• Online petition calling for inquiry into Colten Boushie shooting gets thousands of signatures
    News
    CBC

    Online petition calling for inquiry into Colten Boushie shooting gets thousands of signatures

    An online petition calling for a public inquiry into the shooting death of Colten Boushie has garnered thousands of signatures — but the provincial government says the incident has already been thoroughly covered during a criminal trial.Colten Boushie, 22, was shot and killed after he and four others from the Red Pheasant Cree Nation drove onto Gerald Stanley's farm in August 2016. In the subsequent criminal trial, Stanley, 56, testified he was trying to scare the group off and accidentally shot Boushie in the head.  The jury found Stanley not guilty of second-degree murder, igniting a firestorm of debate in the weeks that followed. "The conditions for an inquest have been fulfilled by the criminal trial and there is nothing further to establish in this case that has not been covered by a public criminal trial," according to a statement provided by Saskatchewan's Ministry of Justice. "We understand some people were disappointed in the verdict," the statement went on. "However, there is no indication that the jury's decision was guided by anything other than the trial evidence and the judge's instructions."Acquittal 'enforces systemic discrimination'The petition was launched last week on change.org by Andre Bear, an Indigenous law student at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. As of Friday, it had garnered 3,979 virtual signatures. In the petition, Bear wrote that Stanley's acquittal "enforces systemic discrimination embedded in the legal system and has failed to uphold justice in Canada."Bear, who is Cree and a member of the Canoe Lake First Nation, cited "the selection of an all-white jury" as a concern. CBC News cannot verify the race of the 12 jurors selected for the trial, but at the time, the Boushie family said they were angered that Indigenous-looking jury candidates were challenged and excluded by Stanely's defence team."We have a right to be to be judged by or among our own peers," Bear said Friday. "If there is an Indigenous person that is [a] victim....there should be at least one Indigenous person on that jury no matter what. That is our charter right."The federal government has now eliminated the practice of peremptory challenges, although at least one judge has since overturned that decision.Bear's petition outlined a number of other concerns, including the "flawed" RCMP investigation (already the subject of an ongoing civilian review) and the Saskatchwan Crown's decision not to appeal the Stanley verdict. "This had been one of the most important cases in my lifetime as a young person in this province," Bear said. "I think it's irrefutable — the fact that there was not a public inquiry that's been done. And so I'm hoping that this petition can create more awareness and keep this on the agenda."Bear said he has the support of Boushie's mother and uncle. "The [case] serves as just one stark example of the failure of the criminal justice system to treat Indigenous victims, offenders, and their families fairly with dignity and respect," according to Bear's petition. "The need to address it remains increasingly important to meet the Government's commitment of reconciliation."5 Indigenous provincial judges appointedIn its statement, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice said five judges who have self-declared as Indigenous have been appointed to the Provincial Court of Saskatoon since January 2018, the month the Stanley trial began. The province also cited ongoing work with the Elders Advisory Committee, which gives advice on justice-related issues and programs. "Racism and intolerance have no place in Saskatchewan," the statement said. "We need collaborative, respectful dialogues about the issues facing our communities."The government is working on the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that fall under provincial authority and jurisdiction. "We know that reconciliation will require continuous and respectful engagement with Indigenous people to ensure every community's voice is heard within the justice system."'Much work still needed': feds Bear said his petition was also directed to the federal government. "The death of Colten Boushie was a tragedy, and our government continues to share in the grief of the Boushie family," a statement provided Friday by the Office of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada said. "We are committed to advancing reconciliation and addressing systemic issues involving Indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system."The statement pointed to the abolishment of peremptory challenges. "We have also worked in partnership with Indigenous communities, provinces and territories to increase the use of restorative justice programs," according to the statement."There is much work still needed and we are committed to continuing to make progress in partnership with Indigenous peoples. This includes working hand-in-hand with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples on the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."

  • News
    Reuters

    Death squad disrupters: Filipina patrols help keep drug killings at bay

    Late each night, a dozen women chat and share a meal before hitting the narrow streets of a Manila suburb where a death squad once roamed. Not long after Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte declared a war on drugs in 2016 and promised thousands would die, Pateros was being terrorized by attackers in hoods and ski masks, known locally as the "bonnet gang".

  • India summons Turkish envoy over Erdogan's remarks on Kashmir
    News
    Reuters

    India summons Turkish envoy over Erdogan's remarks on Kashmir

    India summoned the Turkish ambassador on Monday to lodge a diplomatic protest over President Tayyip Erdogan's remarks on the disputed region of Kashmir and warned it would have a bearing on bilateral ties. During a visit to Pakistan last week, Erdogan said the situation in Indian Kashmir was worsening because of sweeping changes New Delhi introduced in the Muslim-majority territory and that Turkey stood in solidarity with the people of Kashmir.

  • All-Star weekend, as expected, was about honouring Kobe
    News
    The Canadian Press

