• 'Havoc and chaos:' Alberta separatist group gains support as Liberals re-elected
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Havoc and chaos:' Alberta separatist group gains support as Liberals re-elected

    CALGARY — There's been a surge of support for an Alberta separatist group since the Liberals secured a minority government Monday night, and while political scientists say a split from Canada may not be a real possibility, the anger underlying the movement is serious."The idea of Canada has died in the hearts of many, many western Canadians," said "Wexit" Alberta founder Peter Downing, a former soldier and RCMP officer.The Liberals managed to hang onto seats in Atlantic Canada, Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia, but Alberta and Saskatchewan ended up Conservative blue except for one NDP riding in Edmonton.The VoteWexit Facebook page with its motto "The West Wants Out" went from 2,000 or so members on Monday to nearly 160,000 and counting by Tuesday afternoon. Downing said his group received more than $20,000 in donations and membership fees overnight.A separate online petition calling for a western alliance and for Alberta to separate was backed by more than 40,000 people.Downing got the idea for "Wexit" — an apparent play on Brexit in the United Kingdom — late last year when he heard United Conservative Leader Jason Kenney warn of rising separatist sentiment if the Liberal government didn't back off from policies he said were hostile to the energy sector. Those include the overhaul of environmental reviews and an oil tanker ban off B.C.'s north coast."Justin Trudeau is obviously the fuel for it, but Jason Kenney was the spark," said Downing.He said his group is pushing for Kenney, who describes himself as a staunch federalist, to call a referendum on whether Alberta should separate. If successful, that would result in the province replacing the RCMP with its own police force and having control over immigration, taxation, firearms and pensions, Downing said.The idea is getting interest from people in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and parts of British Columbia, too, he added.In the meantime, Downing wants to get "Wexit" representatives elected to Parliament."We're going to push into Canada and cause havoc and chaos until the grounds are right and the conditions are set to have that referendum on separation and become an independent nation."Grant Fagerheim, CEO of oil company Whitecap Resources Inc., said Alberta and Saskatchewan's contributions to the Canadian economy have not been respected and he's not surprised there has been talk of the region splitting off."I don't believe at this particular time, whether you live in Saskatchewan or Alberta, that people would say they're Canadian first."Whether that amounts to anything is another matter.David Taras, a political scientist at Calgary's Mount Royal University, said he doubts people in Alberta would back separation if they understood the practicalities. Would they need a visa to take a ski trip or wine tour in B.C., for instance?"The vast majority of Albertans love being in Canada and have a deep emotional attachment to Canada, so I don't think that will be severed easily," he said. "But the anger and frustration is real."Taras said he'll be curious whether Kenney chooses an "endless war" with Trudeau over energy policy, or decides on a more conciliatory tack.Ted Morton, a former Alberta Progressive Conservative cabinet minister, said the angst may not lead to separation, but it could propel Kenney's efforts to exert pressure on Ottawa.The premier has already said Alberta will hold a referendum on equalization — a federal program meant to even out fiscal disparities between "have" and "have not" provinces — along with municipal elections next October if there's no substantive progress on building a market-opening pipeline.Morton, now an executive fellow at the University of Calgary's School of Public Policy, has said he's heard calls to do it sooner.He suggested increasing "Wexit" talk is a barometer of the anger and fear western Canadians feel. People in the energy sector are losing their jobs and, in many cases, that leads to domestic strife and addiction, he said."Pipelines aren't just an infrastructure and finance issue in Alberta and Saskatchewan," Morton said. "They're a people issue."This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 22, 2019.Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press

  • In election's wake, Trans Mountain still looms large in B.C. and beyond
    News
    CBC

    In election's wake, Trans Mountain still looms large in B.C. and beyond

    Minutes after his re-election was announced to a jubilant crowd of supporters at Joey's Restaurant in Burnaby Monday night, Terry Beech told reporters he gave more than 40 interviews during the 2019 election.Every one of those interviews, the returning Liberal MP for Burnaby North-Seymour said, meant answering questions about the Trans Mountain pipeline.The trend continued in the first scrum after his victory speech as reporters pressed him on the project, which Beech acknowledged is "a big issue" in the riding."So is affordability, so is fighting climate change, so is growing the economy," he said.Throughout the campaign Beech had the delicate job of defending the Trans Mountain pipeline, which the Liberal government purchased in 2018 — even though the MP was personally opposed to the $4.5-billion expansion project.He voted against the project in the House of Commons and he noted Monday night that some members of his campaign team were also opposed to the project.Representing his constituents has been a balancing act for Beech, according to Simon Fraser University professor Stewart Prest, and will likely continue to be.Prest said the project is a major concern in the riding where the diluted bitumen pipeline will terminate at a tank facility on Burrard Inlet."It's clearly a place where… It's not an abstract concept about the economy," Prest said. "It's actually in people's backyards, just about."Prest said it's hard to imagine the Liberal Party walking away from the pipeline.The Liberals won a minority government Monday night, but will need help from other parties to pass legislation — likely, Prest said, from the New Democrats who are opposed to Trans Mountain.Voters dividedThe pipeline, Prest said, could become a point of tension in the next Parliament.He says the NDP must decide how much importance it wants to put on the project. Will it become a line in the sand? Or something they can compromise on?Stewart Prest discusses the nuanced feelings many Canadians have on energy and the environment:On Tuesday, the day after the votes were counted, the leader of the federal NDP Jagmeet Singh re-stated his opposition to it."I have been opposed to Trans Mountain. I will continue to be opposed to it, and I want real action on fighting the climate crisis," Singh said.Singh's fellow New Democrat and B.C. environment minister George Heyman took a similar tack."We intend to continue to do everything we can to ensure that within the law, within our jurisdiction, we protect B.C.'s interests in the environment and the economy," Heyman said at the B.C. Legislature.For some voters in the Burnaby Mountain area, the pipeline remains divisive."We've had issues with the pipeline once before, couple of years ago," said Brian Cowie, 67. "It's been in my mind for years. Especially when I voted.""I don't think it's a good thing," Vita Laurino, 64, said "I see it as a risk from the environment point of view."On the other hand, 64-year-old Ed Lansdowne describes himself as a pro-pipeline Conservative voter."Build the thing. Get it over with."Beech believes those divisions show a need to better communicate with voters.When asked if he had any plans to change his stance on the project, he replied, "My stance has always been to represent my constituents. I'm going to represent my constituents."

