• 4 people charged in connection with fatal hit and run in Mississauga
    News
    CBC

    4 people charged in connection with fatal hit and run in Mississauga

    Four people have been charged in connection with a fatal hit and run in Mississauga that left a 61-year-old woman dead last week. Police were called to the area of Mavis Road and Knotty Pine Grove, north of Derry Road West, in Mississauga last Thursday around 8:40 p.m. Three other Brampton residents are charged with accessory after the fact in connection with the incident.

  • News
    CBC

    Canada's Kaetlyn Osmond in medal position after women's short skate

    Canada's Kaetlyn Osmond thrust herself into podium consideration with a strong third-place performance in the women's short program at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Olympic Athlete from Russia Alina Zagitova, who turns 16 in May, set a new world record in the women's short program, scoring 82.92 points to oudo the previous standard set by teammate Evgenia Medvedeva, who sits in second, earlier in the event with 81.61. Zagitova flawlessly executed a triple Lutz triple loop off the top of her Black Swan routine, followed later by a triple flip and a double Axel.

  • Artificial intelligence poses risks of misuse by hackers, researchers say
    News
    Reuters

    Artificial intelligence poses risks of misuse by hackers, researchers say

    By Eric Auchard FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Rapid advances in artificial intelligence are raising risks that malicious users will soon exploit the technology to mount automated hacking attacks, cause driverless car crashes or turn commercial drones into targeted weapons, a new report warns. The study, published on Wednesday by 25 technical and public policy researchers from Cambridge, Oxford and Yale universities along with privacy and military experts, sounded the alarm for the potential misuse of AI by rogue states, criminals and lone-wolf attackers. "We all agree there are a lot of positive applications of AI," Miles Brundage, a research fellow at Oxford's Future of Humanity Institute.

  • News
    CBC

    B.C. Utilities Commission seeks input on electric vehicle charging stations future

    The B.C. Utilities Commission has launched an independent inquiry to look into whether or not charging stations for electric vehicles should be provincially regulated. The commission says it's seeking input from both stakeholders and the public and will be holding community input sessions in March and April. "The focus is on whether charging stations should be regulated and if so how they should be regulated," said David Morton, B.C. Utilities Commission CEO.

  • News
    CBC

    Small growers wary as major pot producer moves in to B.C.

    This weekend, B.C.'s pot supply grew by another 100,000 plants. The new operation shows just how much room there is to grow in the cannabis industry, according to Ian Dawkins, president of the Cannabis Commerce Association of Canada. "This is an existing economy with tens of thousands of people employed in it across Canada, and the government needs to remember that legalization only works if those people feel like they have a fair chance to participate in the market," Dawkins told CBC News.

  • Thai junta says 'not concerned' about ousted PM Thaksin's Asia tour
    News
    Reuters

    Thai junta says 'not concerned' about ousted PM Thaksin's Asia tour

    By Aukkarapon Niyomyat and Panarat Thepgumpanat BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand is not concerned about the movement of fugitive former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and his sister, also an ousted former leader, after recent visits by the pair to several Asian cities and meetings with members of their party. The Shinawatras have dominated Thai politics for nearly two decades and wield significant influence through allies and relatives despite both living in self-exile. Critics say the military, which took power in a 2014 coup that removed Yingluck Shinawatra's government, wants to end the family's political influence - something that is reflected in a new, military-backed charter, party laws and restrictions on political parties.

  • News
    Reuters

    Russia says Syrian ceasefire monitoring center hit in shelling: TASS

    Russia's ceasefire monitoring center has been damaged by shelling from the rebel-held district of eastern Ghouta outside the Syrian capital Damascus, the TASS news agency cited Russia's Ministry of Defense as saying late on Tuesday. "Residential areas, Damascus hotels, as well as Russia's Center for Syrian Reconciliation, were hit in a massive bombardment by illegal armed groups from Eastern Ghouta," TASS cited the ministry as saying.