    All-Star weekend, as expected, was about honouring Kobe

    CHICAGO — It has become one of the NBA’s most revered traditions: On the morning of the NBA All-Star Game, the league pays tribute to retired players with what is called the Legends Brunch. It brings together about 3,000 guests, and every year a recent retiree with ties to the game’s host city is honoured.When the game was in Los Angeles two years ago, the NBA wanted to honour Kobe Bryant.He declined. He couldn’t attend. His reason: his daughter Gianna Bryant had a game that morning.“That said, to us, everything about his priorities,” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said Sunday as he recalled that conversation with Bryant.This All-Star weekend was Michael Jordan’s longtime home of Chicago, highlighted by a game where LeBron James and Giannis Antetokounmpo served as captains — but it was, predictably and understandably, overshadowed by the mourning of Bryant.Jennifer Hudson, wearing the Lakers' deep purple, performed a pregame tribute to Bryant and sang “For All We Know." Players on James’ team wore Gianna’s No. 2 on their jerseys and players on Antetokounmpo’s team wore Kobe’s No. 24 on theirs. And all players wore a patch with nine stars, one for each victim of the crash.Common, in his pregame tribute to Chicago, also paid homage to Bryant, saying that “even in the darkest times, you'll feel Kobe's light."Everyone at the All-Star Game on Sunday got a 24-page tribute published by Sports Illustrated devoted to Bryant's career. On the last page of text, just before the back cover, was a quote from Jordan: “I loved Kobe — he was like a little brother to me," it began. Next to that quote was a photo, Bryant guarding Jordan in 1997, sticking his tongue out much in the same way that the Bulls' guard often did.And when the night was over, someone was going to be the first recipient of the Kobe Bryant MVP Award, given to the player voted as the biggest star of the All-Star Game — a trophy that Bryant hoisted four times.It’s been three weeks now since Bryant, 13-year-old Gianna and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash in Southern California.And the mourning period is still very active, very real, very necessary.It’s a doubly sombre time for the NBA, since the league is also coming to grips with the Jan. 1 death of Commissioner Emeritus David Stern — the person credited for taking a fledgling league and turning it into one of the planet’s most powerful sports brands, a multi-billion-dollar entity with a reach that touches nearly every outpost on earth. Stern was remembered as well at the Legends Brunch, and Silver drew a parallel between Bryant and his former boss.“Just as a reminder: Who more embodies the spirit of All-Star than Kobe? ... He always played hard. He didn’t care if it was an All-Star game,” Silver said. “And I think that’s what he and David had in common. They always competed. They believed in the power of sports. They believed in winning and they believed it was necessary to always give their all. And I think that’s why their losses have resonated with so many people around the world.”Magic Johnson — like Bryant, a Los Angeles Lakers legend — had been hired two years ago to introduce Bryant at the Legends Brunch, the one that Bryant couldn’t attend because his daughter had a game that morning.On Sunday, Johnson finally got his chance to speak at the event and pay tribute to Bryant. He told the story about how, before Bryant was drafted in 1996, Jerry West called him to say that he had seen the greatest draft workout that he could recall.He was speaking of Bryant’s workout.“And I said, ‘Really,’” said Johnson, who also paid tribute to Stern and Bryant at United Center before Sunday's game by addressing fans. “He said, ‘Yes, this guy named Kobe Bryant. Just was incredible in his workout and we’re going to do everything we can to draft him.”The rest is history. Bryant came to the Lakers in a draft-night trade and played there for 20 years, winning five titles. Johnson said he was quickly impressed with Bryant’s work ethic, how he would work for two hours before practice and then go through another two-hour session with the team.“That’s who Kobe Bryant was,” Johnson said. “He was always thinking about ‘How can I get better? How can I lead my team to victory?’ And when you think about him scoring 81 points in a game, only second to Wilt Chamberlain, and then five NBA championships, and then to score 60 points in his last game — that was probably the greatest thing I’ve ever seen from any athlete. He said, ‘Hey, I’m going to go out Mamba-style.’”The brunch paid tribute this year to four individuals: USA Basketball managing director Jerry Colangelo received the Lifetime Achievement award, newly retired three-time NBA champion and Chicago native Dwyane Wade received the Community Ambassador award, retired WNBA player and another Chicago native Cappie Pondexter was the Hometown Hero recipient, and longtime Chicago Bulls star and six-time NBA champion Scottie Pippen was the Legend of the Year.Pippen was at his Los Angeles home when he got the news on Jan. 26 about Bryant.“It was a weird morning,” Pippen said. “And I’m still today regretting that I didn’t get a chance to tell Kobe Bryant how great he really was.”___More AP coverage of the life and death of Kobe Bryant: https://apnews.com/KobeBryant___More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_SportsTim Reynolds, The Associated Press

  • Why the Democrats might be on track for a contested convention
    News
    CBC

    Why the Democrats might be on track for a contested convention

    The race for the Democratic nomination has a front runner and his name is Bernie Sanders. But does that mean he's the candidate most likely to take on Donald Trump in November?Not exactly.There's one obvious reason why it's way too early to say Sanders will be named the nominee at the Democratic National Convention in July. Only two states have voted and more than 98 per cent of delegates have yet to be awarded. A lot can happen over the next five months.Sanders's support has proved resilient, though. There is every indication he can keep up this pace.But while this pace might be good enough to win more delegates than any of his rivals, it might not be brisk enough to win him a majority. That would result in a contested convention in Milwaukee — with a potentially unpredictable outcome.The rules governing Democratic primaries and caucuses differ from state to state, but they generally give all registered Democrats (and, in some cases, Independents and even Republicans) a chance to vote.But the process determines the allegiance of the 3,979 delegates who get to go to the Democratic National Convention. Normally, the eventual nominee has already secured a majority of delegates by that point, making the vote a formality.That might not happen this time. If it doesn't, the decision on who becomes the next Democratic nominee will be made by delegates on the convention floor — much like the delegated conventions that, until recently, were common in Canada.On this side of the border, these conventions have generated some unexpected outcomes. Stéphane Dion was the compromise candidate who won the 2006 Liberal leadership race, despite finishing in third place on the first ballot behind frontrunners Michael Ignatieff and Bob Rae. Joe Clark (in 1976) and Brian Mulroney (in 1983) both became the Progressive Conservative leaders without leading on the first ballot.It's too early to even speculate about what might happen if the Democrats wind up in a contested convention. Everything would depend on who's still in the running and how many delegates they have. But it isn't too early to recognize that, unless there is an important shift in the race, there's a strong possibility that the party is on track for a long, hot summer of internecine politics.Sanders vs. the moderatesIt really comes down to math. Sanders just might not have the numbers working in his favour.The Vermont senator won the most votes in both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, but he doesn't have the delegates to show for it. Though delegates are largely awarded proportionally, that sharing-out can depend on how each candidate's vote is regionally distributed. According to the latest estimates, Sanders has 21 delegates compared to 23 for Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana.Sanders's results in Iowa and New Hampshire were relatively modest — 26 per cent of the vote in both contests. That kind of result is enough to top a divided field, but it doesn't deliver a lot of delegates.Sanders is cornering one big segment of the Democratic electorate while his rivals split up the rest. According to entrance and exit polls from the two states, just under a quarter of voters considered themselves "very liberal." Sanders averaged 44.5 per cent of the vote in the two states among these voters, putting him 21 points ahead of Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren.Among "somewhat liberal" voters (about two-fifths of the electorate in the two states), Sanders ran nearly even with Buttigieg.Only among "moderate" voters (about a third of the Democratic electorate) did Sanders run behind. Buttigieg averaged 26 per cent among these voters, putting him narrowly ahead of Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (23.5 per cent). Former vice-president Joe Biden followed with 18 per cent. Sanders took 14 per cent and Warren just five per cent.Better performances among moderates would have delivered both Iowa and New Hampshire to Sanders easily. But he will keep winning as long as he continues to be competitive among more centrist Democrats, runs up the numbers among progressives and lets his rivals divvy up the pie of moderates among them.A very long road to 1,990It looks like the field will continue to be divided for some time to come. In the wake of his poor showing so far, Biden's support in national polls has been dropping. But no moderate candidate has been the sole beneficiary of Biden's slide; Buttigieg and Klobuchar are both making gains, as is former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.Support for Buttigieg and Klobuchar, however, remains relatively modest — and Bloomberg isn't even contesting the first four states on the primary calendar (Nevada on Feb. 22 and South Carolina on Feb. 29 are next).The race heats up on March 3, when 14 states (and American Samoa) vote in what's known as "Super Tuesday." Sanders is likely to do well across the board — his support is relatively uniform across the country and among different demographic groups. That means Sanders is likely to emerge from Super Tuesday with a lot of delegates, while each of his opponents are well-positioned to win delegates in certain parts of the country. Biden is banking on the South, due to his strong support among African Americans. Buttigieg could contend in less diverse states and Klobuchar and Warren in their home states. Bloomberg is looking like he could do well — particularly in places where he has spent tens of millions of dollars of his own money on campaign ads.According to the forecast estimates from FiveThirtyEight, Sanders hypothetically could come out of Super Tuesday with nearly 40 per cent of the delegates — roughly twice as many as any of his rivals.That's a problem. Assuming Sanders is somewhere around 600 delegates, that would put him about 1,400 shy of what he would need on the convention floor to win a majority. But after Super Tuesday, only about 2,500 delegates will still be up for grabs. That means Sanders would need to win more than 55 per cent of delegates in the remaining caucuses and primaries.That's a tall order for a candidate who hasn't polled higher than 30 per cent throughout this election cycle and won just 45 per cent of delegates against a single opponent (Hillary Clinton) in the 2016 primaries.To avoid a contested convention, Sanders will need to separate himself from the field — while hoping it stays divided. There is a decent prospect the field will remain fractured and a contested convention looks like a real possibility — which would serve as an incentive for candidates to stay in the running and take their chances on the convention floor. But if Sanders does separate himself from his divided opponents, there's a greater chance that the field (and voters) will consolidate behind a single moderate.Perhaps developments in the next few weeks will make this discussion moot. But it seems the major moderate candidates are, for the time being at least, prepared to stick it out for the long haul.With only two states having voted, it's obvious that this race is far from over. But it could take a lot longer than usual for the likely nominee to emerge.