  • 10 Indigenous candidates elected to the House of Commons
    News
    CBC

    10 Indigenous candidates elected to the House of Commons

    Ten Indigenous candidates were elected to the House of Commons Monday, one fewer than the 2015 election where a record 11 Indigenous MPs were elected.But Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde said they will add strong voices to Parliament."We have to get our people in all parties," he told CBC News."We have to get them into the House of Commons, get them around cabinet, get them onto the Supreme Court of Canada, get them onto boards of directors, boards of governors, We have to do that in order to bring about policy and legislative change."Bellegarde said while he feels the current Liberal government has done much for First Nations, there's still a lot of work to be done."Progress doesn't mean parity," he said."We have to keep investing in education, housing, and water, infrastructure and find ways to move beyond the Indian Act, find ways to implement the UN Declaration. When the gap closes between the quality of life of First Nations people and everybody else, it's not only good for our people, it's good for Canada."Four First Nations, four Métis and two Inuit candidates were elected.Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the national Inuit advocacy organization, said in a statement issued Tuesday that it looks forward to continuing to work with the Liberal government to advance Inuit-Crown priorities through the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee."The Liberal government has taken positive steps to reduce social and economic inequities among Inuit. However significant work remains in transforming the spirit of reconciliation into sustained and transformative policy actions that help close the longstanding service and policy gaps that negatively and disproportionately impact Inuit," said the statement."To advance this goal, ITK looks forward to working in partnership with the federal government on implementing the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework."The Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) also congratulated the Liberal Party on its win. "We look forward to working side by side, once again, with the Liberals in advancing the interests of the Métis Nation," said MMF President David Chartrand in a statement."The federal Liberal government has demonstrated that nurturing a distinctions-based, nation-to-nation, government-to-government relationship is the road to success," 2 new NDP MPsThe full adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is something NDP candidate Leah Gazan said she will push for following her win in Winnipeg Centre. She said having the declaration legislated will address inequalities Indigenous peoples face when it comes to housing, clean drinking water, and child welfare."I'm going to push hard in government to have these human rights recognized," said Gazan, who is from the Wood Mountain Lakota Nation."The current government is in its eighth non-compliance order to stop racially discriminating against First Nations kids on-reserve. They continue to fail to honour the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling. This is appalling."Liberal incumbent Robert-Falcon Ouellette lost his seat by 1,687 votes to Gazan. The New Democrats had the most Indigenous candidates running in this election, but only Gazan and Mumilaaq Qaqqaq in Nunavut won seats.Qaqqaq took 41.2 per cent of the vote in Nunavut, defeating former Conservative MP Leona Aglukkaq and Liberal candidate Megan Pizzo Lyall. The 25-year-old Inuk said in a video posted to Facebook that she's excited to head to Ottawa."I have no words," she said. "I look forward to the next four years, The federal government needs to step up and needs to start doing things that they should have been doing here for the last few decades."Incumbent NDP MP Georgina Jolibois, who is Dene, lost her seat in Desnethé-Missinippi-Churchill River in Saskatchewan to Conservative Gary Vidal, and incumbent NDP MP Romeo Saganash, who is Cree, did not seek re-election in Abitibi-Baie-James--Nunavik-Eeyou. Liberal incumbents re-electedThe majority of Indigenous candidates elected Monday were Liberal incumbents. Vance Badawey (Métis) in Niagara Centre, Yvonne Jones (Inuk) in Labrador, Michael McLeod (Métis) in Northwest Territories, Dan Vandal (Métis) in Saint Boniface-Saint Vital, and Marc Serré in Nickel Belt were all re-elected. Serré, who received 39 per cent of votes in his Ontario riding, was co-chair of the Liberal Indigenous caucus with Falcon-Ouellette and is a member of the Mattawa/North Bay Algonquin First Nation. Earlier this month, Halifax academic Darryl Leroux. questioned Serre's Indigenous identity.Liberal candidate Jaime Battiste won a tight race in the Sydney-Victoria riding in Nova Scotia. Battiste, who is a member of the Eskasoni First Nation, is the first-ever Mi'kmaw MP.Conservative candidatesMarc Dalton, who is Métis, was the sole Indigenous candidate for the Conservatives to win his seat. He received 36.3 per cent of the votes against the Liberal incumbent in Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge, B.C.Independent candidatesFormer Liberal justice minister and Attorney General of Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould ran as an Independent and kept her seat in Vancouver-Granville. None of the Indigenous candidates for the Green Party were elected.

  • Raptors raise championship banner to rafters in scintillating pre-game ceremony
    News
    CBC

    Raptors raise championship banner to rafters in scintillating pre-game ceremony

    Nobody was going to miss this.The normally late-arriving Toronto crowd rushed to their seats. Nearly 40 minutes before the Toronto Raptors opening night tip-off, every seat was taken. A capacity crowd, the 238rd consecutive sellout at Scotiabank Arena, stood and roared.Fans didn't stop cheering.The Raptors players, coaches and support staff made their way to the court. Fans continued to go crazy. The cheers were spine-tingling, ear-splitting and filled with emotion.WATCH | Lowry unveils Raptors' 2019 championship banner:The arena lights were shut off. When they came back on the Larry O'Brien Trophy sat at centre court, spotlights blasting down on the NBA championship trophy.A video highlighting pivotal moments during the Raptors historic playoff run played, with the loudest cheers coming for Kawhi Leonard's gravity-defying, bounce-around-the-rim Game 7 buzzer-beating, series-clinching shot against Philadelphia.Fans just kept clapping and yelling, almost in disbelief that their beloved Raptors are the NBA champions — the feeling so new and foreign.Commissioner Adam Silver then made his way onto the court."Finally, basketball," he said over the loudspeakers. "To the fans in Toronto and Canada, over 50 per cent of this country watched the Finals. Nothing brings people together like sports. Let's give out the rings."Raptors receive rings in styleOne by one, the Raptors ownership group, coaching staff and supporting staff were presented their championship rings. Raptors president Masai Ujiri was introduced, throwing his hands in the air as he walked onto the court to get it, fans screaming 'MVP, MVP,' as he put his ring on.They roared again for Raptors head coach Nick Nurse, who guided the team to victory in his first season at the helm. Then the players got their chance to try on their championship bling.WATCH | The National's of the Raptors' pre-game celebrations:Norman Powell danced before he got his. Fred VanVleet put his fist in the air as he walked to centre court to get his ring. Pascal Siakam pointed to the sky before putting on his ring.The longest-serving Raptor Kyle Lowry drew the biggest cheer, as he carefully looked over the ring before putting it on his finger. He never stopped smiling as the fans roared and Lowry showed off his prize to the crowd."Such a special night," Lowry said, addressing the fans. "On behalf of my teammates and the organization we want to thank you fans and the great city of Toronto. We wouldn't be able to do this without you."Then it was time to reveal the NBA championship banner."We got that special thing right there we're about to unveil," Lowry said. He huddled his teammates around him and asked the fans to countdown from five.Fireworks blasted, We Are the Champions played, and the massive new 2019 World Champion banner, with all the Raptors names etched in the red trimming, was lit up.A shimmering gold Larry O'Brien trophy sits in the middle of it, the championship banner is now hanging from the Scotiabank Arena rafters — Maple Leafs greats Frank Mahovlich and Wendel Clark banners on one side, Stanley Cup banners on the other.It was an exquisite affair fit for first-time champions that lasted nearly 30 minutes.After the thrilling opening night 130-122 overtime victory, Lowry talked about his moment on centre court."It just meant the world to me to be able to address the crowd and speak for everyone that has put the time, blood, sweat and tears into this organization," he said. "It meant everything. From the first day I got here the fans welcomed me."Lowry played an integral role in designing the championship rings and said he had no doubts his teammates would appreciate what he came up with."I wanted them to represent the journey that it took to get here because last year took a journey," Lowry said."It wasn't one game or two games. It was a long journey from the start of training camp to June 13th. You have to represent that journey because that's what you'll remember. The journey."Jurassic Park partyMore than three hours before tip-off, fans poured into Jurassic Park like they have so many times before to support the Raptors. They danced and cheered and re-lived the championship run all over again.Toronto Mayor John Tory arrived to greet the fans. So too did the most recognizable Raptors fan — Super Fan Nav Bhatia entered Jurassic Park and couldn't take two steps without being stopped for a selfie.He's a rock star wherever he goes now, known for having never missed a game.WATCH | Raptors enter season as defending champs:"This is a huge night for all of us. It's a historic night. I'm feeling amazing," Bhatia said, smiling."This is the day we've been waiting for. There was always hope that this would happen. We've always wanted this. And finally, we've done it."A new chapter of Raptors basketball is now underway, and it couldn't be more different from the humble beginnings. When it all started 25 years ago in November 1995, the Raps took to the court inside a cavernous Sky Dome just hoping to be competitive. They weren't. And haven't been until recently.That's what makes Tuesday night's championship celebration so much sweeter. Because for so much of this franchise's existence being the best seemed so far away.Now it's here. The Raptors are starting a season as defending NBA champions.

