• Canada beats Czech Republic to advance to gold-medal game at world championship
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canada beats Czech Republic to advance to gold-medal game at world championship

    BRATISLAVA, Slovakia — Canada's latest win at the world hockey championship left Mark Stone with a renewed sense of confidence heading into the gold-medal game.Stone scored his tournament-leading eighth goal and Matt Murray made 39 saves as Canada downed the Czech Republic 5-1 in semifinal play on Saturday, setting up a gold-medal finale against Finland for Sunday. The Finns are the only team to have beaten Canada at the tournament — a 3-1 victory in the opener on May 10."I think we can beat anybody in this tournament," Stone said after Saturday's win. "It's just a matter of whether we play well or not. We're going to have to bring our best game to beat (Finland), but I'm comfortable with the team that we have."Darnell Nurse, Pierre-Luc Dubois, Kyle Turris and Thomas Chabot also scored for Canada in the second semifinal of the day. Finland edged Russia 1-0 in the earlier game. "The score was 5-1 but it felt closer than that," said Dubois. "The Czechs played a really good game. They did a lot of good things."I thought we defended well as a unit of five. We didn't give them a lot. Murray was really good when we made mistakes and that's what made the difference."Tomas Zohorna scored the lone Czech goal, with 6:01 left to play in the third period.The gold medal game will serve as a rematch of the 2016 final in Moscow, which Canada won 2-1.Canada has won eight straight games at this year's tournament after dropping the opener."It feels great," Murray said. "I think as a team we're just thankful for the opportunity. One, to be here and play for our country and now to get this opportunity to play for gold. It's very exciting and that's what we're here for."Canada opened the scoring in Saturday's game at the 5:18 mark of the first period when Stone streaked to the net to tip a centring pass from Troy Stecher below the glove of Czech netminder Patrik Bartosak.Nurse doubled the lead just 10 seconds into the middle frame when he picked up the puck behind the net and deposited it behind an unsuspecting Bartosak on a wraparound play.Bartosak's day came to an end at the 5:06 mark of the second, when Dubois converted a cross-ice feed from Marchessault for Canada's third goal of the game. Bartosak was replaced by Pavel Francouz, who gave up third-period goals to Turris and Chabot.Canada's coach, Alain Vigneault, was happy to see balanced scoring from his squad."We needed that tonight," he said. "We had a very tough opponent that has really been on top of their game."We had talked prior to the game about the types of looks that we were looking for, to have success against such a good opponent. We were able to get those looks and we were able to get different guys to put the puck in the net for us. That's given us a chance to play tomorrow for gold and we're going to need a full team effort on both parts, offensively and defensively."The Czechs outshot Canada 12-11 in each of the first two periods, and 41-30 in the game.Canada's penalty killing played a crucial early role in the win. Ranked 11th out of 16 teams going into the semifinal, the Canadians successfully killed off first-period penalties to Marchessault and Turris and a third-period infraction by Chabot to keep the Czechs' 10th-ranked power play off the board.Canada was the top team in the tournament with the man advantage heading into the game but did not get many chances Saturday. The disciplined Czechs did not give up their first power play until the late stages of the third period.Canadian forward Anthony Mantha returned to the lineup on Saturday after serving a one-game suspension. Mantha came into the game tied with Stone for the team lead in scoring with 12 points and picked up his sixth assist of the tournament with his feed on Turris' goal.Saturday marked the Czechs' first time in the world championship semifinal since a 2-0 loss to Canada on home soil in Prague in 2015. Canada went 10-0 in that tournament and took home the first of two back-to-back gold medals. The Czechs' last medals were back-to-back bronze in 2011 and 2012.Carol Schram, The Canadian Press

  • Premier Legault to force the Caisse to purchase REM trains made in Quebec
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Premier Legault to force the Caisse to purchase REM trains made in Quebec

    Premier Francois Legault says his government will force the Caisse to purchase trains made in Quebec as part of the extension of Montreal's Reseau Express Metropolitain light-rail system. Whether in the form of the REM or tramways ... for sure we will require local content," he said Saturday at the Coalition Avenir Quebec's party convention on green issues in Montreal. The Caisse, Quebec's pension fund operator, has a mandate to operate independently and free of political interference in its decisions.