  • Bahrain's sovereign fund in talks to invest in SoftBank's Vision Fund: CEO
    News
    Reuters

    Bahrain's sovereign fund in talks to invest in SoftBank's Vision Fund: CEO

    By Davide Barbuscia MANAMA (Reuters) - Bahrain's sovereign wealth fund Mumtalakat is in early talks to invest in Softbank Group's private equity fund that aims to target the technology sector, its chief executive said. Mumtalakat could join other Gulf state funds such as the Public Investment Fund, Saudi Arabia's main sovereign wealth fund, and Abu Dhabi's Mubadala, who have invested in SoftBank's $93 billion private equity Vision Fund.

  • TB death in Quebec's far north spurs public health awareness campaign
    News
    CBC

    TB death in Quebec's far north spurs public health awareness campaign

    Public health officials in the far north of Quebec are planning to launch a tuberculosis awareness campaign, following the death of a 22-year-old Inuk man last June from the infectious disease that has all but disappeared from southern Canada. Jimmy Baron lived in Kangiqsualujjuaq, Que., the easternmost village in Quebec's Inuit territory of Nunavik, with a population of just under 1,000. Coroner Jean Brochu said the young man died on June 3, 2017, after being in close contact with another person infected with TB, which affects the lungs and other organs.

  • Daimler to start serial production of eActros truck in 2021
    News
    Reuters

    Daimler to start serial production of eActros truck in 2021

    Daimler said on Wednesday it aims to start serial production of an electric heavy truck with a range of 200 km (124 miles) in 2021, Daimler Trucks chief Martin Daum said. A year ago, Daimler had said its eActros could be ready for serial production in 2020. Ten customers, including supermarket chain Edeka and logistics group Hermes, are to test Daimler's eActros truck this year, Daum said.

  • Hedley fans flock to Ottawa show despite misconduct claims
    News
    CBC

    Hedley fans flock to Ottawa show despite misconduct claims

    Hedley still managed to draw an enthusiastic crowd in Ottawa Tuesday night amidst allegations of sexual misconduct that recently appeared anonymously on social media. Kelsey Pokoj, 14, and Morgan Nordskog, 18, had the opportunity to meet the band ahead of the show thanks to the VIP tickets they bought at their first possible opportunity in September. Nordskog said after more than 10 years of being Hedley fans and months waiting for the show, they're trying to set the allegations aside and enjoy the music.

  • In 1951, Marelene Clyke became one of the first black N.S. women to join the reserves
    News
    CBC

    In 1951, Marelene Clyke became one of the first black N.S. women to join the reserves

    In 1951 at the age of 17, Marelene Clyke became one of the first black women from Nova Scotia to enlist as a reservist in the Canadian Women's Army Corps. "I was in high school at that time and during the summers we … couldn't find employment in the stores, the only employment we could do would be housework," the 83-year-old Halifax woman said in an interview. Clyke's story is one of a number that Halifax writer Juanita Peters highlights during African Heritage Month in Nova Scotia, part of her work looking at the achievements of black women in the military.

  • News
    CBC

    End of an era for family business that popularized Lunenburg pudding

    Victor Greek perfected the iconic South Shore snack back in the 1940s, and his family's company in Bridgewater, N.S., still sells a lot of it — 680 kilograms (or 1,500 pounds) a week, to be exact. "It's a nice feeling to know that my father started it, and I continued it and it's going to be passed on," said Greek, who officially sold the business on Feb. 1 but is still showing the new owner the ropes. Lunenburg pudding is a traditional German food that's similar to pâté, and the Greeks make it by combining beef, pork, liver and heart.

  • News
    CBC

    Toronto opens new safe injection site at Fred Victor Centre

    Toronto will open a new safe injection site at Fred Victor Centre on Wednesday after recently receiving federal approval, Coun. Cressy told CBC Toronto that Fred Victor Centre is across the street from Moss Park, an area that has already seen a large number of overdoses. "Originally we were supposed to move into Fred Victor, and then Fred Victor decided that they wanted to have their own supervised injection site," she said. "I think it's great that they're finally opening.

  • Is this the #TimesUp moment for aid sector?
    BBC News

    Is this the #TimesUp moment for aid sector?

    Revelations of sexual misconduct by some aid workers and investigations into the aid organisations' handling of the scandals has hopefully reached a #MeToo and #TimesUp moment for the aid sector, former aid worker Amira Malik Miller has said. Speaking on Tuesday she told BBC Hardtalk’s Stephen Sackur that there is a real systematic problem at all levels of the industry, and now was the opportunity to challenge it and bring it to light. While working as an aid worker in 2004 Ms Miller witnessed misconduct first hand, she reported it and it led to several senior managers in charge being dismissed.