  • RCMP won't proceed with new conduct charges after officer cleared of old ones
    News
    CBC

    RCMP won't proceed with new conduct charges after officer cleared of old ones

    Inspector Suki Manj  says he is happy the RCMP has decided not to proceed with a new code of conduct hearing against him after he was was cleared earlier this month of several charges of abuse of authority related to his time as head of the detachment in Lloydminster, Alta., in 2016. The RCMP initially proceeded on four of 14 allegations against Manj and had threatened to reinstate some of the others after he was cleared.Tuesday, he was told the force would not be proceeding with them, ending what he calls the "nightmare" his family has faced for four years."I'm happy that I don't have to go through another hearing to prove that I didn't do anything wrong and I'm happy that somebody has taken the time to read the material and think that through," he told the CBC in a telephone interview.Manj had been accused of mishandling a romantic relationship between a civilian office manager and an RCMP doghandler under his command. In a strongly worded oral decision at the end of Manj's five-day tribunal hearing in early October, Gerry Annetts, who presided over it, said the evidence from Manj's bosses, Chief Supt. Shahin Mehdizadeh and Chief Supt. Wendell Reimer ,was "unreliable."Annetts also ruled that evidence from the RCMP's witness, Staff Sgt. Sarah Knelsen, were "some of the most biased, leading, unreliable statements I have ever seen," according to notes provided by Manj's lawyer from the oral decision.A written decision had not yet been issued.Annetts also apparently wished Manj a better experience with the RCMP than he has experienced over the past few years.Manj says he hopes some good will come out of the ordeal his family has gone through after he and his wife, Cpl Tammy Hollingsworth, were transferred back to B.C., were both handed several allegations of misconduct and suspended with pay in 2017."I feel that I have a purpose now and that purpose is to make sure the organization improves its processes around conduct. And I think I want to be a part of that. I never wanted to be off. I am happy that I'll have an opportunity to prove myself again," he said. Hollingsworth was also completely cleared in her misconduct hearing earlier this year.She has returned to work and filed a civil claim against the RCMP over her treatment. Manj is still off but says he hopes to return to the successful career he loved and had aspired to since he was a boy.

  • News
    CBC

    Former violin teacher abandons Supreme Court appeal of sexual assault conviction

    A violin teacher convicted of dozens of sex assault-related charges has abandoned his appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, CBC News has learned.Trachy's lawyer, Matthew Gourlay, confirmed Tuesday his client has chosen not to pursue the appeal, but would not say why. The 73 year-old repeatedly asked his young, female students to take off their tops in order to measure them for shoulder rests between the 1970s and 1990s.Multiple students testified Trachy had touched their breasts, had them remove their blouses and bras and play with their breasts exposed. In some instances, the former students testified plastic moulds had been taken of their breasts, though he did not do this with his male students.In late July, the Ontario Court of Appeal reversed a decision made by a court in Chatham, Ont. to acquit Trachy of 51 charges of sexual assault, sexual interference, sexual exploitation and indecent assault. The trial judge had acquitted Trachy because he believed there was no sexual intent. In July, the Court of Appeal said that judge erred as sexual intent was not a factor and convicted the former teacher. In August. Trachy appealed the conviction. A sentencing date has not yet been chosen.