  • New poll suggests one-third don't want politicians to wear religious symbols
    News
    The Canadian Press

    New poll suggests one-third don't want politicians to wear religious symbols

    OTTAWA — While most Canadians firmly back the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and strongly support the idea of diversity, a new poll suggests a third of Canadians would ban their elected officials from wearing religious symbols.A majority of Quebecers canvassed in the survey agreed that federal, provincial and local politicians shouldn't be allowed to wear hijabs, crucifixes or turbans on the job.Nationally, 49 per cent of respondents said they would not favour such a ban, but 37 per cent said they would support it.The proposed ban would not extend to elected officials, but a question about whether it should was included among questions about how Canadians in different provinces feel about religions and religious signs.The Leger Marketing poll was done to gauge public sentiment in light of a proposed secularism law in Quebec that would ban public servants in positions of authority from wearing religious symbols.The survey of respondents, drawn from an online panel, canvassed the opinions of 2,215 adults across Canada between May 3 and 7. Because online panels aren't fully random samples of the population, no margin of error for the results can be calculated.Jack Jedwab, president of the Association for Canadian Studies, which commissioned the survey, says a deeper dive into the numbers shows the strongest supporters of such a ban for politicians are those more likely to feel threatened by religious minorities. They also expressed negative feelings toward Islam, Muslims and react negatively to hijabs.Respondents who said they interact more with and are comfortable around religious minorities are less likely to support banning religious symbols for elected officials, the data suggests.Meanwhile, more than 80 per cent of all of those surveyed said they have positive views of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and also said they favour multiculturalism.The results indicate what Jedwab calls a "striking paradox" among Canadians."(People) express broad appreciation of diversity and say that our society is tolerant and accepting of religious-minority customs and traditions, yet at the same time ... we, to a significant degree, don't like the idea of politicians wearing religious symbols or signs."The results of this survey suggest federal leaders will have to approach issues of religious symbolism carefully in seat-rich Quebec as the province moves to enact its secularism law while federal parties gear up for a fall federal election.NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, a practising Sikh who sports a brightly coloured turban, will have an especially challenging time in Quebec, Jedwab says."He's going to probably encounter some challenges that people probably will not express publicly, but that they feel privately," he said."Those feelings are out there ... Is it going to affect his chances of getting elected? It's difficult to say. It creates a new layer that is out there."During the last federal election campaign, religious symbolism became a flashpoint after the Federal Court of Canada upheld a lower court's decision to strike down the former Conservative government's ban on wearing niqabs at citizenship ceremonies.Former NDP leader Tom Mulcair took a firm stance against the ban — a move he later said he believes cost him the election, as support for the ban was strong in Quebec, where his party base was strongest.Jedwab says he believes Prime Minister Justin Trudeau successfully skirted backlash on the niqab issue in 2015 because Mulcair took the brunt of Quebecers' concerns.This time, Trudeau — who has spoken against the secularism bill and who has taken a strong stance in favour of welcoming immigrants and minorities — could have a more turbulent ride."It's going to be challenging for him because he needs to build and/or strengthen his base in Quebec. The challenge will be that there is a lot of support for these types of restrictions," Jedwab said.Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will also have to walk a fine line on issues of religious symbolism and immigration, Jedwab added."The polling numbers in this poll nationally suggest (Scheer) may be able to find a line through this thing where he says, 'We understand people's fears and insecurities, but we need to respect the Charter of Rights.' I don't think Mr. Trudeau will be saying he understands people's fears and insecurities, because that will validate them," Jedwab said.—Follow @ReporterTeresa on Twitter.Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press

  • You can't walk off depression, but 5K event hopes to help defeat it
    News
    CBC

    You can't walk off depression, but 5K event hopes to help defeat it

    A stroll through Bowring Park in St. John's did more than just get a few hearts pumping Saturday. The Pottle Centre's first Defeat Depression walk garnered over $20,000 in donations from its 100-plus participants, money sorely needed for a mental health organization that survives on less than $100,000 a year in public money. The walk wasn't just about the bottom line, explained Katie Blyde: the sheer number of participants showed support for people affected by the disorder.