  • 1 man in critical condition after collision between truck, minivan and bus in Surrey
    News
    CBC

    1 man in critical condition after collision between truck, minivan and bus in Surrey

    A man is in critical condition after his truck struck a minivan and a small bus Sunday evening in Surrey.At around 7 p.m., Surrey RCMP were called to the 2300 block of 140th Street for a report of a collision.A grey GMC pickup truck was travelling south on 140th Street when it hit a white Dodge Caravan and a small private bus, Surrey RCMP said.The driver of the truck, a man, was airlifted to hospital in critical condition. Three people were in the bus and five people were in the minivan. Some were not injured, others received minored injuries. None were taken to hospital. RCMP say 140th Street between 20th and 24th Avenue will be closed Sunday night for several hours as they investigate.The investigation is in its early stages, but alcohol or drug impairment and speed have not been ruled out as contributing factors to the crash.Anyone with dashcam footage or other information about the collision is asked to contact Surrey RCMP.

  • UK digital bank Monzo plans to hire 500 and relaunch paid accounts
    News
    Reuters

    UK digital bank Monzo plans to hire 500 and relaunch paid accounts

    Fast-growing British digital bank Monzo plans to hire up to 500 people and forecasts it will get 5.5 million users this year, as it prepares to have another crack at charging some customers to turn a profit. Launched in 2015, Monzo has attracted 3.8 million customers in Britain with its bright coral card and spend-tracking data. Some younger customers in particular have become fierce advocates, with the digital bank ranked as the most likely brand in Britain to be recommended to a friend in a YouGov survey in November.

  • As Canadians return home from Westerdam cruise, health officials urge them to self-isolate
    News
    CBC

    As Canadians return home from Westerdam cruise, health officials urge them to self-isolate

    Two Canadians who were aboard a cruise ship that was refused entry to several countries before docking in Cambodia last week received an unusual greeting when they returned to Canada Sunday: border agents were waiting at their gate, requesting they don masks.Stephen Hansen and his wife were among 271 Canadians who had been stuck aboard the Westerdam cruise ship that eventually docked in Cambodia on Friday, allowing passengers to disembark.But not long after, an 83-year old American passenger tested positive for COVID-19, the coronavirus, raising concerns that other passengers could have been infected. Initially, Holland America, which operates the cruise, said there was no one was sick on its ship.At Vancouver International Airport, the Hansens, of Surrey, B.C., were asked to wear masks, but weren't told to isolate themselves."We were asked a few questions and filled out an immigration form, and they very nicely helped us bypass the usual lineups and let us out the door," Hansen said.'We're feeling fine'Now, Canadian health officials are asking passengers who were on the Westerdam and who are returning to Canada to isolate themselves for 14 days after they return, and to report to local public health authorities within 24 hours to be monitored for symptoms of the COVID‑19In a statement Sunday, Tammy Jarbeau, a spokesperson for the Public Health Agency of Canada said Westerdam passengers will undergo further examination and screening.The statement said Canadian passengers from the MS Westerdam were identified so that they would be screened when they returned to Canada. The Canadian passengers will be asked to inform authorities where they will be, so public health authorities can follow up.The statement said some travellers returned before these measures were put in place. Health officials and the Canada Border Services Agency are working together to identify those individuals who will be contacted, the statement said.Cruise didn't go as plannedThe Westerdam cruise ship left Hong Kong on February 1, with several stops planned before ending in Japan. But the ship was turned away by five different countries over fears of the coronavirus.It wasn't the vacation Hansen was expecting. "It was supposed to be a 30-day bucket list tour," he said Sunday."It wasn't as planned or hoped for but I guess in another way it's the journey of a lifetime so lots of stories."Hansen said he didn't know that an American woman had the virus until he landed in Canada on Sunday, and spoke with CBC News at the airport."I guess on the one hand it's upsetting because to know that there was one case but we're feeling fine, we've had health scans, temperature scans and we don't have any concerns for our own health."The ordeal ended for most passengers when Cambodia agreed to let guests disembark on Friday..One of the passengers who got off the ship was an American woman who then flew to Malaysia. She has since tested positive for COVID-19 and that has posed a concern for health experts concerned about the spread of the illness.University of Toronto infectious disease researcher Dr. Anna Banerji told CBC Sunday afternoon that passengers should be quarantined.Banerj said the use of quarantine has proved effective in the past, including during the SARS outbreak, and said it should be used until a vaccine can be made for the virus."It's concerning to me that there's a passenger on this cruise line that tested positive for coronavirus and the fact that this cruise line was not quarantined that makes other passengers at risk."Watch | Canadian health officials urge Westerdam passengers to stay in their homes:He said he's just glad to be back on Canadian soil. He and his wife had to go through at least three countries before going to Vancouver and worried immigration officials might stop them."It felt a little bit like that movie Argo where you're trying to get the Iranian hostages out."Hansen had praise for the crew on board and said apart from being stuck at sea and having "mounting anxiety," during the ordeal the rest of the trip was great.Holland America said in a statement no other guests or crew have reported symptoms of the illness. The company said passengers who've already returned home will be contacted by health officials.

