta ranch found safe

    Six horses stolen from a ranch southwest of Edmonton have been returned to the family that owns them. The animals were recovered Tuesday evening and brought home safely, nearly a week after they were snatched from the Thunder Valley Ranches property in Wetaskiwin County. The animals were found roaming loose in a remote wooded area near a gas lease between Rocky Mountain House and Buck Lake.

  • News
    Reuters

    Canadian home prices fall again in November: Teranet

    Canadian home prices fell again in November, the third straight monthly decline and the largest November drop outside of a recession, as Toronto prices fell for the fourth month and Vancouver prices were flat, data showed on Wednesday. The Teranet-National Bank Composite House Price Index, which measures changes for repeat sales of single-family homes, showed national prices declined 0.5 percent in November from the month before as four of the 11 cities surveyed weakened. The index was up 9.2 percent from a year earlier, a fourth straight deceleration from record gains seen earlier in the year, as government measures to rein in the housing market continued to dampen demand.

  • News
    CBC

    15% of Islanders likely to buy legal pot, according to poll

    Islanders will not be rushing to purchase marijuana when it becomes legal next year, according to a new poll from Corporate Research Associates. Reaching 300 people by phone during the month of November, CRA found just 15 per cent of respondents said they would definitely or probably purchase legalized marijuana at least occasionally for personal use. Rates across Atlantic Canada were generally higher — as high as 23 per cent of those surveyed in Newfoundland and Labrador were likely to purchase.

  • News
    CBC

    Pyjama donations aim to make hospital stay cozier for kids with cancer

    A Selkirk mother has launched a campaign to make life a little cozier for kids in hospital undergoing cancer treatment. Candace Schellenberg is collecting donations of pyjamas for the Children's Hospital Foundation. Due to the chemotherapy, Brenna would throw up several times a day.

  • News
    CBC

    Volunteer team uses drones in search for missing women

    A volunteer search team based in Enderby, B.C. — 37 kilometres northwest of Silver Creek where human remains were found last month — is using drones equipped with cameras to help find out what happened to other women missing from the area.

  • News
    CBC

    RCMP search for missing Campbellton man

    RCMP are trying to find a 61-year-old man reported missing in the Campbellton area and are concerned for his well-being. William Clarence Smith was reported missing by his family on Dec. 7, after he left his home on Lily Lake Road in Campbellton to go for a walk. The Northeast District RCMP said Smith did not return home.

  • News
    Reuters

    Red Cross says life has stopped in Myanmar's Rakhine

    By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - Life has stopped in its tracks in Myanmar's northern Rakhine state where an estimated 180,000 Rohingya remain, fearful after violence drove 650,000 to flee to Bangladesh, the International Committee of the Red Cross said on Wednesday. Dominik Stillhart, ICRC director of operations, speaking after a three-day mission to the remote area, said continuing tensions in the Muslim and dominant Buddhist communities were preventing Muslim traders from reopening shops and markets. The ICRC is one of the only aid agencies to operate in northern Rakhine after Myanmar's military waged a campaign the United Nations has called "ethnic cleansing" in response to Aug. 25 attacks by Rohingya militants on security posts.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    N.S. recruiting doctors, but vacancies persist: 'We will take as many as we can'

    Nova Scotia health officials say they are stepping up efforts to address doctor shortages, touting the province's quality of life and new healthcare approach to prospective physicians, but admit vacancies persist. The Nova Scotia Health Authority has recruited 92 doctors since April 1, but there are still 60 or more vacancies due to physician retirements and other issues. Dr. Lynne Harrigan, the authority's vice-president of medicine, told the public accounts committee the recruitment goal for this year is 100 doctors — 50 family doctors and 50 specialists.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    List of nominees for the Screen Actors Guild Awards

    WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — A list of the nominees for the 24th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, announced Wednesday in West Hollywood, California:

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    New Brunswick to seek new fuel source to replace coal in major power plant

    New Brunswick's Crown-owned power utility will spend up to $7 million to find a new fuel source for its Belledune coal-fired generating station — with the aim of eliminating coal by 2030. Energy and Resource Development Minister Rick Doucet said NB Power will look at alternatives such as hydrogen, biomass and natural gas. The provincial government first announced its intention to eliminate coal last year, but Doucet said they now have the plan to move forward.

  • News
    Reuters

    Rights group criticizes China for mass DNA collection in Xinjiang

    Chinese authorities have collected DNA and other biometric data from the whole population of the volatile western region of Xinjiang, Human Right Watch said on Wednesday, denouncing the campaign as a gross violation of international norms. Hundreds of people have been killed in Xinjiang in the past few years in violence between Uighurs, a mostly Muslim people, and ethnic majority Han Chinese, which Beijing blames on Islamist militants. Police are responsible for collecting pictures, fingerprints, iris scans and household registration information, while health authorities should collect DNA samples and blood type information as part of a "Physicals for All" program, the New York-based group said in a statement, citing government a document.

  • News
    CBC

    Justice system 'riddled with loopholes,' says child sex assault victim after charges dropped

    It took 10 years for David to muster the courage to tell family members about the sexual abuse he says he suffered beginning when he was just eight years old. "I'm 31 years old now and I've managed to work through most of these issues.

  • News
    Reuters

    China warns Taiwan not to rely on foreigners after attack threat

    BEIJING/TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan will fail to get foreign support for its cause, the Chinese government said on Wednesday after a Chinese diplomat threatened the self-ruled island with attack, while Taiwan said it was committed to peace. China considers Taiwan to be a wayward province and has never renounced the use of force to bring it under its control. The United States has no formal ties with Taiwan but is bound by law to help it defend itself and is its main source of arms.