• Japan confronts risks of U.S. alliance based on dollars and deals, not values
    News
    Reuters

    Japan confronts risks of U.S. alliance based on dollars and deals, not values

    By Linda Sieg TOKYO (Reuters) - Eighteen months after Donald Trump became U.S. president and started shaking up global diplomacy, Japan is waking up to the risks of an alliance based on dollars and deals rather than shared values and security interests. For decades, U.S. and Japanese leaders have stressed that the two countries' alliance was based on values such as democracy, freedom and the rule of law. One of Asia's oldest security relationships, it placed Japan under a U.S. defense umbrella.

  • Ford orders public sector hiring freeze, excludes essential frontline staff
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ford orders public sector hiring freeze, excludes essential frontline staff

    Ontario's incoming premier has put the public service under a hiring freeze as part of a series of measures meant to limit spending as he re-examines the province's books, raising concerns among some government workers. A spokesman for Doug Ford said the Progressive Conservative leader has also directed government ministries to cancel "subscription-based services" and to restrict out-of-province travel. "The people of Ontario work hard for their money and they expect their tax dollars to go to the services we all depend on," Simon Jefferies said in a statement.

  • How U.S. tariffs on cars could hit Canadians
    News
    CBC

    How U.S. tariffs on cars could hit Canadians

    Up to now, Donald Trump's weapon of choice in the trade standoff between Canada and the U.S. has been tariffs. The president most recently put the crosshairs on vehicles — and if Canada is slapped with more tariffs, workers and consumers could be the biggest losers. Last week, as he was en route to Singapore from the G7 summit, Trump threatened to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on Canadian cars.

  • Syrian, Iraqi forces say U.S. bombs military border positions, U.S. denies
    News
    Reuters

    Syrian, Iraqi forces say U.S. bombs military border positions, U.S. denies

    By Angus McDowall BEIRUT (Reuters) - Syrian state media said on Monday that U.S.-led coalition aircraft had bombed a Syrian army position near the Iraqi border, causing deaths and injuries, but the U.S. military denied it was responsible. The attack took place in al-Harra, southeast of the town of Albu Kamal, state news agency SANA said, citing a military source. A commander in the alliance fighting alongside Damascus told Reuters that drones that were "probably American" had bombed the positions of Iraqi factions between Albu Kamal and Tanf, as well as Syrian military positions.

  • Liberals pressed on anti-poverty plan as report details child poverty rates
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Liberals pressed on anti-poverty plan as report details child poverty rates

    Anti-poverty groups are raising the stakes on the Liberal government's promise to reduce the prevalence of low-income families by detailing child poverty rates in all 338 federal ridings — including the above-average rates facing constituents of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Finance Minister Bill Morneau. Trudeau said the child poverty figures, "which are so alarming," show that action is needed. "We're going to continue to fight child poverty," he said.

  • Bonaventure Expressway reopens toward downtown Montreal
    News
    CBC

    Bonaventure Expressway reopens toward downtown Montreal

    All the westbound lanes of the Bonaventure Expressway, heading toward downtown Montreal, are now reopened after being closed for nearly five hours. 

  • 'You Were Made for This' explores marriage and parenting
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'You Were Made for This' explores marriage and parenting

    To outsiders, Merry and Sam Hurley seem to have settled into an idyllic life in rural Sweden. The Hurleys thrive on being together almost constantly — "an island of three" — doting on their 8-month-old baby, Conor.

  • Defeated Ontario Liberals must begin soul-searching: interim leader
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Defeated Ontario Liberals must begin soul-searching: interim leader

    Ontario's Liberals must do some soul-searching in the wake of the devastating defeat they suffered in the provincial election in order to understand where things went wrong, the party's new interim leader said Monday. John Fraser, an Ottawa-are legislator first elected in 2013, said the party respects the electorate's decision and must now look internally for answers. "The people of Ontario sent the Liberal party a very clear message," he said in an interview.

  • 'You will succeed eventually': Teen who couldn't even leave his home helps others with anxiety
    News
    CBC

    'You will succeed eventually': Teen who couldn't even leave his home helps others with anxiety

    Tyrell Bird spent most of his teenage years dealing with anxiety so severe that he couldn't leave his house. Now the 19-year-old Winnipegger works as an educational assistant, helping other young people dealing with the type of anxiety that left him feeling as though he would never get better and forced him to quit school. Bird was 13 when the stresses he was facing in life brought on debilitating anxiety.