  • Athletes, fitness influencers workout in City Shred event
    Global News

    Athletes, fitness influencers workout in City Shred event

    Toronto’s fitness community gathered at Lamport Stadium for an intense workout on Sunday. Brittany Rosen has more from the event.

  • The 'Fox Fiver': Port Coquitlam wants Terry Fox to be the new face of the $5 bill
    News
    CBC

    The 'Fox Fiver': Port Coquitlam wants Terry Fox to be the new face of the $5 bill

    The City of Port Coquitlam is encouraging residents to nominate Terry Fox as the new face of the $5 bill.The city's website now features a link to a Bank of Canada voting page which asks people to nominate the next "bank NOTE-able Canadian.""This is Terry's town, this is where he grew up," said Coun. Steve Darling."We encourage all of our citizens to go online and nominate Terry for the $5 bill," he said.In January, the Bank of Canada announced it would let the public have a say about who would replace Sir Wilfred Laurier who has been the face of the $5 bill since 1972.Port Coquitlam Mayor Brad West has written letters to Stephen Poloz, governor of the Bank of Canada, and federal finance minister Bill Morneau in support of Terry Fox's nomination, according to Darling.Fox, considered a national hero, spent his formative years in Port Coquitlam.Terry's legacyIn 1980, the 21-year-old athlete — who had already lost a leg to cancer — started his ambitious Marathon of Hope to raise money and awareness for cancer research. He died before he could complete his journey, but in the process raised over $24 million. The foundation created in his name has raised hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research in the four decades since Fox's death.Dave Teixeira, the organizer of the Terry Fox Hometown Run in Port Coquitlam wants to see Fox named in time to coincide with the 40th anniversary of his historic fundraising journey, September 20, 2020."The 'Fox Fiver' would be a great way to honour him," said Teixeira. "And also remind us that maybe it's time again for us to dip into our pockets to give a little bit more to help bring an end to cancer."Close to 300 Canadian's are in the running to be the face of the next $5 bill including: * Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin. * Billy Bishop, First World War flying ace. * John Candy, comedian. * Emily Carr, artist and writer. * Jane Constance Cook, First Nations activist."It's our turn to help the Terry Fox family foundation by getting him on the $5 bill," said Darling. "He deserves to be there."A short list will be developed from among the nominated candidates when the contest closes March 11. That list will be submitted to the minister of finance, who will make the final decision. The Bank of Canada said it expects the new $5 note to be in circulation "in a few years."

  • Yellowknife man wins dream trip to Italy for his home-cooked meal
    News
    CBC

    Yellowknife man wins dream trip to Italy for his home-cooked meal

    There's nothing quite like a home-cooked meal made from local, fresh ingredients, and for one Yellowknife man, a prize-winning dish has earned him a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Italy this summer.Trevor Sinclair is one of 100 home cooks who have been selected by Airbnb Experiences to spend a week at the Slow Food Institute's University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy.There, they will get to learn from experts like celebrity chef David Chang, founder of the Momofuku restaurant group. "There are so many things I'm looking forward to," Sinclair said, including meeting other home cooks from around the world."I'm looking forward to learning from them and seeing what they entered into for the competition and stealing some great ideas there that I can bring back home."Sinclair said he came across a posting for the contest on Facebook and decided to enter on a whim.  "I'm a stay-at-home dad and I cook fresh, unique meals every single day. And I thought 'well, this sounds like something I could get behind.'"Sinclair entered his recipe for pan fried whitefish with cranberry salsa and a side of fiddleheads with birch syrup glaze and mushrooms. He said it was important to him that all of the ingredients be locally sourced because Airbnb Experiences is all about locally designed and hosted meals and adventures. "These were all things that we collected ourselves," Sinclair said, adding that he picked 21 kilograms of cranberries this year. "I know where all the secret spots are."Sinclair said his love of cooking comes from his mother who made "great, unique meals" and also used local ingredients. While he isn't a professional chef, Sinclair says home cooks are unique because they're good at adapting. "You open up the fridge and now you have to create with what you've got — and that's including that old wilty spinach hiding in the corner — and turning it into something great and wonderful that is both healthy, appealing and tasty."  The recipes from the winning home chefs will be published in the first-ever Airbnb cookbook and sent to listings around the globe. "The recipe will be in there and N.W.T. will be represented," Sinclair said.

