• Doug Ford says nurses, teachers exempt from public sector hiring freeze
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Doug Ford says nurses, teachers exempt from public sector hiring freeze

    Ontario's incoming premier said Tuesday that teachers and nurses are exempt from the public service hiring freeze he has ordered as part of his efforts to curb government spending. The Progressive Conservatives had said the freeze did not apply to essential frontline staff such as police, corrections officers and fire services, as well as lateral moves within the public service, but some observers had raised concerns about how the move could impact services like health care and education. "There's not on the teachers either," he said.

  • U.S. quits U.N. human rights body, citing bias vs. Israel, alarming critics
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. quits U.N. human rights body, citing bias vs. Israel, alarming critics

    By Lesley Wroughton and Michelle Nichols WASHINGTON/UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States withdrew from a "hypocritical and self-serving" United Nations Human Rights Council on Tuesday over what it called chronic bias against Israel and a lack of reform, a move activists warned would make advancing human rights globally even more difficult. Standing with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the State Department, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley slammed Russia, China, Cuba and Egypt for thwarting U.S. efforts to reform the council.

  • Canadians Divided On Government's Purchase Of Trans Mountain Pipeline: Angus Reid Institute Poll
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Canadians Divided On Government's Purchase Of Trans Mountain Pipeline: Angus Reid Institute Poll

    Canadians are almost evenly divided on whether the federal government buying Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline was a good investment or a negative precedent-setter. A new Angus Reid Institute poll finds an equal number of Canadians (37 per cent) say the purchase was the right decision as the number who say it was the wrong decision. Across most provinces, Canadians were still evenly split on the decision, including in British Columbia (38 per cent and 38 per cent).

  • Police monitoring trucks transporting loose gravel in Charlottetown
    News
    CBC

    Police monitoring trucks transporting loose gravel in Charlottetown

    Charlottetown police will be watching the port area more closely after reports of loose gravel falling off some trucks. Cynthia King is a cyclist who has been commuting from Stratford for years and often travels on Water Street near the port. MacConnell said police have contacted the contractors who transport gravel in the area to make sure they are following the laws.

  • New Brunswick producer fights tainted cannabis lawsuit in court
    News
    CBC

    New Brunswick producer fights tainted cannabis lawsuit in court

    New Brunswick's largest licensed supplier of medical marijuana is trying to fend off a class-action lawsuit at a three-day hearing that started Tuesday in Halifax. Organigram, which employs some 300 people in Moncton, is accused of making customers sick by supplying them with cannabis that was tainted with unapproved pesticides in 2016. In 2016, Organigram announced a voluntary recall of its cannabis because myclobutanil was detected.

  • Chilean law enforcement question Vatican sex abuse envoy at airport
    News
    Reuters

    Chilean law enforcement question Vatican sex abuse envoy at airport

    By Aislinn Laing and Dave Sherwood SANTIAGO (Reuters) - Chilean prosecutors said on Tuesday they questioned the Vatican's top sex abuse investigator as he prepared to fly out of the country following a fact-finding and reconciliation mission ordered by the Pope. Raúl Guzmán, a prosecutor based in the capital Santiago, said he "interrogated" Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta in the police station at Santiago airport in relation to an abuse case involving 25 Marist brothers and 30 alleged victims. "We arranged an interview with Charles Scicluna that took place in the offices of the investigative police in the airport before his flight," he told journalists.

  • Councillors give green light to smart traffic signals at Edmonton intersections
    News
    CBC

    Councillors give green light to smart traffic signals at Edmonton intersections

    Edmonton intersections are destined to be smarter, likely starting next year after city council approves the next four-year budget in September. The city's operations branch told the urban planning committee Tuesday that it plans to install smart technology, also called adaptive signals, at intersections already slated for upgrades. Andrew Knack has been a proponent of the technology and said he's pleased to hear the city has a plan.

  • Fredericton starts park-and-ride service to ease construction traffic
    News
    CBC

    Fredericton starts park-and-ride service to ease construction traffic

    The City of Fredericton will introduce park and ride services Wednesday to ease traffic congestion downtown caused by summer construction, the first time it's ever done so. Five different routes have been identified for park-and-ride locations by Fredericton Transit. The city has also identified two park-and-walk locations where residents can park their cars, then bike or walk into the downtown.