  • News
    CBC

    Higgs may create his own carbon tax in wake of federal Liberal win

    New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs says Monday's federal election result means he'll look at how to comply with the Trudeau government's federal climate plan, including the requirement for a carbon tax for consumers.Higgs signalled Tuesday morning that the Liberal victory, including a decisive win in the popular vote in New Brunswick, may be a turning point in the carbon-tax debate in this province."People voted for it, so we have to find a way in New Brunswick to make it work," he said.That includes exploring a made-in-New Brunswick plan that would meet Ottawa's requirements for an escalating price on fossil fuels from now until 2022."I will," Higgs said. "I can't ignore the obvious here. The country has spoken."Federal Liberal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna quickly thanked Higgs for his comments in a tweet."Looking forward to continuing to work with you and the people of New Brunswick on climate action," she wrote. New Brunswick is one of four provinces that refused to come up with its own tax. In April, the Trudeau government imposed a federal carbon tax, known as the backstop, on those provinces.Alberta has repealed its carbon tax and the federal backstop will kick in there Jan. 1.The tax is 4.4 cents per litre this year and will rise to 11 cents per litre, the equivalent of $50 per tonne of greenhouse gases, in 2022.Higgs said that some New Brunswickers may not have been aware of estimates that even higher carbon-tax rates will be needed in the future to meet Canada's targets under the Paris climate agreement.37.6% of N.B. voters supported LiberalsBut even so, he said he has to acknowledge the election result.In Monday's election, 37.6 per cent of New Brunswick voters supported the federal Liberals. The NDP and the Greens, which also support carbon pricing, drew 9.4 and 17 per cent support, respectively. The Conservatives had 32.8 per cent of the vote in the province.Six Liberal MPs were re-elected compared to three Conservatives. The province's first-ever Green MP was elected in Fredericton."People have voted for a carbon tax," Higgs said. "Even in New Brunswick, although we now have representatives from the Conservative side that will go to Ottawa, still there was a strong showing from Liberals and Greens."Previous approach rejectedNew Brunswick's previous Liberal government attempted to meet the federal standard by creating a carbon tax at gas pumps. But it also lowered the existing provincial gas tax by the same rate, meaning consumers did not see a net increase at the pumps.Ottawa rejected that approach, and after he took power last fall, Higgs refused to come up with a replacement system for consumers. His government has proposed an emissions levy on large industry that the federal government has yet to approve or reject.Higgs decided not to challenge the constitutionality of the federal backstop on consumers in court, though the province intervened in reference cases filed by Ontario and Saskatchewan.Those two provinces lost when their top courts ruled the Trudeau plan is constitutional.Will talk to Ontario, Sask. premiersHiggs said he hasn't decided whether New Brunswick will intervene in appeals by Ontario and Saskatchewan of those rulings to the Supreme Court of Canada. He plans to talk soon to the premiers of those provinces."We do have to have that discussion, because where do we go next? Because in many ways Canadians have spoken on this issue."In August, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said if the Liberals won the election, he might abandon the appeal."Once the people decide, I believe in democracy, I respect democracy, we move on," he said at the time.But on Tuesday, Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe took the opposite approach from Higgs, challenging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to bridge regional divisions by agreeing to "a new deal" with his province and Alberta, including the elimination of the carbon tax. I think even Premier Higgs is starting to realize this isn't a winning issue for him. \- Wayne Long, Saint John-Rothesay Liberal MPNewly re-elected Saint John-Rothesay Liberal MP Wayne Long said Tuesday that federal Conservatives miscalculated in trying to make the election a referendum on the carbon tax."I'm a progressive standing in an industrial riding. I wasn't shying away from the fact that we need to put a price on pollution. In fact, I openly embraced it and talk about it and said I supported it. I didn't duck it, and I think constituents in the riding responded."Long accused Higgs of dragging his feet on dealing with Ottawa's requirements because he "wanted the federal [Liberal] MPs to have to wear that and own that in this election.""Well, the election's over, there are six of us re-elected, and now it's time to put all the politics aside. Let's sit down and come up with a legitimate made-in-New Brunswick plan."He said increasingly frequent extreme weather, including flooding in his constituency this spring, had shifted the debate on the issue.And he attributed his win on Monday in part to young voters in Saint John who were angry that Conservative candidate Rodney Weston refused to attend two candidate debates devoted to climate change."I think even Premier Higgs is starting to realize this isn't a winning issue for him. It's not a winning issue for their party," Long said.

  • Greta Thunberg says she didn't know about Victoria invite, but ferry emissions not an issue
    News
    CBC

    Greta Thunberg says she didn't know about Victoria invite, but ferry emissions not an issue

    Climate change activist Greta Thunberg is disputing stories about an invitation to speak to British Columbia's provincial legislature, saying she wasn't aware of the invite and "definitely" didn't turn it down because of concern over ferry emissions.On Tuesday, B.C. Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver said he extended an invitation to visit Victoria to the 16-year-old Swede. But rumours quickly spread through Victoria's political circles that Thunberg wouldn't be coming to Victoria because there's no way to get there without burning fossil fuels either by ferry or flight.Mayor Lisa Helps said that although she hadn't heard from Thunberg directly, one of her councillors learned the news from the climate activist's team.Thunberg dismissed the rumours in a tweet on Tuesday evening, writing that she didn't know about the invitation and "have definitely not declined it because of 'emissions' from the public transport ferry."Thunberg eschewed flights to travel across the Atlantic Ocean in a zero-emission sailboat to attend the UN Climate Action Summit in September. She has travelled in an electric Tesla in her trips across North America. Earlier Tuesday, some Vancouver Islanders came up with creative solutions for bringing Thunberg to Victoria. Helps said Olympic rower Adam Kreek offered to row Thunberg to Vancouver Island and back again.While BC Ferries' long-term plan is to have the company's entire fleet powered by electricity, the fleet currently runs on diesel fuel. It announced its first wave of hybrid electric vessels in September, the first of which are expected to be in operation by 2022, with the first two expected to be in service in 2020.Climate rally planned in VancouverThunberg also confirmed Tuesday that she will be joining a climate strike outside the Vancouver Art Gallery on Friday.Sustainabiliteens, a group of teenagers that has organized previous climate strikes in Vancouver, says youth are pushing for cross-party collaboration to tackle the climate crisis from a newly elected minority federal government.

  • Man dead, 2 critically hurt in shooting on Highway 410 ramp in Mississauga
    News
    CBC

    Man dead, 2 critically hurt in shooting on Highway 410 ramp in Mississauga

    A man is dead and two people are in life-threatening condition after a shooting on Highway 410 in Mississauga on Tuesday night, paramedics say.The shooting happened on the northbound Highway 410 off-ramp to Derry Road. Emergency crews were called to the scene at about 9:48 p.m.Police said the shots were fired from inside another car at the off-ramp stoplight. Peel Regional Paramedics said all three people suffered gunshot wounds. One man without vital signs was pronounced dead at the scene.Another man and a woman were taken to a trauma centre in life-threatening condition. Anyone with information is asked to call policeSgt. Kerry Schmidt, spokesperson for the Ontario Provincial Police Highway Safety Division, said police, paramedics and firefighters rushed to the scene when they received reports of the shooting on the highway.Road closures continued Wednesday morning, with Kennedy Road to Tomken Road closed to motorists, and the northbound Highway 410 ramp to Derry Road also closed.Police urged motorists to avoid the area and asked anyone who has information to call them.No suspect information has been released.

  • Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville residents worry what planned crematoria will mean for air quality
    News
    CBC

    Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville residents worry what planned crematoria will mean for air quality

    Residents in Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville are pushing back against a planned funeral centre that would be located near a residential area.The site on Parent Street would include two crematoria, which people are concerned will impact air quality. That's why they launched a petition last week, and attended a city council meeting — an information session on the planned funeral centre — Tuesday."This is a residential neighbourhood, and it's the effects of what the crematoriums will have — we don't know the environmental impact," said Anna-Marie Blyth as she canvassed for signatures Saturday. She and other residents are worried about effects on local traffic and property values, but especially about the effect on air quality.The petition, which calls for the city to study the impacts on air quality and traffic, had garnered 250 signatures as of Tuesday evening. The planned location is already zoned for commercial use, but the project is still subject to the Site Planning and Agriculture Integration bylaw, according to the city. That means council must approve architectural landscaping plans. Council voted unanimously not to make the decision at Tuesday night's council meeting, as was originally planned, so members could hear residents' concerns and make a decision based on them. Further studies will be done and the city said it will work with a small citizens group to keep them updated of the development on the town's side.But the city's planning advisory committee reviewed the project based on the criteria for integrating the bylaw and recommended council approve it. "We do have a Tim Hortons, we do have a Petro Canada, and it's fine," said one resident who canvassed for petitions, Alissa El-Hachem. "But a crematorium feels like another story — on another level. It feels more industrial than commercial to us."

  • The Latest: Alec Baldwin campaigns for Virginia Democrats
    News
    The Canadian Press

    The Latest: Alec Baldwin campaigns for Virginia Democrats

    RICHMOND, Va. — The Latest on Alec Baldwin campaigning for Democratic candidates in Virginia (all times local):3:45 p.m.Actor Alec Baldwin has knocked on doors and cracked a few jokes in a suburban Richmond neighbourhood to try to drum up votes for Democratic legislative candidates in Virginia.Baldwin is known for his mocking impersonations of Republican President Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live."Baldwin campaigned on Tuesday with Amanda Pohl, a Democrat looking to unseat incumbent Republican state Sen. Amanda Chase.Baldwin stumped just a few doors down from Chase's home and joked about leaving a roll of quarters in her mailbox after referring to a confrontation she had with a Capitol Police officer earlier this year over a parking space.Earlier this year, Baldwin pleaded guilty to harassing a man in a dispute over a parking space.___1 a.m.Actor Alec Baldwin, known for his mocking impersonations of President Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live," is coming to Virginia to help Democratic legislative candidates.Baldwin is set to knock on doors, make calls and deliver pizza to volunteers at multiple stops around Virginia on Tuesday.The progressive advocacy group People for the American Way helped organize the trip. Baldwin is a board member of the group and has been an outspoken critic of Trump.Virginia is one of only four states holding legislative elections this year and the only one where partisan control of the legislature is up for grabs. National groups view Virginia as a warmup to the 2020 presidential cycle and are pouring money into the state.Several other celebrities have been urging Virginians to vote.The Associated Press

  • 'Baby Shark' song used to soothe toddler becomes rallying cry in Lebanon
    News
    Reuters

    'Baby Shark' song used to soothe toddler becomes rallying cry in Lebanon

    When driver Eliane Jabbour was surrounded by a rally in the capital last weekend, she asked protesters if they could stop shouting as her young son, Robin, was asleep in the front passenger seat. On the spot, Eliane relates, the crowd spontaneously broke out into a rendition of the song "Baby Shark", complete with hand gestures depicting a shark's bite, and big smiles.

  • South Korea warns of 'serious risk' from vaping, considers sales ban
    News
    Reuters

    South Korea warns of 'serious risk' from vaping, considers sales ban

    South Korea on Wednesday advised people to stop using liquid e-cigarettes due to growing health concerns and vowed to speed up an investigation into whether to ban sales, a move likely to hit major producers such as Juul and local tobacco company KT&G. While long-term health impacts from vaping remain largely unknown, e-cigarettes were viewed as a healthier alternative that could help users quit smoking when they were first launched a few years ago. "The current situation is considered as a serious risk to public health," South Korea's health minister Park Neung-hoo told a briefing, citing cases of lung injuries associated with e-cigarette use in the United States.

  • Biogen reanalyzes studies, presses ahead on Alzheimer's drug
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Biogen reanalyzes studies, presses ahead on Alzheimer's drug

    Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia.The announcement was a surprise because the drug company earlier this year stopped two studies of the drug when partial results suggested it was not likely to be successful. The company now says a new analysis of more results suggest that the drug helped reduce a decline of thinking skills at the highest dose.The drug, called aducanumab, aims to help the body clear harmful plaques from the brain. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Biogen is developing it with a Japanese company, Eisai Co. Ltd.More than 5 million people in the United States and millions more worldwide have Alzheimer's. Current drugs only temporarily ease symptoms and do not slow the loss of memory and thinking skills. Dozens of efforts to develop a drug to slow or reverse the course of the disease have failed.The two studies tested aducanumab, given as monthly infusions, in more than 3,000 patients with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia due to Alzheimer's. The company said Tuesday that in one study, those given a high dose showed 23% less decline on one measure of thinking skills and smaller declines on other measures.However, no details were given on how much that decline meant in absolute terms. For example, the company didn't say how much difference it made in practical matters, like whether patients were able to dress or feed themselves or live independently longer, just that these skills overall declined less for those on the high dose of the drug."It's a tricky question" whether the results are truly meaningful for patients until more details are known, said Dr. Ronald Petersen, a Mayo Clinic dementia specialist who has consulted for Biogen on the studies.But filing for federal Food and Drug Administration approval "gives some hopes for patients and families that there may be disease-modifying therapies out there," he said.The company said more details would be given at a conference in December, including on safety. The company said the most common side effects were inflammation in the brain, most of which did not cause symptoms or lasting problems, and headaches. The brain inflammation has been seen in other studies of Alzheimer's medicines that target the brain plaques."We're really encouraged by the information that they've provided today," the largest benefit so far for any experimental medicine, said Rebecca Edelmayer, a scientist at the Alzheimer's Association, which had no role in the studies.Biogen said it would offer aducanumab now to patients enrolled in these and earlier studies of it.Biogen shares were up more than 26% to $281.87 Tuesday, but some on Wall Street remained skeptical.Mizuho Securities USA analyst Salim Syed said he wants to know more about the FDA's involvement in Biogen's decision. He also said in a research note that it's still just a hypothesis that removing beta amyloid plaques can benefit Alzheimer's patients.The company's announcement "does not guarantee approval and questions remain," he said.___AP Health Writer Tom Murphy in Indianapolis contributed reporting.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Marilynn Marchione, The Associated Press

  • Cape Breton Conservatives out of work following failed federal bids
    News
    CBC