  • 'I was mind-blown': Toronto-area teen violinist heading to New York to play at Carnegie Hall
    News
    CBC

    'I was mind-blown': Toronto-area teen violinist heading to New York to play at Carnegie Hall

    At just 13 years old, Lincoln Haggart-Ives is about to do something many musicians have only dreamed of.The teen violinist, from Vaughan, Ont., is headed to New York to play at Carnegie Hall."I was really excited. I was mind-blown," Haggart-Ives said CBC News of his reaction when he learned his audition tape for the American Protégé Music Competitions had been successful."I didn't really expect that to happen but it happened, so I was really happy and excited. I was just shocked."American Protégé is designed for young musicians, actors and singers on the path to a successful career; and gives participants an opportunity to showcase their unique talents.Organizers say the 2018-2019 competitions attracted the largest number of very competitive applicants on record, hailing from every corner of the world including various parts of the U.S. and 58 other countries.Lincoln's mom, Maria Haggart, says she found out about the competition from a neighbour and immediately found the "opportunity for the kids to play at Carnegie Hall" very appealing."I thought to myself, 'I'll just put Lincoln in and see what happens,'" Haggart told CBC News. "So, I submitted the video and then last Thursday we just got word that he placed and he will be playing in the winners' recital in June."Preparing for the big stageHaggart-Ives says he'll be playing Csárdás, which is one of his favourite pieces.Csárdás — by Italian composer Vittorio Monti — is and rhapsodical concert piece written in 1904, originally composed for violin, mandolin or piano."It has different parts to it. For example there's a fast bit and there's a slow bit," he explained.The teen admits he does get a bit nervous sometimes when he has to play to a large crowd, but he has his own way to calm his nerves."Sometimes I get a little nervous, but when I start playing I lose it and I just focus on the thing I'm doing and it goes away and then I do fine," he said."I just practice the pieces I'm going to play and I just try to perfect it and make it sound as good as possible."Learning new pieces is what Haggart-Ives likes the most about playing the violin."I like to branch out and to explore different types of pieces and try to just play as many different pieces as possible, to challenge myself more and more to play different pieces in higher levels," he said.'Very musical' from he was a babyLincoln's mom said he started music lessons one month before his fourth birthday."I thought that the violin was the best instrument to start him on because it's a sizable instrument. He started on the box violin and he started playing an actual instrument when he was four," Haggart said."He just took off with it… He was very musical from the time he was a little baby. "We used to play music for him when he was really young, before he could even walk or talk. We would play The Beatles and Coldplay. His favourite actually was Amy Winehouse. He loved Amy Winehouse and he would like to dance around that," Haggart added.The proud mom says, "It's just been a journey for us. There have been challenges and obstacles but it's been very, very rewarding."But for Lincoln, this is only the beginning.Next on his bucket list is to play in an Orchestra."Maybe the Toronto Symphony Orchestra or the National Orchestra," he said.

  • N.B. premier cancels controversial plan to close rural ERs overnight
    News
    CBC

    N.B. premier cancels controversial plan to close rural ERs overnight

    New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs has announced he's backing away from the controversial plan to close six emergency departments between midnight and 8 a.m. in a month's time. Higgs issued a news release shortly before 8 p.m. Sunday. He said hours will not be reduced at the hospitals in Sussex, Sackville, Sainte-Anne-de-Kent, Caraquet, Grand Falls and Perth-Andover. "We have experienced a multitude of reactions and genuine concerns to the regional health authorities' reform plan," he said in the statement."I can't in good conscience move forward without addressing the concerns and fears that have been brought to light."The Progressive Conservative minority government announced the contentious health-care reforms on Tuesday, sparking angry protests, political divide and talk of an early provincial election.The changes were scheduled to go into effect March 11. Now Higgs said there will be further consultations in April and May. "I will personally visit these communities to initiate the process to ensure that we hear from community leaders, the people delivering care and concerned citizens," his statement said. There will be a "health-care summit" in June to discuss a long-term strategy for the system and the challenges in rural communities, Higgs went on to say. He committed to releasing the findings of both the summit and the community meetings sometime this fall. In a news conference on Friday Higgs called the changes "necessary" and that "no responsible government would be able to avoid them."Sussex-Fundy-St. Martins PC MLA Bruce Northrup, who said he wouldn't be able to support the plan to cut nursing home hours, described the cancelling of the cuts as "pushing the pause button.""We have to talk to the stakeholders, we have to talk to the doctors, the administrative staff, the nurse practitioners and everybody involved in this situation," said Northrup."You've heard from the ambulance people that you know they're razor thin and they're not ready for this change. The nurses aren't ready for this change."In a tweet, Green Party leader David Coon said the premier has "done the right thing."Perth-Andover Mayor Marianne Bell said she spoke to the premier this afternoon about the changes and is ecstatic to hear they're not going forward."I don't exactly know what tipped them over but I am so, so pleased," said Bell.While the proposed changes haven't been taken off the table entirely, Bell said she welcomes public consultations on the future of New Brunswick's health care system."We want change," said Bell. "We want improvement. I am delighted that he is saying that he is going to come around and talk to us, talk to the people delivering the care, talk to the people in the local area. This is exactly what we want."The province had also been proposing to convert acute-care beds to long-term care beds in response to a shortage of staff and beds.The rationale was that cutting overnight ER hours at the six hospitals would free up more doctors to work during the day, when demand for service is higher.  Opposition to the proposed health reforms was swift. Hundreds of protesters stood outside the hospital emergency room in Sussex on Tuesday, ringing bells, waving bright orange signs and chanting "rural lives matter." A similar angry crowd gathered in Caraquet as the changes were announced.On Friday, MLA Robert Gauvin resigned as deputy premier and said he would sit as an independent MLA, calling the changes an "attack on rural New Brunswick."

  • Boyfriend of British TV presenter heartbroken by her death
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boyfriend of British TV presenter heartbroken by her death