  • Windsor Public Library chooses temporary site for central library — but won't say where it is
    News
    CBC

    Windsor Public Library chooses temporary site for central library — but won't say where it is

    The Windsor Public Library Board has decided on a temporary location for the central library — but won't give details until it gets approval from city council to use the space. The library has been looking for a temporary home after its surprise decision in March to sell the current central library building to the Downtown Mission for $3.6 million. "There are two potential locations — the library board has a preferred location," said WPL CEO Kitty Pope.

  • SaskPower to build first utility-scale solar power project
    News
    CBC

    SaskPower to build first utility-scale solar power project

    ​ SaskPower announced plans Tuesday for the province's first utility-scale solar power project. A company called Saturn Power (based in Ontario) signed a 20-year agreement with SaskPower to build and maintain the facility. It will be located in the RM of Coulee, near Swift Current, and will provide 10 megawatts of power, which is enough to power roughly 2,000 homes.

  • Eddie Joyce says he's fighting for local jobs, even as his own remains in flux
    News
    CBC

    Eddie Joyce says he's fighting for local jobs, even as his own remains in flux

    ​Despite his protest appearances, some ironworkers felt Joyce was making empty promises. The review into his case is still underway, but that hasn't stopped Joyce from continuing to regularly pop up at local events in his district of Humber-Bay of Islands, as well campaigning for causes beyond its borders, such as the construction dispute. Joyce hasn't spoken publicly about the review process since he became an independent, but even when asked now, he isn't saying much.

  • Overcrowding prompts Jewell's Country Market to create group photo policy
    News
    CBC

    Overcrowding prompts Jewell's Country Market to create group photo policy

    An Island business says it's had to change the way it operates, after group photo shoots at its store have caused overcrowding. Jewell's Country Market in Marshfield, P.E.I. is known for its beautiful greenhouse and is a popular spot for prom-goers — as well as engagement and bridal parties — to take photos.

  • Battle of the fans: Iceland v Mexico
    BBC News

    Battle of the fans: Iceland v Mexico

    How do some of the most colourful fans support their teams at the World Cup?

  • News
    CBC

    Vancouver considers allowing duplexes throughout the city

    Zoning that ensures the majority of Vancouver is reserved for single-family homes could be changed as early as next month. City council will consider a motion Wednesday  which can be read here, asking staff to explore how amendments could be made "to enable duplex use in some or all" single-family neighbourhoods in Vancouver.

  • Walt Disney names creative heads of animation studios
    News
    Reuters

    Walt Disney names creative heads of animation studios

    (Reuters) - Walt Disney Co on Tuesday split the role of its outgoing creative head John Lasseter and appointed two Academy award winners to spearhead its two animation studios. Jennifer Lee will be the Chief Creative Officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pete Docter will take over the same role at Pixar Animation Studios. Lasseter will leave at the end of the year, the company had said earlier this month.

  • Montreal Museum of Fine Arts buzzing with activity as bees take up residence on roof
    News
    CBC

    Montreal Museum of Fine Arts buzzing with activity as bees take up residence on roof

    By the end of the summer, 100,000 bees will be living on the roof of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts' Peace Pavilion on Bishop Street. Alvéole is a Montreal-based company that rents out beehives to people and businesses interested in making their own honey and learning more about beekeeping. The MMFA is one of several Montreal buildings — along with Maison Radio-Canada, which houses CBC's offices — to invite a colony of bees to stay.

  • Stem cell donor needed for 4-year-old with rare blood disease
    News
    CBC

    Stem cell donor needed for 4-year-old with rare blood disease

    Tanner McLeod was just six months old when he was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder called sideroblastic anemia. "As a mother, it can be challenging at times because I am not the one receiving the poke, but it kind of feels like it," said Miranda McLeod.