  • The girls who defied IS
    BBC News

    The girls who defied IS

    The story of how a group of girls in Syria defied the Islamic State Group to get the education it denied them.

  • Carl English named general manager of St. John's Edge
    News
    CBC

    Carl English named general manager of St. John's Edge

    Carl English has been named interim general manager of the St. John's Edge, the owners of the basketball team announced Monday. In a news release, the team said English will immediately assist with the selection of a head coach and player recruitment. English, who grew up in Patrick's Cove on the Cape Shore of the Avalon Peninsula, was named most valuable player for the National Basketball League of Canada in the 2017-2018 season and was a hometown favourite.

  • U.S. top court mulls Apple's App Store commissions in antitrust case
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. top court mulls Apple's App Store commissions in antitrust case

    By Andrew Chung WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to take up Apple Inc's bid to escape a lawsuit accusing it of breaking federal antitrust laws by monopolizing the market for iPhone software applications and causing consumers to pay more than they should. The justices said they would hear Apple's appeal of a lower court's ruling that revived the proposed class-action lawsuit by iPhone buyers over commissions that the Cupertino, California-based technology company receives through its App Store. President Donald Trump's administration backed Apple and urged the justices to take the case.

  • Reports suggest fire that engulfed downtown Brandon buildings was caused by people: police
    News
    CBC

    Reports suggest fire that engulfed downtown Brandon buildings was caused by people: police

    A massive fire that destroyed multiple buildings in downtown Brandon last month may have been caused by people, city police say. Multiple witnesses reported seeing "a number of people" in a grassy area between a Canadian Pacific railway line and Christie's Office Plus before that building went up in flames on May 19, Brandon police said in a news release on Monday. Don Green, the longtime owner of Christie's Office Plus, said the company — which he was in the process of selling before the fire — is just now getting most employees back to work at a temporary job site, about half the size of their former warehouse.

  • Six post-Ramadan lessons from a pair of mediocre Muslims
    News
    Yahoo Canada News

    Six post-Ramadan lessons from a pair of mediocre Muslims

    This year, for the first time in years, I challenged myself to keep almost every fast in Ramadan and succeeded! Please, come eat with me! Ramadan has come and gone, and gone with it are the early mornings of rising to eat before dawn, persistently empty stomachs and a solid case of daily “hanger” as you struggle to keep your fast throughout the Holy Month. The lessons we’ve learned have changed our views on food, religion and most importantly: life.

  • More than melting watches: Spain's Salvador Dali Triangle
    News
    The Canadian Press

    More than melting watches: Spain's Salvador Dali Triangle

    If the name Salvador Dali conjures images of melting watches and one conspicuous moustache but not much else, then a visit to Spain's "Dali Triangle" will not only make for a fantastic road trip, it will show that there's so much more to the renowned surrealist's work. Dali's homes, converted to museums, are located along the Costa Brava, a nearly 100-mile ( 160-kilometre ) stretch of rugged coastline in northeastern Catalonia. Plan a leisurely drive with stops in Pubol, Figueres and Portlligat — the three points of the triangle — to experience the museums, Dali's art and the stunning natural scenery that helped shape and inspire one of the world's most iconic artists.

  • News
    CBC

    The garden path less trodden: Niki Jabbour brings new vegetables to Maritime gardeners

    Seven years ago Niki Jabbour introduced Maritime gardeners to winter gardening, and now her latest book has hundreds of suggestions for vegetables you may have never heard of. Veggie Garden Remix got its start when Jabbour's mother-in-law pointed out to her that ornamental gourds she was growing were actually edible. "I started to look for other vegetables that she might know from Lebanon, it led me down this global garden journey," Jabbour told CBC's Island Morning.