  • Glass towers amid green: New book details invention of Vancouverism
    News
    CBC

    Glass towers amid green: New book details invention of Vancouverism

    Soaring glass towers, transit-dense arteries and an emphasis on green sustainability may seem like Vancouver's established identity, but former city planner Larry Beasley says it took a lot of imagination to push the city in this direction decades ago.

  • How to take advantage of a real estate buyers' market
    News
    CBC

    How to take advantage of a real estate buyers' market

    April home sales in Metro Vancouver were 43 per cent below the 10-year average as many buyers continue to sit on the sidelines hoping that if they are patient, the market will continue to become less expensive. To get a deal done, we first need to understand what motivates people to buy and sell real estate. Buyers hope to find a seller who has had a house on the market for some time and who is reading all the negative headlines about the housing market.

  • News
    CBC

    'Embarrassing' weeds to be removed from fountain in Charlottetown Park

    The Joe Ghiz Memorial Park in Charlottetown has been Marlene Breynton's "baby" over the years. But unsightly weeds are popping up around the park's fountain, and Breynton, a long time coordinator and supporter of the park, has had enough.

  • The Latest: Bong Joon-ho's satire "Parasite" wins Palme d'Or
    News
    The Canadian Press

    The Latest: Bong Joon-ho's satire "Parasite" wins Palme d'Or

    South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's social satire "Parasite," about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, has won the Cannes Film Festival's top award, the Palme d'Or. The win for "Parasite" marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. The awards were handed out in a ceremony Saturday after being chosen by a jury presided over by filmmaker Alejandro Inarritu.

  • Arkansas newspaper gambles on free iPads as the future
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Arkansas newspaper gambles on free iPads as the future