  • News
    Reuters

    Cybersecurity rivals CrowdStrike, Cylance close major funding rounds

    By Angela Moon NEW YORK (Reuters) - CrowdStrike Inc and Cylance Inc, rival cybersecurity startups vying for a chunk of the surging security industry, both announced major rounds of funding on Tuesday. CrowdStrike, a California-based firm founded in 2011, said it has raised $200 million in its series E round of financing, putting the company's valuation at more than $3 billion. Its rival Cylance, founded in 2012, said it has raised $120 million also in its series E, or fifth round of funding, but declined to disclose the company's valuation.

  • Verizon to stop selling phone location data to third parties
    News
    Reuters

    Verizon to stop selling phone location data to third parties

    Verizon Communications Inc will stop selling its customers' phone location data to third parties after an investigation by a U.S. Senator found law enforcement agencies were able to use the data to track people without their consent. The move by Verizon comes as consumers and lawmakers are increasingly concerned about privacy and security amid data breaches by tech firms, including Facebook Inc.. In a letter to Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon dated June 15 and released by Wyden's office on Tuesday, Verizon said it was beginning the process to stop selling customer location data to vendors that aggregate the data.

  • Film Review: 'The King' is guilty of an Elvis crime- excess
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Film Review: 'The King' is guilty of an Elvis crime- excess

    While making the documentary "The King," he actually got gruff from a member of his own film crew. After a car breaks down, Jarecki takes the opportunity to ask the driver of the truck hauling it to be fixed what he thinks of the film so far. The crewman responds that he's not sure what Jarecki's intention is and doesn't really buy the tenuous analogy he's developed so far.

  • Silicon Valley-style coding boot camp seeks to reset Japan Inc
    News
    Reuters

    Silicon Valley-style coding boot camp seeks to reset Japan Inc

    By Chang-Ran Kim TOKYO (Reuters) - Barely six months after inaugurating a tiny software-coding boot camp in a basement in Tokyo, Silicon Valley transplant Kani Munidasa stood before some of Japan's top business leaders in February with a warning: software was threatening their future. A Sri Lankan native with a Japanese mother and wife, Munidasa was speaking at the invitation of Nobuyuki Idei, a former chief executive of Sony Corp. Idei had offered to become an adviser to the boot camp, called Code Chrysalis, whose mission of bringing Japan's software engineering up to global standards and helping its companies transform aligned with his own. Long known as a "monozukuri" - or manufacturing - powerhouse, Japan is in danger of getting left behind as artificial intelligence, robotics, and machine learning sweep through industries from cars to banking, Idei and others say.Japanese companies have traditionally treated software as a means to cut costs rather than add value, and code-writers as second-class citizens.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Denys Arcand's 'The Fall of the American Empire' is about the power of money

    The latest film by internationally recognized Quebec director Denys Arcand is about money, how it's omnipresent, guides people's choices, and like humans, is capable of doing good things and bad. Arcand once again made a movie highly critical of society, but "The Fall of the American Empire" is also filled with hope.

  • Humboldt Broncos bus crash survivors reunite in Las Vegas for NHL awards
    News
    CBC

    Humboldt Broncos bus crash survivors reunite in Las Vegas for NHL awards

    The team will be honoured at the NHL Awards ceremony happening Wednesday. Additionally, the late Humboldt Broncos head coach Darcy Haugan has been nominated for the inaugural Willie O'Ree Community Hero Award. "He was very inspirational to our team," Dahlgren said of the coach who taught them lessons on and off the ice.

  • Flair Airlines makes Edmonton its new home base
    News
    CBC

    Flair Airlines makes Edmonton its new home base

    Flair Airlines made a big splash Tuesday morning, announcing Edmonton International Airport as the discount flyer's new hub. The low-fare airline currently based in Kelowna, B.C. says as many as 300 employees, including the airline's executive, will eventually be working out of Edmonton. "We are thrilled today, to be declaring that Edmonton is our new main transfer hub," said David Tait, Flair's executive chairman.

  • News
    CBC

    Nunavut's chief devolution negotiator back on the job — a week after being replaced

    One of Joe Savikataaq's first moves as Nunavut's new premier is to bring back Simon Awa as the chief negotiator of devolution for the territory — undoing one of former premier Paul Quassa's last moves. Savikataaq said Tuesday that Awa will return as chief negotiator. Quassa announced Awa would leave the position last Tuesday, after Awa spent four years as chief negotiator.