• U.S. Navy again sails through Taiwan Strait, angering China
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. Navy again sails through Taiwan Strait, angering China

    Taiwan is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which also include a bitter trade war, U.S. sanctions and China's increasingly muscular military posture in the South China Sea, where the United States also conducts freedom-of-navigation patrols. The voyage will be viewed by self-ruled Taiwan as a sign of support from the Trump administration amid growing friction between Taipei and Beijing, which views the island as a breakaway province. "The ships' transit through the Taiwan Strait demonstrates the U.S. commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific," Commander Clay Doss, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy's Seventh Fleet, said in a statement.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    First Nations leaders disappointed Indigenous high school courses not mandatory

    TORONTO — Indigenous courses will not be a mandatory part of the high school curriculum in Ontario — a decision that has angered First Nations members.The Progressive Conservative government's decision reverses a commitment from the former Liberals to make the courses mandatory, stemming from a recommendation by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler.He is disappointed the courses will only be offered as electives."Learning about the colonial history of this country should not be optional," Fiddler said. "As long as we make these courses as electives, I think the system will continue to fail our students...Imagine training the next generation of leaders, whether they're in politics or judges or lawyers or teachers, without this critical piece. It's very troublesome."Education Minister Lisa Thompson announced this week that the newly developed First Nations, Metis and Inuit Studies curriculum for grades 9 to 12 will be in place this September."We are committed to ensuring that Indigenous perspectives are present in Ontario's curriculum," Thompson said in a statement. "We look forward to continuing strong partnerships with Indigenous leaders and the community, and this represents an important step in our ongoing collaboration."The curriculum is comprised of 10 courses, which she said will give students up-to-date learning about Indigenous perspectives, cultures, contributions and contemporary realities in areas such as art, literature, law, humanities, politics and history.Three of the courses may be substituted for compulsory credits, but decisions are up to school boards, the ministry said.A revised curriculum implemented last year does include some mandatory Indigenous content for grades 1 to 10, the ministry said."We also recently announced our plans to move forward with additional revisions to strengthen mandatory Indigenous content and learning across subjects, grades and courses," spokeswoman Heather Irwin said in a statement.It replaces the 20-year-old Native Studies curriculum, which was also comprised of elective courses.Fiddler said Nishnawbe Aski Nation, which represents 49 First Nation communities across northern Ontario, had been involved in developing the curriculum until shortly after last year's election. The government said the new curriculum is the result of collaboration with Indigenous teachers, elders, residential school survivors, and other community representatives. The government will be seeking input on the curriculum from the community next month.Sol Mamakwa, the NDP critic for Indigenous relations and reconciliation, said it is "shameful" the curriculum was developed without adequately consulting Indigenous communities."It's disheartening and frustrating to see the voices of Indigenous communities ignored once again," Mamakwa said in a statement.He slammed the decision to make the courses elective, at a time when school boards say they are scaling back on the elective courses they are able to offer because of the Premier Doug Ford government's decision to increase high school class sizes."Ford is not taking this (Truth and Reconciliation Commission) Call to Action seriously — and that drags us backwards, further away from reconciliation," Mamakwa wrote.The former Liberal government said in 2016 that it would make Indigenous learning mandatory for all students."We will educate all Ontarians about the horrors of the residential school system, the betrayals of past governments and our rights and responsibilities as treaty people — because in Ontario, we are all treaty people," then-premier Kathleen Wynne said at the time.Allison Jones, The Canadian Press

  • Kenney warns 'tough decisions' ahead as UCP rolls out throne speech
    News
    CBC

    Kenney warns 'tough decisions' ahead as UCP rolls out throne speech

    Albertans can expect the new UCP government to make tough fiscal decisions as it works to balance the budget while maintaining frontline services, Premier Jason Kenney said Wednesday ahead of the throne speech. "Yes, there will be some tough decisions ahead," Kenney said at a pre-speech news conference. Kenney said a silent majority of voters understands the need to return to balanced budgets.

  • Calgary council may ask province to allow 'Idaho stop' for cyclists
    News
    CBC

    Calgary council may ask province to allow 'Idaho stop' for cyclists

    A city council committee is recommending Calgary ask the province to allow cyclists to treat stop signs as yield signs — a move known as the Idaho stop. The recommendation is one of a list of changes the city's transportation committee is suggesting council support that would require the province to amend the Traffic Safety Act. The Idaho stop would allow cyclists to roll past stop signs if it's safe to proceed without coming to a halt.