    Cape Breton Conservatives out of work following failed federal bids

    Two Cape Breton politicians are considering their futures after failed bids to win seats in Monday's federal election.Eddie Orrell, 54, and Alfie MacLeod, 63, both resigned their seats in the Nova Scotia Legislature in July to run federally for the Conservative Party of Canada.Orrell finished second in the riding of Sydney-Victoria, behind Liberal Jaime Battiste, a political newcomer.Orrell said he was disappointed, but proud of his campaign and his team."We couldn't have done anything different," Orrell said at his headquarters on Monday, as the last results trickled in."My volunteers are the best.... They were the ones that worked the hardest and usually that pays off. But tonight? People wanted a different result. So they got it."Orrell to return to health careOrrell said he'll return to his job as a physiotherapist with the Nova Scotia Health Authority, a position he held for 24 years before being elected to the House of Assembly in the riding of Northside-Westmount in 2011."I've still kept my licence up," said Orrell. "I'll take a week or two off, get myself settled back into a normal kind of life, be home every day at 4 p.m. and do the kind of things that normal people do."Orrell said he enjoys his work as a physiotherapist, but moved into politics because he thought he could do "more things for more people".MacLeod lost to Liberal Mike Kelloway in the riding of Cape Breton-Canso. He said he will take a few weeks before deciding what to do next.MacLeod said his wife has a to-do list for him because "there's lots of things around home that I haven't been doing in awhile".And after that, he'll start thinking of other "challenges or adventures"."I'm too young not to do something," he said.MacLeod worked at the Cape Breton Development Corporation — which owned and operated the island's underground coal mines — for 19 years before he was elected to the legislature in 1995.When he lost the 1998 provincial election, he worked for a time at Sydney Steel as a community relations manager, and in the provincial cabinet office in Sydney. He was re-elected in 2006 in the riding of Cape Breton West, which later became Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.MacLeod was seen as a strong contender for the federal seat of Cape Breton-Canso. He said he wouldn't have done anything differently in his campaign."You go out and put your best foot forward, and do what you can," said MacLeod. "At the end of the day, the people make their decision and we just move on from here."      MORE TOP STORIES

  • Henry Thomas, star of 'E.T.', arrested for DUI in Oregon
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Henry Thomas, star of 'E.T.', arrested for DUI in Oregon

    TUALATIN, Ore. — Authorities say Henry Thomas, the actor who starred as a child in "E.T. the Extra Terrestrial," has been arrested for driving under the influence in Oregon.The 48-year-old Thomas was booked into the Washington County Jail and faces the misdemeanour charge after police said they found him Monday in a stationary car.Thomas played Elliott, the young boy who befriends an alien in the classic 1982 movie. He has also appeared in "Gangs of New York" and "Legends of the Fall."An email to his representatives wasn't immediately returned Tuesday.KGW reports the Tualatin Police Department said they received a call about a car that was not moving.Police say officers arrived, found Thomas and took him into custody after a field sobriety test.The Associated Press

  • Halifax council stops short of quashing review of stadium proposal
    News
    CBC

    Halifax council stops short of quashing review of stadium proposal

    Halifax council defeated a motion Tuesday that would have ended talks for a proposed CFL stadium in Dartmouth.Council voted 9-8 against Coun. Sam Austin's motion to nix a months-long staff review of the stadium proposal from Schooners Sports and Entertainment.Austin would have needed two thirds of councillors to vote in favour of the motion for it to have passed.Schooners Sports and Entertainment's proposal, released last month, contained various ways the municipality could fund the stadium and community sports complex.That included an upfront cash payment of 15-20 per cent of the cost and annual payments of $2 million with the expectation of getting money back through ticket sales.At council on Tuesday, Austin said the city is being asked to assume risk without getting a big enough share in profits."We're going to pay to build the stadium, help with the ongoing costs, assume the risk, fix the transportation needs, but not own anything and leave the profits to Schooners," he said."This is quite the business proposal and not what I would have characterized as private sector-driven."Some of Austin's colleagues agreed, with Coun. Shawn Cleary saying he doesn't know if Halifax even needs a stadium and pointed out that CFL attendance is trending downward.He also criticized the proposal itself, saying it failed to adequately lay out the stadium's impact on the city's economy, development and climate change plans."If they wanted to come back with something different, fine, let them fill their boots," said Austin."But I can't imagine we would let staff waste their precious time when they have other things to do on something that's going to come back and we're going to vote against anyway."'What message does it send?' But other councillors said they needed to have all the information to make a decision on the stadium.Coun. Bill Karsten said that shutting down the project without allowing staff to analyze the risks would amount to "reputational harm." "If you just boil it down to the sheer aspect of future business dealings with the municipality, what message does it send to anybody that may at one point or another want to engage into a conversation?" he said."Why would you trust us to look at any other kind of proposal in the future?"He proposed that staff come back with an analysis in December, earlier than the original six-month deadline set when the proposal first came out.Coun. Lisa Blackburn agreed, saying that while she didn't like the options in the proposal on first sight, staff needed to break them down for councillors.Report coming in DecemberMayor Mike Savage said he couldn't support Austin's motion, but he thought it was reasonable to ask for a staff report in December.Councillors Austin, Cleary, Waye Mason, Lindell Smith, Matt Whitman, Tim Outhit, and Paul Russell ended up voting in favour of Austin's motion.Savage, Deputy Mayor Tony Mancini, and councillors Blackburn, David Hendsbee, Steve Streatch, Lorelei Nicoll, Bill Karsten, Russell Walker, and Steve Adams all voted against the motion.Council then voted in favour of having staff analyze the proposal and have them return with a report in December.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Raptors celebrate NBA championship at home opener
    CBC

    Raptors celebrate NBA championship at home opener

    The Toronto Raptors raised their NBA championship banner, celebrating last season’s win before opening a new season without some big-name players.

  • Chair of inquiry into youth protection services says Quebec society failed kids
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Chair of inquiry into youth protection services says Quebec society failed kids

    MONTREAL — An inquiry into Quebec's maligned youth protection system began Tuesday with a declaration from its chair that the exercise itself reflects a societal failure.Regine Laurent said the very need for such a hearing is proof that society has failed kids. "It's sad to have to be here today," she said. "To be here today is a failure."The Quebec government in May announced the wide-ranging independent commission to look into youth protection services, following the alleged slaying of a seven-year-old girl from Granby, Que. She had been monitored by child services but nevertheless fell through the cracks.While the death of the Granby girl was the impetus for the commission, the government has said it won't be its sole focus.But at the end of her opening statement, Laurent, her voice tinged with emotion, spoke of the young Granby victim, referring to her as "Tililly" — a name she gave her in Creole."My darling, I'm doing it for you. As soon as you died, I gave you a name. You could have been my granddaughter. You would have been 8 years old a week ago," Laurent said, inviting those in the room to spare a thought for the young girl.The inquiry will take a critical look at the legal framework around the youth protection system, including its funding and organization.It heard first from several young adults who went through the system as children. They described the difficulties they encountered trying to establish themselves once released from youth protection at 18 years old.Most described a difficult transition, with problems finding work, adequate housing, developing a social network or even dealing with emotional issues.They suggested the government establish an ombudsman's office for children services, which would include experts, researchers and others to advise the youth protection system. The witnesses also encouraged authorities to promote foster families and to offer more therapy or family mediation, in order to discourage parents from placing their children in state care.They also highlighted the importance of community groups that can offer temporary lodging, help in finding work and in rebuilding self-confidence.Laurent, a nurse and former labour leader, was picked by the Legault government to run the inquiry alongside other elected members of the legislature as well as with child services experts.The inquiry must produce a report to the government by Nov. 30, 2020.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 22, 2019.The Canadian Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    No trial for deported Sri Lankan accused of killing wife, Quebec court rules

