• Meghan Markle takes mom along to UK cooking fundraiser
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Meghan Markle takes mom along to UK cooking fundraiser

    Meghan Markle was joined by her mother Thursday to launch a cookbook aimed at raising money for the victims of London's Grenfell Tower fire. The book was inspired by a visit by the former American actress to the Hubb Community Kitchen in North Kensington, which could only open a few days a week for lack of funds.

  • Liberal Leader Brian Gallant: From humble roots to N.B. premier's office
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Liberal Leader Brian Gallant: From humble roots to N.B. premier's office

    Sitting on the Liberal campaign bus with days to go before New Brunswick's provincial election, Premier Brian Gallant is relaxed and at ease. A priest in Minto, a small community east of Fredericton, took them in and helped them get started.

  • TV medium accused of ripping off grieving family who paid $525 for reading never received
    News
    CBC

    TV medium accused of ripping off grieving family who paid $525 for reading never received

    Greg and Jodi Kucher were struggling with grief after a string of deaths of close family members and friends. The southern Alberta couple was also trying to get pregnant with their first child — and they felt that if they could just talk to their lost loved ones, maybe they could make sense of everything in their lives. Instead, they've waited three years for an appointment, growing increasingly frustrated and angry as the medium has refused them a refund for the $525 they paid.

  • Self-harm prevention one of most common uses for Taser among police: report
    News
    CBC

    Self-harm prevention one of most common uses for Taser among police: report

    There are many reasons why a police officer may use a Taser, but one common use is in response to a person threatening self-harm or exhibiting a mental health crisis, according to Regina Police. In Regina last year,  Conducted Energy Weapons, or CEWs, were used 18 times. Seven of those times involved a mental health crisis or a person threatening self-harm.

  • Leaving Venezuela: How Colombia is shouldering a migration crisis
    News
    CBC

    Leaving Venezuela: How Colombia is shouldering a migration crisis

    Venezuela is in an economic free fall. The mass migration from Venezuela — due to corruption, hyperinflation and economic mismanagement — is currently one of the biggest movements of people on the planet. The United Nations International Organization for Migration (IOM) says an estimated 2.3 million Venezuelans were living abroad as of June 2018, with more than 1.6 million having left the country since 2015.

  • Whitetail deer fawn shares amazing friendship with rescue kitten
    Rumble

    Whitetail deer fawn shares amazing friendship with rescue kitten

    Clarice, a special needs whitetail rescue fawn, spends some quality time with her BFF Spooky the rescue kitten. What an adorable friendship!

  • Akwesasne Mohawk council puts settlement of 130-year-old land grievance to a vote
    News
    CBC

    Akwesasne Mohawk council puts settlement of 130-year-old land grievance to a vote

    The Kanien'kehá:ka community of Akwesasne will decide whether or not to accept a $240 million settlement offer from Canada by a referendum, with voting beginning next month. The vote was recently announced by the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne (MCA) to settle a claim over approximately 8,000 hectares of land along the south shore of the St. Lawrence River in the most western portion of Quebec. Darren Bonaparte, an independent researcher from Akwesasne — which straddles the Quebec, Ontario and New York State borders — said he plans on voting yes.

  • Hundreds of pipeline parts are faulty but 'not an immediate danger'
    News
    CBC

    Hundreds of pipeline parts are faulty but 'not an immediate danger'

    The National Energy Board has found hundreds of parts currently being used on major oil and gas pipelines are not as strong as previously thought and could expand or break if put under enough pressure. The parts are pipeline fittings, similar to those found in home plumbing such as elbows, tees and reducers, however they are much larger — about one metre in diameter and two metres long. According to the NEB, the steel fittings were not manufactured up to Canadian standards, however the regulator is not concerned enough to order pipeline companies to replace them — at least not yet.

  • Fire in Saint John's north end forces road closures for most of day
    News
    CBC

    Fire in Saint John's north end forces road closures for most of day

    Firefighters in Saint John battled a house fire in the north end of the city early Thursday morning. Oickle said heavy flames and smoke were coming from the second floor of a three-storey building. The fire eventually spread and heavy flames could be seen from the roof of the building. Oickle said no one was inside the building when the fire broke out, and no one was injured.