  • Road to Boughton Island is public, says P.E.I. transportation minister
    News
    CBC

    Road to Boughton Island is public, says P.E.I. transportation minister

    The province's chief surveyor has done work to confirm that the Bruce Point Road is a public road, said P.E.I.'s new minister of transportation, Steven Myers. It blocked the only road access to Boughton Island, a popular destination for locals. Myers said it's important to reaffirm that no one has the right to block public roads on Prince Edward Island.

  • 3 more parents plead guilty in college admissions scam
    News
    The Canadian Press

    3 more parents plead guilty in college admissions scam

    BOSTON — A married couple and a California businessman are the latest parents to plead guilty in the sweeping college admissions scam.Gregory and Marcia Abbott and Peter Jan Sartorio entered their pleas Wednesday in Boston federal court. They are among 14 parents who have agreed to admit to allegations in the case.The Abbotts, who have homes in New York City and Aspen, Colorado, were charged with paying $125,000 to have someone cheat on their daughter's entrance exams. Gregory Abbot is the founder of a food and beverage packaging company.Sartorio was charged with paying $15,000 to have someone correct his daughter's answers on the ACT. The Menlo Park, California, man founded an organic frozen food company.Nineteen other parents are fighting the charges. They include actress Lori Loughlin (LAWK'-lin) and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli.The Associated Press

  • Once a whistleblower, Bernier's new candidate now promotes conspiracy theories
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Once a whistleblower, Bernier's new candidate now promotes conspiracy theories

    MONTREAL — Maxime Bernier's People's Party of Canada is defending one of its candidates who has promoted conspiracy theorists online and suggested the fight against climate change is akin to the Islamic State.Party spokesman Martin Masse said Ken Pereira may have "eccentric" personal opinions, but the Quebec City-area candidate is an important personality in the province."He defends our values and believes in our values, and that's what's important for us," Masse said in an interview Wednesday.Pereira was one of the first people to blow the whistle on corruption in Quebec's construction industry, but instead of being noticed for his public service, the former president of an industrial mechanics union is getting attention for his online persona.He has suggested the measles vaccine will give people autism, and in a tweet last March Pereira wrote, "The climate agenda is as harmful for Western youth as the radical Islamic State is for their youth." He has also promoted and defended the U.S. sites The Gateway Pundit and Infowars, known for spreading conspiracy theories.Pereira's name became known across the province following a 2009 report on Radio-Canada that looked into corruption in Quebec's construction industry. He was one of the main sources for the story.Pereira leaked the expense accounts of Jocelyn Dupuis, who was the head of Quebec's FTQ-Construction, a union representing the majority of Quebec's construction workers.That Radio-Canada episode helped spark additional investigative reporting that led to the Charbonneau commission, a multi-year inquiry into corruption in the construction industry and the illegal financing of political parties. Pereira testified before the commission in 2013.He went on to develop an online persona — mostly on Twitter. In an April 2016 Twitter post he promoted the debunked theory that the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine causes autism. Last month, he linked to a story about Pope Francis with the comment, "Traitor or mentally ill, the pope wants to radicalize the Catholic Church movement, the new crusade!"Masse said Pereira used to be involved in a type of conspiracy — a corrupt construction industry that had ties to organized crime. And since then he's been interested in conspiracy theories, in general.Pereira is a man who believes in smaller government, personal responsibility, Masse said: "Those are the values that Bernier speaks about constantly."Asked whether climate change activists can be compared to Islamic State terrorists, Masse said that was "rhetoric" on Pereira's part."Look, he thinks there is an exaggeration in the thesis of climate change, and we believe that too," Masse said.In an interview with The Canadian Press Tuesday, Pereira said he remains uncertain about the safety of the MMR vaccine, saying he has "asked a lot of doctors" and has not received a satisfactory response.Bernier, 56, who represents the federal riding of Beauce, south of Quebec City, slammed the door on the Conservative party on the eve of its convention last August.The Tories, he said, were "too intellectually and morally corrupt to be reformed," and on Sept. 14 he launched his new party.The Canadian Press

  • U.S. startup accuses Huawei executive of involvement in trade-secrets theft: WSJ
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. startup accuses Huawei executive of involvement in trade-secrets theft: WSJ

    A Silicon Valley chip startup has accused a top executive of China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Deputy Chairman Eric Xu, of participating in a conspiracy to steal its trade secrets, the Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday, citing court documents. The allegations were made in a lawsuit set for trial on June 3 in federal court in the Eastern District of Texas, in which CNEX Labs Inc claimed that Huawei engaged in a multiyear conspiracy to steal company's solid-state drive computer storage technology, including with the help of a Chinese university, the WSJ reported.