    MONTREAL — The Quebec Court of Appeal has ruled that a Sri Lankan national who saw a murder charge against him stayed due to trial delays — and who has since been deported from Canada — will not stand trial.In 2017, Sivaloganathan Thanabalasingham avoided trial for the killing of his wife Anuja Baskaran when a Quebec Superior Court judge ruled that the nearly 60-month delay between his 2012 arrest and the start of his trial was excessive.The Jordan decision, a 2016 Supreme Court ruling, set a 30-month limit between the laying of charges and a trial for Superior Court cases.Following his release, Thanabalasingham was deported to his native Sri Lanka, but the Crown contested the stay and asked the Quebec Court of Appeal to order a new trial.The court didn't hear the case, noting it had become irrelevant and theoretical, but it was ordered to take a second look by the Supreme Court of Canada.On Tuesday, three out of five judges upheld the original decision and rejected the Crown's appeal once more, ruling the original judges had not erred in refusing to hear the case.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 22, 2019 The Canadian Press

  • How the Toronto area influenced the election result
    CBC

    How the Toronto area influenced the election result

    The cities around Toronto played a big role in the election result, Adrienne Arsenault was there today to talk to voters and candidates about how it happened.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Meet Jaime Battiste: Nova Scotia's first Mi'kmaq member of Parliament

    HALIFAX — Jaime Battiste made history Monday when he was became the first Mi'kmaq politician to represent Nova Scotia in the House of Commons.The 40-year-old legal expert and Indigenous activist, elected as a Liberal in Cape Breton, seems poised to make a name for himself in federal politics — even though his campaign was briefly sidetracked earlier this month by some ugly social media posts from his past.Battiste, who is well known in Nova Scotia for his work on improving education for Mi'kmaq youth, said he hopes his electoral breakthrough will serve as an example for Indigenous youth."When I was growing up on a reserve, there was a greater chance that I would have died a violent death or committed suicide than get a nomination to run for a federal party," he said in an interview Tuesday from Sydney."To actually win — the obstacles that you have to overcome, the barriers, the challenges of growing up on a First Nation community — you have to overcome all of these barriers ... I hope that youth now look around our community and say that if one of us can do this, then we can do it as well."Battiste was born in Sydney and grew up on Cape Breton's Chapel Island 5 reserve, now known as the Potlotek First Nation. He graduated from Dalhousie University's law school in 2004 and has served as chairman of the Assembly of First Nations Youth Council and a regional chief with the Assembly of First Nations.His parents, Marie Battiste and James (Sakej) Henderson, are both professors at the University of Saskatchewan: Battiste specializes in Aboriginal learning, decolonization, violence prevention and historical studies of Indigenous education; Henderson is an international human rights lawyer and one of the drafters of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Battiste is also known for his work with the Mi'kmaq education authority, which has helped boost the graduation rate among Mi'kmaq high school students from 30 per cent 20 years ago to 90 per cent in 2016-2017 — the highest on-reserve graduation rate in the country."Mi'kmaq have made great strides in education," said Battiste, who now lives on the Eskasoni First Nation. "I was very proud of the work that we did on treaty education."Battiste said he is now working on a national treaty education plan, which was part of the federal Liberal platform."More Canadians need to be aware of Indigenous history and Indigenous knowledge," he said. Despite his impressive resume, Battiste's bid for public office was almost derailed when the Toronto Sun published a series of racist, sexist and homophobic tweets the newspaper attributed to him.The posts, all about seven or eight years old, included a reference to Battiste's desire to find a woman to take care of his "cleaning, folding, cooking."Another tweet mocked the broken English of Chinese waiters in a scene from the film "A Christmas Story."Prime Minister Justin Trudeau described the posts as unacceptable and Battiste issued an apology about his "crude jokes."When asked about the tweets on Tuesday, Battiste drew a deep breath and described how the backlash caused him deep emotional pain."When I was 18 years old, I got hit by a truck from behind while walking on the road," he said. "That was the second-most painful hit I took in my life. To have these ... tweets that I made in the past surfacing now, and painting me in a picture of who I am today — it was very difficult."He said he hoped voters would understand he is not the same person he was back then."Every day, you wake up with that thought in your head: 'Why did I say those things?' There's no excusing them. I apologized for saying them. And I told people this is not who I am today ... I believe I've grown a lot since those days."When he issued his initial apology, Battiste said the tweets were made during a difficult time in his life, but he declined to elaborate on Tuesday."I don't really want to go into that detail," he said. "We all suffer from depression and heartbreaks from relationships."Sydney-Victoria was considered a safe Liberal riding for years, but that was before the incumbent, veteran politician Mark Eyking, decided to step down from public life earlier this year. Eyking had held the riding for almost 20 years.On election night, Battiste fought a see-saw battle with Eddie Orrell, a well-known former provincial Tory. Victory for Battiste, in the form of a 1,000-vote margin, came more than three hours after the polls closed.— Follow @NovaMac on TwitterThis report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 22, 2019.Michael MacDonald, The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    TTC subway service resumes between Lawrence and St. Clair after repairs

    Full subway service on Line 1 between Lawrence and St. Clair stations resumed for the Wednesday morning commute after construction work damaged a tunnel wall Tuesday afternoon.The TTC initially closed that stretch when the damage was discovered Tuesday afternoon before rush hour began and then partially reopened it hours later.Northbound trains were moving at 15 kilometres per hour between the two stations. Southbound trains, meanwhile, were moving at regular speeds as shuttle buses also helped with the overflow of passengers.The TTC then said it would close Line 1 between Lawrence and St. Clair stations for emergency repairs at 11:30 p.m. It delayed the closure to accommodate passengers following the Toronto Raptors game."Sorry, Raps fans. But safety first," TTC spokesperson Stuart Green said in a tweet.Engineers examined the tunnel to determine if any structural damage was done and crews were then ready to plug and "grout" the hole, Green added.The TTC tweeted early Wednesday that the repairs were successfully completed overnight and full service would resume Wednesday morning.The damage is believed to have occurred between Lawrence and Eglinton stations after a private contractor drilled through a concrete subway tunnel liner.