    HOPE, Ark. — Over a lunch of hamburger steaks, mashed potatoes and green beans, Walter Hussman delivered his pitch to the dozen or so attendees of the Hope, Arkansas, Rotary Club meeting. He promised that if they keep paying their current rate of $36 a month for subscription to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette newspaper, even though it will no longer be printed daily or delivered to their door, they'll get a free iPad to view a digital version.The daily digital replica of the state's largest newspaper will be accessed with an easy-to-use app they can download on the tablet that the newspaper is distributing to subscribers.Hussman, the newspaper's publisher, said Wednesday that by the end of the year, only the Sunday edition of the paper will be printed.It's a gamble Hussman feels compelled to take to sustain his newsroom of 106 employees and turn a profit, which the paper hasn't done since 2017.In March 2018, the paper began the experiment in Blytheville, a town of about 14,000 in the northeast corner of the state 155 miles (249 kilometres) from Little Rock, where the paper publishes. Each of the paper's 200 subscribers was offered the iPad at the current print delivery rate, plus a personal training session to explain how to use the tablet, and print delivery stopped about two months later.More than 70% of the Blytheville subscribers converted to the digital version, a figure that, if replicated statewide, is enough for the paper to turn a profit, which Hussman expects will be in 2020. Including distribution of the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, which is not converting to iPad, the paper's daily circulation was about 80,000 before the transition, said Larry Graham, vice-president of circulation.Hussman has said he's willing to spend $12 million on the tablets, or about 36,400 iPads, which retail for $329. At the current lowest subscription rate of $34 a month, that would generate about $14.8 million in revenue per year, which Hussman said would turn a profit after expenses.Rick Edmonds, media business analyst at Poynter, said two publications have tried similar experiments. In 2011, the Philadelphia Inquirer sold Android tablets for $100 if users signed up for a two-year, $9.99 monthly subscription, a program which Edmonds said was "very unsuccessful." In 2013, the Montreal-based La Presse launched a free tablet app and discontinued daily printed editions three years later, though they've since become a non-profit.To sell the Democrat-Gazette's plan, Hussman is travelling the state speaking to civic clubs. He explains how advertising revenue for newspapers has dropped precipitously since its peak in 2006, and how digital advertising isn't as profitable as media outlets originally predicted.After the Rotary meeting, 65-year-old Steve Harris, a subscriber since the early 1980s, said he's been using his iPad for about a month. There are "pros and cons" to the iPad, but he likes the photo galleries available on the digital replica, as well as its ease of access when he's travelling.But Bill Loe, 87, said he doesn't know if he'll keep subscribing."I'm not sure. If I can run that gadget, I will," he said.In Hussman's experience, skepticism is the initial reaction from subscribers of the newspaper, who tend to skew older, but eventually, most tell him they prefer it to print.The digital replica looks just like the printed paper and is intuitive to navigate within the app. Clicking on the jump takes the user to the continuing story. The text can be enlarged. All pictures are in colour; some also reveal videos.This isn't Hussman's first controversial move to keep his newspaper profitable. In the mid-2000s, he thought papers publishing online content for free was short-sighted and the Democrat-Gazette's website established a paywall earlier than most media organizations.The tablets are essentially a long-term loan and subscribers keep them for as long as they pay for the paper. They're also responsible for repairing or replacing the tablets, which come with Apple's one-year warranty. Hussman said the newspaper doesn't monitor usage or track users in any way. When it's returned, it's wiped clean and can be re-distributed.Hussman isn't sure whether the digital replica will appeal to younger generations, but enough people are converting for now.Penny Muse Abernathy, who teaches digital media economics and behaviour at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said whether people will continue to pay depends on what the reader experience is like and if the news is still vital to readers."I think it's a very smart move. It's a very farsighted one," she said.The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, which turns 200 this year, won two Pulitzers in 1958 as the Gazette before two papers merged, for its coverage of the integration of Little Rock's Central High School."I wish we didn't have to do this," Hussman said of scrapping print, but to sell the newspaper would be a "dereliction of our responsibility."Cutting print delivery hasn't disappointed everyone, though. Dolly Henley, 61, decided to subscribe at the Rotary Club meeting. She and her husband haven't had the Democrat-Gazette delivered to their home in the 25 years they've lived in the tiny town of Washington, Arkansas. Now, with the digital replica accessible by iPad, she's excited to get daily "delivery" again."Getting it to the digital world is just where it's at right now," she said. "Change is good."___Follow Hannah Grabenstein on Twitter: https://twitter.com/hgrabensteinHannah Grabenstein, The Associated Press

  • French police search for man who left bomb in Lyon
    News
    Reuters

    French police search for man who left bomb in Lyon

    Ninety police investigators supported by 30 scientific officers and technicians as well as local police were searching for the man, who was seen on security cameras at around 5.30 p.m. on Friday, anti-terrorism prosecutor Remy Heitz told reporters in Paris. French police were able to track the movements of the man, who appeared to be around 30 years old, for 10 minutes before the attack and are still trying to identify him.

  • Ghost Opera brings the dead to life through puppetry
    News
    CBC

    Ghost Opera brings the dead to life through puppetry

    A haunting tale based on ancient Greek myth is getting retold in an entirely new way, through a first-time collaboration between The Old Trout Puppet Workshop and the Calgary Opera Company. Ghost Opera had its world premiere at the Banff Centre on Saturday, and will run from May 29 to June 8 at The Grand in Calgary. Puppet master Peter Balkwill, who co-directed the production, and conductor Kimberly Bartczak, of the Calgary Opera Company, joined the Homestretch to chat about the production.