  • Feds offer $15.8B in new ships to Vancouver, Halifax while opening door to Davie
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Feds offer $15.8B in new ships to Vancouver, Halifax while opening door to Davie

    OTTAWA — The federal Liberals have ripped open Canada's multibillion-dollar plan to build new ships for the navy and coast guard, prompting cheers and frustration from shipyards in different parts of the country.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau used a Canadian Coast Guard vessel in Vancouver as a backdrop Wednesday to announce that Ottawa would spend $15.7 billion on new ships for the coastal service.The spending includes two more Arctic patrol vessels from Halifax-based Irving Shipbuilding, which is building six such ships for the navy, and 16 so-called multi-purpose vessels from Seaspan Shipbuilding in Vancouver.The coast guard desperately needs new ships: Documents obtained by The Canadian Press this year warned more than one-third of its 26 large vessels have exceeded their expected lifespans.And their advanced age affects the coast guard's ability to do its job, including reduced search-and-rescue coverage, ferry-service disruptions and cancelled resupply runs to the Arctic."The men and women of the coast guard have been making do with the vessels they have, some of which are almost as old as the coast guard," Trudeau said Wednesday."That is why we are doing a complete fleet renewal."Yet the biggest surprise came when Trudeau revealed the government intends to add a third shipyard as a partner in the national shipbuilding strategy, in an apparent nod to Davie Shipbuilding in Quebec City."Canada's two existing shipyards don't have the capacity to deliver the fleet renewal by themselves," said Trudeau, who was flanked by Liberal ministers and MPs from the Vancouver area."So we're also starting a competitive process for a third yard to help build ships when they're needed."Seaspan and Irving were selected following a competition in 2011 as the two shipyards responsible for building billions of dollars in new vessels for the navy and coast guard.Davie competed, but was passed over and has since fought for scraps outside the plan, including an interim support ship for the navy and three used icebreakers for the coast guard.The Quebec City shipyard nonetheless aggressively lobbied for admittance into the shipbuilding plan, pointing to delays, cost overruns and the fact neither Irving nor Seaspan has delivered a vessel as proof the strategy needed to change.Trudeau stopped short of guaranteeing Davie a spot at the table. Still, Davie spokesman Frederik Boisvert sounded beyond confident, saying the shipyard was clearly now part of the shipbuilding strategy."They recognize the fact that this strategy has been failing the government and the Canadian Coast Guard and the navy for years," he said."This strategy badly needs extra capacity and that's exactly what Davie Shipbuilding is providing."The mood was more sombre at Seaspan, where any celebrations over the government's promise of 16 multipurpose vessels was dulled by the threat of Davie taking away work.Seaspan was selected through the national shipbuilding strategy in 2011 to build four science vessels and a polar icebreaker for the coast guard, as well as two support ships for the navy.While the Vancouver shipyard has been troubled by delays, including faulty welding on some of the ships, the company said it is now making headway. The first science vessel is scheduled for delivery next month.In 2013, the previous Conservative government announced that Seaspan would build 10 other coast guard vessels afterward, but a deal was never finalized.The promise of 16 new multipurpose vessels gives the company the clarity it has wanted, but Seaspan vice-president Tim Page said the entry of a third shipyard into the shipbuilding plan raises new questions about his company's long-term viability — and that of the entire industry."We disagree with the need to add a third shipyard to meet the needs of our Canadian customers," he said."We're worried the entry of a third shipyard will return Canada to the boom-and-bust cycles that have defined previous federal shipbuilding programs."Irving Shipbuilding didn't weigh in on the addition of a third yard, instead simply welcoming the government's decision to purchase two more Arctic patrol vessels.Irving was selected in 2011 to build five Arctic patrol vessels and the navy's new fleet of 15 warships, which latest estimates peg at $60 billion. The Liberals ordered a sixth Arctic vessel and agreed to pay Irving to slow production at a cost of $800 million to prevent layoffs between the end of work on the last Arctic ship and the start of warship work.Even then, federal bureaucrats and Irving have warned there was still the threat of an 18- to 24-month production gap between the two fleets.\- Follow @leeberthiaume on Twitter.Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