    LONDON — The boyfriend of Caroline Flack, the former British TV host for the controversial reality show “Love Island,” said Sunday that his “heart is broken" at her death as criticism mounted over her treatment by some British media.British commercial television network ITV said it would not air Sunday's edition of the show but that it would return on Monday with a tribute to its former host.Flack, 40, was found dead Saturday at her home in east London after taking her own life, according to a family lawyer. Flack hosted “Love Island” from its launch in 2015 before stepping down in December after being charged with assaulting her 27-year-old boyfriend, Lewis Burton.Flack denied the charge and was to stand trial next month. She was also not allowed to have any contact with Burton, a bail restriction he objected to. Burton also did not want Britain's Crown Prosecution Service to go ahead with the trial.Over the past few months, Flack had been the focus of several negative articles and was trolled across social media for the assault charge. On Sunday, the story of her suicide dominated the front pages of British newspapers.Beside a picture of them together, Burton said on Instagram that he was in “so much pain."He added: “I promise I will ask all the questions you wanted and I will get all the answers nothing will bring you back but I will try make you proud everyday.”The sixth season of “Love Island" is currently airing and ITV said in a statement that it will not broadcast Sunday's edition of the show. On Saturday, the commercial network did not air a package of unseen footage from the previous week.“After careful consultation between Caroline's representatives and the ‘Love Island' production team, and given how close we still are to the news of Caroline's tragic death, we have decided not to broadcast tonight's ‘Love Island' out of respect for Caroline's family,” ITV said in a statement.ITV said the show will return on Monday and that it will include “a tribute to Caroline who will be forever in our hearts.”“Love Island” puts young, attractive contestants in a tropical paradise, where they must pair up or risk being exiled. Critics claim the program places vulnerable young people under intense scrutiny and pressure, which is magnified by blanket coverage of the show by tabloids and TV talk shows. Two former “Love Island” contestants, Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis, died by suicide in 2018 and 2019.Until her arrest, Flack had enjoyed a meteoric career rise after co-hosting Saturday morning children's television shows. She also hosted companion shows to the popular ITV programs “I'm A Celebrity ... Get Me Out of Here!” and “The X Factor.”Flack's career blossomed further after she won the BBC show “Strictly Come Dancing” in 2014, the British version of “Dancing With The Stars.” While hosting “Love Island,” Flack made her West End stage debut in 2018, playing Roxie Hart in the musical “Chicago.”Her death led to a flood of tributes from fellow TV hosts and criticism of her treatment by the media. The Sun tabloid, for example, removed negative online articles about her soon after her death was announced.Talent agent Jonathan Shalit told BBC radio that Flack received "more negative press than a terrorist or a paedophile" over the trial."These people might be famous, but they're still vulnerable individuals," Shalit said.By Sunday evening, an online petition calling for a government inquiry into "the practices and policies of mainstream media organisations and social media platforms in their efforts to protect members of the public from harm" had garnered more than 191,000 signatures.The Crown Prosecution Service has also come under criticism for pushing ahead with the trial in the face of Burton's opposition, particularly from Flack's management's company.“The CPS should look at themselves today and how they pursued a show trial that was not only without merit but not in the public interest,” said Francis Ridley of Money Talent Management. “And ultimately resulted in significant distress to Caroline.”___Jill Lawless contributed.Pan Pylas, The Associated Press

  • 'Unfathomable': Search to continue Monday for body of 9-year-old boy in Lake Erie
    News
    CBC

    'Unfathomable': Search to continue Monday for body of 9-year-old boy in Lake Erie

    Locals watched the icy water with helplessness, as a recovery search continued Sunday for the nine-year-old boy who fell into Lake Erie on Saturday afternoon."It's just so insanely tragic. And on a Family Day weekend of all the times," said Denice McKenzie, who lives in the small, close-knit community of Peacock Point, Ont. The town is about 60 km south of Hamilton.A search helicopter circled the water, while private citizens operated a drone hoping to spot the little boy. Underwater search crews were at the scene, but ice conditions were too dangerous to go into the lake, Leclair said. Boy's sister ran for helpPolice say the boy was on the ice Saturday afternoon with his eight-year-old friend and 10-year-old sister.A wave swept the two boys into the water and the girl ran looking for help, said Const. Rodney Leclair, media relations officer with the Ontario Provincial Police.The girl was able to flag down a car, he said, and two adults pulled the 8-year-old out of the water.The adults could not rescue the nine-year-old, however. The ensuing search was deemed a recovery mission around 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The eight-year-old boy is home from hospital unharmed, Leclair said. Police say the other child is presumed to have drowned.'A happy, happy little boy'"He was just a happy, happy little boy," said Debbie Vallee, treasurer for the Peacock Point Cottage Owners' Association.She spoke inside the community hall by the lakeshore, where local residents delivered food and coffee throughout the day for people helping.Vallee said her four-year-old granddaughter went to school with the missing boy, riding the bus with him and his sister.Police and the family have not yet released the child's identity.Vallee described the child as "very, very friendly" and "open to people." He was "inseparable" from his sister, she added.He was a "typical little boy," said Vallee. "He'd be the boy on the bus that would sit behind a girl and pull her ponytail."A thick ice shelf covered the lake on Sunday afternoon, and a boat arrived to do a sonar search.People have been scouring the shoreline and the U.S. Coast Guard helicopter joined the efforts on Saturday, Leclair said.Neighbours tried to help, some describing a sense of helplessness. Leclair said the family is "devastated, obviously.""I can't even imagine what they're going through at this time," he said.Residents say there aren't many children in the community, with many people coming to Peacock Point just for the summer.McKenzie said this will be tough for kids in the town, calling the situation "unfathomable."The search was set to continue until nightfall Sunday, likely picking up again the next day.Leclair stressed the importance of staying off the ice - you can never tell how thick it really is.

  • Chinese support measures buoy world stocks
    News
    Reuters

    Chinese support measures buoy world stocks

    Global shares were buoyant on Monday as the promise of further policy stimulus from China to counteract the economic hit from a coronavirus outbreak calmed nervous investors. In Asia, MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan advanced 0.14% to near last week's peak of 558.30, its highest since late January. The gains were led by China, whose blue-chip index climbed 2.25% after the country's central bank lowered a key interest rate and injected more liquidity into the system.

  • Glamour, glitz at London Fashion Week despite stormy weather
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Glamour, glitz at London Fashion Week despite stormy weather

    LONDON — Gale force winds and a deluge of rain may be causing havoc to much of Britain, but for the fashion crowd the show must go on.Storm Dennis didn't stop models, celebrities and fashion insiders from donning their finest to attend London Fashion Week on Sunday, which showcased new season styles from designers including Victoria Beckham, Roland Mouret, Roksanda and Emilia Wickstead. American streetwear designer Tommy Hilfiger also made a guest appearance, showing neon yellow tracksuits and luxury sportswear in a collaboration collection with Formula One racing driver Lewis Hamilton.Cameras flashed as the Beckham family turned out in style to support Spice Girl-turned-designer Victoria Beckham, who staged her catwalk show at central London's grand Banqueting Hall. Her sons Romeo and Cruz shared the front row with father and former soccer star David Beckham, while 8-year-old Harper got a comfy seat in her father's lap.On the catwalk, models wore checked shirts, smart tailored coats, culottes and velvet blazers, all paired with skin-tight, thigh-high leather boots in shades from blue to bright red. Beckham said "we're using the boot to throw things off in a little bit of a strange way."Elsewhere, French designer Roland Mouret turned to 1980s London under Margaret Thatcher for inspiration. There were double-breasted blazers, exaggerated shoulders and androgynous suits; a sugary pink boxy blazer, worn with matching culottes, stood out in a mostly austere palette of greys, khakis and monochrome.The fashion industry has come under increasing scrutiny from green groups, and Mouret — who counts Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, among his celebrity fans — was keen to respond to calls for more transparent and environmentally-friendly practices. Sustainable fashion "is at the heart of my collection in a time where the process of creating clothes carries with it a personal responsibility," he said, and emphasized that he aimed for the brand to be carbon neutral within the year.Sylvia Hui, The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    TMR residents vote in favour of new $48.7M sports complex in referendum