  • Review: 'Jurassic World 2' leans on nostalgia, contrivances
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Review: 'Jurassic World 2' leans on nostalgia, contrivances

    Here's the good news: "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom " is more fun than "Jurassic World." It's not exactly a high bar, but still a welcome surprise. In the hands of a new director, J.A. Bayona, with Chris Pratt's high-wattage charisma on full blast and a fair amount of self-aware humour intact, there are certainly worse ways to spend a couple hours in the air-conditioned multiplex this summer. Mind you, this movie is pretty ridiculous and the script (from Colin Trevorrow and Derek Connolly) is not very clever — I found myself rolling my eyes almost as frequently as I found myself smiling with genuine delight.

  • Square obtains NY State cryptocurrency license
    News
    Reuters

    Square obtains NY State cryptocurrency license

    By Anna Irrera NEW YORK (Reuters) - Square Inc , the payments company founded by Twitter Inc CEO Jack Dorsey, has obtained a license to offer New York state residents the ability to buy and sell bitcoin through its Cash App, the company said on Monday. This makes Square the ninth firm to have obtained a so-called "BitLicense" by the New York State Department of Financial Services. New York has been considered one of the strictest states for cryptocurrency businesses since June 2015, when it started requiring virtual currency firms doing business there to get a license to hold customer funds and exchange virtual coins for dollars and other regular currencies.

  • News
    CBC

    This young entrepreneur is bagging iceberg ice to get himself a motorbike

    One young entrepreneur is making bank, thanks to icebergs drifting into his neighbourhood. Six-year-old Jax Ryland is the proud owner of Below Zero Iceberg Ice in L'Anse Amour, Labrador. At $4 a bag, Jax knows exactly what he'll do with his profits.

  • Governments commit $540M for permanent flood channels to manage Lake Manitoba, Lake St. Martin
    News
    CBC

    Governments commit $540M for permanent flood channels to manage Lake Manitoba, Lake St. Martin

    The federal and provincial governments are sharing the $540-million cost to build two permanent flood mitigation channels at Lake St. Martin and Lake Manitoba that have been years in the making. The governments announced the funding arrangement Monday morning at a news conference in St. Laurent, on the shore of Lake Manitoba. - The Lake Manitoba Outlet Channel will run north from Watchorn Bay on Lake Manitoba to Birch Bay on Lake St. Martin.

  • Should liberty icon Faneuil Hall's slave ties mean renaming?
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Should liberty icon Faneuil Hall's slave ties mean renaming?

    It's called the Cradle of Liberty because it's where the American Revolution was energized, and it remains one of the most famous buildings in Boston. Now, Faneuil Hall has become one of the latest icons embroiled in debate over whether it should be renamed because of its ties to slavery. It's named for Peter Faneuil, a merchant and slave owner who paid for the building as a gift to the city.

  • Celeb chef Samuelsson to open restaurant in Miami's Overtown
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Celeb chef Samuelsson to open restaurant in Miami's Overtown

    Miami is trying to rebuild a neighbourhood that was once a vibrant centre for black culture, and a celebrity chef is contributing what he does best: food. Marcus Samuelsson has bought a former pool hall in Miami's Overtown neighbourhood and plans to open a restaurant there later this year. A redevelopment board is already pouring tens of millions of dollars into Overtown, but Samuelsson is the first celebrity to make a commitment there.

  • News
    CBC

    Developer, community group reach compromise over building setback

    The Centretown Citizens Community Association (CCCA) has reached a compromise with a developer over the distance between the sidewalk and a proposed apartment building on Kent Street. The homes are within a heritage conservation district. Neighbours feared the brick wall of the building would loom over them as they walked past on the sidewalk.

  • From open-casket funerals to headstones: Pet cemeteries help animal lovers deal with loss
    News
    CBC

    From open-casket funerals to headstones: Pet cemeteries help animal lovers deal with loss

    People who have pets often regard them as their closest companions, and yet society doesn't provide many places to formally mourn the loss of an animal. Rocky View's Country Club Pet Memorial Park is one place that does. There is also a non-denominational chapel where people can say goodbye to their animal companions in an individualized way.

  • Dalhousie University president Richard Florizone to step down
    News
    CBC

    Dalhousie University president Richard Florizone to step down

    Quantum Valley Ideas Lab is a non-profit focused on quantum devices and their applications. It has major funding from the Ontario government and connections to the University of Waterloo. The university has not begun to search for a candidate to replace Florizone.