  • Balanced approach critical to tackling N.B. flooding, says researcher
    News
    CBC

    Balanced approach critical to tackling N.B. flooding, says researcher

    Should places like New Brunswick mitigate flooding or better adapt to it? Both is the answer from a researcher at Western University in London, Ont. "The question is [what should be] the balance between these two approaches?" asked Slobodan Simonovic, a professor in the university's civil and environmental engineering department.

  • Redpath Sugar Ltd. marks 60 years on Toronto's waterfront
    News
    CBC

    Redpath Sugar Ltd. marks 60 years on Toronto's waterfront

    Sixty years ago, Redpath Sugar Ltd. opened a refinery on Toronto's waterfront. On Saturday, company and city officials remembered that day. Phil Guglielmi, general manager of Redpath, says the company has seen the city grow around its landmark industrial site.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Prayers answered: Church posts on Facebook that statue's head has been returned

    Vladimir and Olga posted a photo on Facebook showing the bronze head depicting St. Volodymyr resting on a table, saying that someone found and returned the head on Saturday. The Facebook post says a group of people would be searching the area where the head was found to look for the cross. Jay Murray, who was contacted around the time the Facebook post was made on Saturday, wouldn't confirm the head was found.

  • Cohabitation could be a solution for EMSB, education minister says
    News
    CBC

    Cohabitation could be a solution for EMSB, education minister says

    Jean-François Roberge, in Montreal for the Coalition Avenir Québec's general council meeting, told journalists that he's open to cohabitation — in which one or more EMSB schools would accommodate students from both boards. ​​​​​Roberge said that the EMSB should listen to its parents, who want a solution that doesn't mean a loss of schools, and who in recent days have contacted his offices directly.

  • Andrew Scheer outlines his 'energy corridor' idea
    Global News

    Andrew Scheer outlines his 'energy corridor' idea

    Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer outlined his "energy corridor" idea that he brought up last week, saying he wants to look at a national corridor that would move Canadian oil, gas and other things like telecommunications across the country.

  • Waterton group receives grant to start new bat stewardship program
    News
    CBC

    Waterton group receives grant to start new bat stewardship program

    A new initiative in Waterton, Alta., aims to protect the resiliency of an endangered bat species. The Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association is starting a new bat stewardship project with the help of a $3,000 grant from outdoor clothing company Patagonia. Biosphere reserves are unique ecosystems granted protection by UNESCO — Waterton is one of only 18 such sites in Canada.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Source: Fiat Chrysler, Renault in talks about alliance

    NEW YORK — Carmaker Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and French automaker Renault are in talks about a possible alliance, as both companies seek to address technological and regulatory challenges in the industry.A person with knowledge of the matter confirmed the advanced discussions, first reported by the Financial Times. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the negotiations have not been made public.Fiat Chrysler has for months been the subject of merger speculation, with PSA Peugeot also reportedly interested.Collaboration between automakers has taken on importance in recent years as they seek to build their technological capabilities in pursuit of electrical vehicles, net connectivity and artificial intelligence for vehicles. Automakers are also under pressure from regulators, particularly in Europe and China, to come up with electric vehicles so they can meet tougher pollution limits.Volkswagen and Ford formed a global alliance in January to develop commercial vans and medium-sized pickups and explore co-operation on future battery-powered and autonomous vehicles and services.Renault is already in a three-way global alliance with Nissan and Mitsubishi, a partnership that has been frayed since the arrest of former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn on financial misconduct charges in Japan. Together, the three companies are the biggest maker of passenger cars in the world.Fiat Chrysler CEO Mike Manley told analysts earlier this month that he expects further consolidation in the industry in the near term, though he has stressed that the company can continue to make it as an independent player.Manley also told analysts that Fiat was taking action to address weaknesses in Europe. North American sales accounted for virtually all of the U.S.-Italian carmaker's profits in the first quarter, a difficult period that saw a 47% drop in profits due largely to production changes.The Financial Times reported that a number of partnership options between Renault and Fiat Chrysler are being considered, but that the talks have moved beyond sharing technology.Alexandra Olson, The Associated Press

  • Concern grows over planned privatization of provincial park operation
    News
    CBC

    Concern grows over planned privatization of provincial park operation

    A plan to privatize the operation of Murray Beach Provincial Park has many residents in the area concerned. The area also saw the closure of the tourist information centre in Aulac this year. The tourism centre in Cape Jourimain closed three years ago.