  • Liam Gallagher talks solo rise, family feud and rock music
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Liam Gallagher talks solo rise, family feud and rock music

    LOS ANGELES — Spend a few minutes with Liam Gallagher and it's clear the rocker hasn't lost any of his bravado, right down to counting himself among the greats in rock history.But Gallagher does acknowledge that one band breakup — not, Oasis, but rather the demise of Beady Eye in 2014— left him humbled and ready to temporarily step away from music.Gallagher said leaving band dynamics aside allowed him to "mop up some milk that I spilt in my personal life."I think every now and again, you need to remove yourself from whatever you're doing," Gallagher said. "I just needed a breather. And I think the fans needed a breather."Since then Gallagher's been focused on a solo career, resulting in the 2017 release "As You Were" and his recently released sophomore album, "Why Me? Why Not," which debuted at the top of the charts in the United Kingdom.The singer-songwriter rose to rock stardom with his older brother Noel Gallagher in the 1990s with their group Oasis, which released a series of anthem tunes from "Wonderwall," ''Live Forever" and "Supersonic." Noel left the group in 2009 after accusing Liam of having a hangover that forced them to cancel a concert. Liam disputed the accusation and ultimately sued his brother.That relationship hasn't been mended, but Gallagher said he wants to reconcile, for the sake of his mother.In a recent interview, Gallagher spoke with The Associated Press about the state of rock music and how he'd like to see a reunion with his brother play out.___AP: What's the state of rock 'n' roll? Is it still alive?Gallagher: I think so. I think it might not be selling as many records as dance music or rap music or whatever the (expletive) it is these days that's selling. I think there are some good guitar bands out there. Everyone's been saying rock 'n' roll every year, every decade that it's over. It's been going for a longtime. It ain't over.AP: What's your take on the seemingly lack of guitar bands in rock?Gallagher: Obviously, you got to give a little bit to get on the radio. If you're not getting on the radio, you're not selling records. There are a lot of guitar bands sticking to their guns a little bit. They're not compromising about anything. I think comprising is alright every now and again. If you're going to make some sounds like 1967, you ain't going to get on the radio.AP: How have you compromised?Gallagher: I compromised the sound of production. When I was in a band called Beady Eye, it was very 1967 and no one would touch it. It doesn't mean it was bad, but it definitely sounded retro.AP: How was it to vent through your recent documentary "Liam Gallagher: As It Was"?Gallagher: It was good to get some things off my chest. There are always people spinning lies just for the sake of themselves.AP: What did your brother Noel think about it?Gallagher: I think he's upset. But I think he's upset with me breathing. He's going to have to get over it. ... I don't care what he thought about it.AP: Do you wish you and Noel can work things out?Gallagher: Yeah, I wish so. Only for the brother side of it. Not a bit about Oasis. The most important thing is about me and him being brothers. I've got another brother who he doesn't speak to. It would be nice if all three of us would be together. Obviously, our mum is still alive, so she gets upset about it. He thinks I'm desperate to get the band back together for money. But I didn't join the band to make money. I joined the band to have fun and to see the world.AP: In a picture-perfect world, how would you like things to play out between you two?Gallagher: For him to come to my house, get on his knees and beg for mercy and say "Sorry," maybe bring me a cake with a little candle on it. ... I'm only joking. Just for me and him to go for a beer. Shoot some (expletive) and get off whatever's on his chest off because I don't think we should have split up over a big argument. I mean, I didn't kick his cat. I didn't try hugging up with his Mrs. or anything like that. I don't know what his problem is. I think he just wanted to go away and do his solo career, get all the coin and be surrounded by all the yes men you can fire and hire whenever he wants. You can't do that with me.AP: How have you evolved over the years?Gallagher: I don't think I evolved. I was born great. And I've just been great all the way.___Follow AP Entertainment Writer Jonathan Landrum Jr. on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MrLandrum31Jonathan Landrum Jr., The Associated Press

  • New federal Green member looks to learn from May, not replace her
    News
    The Canadian Press

    New federal Green member looks to learn from May, not replace her

    FREDERICTON — As a teenager, the Green party's newest member of Parliament declared her desire to become prime minister, but Jenica Atwin says she's not gunning for the leadership of her party — at least not yet.Atwin pulled out a historic win Monday, capturing the riding of Fredericton and becoming the first Green MP elected east of British Columbia.On Tuesday she said she is looking forward to assuming her new job and learning from Elizabeth May, who has been Green leader since 2006."I think it will be a steep learning curve, but I'm ready for the challenge," she said. "It's great to say I'm the member of Parliament for Fredericton."Atwin, 32, one of just three Greens elected to the House of Commons Monday, said her constituents are her first priority."I really want to be focused on my constituency. I don't want anything to distract from that at this time. This is what the people of Fredericton wanted, so I have to be available to them, and I can't start thinking about rising in the ranks just yet," Atwin said."I've really got to put the work in first. I'm very thankful for people to even consider that, but Elizabeth is an incredible leader, and I look forward to learning from her along the way."Donald Wright, a political scientist at the University of New Brunswick, said Atwin is a political rookie with a lot to learn, and it's too soon to speculate on her future in the party.Atwin, a mother of two and researcher in First Nations education, said health care will be her number one priority, followed by policy to address climate change.She won a tight three-way race in Fredericton, finishing more than 1,000 votes ahead of the Tory candidate, while incumbent Liberal Matt DeCourcey was third.Wright said Atwin clearly struck a chord with progressive voters in Fredericton."It says there's a large progressive vote in Fredericton that's had enough of the two old parties. I was stunned to see the Liberals finish third," he said. Atwin said it would be too hard to be a new MP while her young children remained at home in New Brunswick, so they will accompany her to Ottawa."My oldest is seven, and he's just excited to see what lies ahead," she said. "He keeps asking, 'When are we going to Ottawa, Mom? Is it happening tomorrow?' "Atwin, who says that in high school she wanted to be chosen most likely to become prime minister, will be joined in the Commons by May and Paul Manly, both of whom represent British Columbia ridings for the Greens. Manly was first elected in a byelection this year.Atwin said back-to-back years of record flooding in Fredericton helped convince voters that it was time to vote for a party with a strong view on climate change.On election night, she vowed to stick up for more than just the people in her riding."I will fight to protect the environment, our home and all that dwell upon it," she said. "I will fight for the water, the ocean, the rivers — our lifeblood. I will fight for the winged ones, the four-legged, the insects, the trees. I will fight for justice." This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 22, 2019.Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press