  • 'Heart of a lion': Injured Broncos player returns to Saskatchewan with the York Lions men's team
    News
    CBC

    'Heart of a lion': Injured Broncos player returns to Saskatchewan with the York Lions men's team

    One of the Humboldt Broncos players who survived the horrific bus crash in April will lace up his skates for York University's men's hockey team in Saskatchewan Thursday evening, as the team honours Mark Cross, a former York player and Broncos assistant coach who died in the crash. Kaleb Dahlgren, 21, is still recovering from the brain injury he suffered in the tragic crash, so he can't play. But he will be on the York Lions bench wearing his old number, 16, which now carries extra meaning. "It honours the 16 people in the accident that aren't here today," Dahlgren told CBC Toronto's Dwight Drummond on Tuesday.

  • Fort Liard First Nation says petroleum company not paying up for resource projects
    News
    CBC

    Fort Liard First Nation says petroleum company not paying up for resource projects

    The Acho Dene Koe First Nation of Fort Liard, N.W.T., has turned to the courts in an effort to get the territorial government to enforce benefits agreements for two oil and gas developments on its traditional lands. In a request for a judicial review, the First Nation also alleges the N.W.T. government is refusing to release annual reports outlining how well Paramount Resources Ltd. is complying with benefits plans related to the projects. Under a 1999 agreement, a copy of which was included in the court filing, Paramount agreed to pay $100,000 annually into the First Nation's community development fund, in connection with an oil and gas project south of Fort Liard.

  • Infrastructure Bank tapped Ottawa for millions in funding - with only one project on its plate
    News
    CBC

    Infrastructure Bank tapped Ottawa for millions in funding - with only one project on its plate

    The Canada Infrastructure Bank has asked the federal government for millions of dollars in operational expenses over the past year — even though it has announced only one project so far. According to Finance Canada documents obtained through the Access to Information Act, in March 2018 the bank requested a draw-down from the federal Consolidated Revenue Fund of $5,756,000 to cover operational expenses until the end of June. Infrastructure Bank CEO Pierre Lavallée said the bank will follow the highest standards of due diligence in managing its expenses.

  • Woman's deadly cannabis allergy highlights complexity of condo living
    News
    CBC

    Woman's deadly cannabis allergy highlights complexity of condo living

    A condominium corporation in Mississauga, Ont., is puzzling over how it can accommodate the conflicting medical needs of some residents as marijuana legalization looms. In April, the condo board of Applewood Place tried to pass a rule that would ban growing and smoking marijuana in the building's units and common areas. This concerned resident Adele Schroder, 38, who, in her late teens, discovered she had a potentially deadly allergy to cannabis at a university party when people around her smoked up.

  • News
    Reuters

    Shark attacks 12-year-old girl near Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    A 12-year-old girl was attacked by a shark in waters off Australia's tropical northeast coast on Thursday, an ambulance official said, the second attack in the tourist region in as many days. Rescuers were called to Cid Harbour at Whitsunday Island, near the Great Barrier Reef, on Thursday afternoon and found the girl with bad leg injuries, said Tracey Eastwick, the regional ambulance operations manager. "The patient's injuries today are again a shark attack bite to the patient's thigh area, with significant blood loss," Eastwick told reporters in Mackay, where the girl is in a serious condition in hospital.

  • Saputi fishing vessel now fully Inuit-owned
    News
    CBC

    Saputi fishing vessel now fully Inuit-owned

    The Qikiqtaaluk Corporation now has full ownership of the fishing vessel Saputi. The corporation, which used to co-own the ship, finalized a deal on Tuesday to buy the other 49 per cent of the vessel from Nataaqnaq Fisheries in Newfoundland. "Having 100 per cent ownership will give us ability to do what we need to do in hiring and training Inuit, which … was kind of lacking in the past," said Harry Flaherty, president of the Qikiqtaaluk Corporation.

  • News
    Reuters

    Inmarsat and Panasonic partner on in-flight broadband

    British satellite company Inmarsat said it would collaborate with Japan's Panasonic Avionics in providing in-flight broadband for commercial airlines. The 10-year agreement will see Inmarsat become Panasonic's exclusive provider of connectivity using the Ka-band satellite signal, Inmarsat said on Thursday. In return, it will offer Panasonic's portfolio of services to its commercial aviation customers.