  • Women's shelter and sobering centre in the works for Fort Good Hope
    News
    CBC

    Women's shelter and sobering centre in the works for Fort Good Hope

    The small community of Fort Good Hope, N.W.T., is looking at turning two vacant homes into a sobering centre and women's shelter. The K'asho Got'ine Housing Society has secured two housing units from the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation, including a four-bedroom house, and a three-bedroom house with a basement suite. "A safe house for women is needed, and the other one is either going to be an emergency sobering shelter or a transitional house," said Arthur Tobac, who works for the housing society.

  • Former Manitoba premier Greg Selinger to resign legislature seat March 7
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Former Manitoba premier Greg Selinger to resign legislature seat March 7

    WINNIPEG — Former Manitoba premier Greg Selinger says he will resign his legislature seat on March 7.

  • News
    CBC

    Get up and go: Windsor's weather, traffic and gas prices for Wednesday

    Rain is expected to continue falling throughout the morning, but should end by the afternoon. Patches of fog should dissipate by the end of the morning. The high is 7 C (44 F) and the low is –2 C (28 F). 

  • Ottawa family finds 1930s homemade sled at museum
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa family finds 1930s homemade sled at museum

    When Bruce Dudley walked into the Canada Science and Technology Museum, he wasn't expecting to see his family's history front and centre. In the 1930s, his father Hector built a sled for him and his siblings. Dudley said he fondly remembers the sled his father built in his spare time, at times using tools from his job at the Ottawa Electric Railway.

  • Make sure your sump pump is hooked up correctly, warns City of Summerside
    News
    CBC

    Make sure your sump pump is hooked up correctly, warns City of Summerside

    The City of Summerside is reminding home owners who have sump pumps of the correct way to run them to avoid causing disruptions at the sewer treatment plant. "The big rain storm we had here a few weeks ago, the big thaw and then the rain, came close to overflowing," said Coun.

  • Decision on whether Greyhound can pull out of northern B.C. expected today
    News
    CBC

    Decision on whether Greyhound can pull out of northern B.C. expected today

    B.C.'s Passenger Transportation Board is expected to rule Wednesday on whether Greyhound Canada can stop offering bus service in northern British Columbia, but the results of that ruling may not be made immediately public, a spokesperson for the board said. 2017, the company applied to cease operations in the region, as well as on Vancouver Island, arguing ride-sharing companies and new public transit options were making it impossible to turn a profit. The application drew immediate backlash from community leaders, who say the service is essential for connecting communities in remote parts of the province.

  • Bell not giving in on $5 community calling fees, despite customer complaints
    News
    CBC

    Bell not giving in on $5 community calling fees, despite customer complaints

    Bell Canada customers in Newfoundland and Labrador who pay into plans that allow for unlimited long distance calling to a neighbouring community are not about to get any relief. The telecommunications company says the plans are "permanent" and in full compliance with the CRTC, the organization that regulates broadcasting and telecommunications in Canada.

  • Some P.E.I. schools closed due to freezing rain
    News
    CBC

    Some P.E.I. schools closed due to freezing rain

    Schools in the Westisle family on P.E.I. were closed Wednesday, while other English public schools opened one hour late due to freezing rain.

  • Restaurant closures in Iqaluit tea up new café for success
    News
    CBC

    Restaurant closures in Iqaluit tea up new café for success

    He thought about opening a restaurant or a ramen bar, but Joseph Szakacs settled on starting a café after taking careful stock of Iqaluit's food scene.

  • Toronto District School Board seeking new Indigenous trustees
    News
    CBC

    Toronto District School Board seeking new Indigenous trustees

    The Toronto District School Board is looking to add Indigenous representation to its leadership with the creation of two new trustee positions. The TDSB's Aboriginal Community Advisory Committee is asking the board to create a new Indigenous trustee to work alongside the board's existing 22 trustees representing each of the city's wards. "We have a massive number of Indigenous students," Ward 3 trustee and Aboriginal Community Advisory Committee chair Pamela Gough said in an interview.