    Town of Mount Royal residents voted in favour of a proposed $48.7-million sports and community complex in a referendum, Sunday evening.Touted as TMR's first municipal building to be constructed in a half century, the plan calls for three pools, a water slide, a double gymnasium, dance and art studios, an indoor track and even a weight room.39 per cent of eligible voters took part in the referendum Sunday, with 57.5 per cent voting in favour of the complex and 41.9 per cent voting against it. In November, 938 residents of the upscale Montreal suburb forced a referendum on the plan by signing a registry that required 931 signatures.Opponents of the project raised concerns that the complex was larger than necessary for the community's population of 21,000.The plan will also take over a local green space and result in higher property taxes for homeowners.Before polling closed Sunday evening, residents offered their thoughts on the plan.Dan Munteanu, who voted in favour, said that with a baby on the way, his family will make use of the new facility regularly."I think its important for the town to have an updated facility — something we can be proud of," he said.But Nora Taji, who voted against, said she's worried about the cost of the project ballooning."The burden is going to be on the citizens and we already pay pretty high taxes."Mayor Philippe Roy has been pushing for the plan since the beginning, saying that the current recreation centre and pool are in poor condition and not adapted for people with reduced mobility.The referendum question focused specifically on a bylaw that would see the town borrow $27.8 million for the construction of the complex.With surpluses allocated and a provincial subsidy secured, the requested financing came down to $20.3 million, the town said.TMR predicts the building's annual operating cost would be about $1.7 million.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Hawaii police say thieves took $1K worth of pungent fruit

    HONOLULU — Police in Hawaii are investigating the theft of fruit valued at about $1,000 including durian, which is known for its powerful odor.Two men entered a property in Hilo on the Big Island and removed 18 durian and other types of fruit on the night of Feb. 1, the Hawaii Police Department said.Authorities released a surveillance camera image of two suspects and asked the public for additional information that could lead to the capture of the fruit bandits.The tropical, spiky durian fruit resembles a small porcupine and typically weighs from 2 to 7 pounds (1 to 3 kilograms).Durian is known for a pale yellow flesh with a sweet taste but a smell that has been compared to mouldy cheese, rotten onions, dead fish and far worse.Durian is popular across Southeast Asia but also is commonly banned from hotel rooms and public transportation there.The smell of rotting durian in a cupboard was mistaken for a gas leak and prompted an evacuation of a library at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia in April 2018.The Associated Press

  • 'Keep talking, that is the way forward': Heritage Day commemorates Africville
    News
    CBC

    'Keep talking, that is the way forward': Heritage Day commemorates Africville

    For Juanita Peters, the Africville story needs to be told and retold.Nova Scotia's 2020 Heritage Day honours Africville, the African-Nova Scotian community expropriated and demolished by the city of Halifax in the 1960s, forcing hundreds from their homes.It wasn't until decades later, in 2010, the municipality formally apologized to the African-Nova Scotian families that lost their homes and their community."It's about the history of us as a people, African-Nova Scotians," Peters, executive director of the Africville Museum, told CBC Nova Scotia's Mainstreet."It's Canadian history, and it's not that historical. It wasn't that long ago that this tragic event happened."Peters said she was "thrilled" to find out Heritage Day is honouring Africville this year."There's so much to tell, there's such a big story. There's so much history, and so much in the future that we want to explore," she said.'Celebrating community'People will gather at the site of the former settlement for a day of dedications and celebration, including sledding through Africville, serving hot chocolate and sandwiches, and a special announcement at 11 a.m.The events will continue at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport, where another ceremony will be held at an Africville display set up in the terminal about a year ago. "It's just about celebrating community, celebrating the different peoples of Halifax," she said.Though this year's Heritage Day remembers a dark part of Nova Scotia's history, Peters said it's "extremely important" for the story Africville to be shared."We have to first acknowledge what has happened and talk about what could make it right today … as long as you keep talking, that is the way forward," Peters said.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Two fathers demand action against Japan over parental child abduction
    News
    Reuters

    Two fathers demand action against Japan over parental child abduction

    Two European fathers who live in Japan will urge EU lawmakers this week to increase pressure on Tokyo to tackle parental child abduction by changing a law that does not recognize joint child custody following divorce. Frenchman Vincent Fichot and Italian Tommaso Perina will present a petition to the bloc's legislative assembly in Brussels on Wednesday to demand action against cases of so-called parental child abduction affecting Europeans living in Japan. The two men -- who both became estranged from their children after their Japanese wives took them without consent -- say Japan should be sanctioned for breaching its human rights obligation under the EU-Japan Strategic Partnership Agreement.

  • Malaysia to choose 5G partners based on own security standards
    News
    Reuters

    Malaysia to choose 5G partners based on own security standards

    Malaysia's own security standards will dictate which companies take part in its planned 5G rollout this year, its communications minister told Reuters on Monday, as the United States pushes countries to exclude China's Huawei [HWT.UL]. Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker, has been at the center of a U.S.-led campaign to clamp down on the use of Chinese technology in the development of the next-generation telecommunications platform because of concerns the equipment could be used by Beijing for spying. The United States placed Huawei on a trade blacklist in May, and in February U.S. prosecutors accused it of stealing trade secrets and helping Iran to track protesters.

  • Railway blockade remains after protesters meet with Indigenous Services Minister
    Global News

    Railway blockade remains after protesters meet with Indigenous Services Minister

    One day after Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller met with Mohawk First Nation members over a railway blockade that had crippled train transportation in the region — demonstrators continued to protest in the area. Kamil Karamali reports.