  • 36 blasts recorded at American Iron & Metal site in 16 months
    News
    CBC

    36 blasts recorded at American Iron & Metal site in 16 months

    Records from New Brunswick's Department of Environment and Local Government show just how routine explosions are at American Iron and Metal's Saint John recycling facility. Since June 1, 2017 there have been 36 blasts — small and large — at the waterfront site. The summer of 2018 was largely explosion free with no blasts recorded in June, July or August.

  • Have a rare look inside a cannabis production facility in southeast Calgary
    News
    CBC

    Have a rare look inside a cannabis production facility in southeast Calgary

    Currently in the first phase of operation, Boaz received a licence to produce cannabis from Health Canada on June 28 — a process completed in just 10 months. The 20,000 square foot facility now has one nursery room — where clones are created from mother plants — and two production pods — where the cloned plants are grown to produce marijuana flowers, or buds. To be able to sell cannabis, applicants must first complete two full grow cycles and the product is sent to Health Canada for inspection.

  • Toronto company offers cash to 'cannabis connoisseurs' to smoke
    News
    CBC

    Toronto company offers cash to 'cannabis connoisseurs' to smoke

    A cannabis firm is looking to hire five pot aficionados from across the country to sample the company's wares and get paid to do it. Toronto-based company AHLOT is offering up to $1,000 a month to five "cannabis connoisseurs" to sample various strains of marijuana. With legalization scheduled for Oct. 17, the bud brain trust will form the company's "cannabis curation committee," reporting back on characteristics and quality.

  • Four children killed in Netherlands as train hits 'cargo' bicycle
    News
    Reuters

    Four children killed in Netherlands as train hits 'cargo' bicycle

    Four children were killed and two people were wounded when a train struck a "cargo" bicycle, widely used by Dutch parents to transport their children, police said on Thursday. Police said the cargo bike was electrically powered and had been transporting the children from a pre-school center to school when the accident occurred. There were numerous witnesses, including other school-age children, police said.

  • Beckie Scott speaks to CBC News Network about WADA reinstating Russia's anti-doping agency
    CBC

    Beckie Scott speaks to CBC News Network about WADA reinstating Russia's anti-doping agency

    Head of WADA's athletes committee is 'profoundly disappointed' with decision

  • Keith Urban brings Winnipeggers on stage, helps them win bet with boss
    News
    CBC

    Keith Urban brings Winnipeggers on stage, helps them win bet with boss

    Country music superstar Keith Urban scored a day off work for a pair of women when he phoned their boss live on stage at his Winnipeg concert on Wednesday. Amid a sea of signs proclaiming love for Urban, a bright yellow sign promoting an orthodontics business got Urban's attention at Bell MTS Place. Urban called up the women, Jenna Paddock and Lauren Bilenky, to find out the story behind the sign.

  • News
    CBC

    Sask. government approves wind turbine project near Herbert

    Wind turbines and renewable energy are coming to Saskatchewan in three years — maybe. The province announced on Thursday that it approved a project which would see 56 wind turbines built in the Herbert area.

  • EU getting 'impatient' with Facebook over consumer data use
    News
    The Canadian Press

    EU getting 'impatient' with Facebook over consumer data use

    The European Union's consumer protection chief said Thursday she's growing impatient with Facebook's efforts to improve transparency with users about their data, warning it could face sanctions for not complying. EU Consumer Commissioner Vera Jourova turned up the pressure on the social media giant, saying she wants the company to update its terms of service and expects to see its proposed changes by mid-October so they can take effect in December. "I will not hide that I am becoming rather impatient because we have been in dialogue with Facebook almost two years and I really want to see, not the progress — it's not enough for me — but I want to see the results," Jourova said.

  • Bridge that collapsed six hours after opening was built without geotech investigation of riverbed: Reeve
    News
    CBC

    Bridge that collapsed six hours after opening was built without geotech investigation of riverbed: Reeve

    The Reeve of the rural municipality of Clayton says the bridge that collapsed six hours after it opened was built without having geotechnical investigation done on the riverbed it stood on. The Dyck Memorial Bridge, located in the RM of Clayton about 300 kilometres east of Saskatoon, collapsed Friday shortly after it was opened. "It seems like something under the riverbed let go and a row of pilings sunk," Hicks said.