  • High Level wildfire evacuees hoping for rain in the forecast
    Global News

    High Level wildfire evacuees hoping for rain in the forecast

    Many wildfire evacuees from High Level have gathered in Fort Vermilion, Alberta as they wait to see what happens next. Julia Wong reports.

  • 'Very disappointed': Bike community reacts to speeding charge in cyclist's death
    News
    CBC

    'Very disappointed': Bike community reacts to speeding charge in cyclist's death

    Junfeng Wu, 40, was struck and killed by a taxi while on his way to work on Dec. 7, 2018, at the intersection of Slidell Street and the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway. RCMP said the driver was going 94 km/h through the intersection, well above the parkway's 60 km/h speed limit. Fanjoy said the RCMP statement seemed to blame Wu for his own death, and that the driver's speed should eclipse any actions the cyclist did or didn't take.

  • Homicide unit investigating 2 deaths after explosion at northwest Calgary home
    News
    CBC

    Homicide unit investigating 2 deaths after explosion at northwest Calgary home

    Calgary police's homicide unit is investigating after two people were found dead and a woman critically injured following a fire and explosion at a northwest Calgary home on Saturday.Emergency crews responded to reports of a house fire and explosion at approximately 1:50 p.m. at 42 Kincora Drive N.W.Two people were found dead inside the home and one woman was taken to hospital with burns in serious, life-threatening condition.The fire is not believed to be accidental and the incident was a domestic one, police said in an emailed release. No suspects are being sought at this time.Police said the explosion was largely contained within the home's garage, and the fire from the blast didn't spread to any nearby homes. The garage door of the home was was visibly damaged. Fire crews have searched the home and did not find any additional victims. The fire department asked the public to avoid the area between Kincora Landing and Kincora Boulevard as they responded to scene at 2:15 p.m. Saturday. Police said further information likely will not be released until autopsies on the two victims are completed on Monday. Neighbour Narendra Das says he was just driving home from work when he spotted that his street was blocked off."It's kind of shocking," he said, adding that he had just moved to the neighbourhood a few months ago and didn't know the victims.Anyone with information is asked to contact Calgary police's homicide tip line at 403-428-8877.

  • Penticton residents stage sidewalk sit-in to protest new bylaw
    News
    CBC

    Penticton residents stage sidewalk sit-in to protest new bylaw

    A group of Penticton residents staged a sit-in on a downtown sidewalk Saturday to mark their disagreement with a new bylaw change which the city says is aimed at improving safety in the city. This week, city council passed a controversial amendment to a bylaw that makes it an offence to either sit or lie down on certain sidewalks in the core during spring and summer. Councillors and Penticton Mayor John Vassilaki said the bylaw is aimed at addressing homelessness and to ensure some business owners and residents don't feel intimidated by homeless people.

  • High-risk offender missing from Dartmouth halfway house
    News
    CBC

    High-risk offender missing from Dartmouth halfway house

    Police are searching for a high-risk offender who left a halfway house in Dartmouth, N.S. Staff at the Jamieson Community Correctional Centre on Morris Drive in Burnside called the Halifax Regional Police on Sunday around 9 a.m. to report that Joshua James Turner, 35, is missing from custody.

  • Budding cannabis trade appealing to broader business community
    News
    CBC

    Budding cannabis trade appealing to broader business community

    With licensed producers set up in booths alongside long-established Charlottetown smoke shop Wild Impulse, there was no mistaking that the crowd gathered at the Delta Hotel on Saturday was there to talk about cannabis.