  • Exo's Candiac line trains disrupted again as protest drags into 2nd week
    News
    CBC

    Exo's Candiac line trains disrupted again as protest drags into 2nd week

    Commuter trains along Exo's Candiac line on Montreal's South Shore continue to be disrupted Monday due to the presence of protestors close to the Canadian Pacific (CP) tracks.Mohawks from Kahnawake have been blocking the tracks that run through their territory in a show of solidarity with protesters who are preventing access to a pipeline construction site on traditional Wet'suwet'en land in northern British Columbia.Exo put out a release Sunday saying that coach buses were being organized to get commuters from the South Shore stations to downtown Montreal.Protests sprang up across the country after the RCMP began raiding blockades set up by Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs.The police are enforcing a B.C. Supreme Court injunction to allow Coastal GasLink workers to continue construction on the pipeline.The $6-billion, 670-kilometre Coastal GasLink pipeline is a key component of a $40-billion project announced by the federal and provincial governments last fall.'Modest progress' madeAnother blockade in Tyendinaga Mohawk territory near Belleville, Ont., has stopped Via Rail service between Montreal and Toronto.Over the weekend, Federal Minister of Indigenous Services and Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs MP Marc Miller met with Tyendinaga protesters.He said "modest progress" had been made in talks to end the blockade.Late Sunday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau cancelled a planned trip to Barbados in order to meet with an Incident Response Group on Monday.

  • 2nd story of babies switched at birth — same year, same Come By Chance hospital
    News
    CBC

    2nd story of babies switched at birth — same year, same Come By Chance hospital

    A Newfoundland couple has come forward with a second story about babies switched at birth at the Come By Chance hospital in the early 1960s.Their story has a happier ending than the case of Clarence Hynes and Craig Avery, but both cases raise questions about how hospitals identify babies to ensure they go home with their birth parents.The nose didn't look rightFifty-eight years ago, Muriel Stringer was a 19-year-old coming home in a taxi with a newborn baby, her husband and her mother.Three days earlier, on Aug. 8, 1962, Stringer had given birth to a baby boy, named Kent.It was a long taxi ride, about 40 kilometres on dirt roads, from the Walwyn Cottage Hospital in Come By Chance to Hodge's Cove, on the east coast of Trinity Bay.They took a break partway home at a restaurant in Goobies. Muriel Stringer and her mom stayed in the car while her husband, Cecil, went inside. My baby had dark hair … and a nose like me. The nose didn't look right to me. \- Muriel Stringer"Me and Mom were there talking and looking at the baby and I said, 'Mom, he don't look like my baby,'" Stringer told CBC News."My baby had dark hair, a lot of dark hair, and a nose like me. The nose didn't look right to me. And my mother said, 'Oh, that's probably because of the bonnet and the clothes on him.' So anyway, we come on home."The arm bandStringer said her mother, Lilian Peddle, changed her mind when they undressed the baby."When she took the sweater off, she said, 'Oh my, it's not your baby.' There was a band on his arm and it was written, 'Baby Boy Adams.' He was only a day old, this baby. Mine was three days old," said Stringer.They didn't have a phone so Cecil Stringer went to the Hodge's Cove Post Office."I phoned the hospital and the nurse answered. I told her what happened and first thing she said was, 'How come you didn't know your own baby?'" said Stringer. "But she checked and told me baby Stringer was there."He called another taxi and left with Muriel's mother to bring the baby back to Come By Chance and pick up Kent."It was embarrassing," he said.For Muriel Stringer it was the beginning of a long, anxious wait."Oh, I was frightened to death. I was thinking, 'What if he didn't have his band on his arm?' It scared me," she said.Cecil Stringer doesn't remember exactly what happened when he got to the hospital, but Muriel Stringer says at the time he told her the other baby's mother was on the steps of the hospital waiting when he got there."This lady had only had her baby that day. So she was frightened to death. You know, anything could have happened to a newborn baby."Wrong cribAt the hospital, a nurse said someone at the hospital had put the baby in the wrong crib, and when the Stringers were leaving, the nurse had just looked at the name on the crib."That was their explanation," said Cecil Stringer. "I don't know for sure if that's what happened."Cecil and Muriel's mother collected Kent and headed home."Oh my, oh my, I was happy. Such a sweet boy. He still is," said Muriel.The couple say they weren't angry about the switch — they say they were treated well at the Walwyn Hospital — but were grateful they got their baby back the same day.The Stringers had five more children. One was born at home when a powerful winter storm closed the road out of Hodge's Cove. Four others were born, like Kent, in Come By Chance.Not the only babies switched at Come By ChanceWhat's striking about the Stringer's story is that it's not unique.The Stringer case happened in August, just months before Craig Avery and Clarence Hynes, born in the same hospital, were switched and sent home with the wrong families in December 1962.And while the Stringers' switch was rectified quickly and happily, the story of Avery and Hynes is still playing out. They didn't learn about their mix-up until it was confirmed by DNA tests last year, and there has been no happy ending for them. How many times did this sort of thing happen? \- Craig AveryThey never met their birth parents, who died years ago. The two men, now in their mid-50s, say they're still struggling with the fallout of everything they thought they knew about their families being turned upside down.Last year, Hynes and Avery launched lawsuits claiming negligence and suing Eastern Health for damages.Avery says the Stringers' story leaves him with more questions."How many times did this sort of thing happen?" he asked.Who's responsible?In a statement of defence filed Feb. 11, Eastern Health says it's not responsible for what happened at the Come By Chance Cottage Hospital more than half a century ago."Neither Eastern Health nor any authority it replaced … ever assumed or was ever vested with the assets, liabilities rights or obligations of the Come By Chance cottage hospital," says the statement.The health authority has asked for the action to be dismissed, with costs.As for the Stringers, the health authority sent CBC News the following statement:"Eastern Health has not been advised of another situation whereby a family went home from a cottage hospital with the wrong baby."Modern patient identificationThe Walwyn Cottage Hospital in Come By Chance closed in 1986. Babies are now born at facilities operated by the province's four regional health authorities. Eastern Health says it takes many steps to make sure babies go home with their birth families."Eastern Health has a number of stringent measures in place to ensure positive patient identification, including newborn babies," it told CBC in its statement.Among those measures, according to the statement: * The infant is kept in the same room with the mother during the hospital stay and limits the number of times an infant is away from its mother. * When a mother and her infant must be separated — such as during a test or other procedure where the parent is not able to accompany the child — identification bands are checked when the infant is returned to the mother. * Upon discharge, all identification bracelets are again verified by a nurse, and the mother signs documentation to confirm the bracelet information is correct and the infant is her own.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador