• Man who arranged to meet prostitute robbed by three men with axe, knife instead
    News
    CBC

    Man who arranged to meet prostitute robbed by three men with axe, knife instead

    The man was then beaten up and robbed before one of the men stole several items, including his identification, from his car, Sgt. Steve Betteridge explained in a media release. After the robbery, the man immediately headed to the police and reported what happened.

  • News
    CBC

    Halifax's historic former Elmwood Hotel could avoid the wrecking ball

    Halifax planners say the former Elmwood Hotel may not be torn down after all. The historic building is located at the corner of Barrington and South streets. Principal Properties had been given permission to tear it down and put up a new, six-storey structure.

  • Sex trade 'alive and well' in Yukon, researcher says after 3-year project
    News
    CBC

    Sex trade 'alive and well' in Yukon, researcher says after 3-year project

    It's becoming more common and widespread for women to sell sex to cover basic necessities like food, shelter and transportation in Yukon, and instances of human trafficking are more prevalent than previously thought, according to a three-year research project by the Yukon Status of Women Council. Charlotte Hrenchuk is the coordinator for the "Not Your Fantasy" project, which was funded by Status of Women Canada and Yukon's Crime Prevention Victim Services Trust Fund. "The sex trade is alive and well and living in the Yukon," Hrenchuk said.

  • News
    CBC

    Islanders keep close eye on Jamaica situation

    In an email to CBC News, Sunwing said it is in contact with its destination team and has been told that while tourists are being encouraged to exercise a degree of caution, all tours and excursions are operating normally. "Jamaica is consistently one of our most popular destinations and we send approximately 5,000 visitors through Montego Bay airport each week without related incident," Sunwing said.

  • Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination
    News
    CBC

    Servers fired from sports bar at Montreal's Bell Centre allege racial discrimination

    Three servers from 1909 Taverne Moderne, a sprawling new sports bar next to the Bell Centre, have filed complaints with Quebec's human rights commission alleging they were fired last week because of racial discrimination. All three told CBC they were given no clear explanation as to why they were fired. All said the manager who fired them told them their work ethic and appearance didn't compare favourably to two model employees, both white francophone Quebecers.

  • Sherman family private investigation could cost up to $1M
    News
    CBC

    Sherman family private investigation could cost up to $1M

    The Sherman family's decision to hire private investigators to separately probe the deaths of their mother and father could cost up to $1 million. CBC News has learned that the Shermans have hired some of the most seasoned investigators to look into the case. With Toronto lawyer Brian Greenspan at the helm, the investigative team is led by former homicide detective Tom Klatt.

  • Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator
    News
    CBC

    Life with dementia can be lived fully, says Alzheimer's educator

    More than 2,500 Islanders currently live with dementia and Snow told attendees at P.E.I.'s annual Alzheimer's Awareness Conference in Charlottetown that those lives can be lived to the fullest. One of the biggest misconceptions about Alzheimer's disease is that it is simply a memory problem, Snow said — but it happens to be much more than that.

  • Canadians travel to Montego Bay despite emergency
    Global News

    Canadians travel to Montego Bay despite emergency

    Mon, Jan 22: Just days after the prime minister of Jamaica declared a state of emergency in the part of his country that includes Montego Bay, Canadians are still travelling there and flights are still departing for the region. Returning Canadians say they were never told about the violence or warning to stay indoors. Sean O’Shea reports.

  • 'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control
    News
    CBC

    'It's going to take some tough love' to get this feral cat colony under control

    Volunteers with Four Paws Food Bank in Kamloops, B.C., have been hauling out bags of rotten cat food and feces from a feral cat colony on the city's north shore. Bonnie McBride runs Four Paws Food Bank and says her group was tagged in a Facebook post after someone was walking through the north shore area and spotted a number of sick looking cats. Cat colonies form when a group of feral cats have access to food and shelter, often created when people provide food to the animals.

  • UBC student stabber sent back to Saudi Arabia after discharge
    News
    CBC

    UBC student stabber sent back to Saudi Arabia after discharge

    A UBC student found not criminally responsible for stabbing a fellow student in the neck has been sent back to Saudi Arabia after being discharged from custody. In a majority decision last month, a B.C. Review Board panel found that Thamer Hameed Almestadi did not present a significant threat to public safety despite a considerable risk of psychotic relapse. Board member Paula Cayley wrote the dissenting opinion.

  • Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boeing skips key government information session for fighter-jet companies

    Boeing says it has not decided whether to submit its Super Hornet fighter jet as a potential replacement for Canada's aging CF-18s, and is instead waiting to see how the federal government will run the multi-billion-dollar competition. The comments come after government officials briefed dozens of industry representatives and foreign delegates Monday on Canada's plan to purchase 88 new fighter jets in the coming years for an estimated $15 billion to $19 billion. Boeing did not send anyone.

  • Harsh words — and different strategies — divide Innu Nation, Nunatsiavut government on caribou plan
    News
    CBC

    Harsh words — and different strategies — divide Innu Nation, Nunatsiavut government on caribou plan

    "Recent decisions by the Innu Nation could very well spell the end for the George River caribou herd, and strain relations with the Nunatsiavut government for many years to come," says Nunatsiavut President Johannes Lampe in a media release. The George River herd has seen a dramatic decline in numbers since the early 1990s when there was an estimated 800,000 animals. Grand Chief of the Innu Nation Gregory Rich said he was "surprised and disappointed" by the comments made by the Nunatsiavut government.

  • News
    CBC

    Toddler's injury from IV line a severe example of a common problem, expert says

    As an Edmonton toddler recovers from severe injury caused by a misplaced intravenous line, one expert says this particular complication is not uncommon, and that patients — and their parents — need to be vigilant in advocating for their own care in busy hospitals. Emmy Gunther, 3, underwent open-heart surgery at the Stollery Children's Hospital last week. Shortly after an IV line was placed in her hand on Friday night, the toddler began screaming in pain — and continued screaming throughout the night.

  • Brampton man charged after 4-year-old girl, other random strangers shot at in 'outrageous' shooting spree
    News
    CBC

    Brampton man charged after 4-year-old girl, other random strangers shot at in 'outrageous' shooting spree

    Toronto police have arrested a man who allegedly shot at random strangers, including a four-year-old girl, in five separate incidents this month. Between Jan. 9 and 21, police say 20-year-old Brampton man Adam Abdi approached people in a variety of circumstances and opened fire before running away. Supt. Ron Taverner described the shootings as "outrageous and disturbing" and said investigators have not determined any possible motive or connection among the victims.

  • News
    CBC

    'Stop feeding the birds': B.C. town overrun by dozens of wild turkeys

    Wild turkeys have become such a problem in one small B.C. Interior community that the regional district is considering a bylaw that would prohibit people from feeding them. Roughly 100 turkeys can be found roaming the streets around Edgewater, B.C., roosting in local trees and causing extensive property damage by defecating in private yards and breaking tree branches. "I've got about 60 or 70 of them living in my trees," said resident Mark Holmes.

  • Tesla proposes big payout if Musk meets lofty goals
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Tesla proposes big payout if Musk meets lofty goals

    Elon Musk is known for his bold predictions on electric and self-driving cars. Under a new all-or-nothing pay package, Musk would remain at Tesla Inc. for the next decade and see his compensation tied to ambitious growth targets. The proposal, revealed Tuesday in a regulatory filing, requires that Tesla grow in $50 billion leaps, to a staggering $650 billion market capitalization.

  • Peter Mansbridge giving lecture in Regina with focus on 'fake news'
    News
    CBC

    Peter Mansbridge giving lecture in Regina with focus on 'fake news'

    Mansbridge is giving the James M. Minifie Lecture at the University of Regina for the second time in his nearly five-decade career in journalism. This time, he said one of the main topics he'll discuss is fake news.

  • Laying Dolores O'Riordan to rest
    Yahoo Canada News

    Laying Dolores O'Riordan to rest

    Dolores O’Riordan was laid to rest in Ireland on Jan. 23 after a funeral in her hometown of Ballybricken, County Limerick. Addressing the crowd of mourners gathered at Saint Ailbe’s Church for the funeral service, BBC reports, family friend Canon Liam McNamara said the late Cranberries front woman had “reached out to the world” and had “a unique respect for everyone.” Among the family and friends at the service were O’Riordan’s mother, her ex-husband Don Burton, their three children, the late singer’s boyfriend Olé Koretsky and her surviving bandmates Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawler. Along with her Cranberries bandmates,  she rose to international fame in the 1990s with the band’s debut album, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? The Cranberries would go on to sell over 40 million records worldwide and have four top 20 albums on the Billboard 200 chart. O’Riordan died in London on Jan. 15 at the age of 46. Details on the cause of death have not been released, but police are not treating the death as suspicious. In the days leading up to O’Riordan’s funeral service, thousands of fans lined up to pay their respects outside of a church in Limerick where her body lay in repose. On Jan. 22, the night before the service, several hundred fans gathered at a Limerick park to honour O’Riordan with a mass singalong of some of The Cranberries most well known songs.

  • Hospital staff knew woman later found frozen and dead outside was anxious to leave ER
    News
    CBC

    Hospital staff knew woman later found frozen and dead outside was anxious to leave ER

    Just hours before an emergency room doctor realized a meth-using pregnant patient was gone, she was slurring her words, exhibiting bizarre behaviour and had told hospital staff she wanted to leave. Windy Sinclair was later found frozen and dead outside an apartment block in Winnipeg. The 29-year-old pregnant mother of four's body was discovered outside a West Broadway apartment block on Dec. 28, days after she sought help for her meth addiction at Seven Oaks Hospital.

  • News
    CBC

    Ottawa defends decision to give Hudson contract to same company that aborted previous refit

    The federal government is defending its decision to award another $840,000 refit contract on the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Hudson to the same company behind an aborted refit on the venerable research ship last year. Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) said Heddle Marine (NL) is a "separate operating entity" from Heddle Marine Services, the company responsible for the aborted dry docking refit on the Hudson at its Ontario shipyard in 2017. Eleven days after receiving questions about the latest refit contract, a PSPC spokesperson said Heddle Marine (NL) submitted the lowest compliant bid for the upcoming mechanical refit, scheduled for the 54-year-old research vessel at its home base at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.

  • Quebec town swaps out salt for eco-friendly wood chips on icy roads
    News
    CBC

    Quebec town swaps out salt for eco-friendly wood chips on icy roads

    The town of Rosemère, Que., is opting for a more environmentally-friendly way of keeping roads from becoming slippery due to ice, snow and freezing rain — it's using wood chips. The town, located just northwest of Laval, is testing out wood chips as a replacement for salt or gravel on the roads. Rosemère Mayor Eric Westram said they are ditching the "old, conventional way" in favour or something more eco-friendly and more efficient.

  • Sessions interviewed by Mueller team in Russia investigation
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Sessions interviewed by Mueller team in Russia investigation

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions was interviewed for hours last week in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, the Justice Department confirmed Tuesday. The interview came as Mueller investigates whether President Donald Trump's actions in office, including the firing of FBI Director James Comey, constitute efforts to obstruct the FBI probe into contacts between his 2016 campaign and Russia.

  • Whitehorse taxi drivers may be disabling mandatory cameras, official says
    News
    CBC

    Whitehorse taxi drivers may be disabling mandatory cameras, official says

    Bylaw officers took rides in four taxis earlier this month as part of enforcement activities, bylaw manager Dave Pruden told city council on Monday night. Security cameras became mandatory in Whitehorse taxis last May. "We went out January 12, did four rides. All four of those drivers knew who we were, even though we were in plainclothes — and three of those vehicles were in non-compliance of the camera," Pruden told councillors. Pruden was at the council meeting asking for permission to begin a round of consultations with the public, taxi operators and other levels of government.

  • Student: Boy arrested in school shooting has violent past
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Student: Boy arrested in school shooting has violent past

    A 16-year-old boy accused of shooting a classmate at a Texas high school on Monday had a history of aggressive actions at school, a fellow student said. The injured student, a 15-year-old girl, was airlifted to a hospital in Dallas following the shooting inside the cafeteria at Italy High School, which is in the small town of Italy about 40 miles (64 kilometres ) south of Dallas. The boy fled after being confronted by a school district official but was later arrested.

  • News
    CBC

    Vegan poké, almond-based cheese: Vancouver's latest food trends

    The market for vegan food has exploded across B.C. in recent years and everything from almond-based cheese to vegan tuna is taking off. "Vegan alternatives to dairy products in particular are seeing huge spikes in sales," said CBC On The Coastfood columnist Gail Johnson. While sales of cow's milk dropped last year, sales of plant milks increased, according to the same study by the Plant Based Foods Association and Good Food Institute.