  • Physicist Corey Gray finds threads that connect Einstein and his own Blackfoot heritage
    News
    CBC

    Physicist Corey Gray finds threads that connect Einstein and his own Blackfoot heritage

    Corey Gray grew up on the Siksika Nation, dreaming of becoming the 'Siksika MacGyver,' after his favourite television character. Gray was also part of the team that discovered the existence of gravitational waves produced by two colliding black holes, which supports Einstein's theory of relativity. One of the great discoveries of the past century, the team's founders won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  • Emergence of Ibaka, bench good news for Toronto Raptors ahead of Game 5
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Emergence of Ibaka, bench good news for Toronto Raptors ahead of Game 5

    MILWAUKEE — Early in the second quarter Tuesday, Serge Ibaka got his hands on a rebound, threw down a monster dunk, then swung from the rim in dramatic fashion.It was one of Ibaka's first baskets of the Raptors' series-tying rout of Milwaukee, and spoke of big things to come from the Congolese big man.Ibaka scored 17 points and grabbed a game-high 13 rebounds off the bench in one of Toronto's best all-around games this post-season.One of the storylines of this post-season is the disappearance of the beloved "Bench Mob," a big part of the Raptors' post-seasons in the past. Through much of two series, the bench was a liability.But on a night that star Kawhi Leonard was hobbling, and the team's second option on offence Pascal Siakam was struggling, the second unit came up big.Was Tuesday's emergence partly about pride?"Oh yeah, we have to take it personal," Ibaka said, in Tuesday's post-game press conference. "We're here for a reason. And when we have a couple of games where we can't really play our best basketball, or we can't really help our team, we take that personally. Everybody."We come in the next day, we watch film, we stay on the court, we take extra shots. Just try to come back and better, like we did tonight."Ibaka, wearing a black monogrammed baseball hat with his nickname "Mafuzzy," was in a jovial mood at the press conference, switching effortlessly to answer questions in English, French and Spanish. He joked with the media: "Anybody speak Italiano? Portuguese?"There was plenty of reason to feel festive. The Raptors' 120-102 victory tied the Eastern Conference final series at two wins apiece. It's now best of three beginning Thursday at Milwaukee's Fiserv Forum. The Raptors are two games away from what would be the franchise's first appearance in the NBA Finals. Another big box ticked in a season of sky-high goals.The 29-year-old Ibaka called Tuesday's win the Raptors' most complete effort."This playoff so far, yes," he said. "Our team needs it from us, coming off the bench to bring some energy, and defensive intensity, and score some points to help our starting lineup. It was big-time for us (Tuesday)." The Raptors arrived in Milwaukee on Wednesday having snatched the momentum back from the Bucks. Tuesday's rout was remarkable in that it came largely with Leonard moving at times like an old man. The player who missed all but nine games last season with a quadriceps injury was clearly hurting.Nurse deftly deflected questions about Leonard's health a day on a conference call Wednesday."Good, no concerns at this point, he's good," Nurse said.Most of the Raptors, banged up from this post-season run — particularly Sunday night's double overtime win — stayed off the court on Wednesday."This is a resting and re-energizing part of the playoffs for us, really almost a full day off of the job outside of guys getting their treatments, few guys got some shots that wanted to stay sharp or get their workouts in, but mostly a recuperation day," Nurse said. "We know we've got a difficult challenge ahead of us, a difficult task and it's going to take everybody's rejuvenated energy and spirit to get the job done."Toronto has never won a series after trailing 0-2. And it's only happened in the conference finals five times in NBA history. Ibaka was part of one those come-from-behind conference wins — Oklahoma City came back to beat San Antonio in the West final in 2012.Before Game 4, Ibaka and Nurse had mulled over offensive rebounds, one of the team's weak spots in previous games."We talked about it before the game," Nurse said. "I said 'Our transition defence has got to be great. Make good decisions. If you're going to go flying in there, you'd better have a chance to get your hands on it or at least tip it to keep it live.'"So I think Serge was determined to get in there and fight for some position, and he looked really big and bouncy and strong, and he got his hands on a bunch of them." The emergence of Norm Powell, who had 18 points Tuesday, and Fred VanVleet (13) is also good news for the Raptors, whose offensive output had stalled after Leonard, Lowry and Siakam."I think we're just playing for one another," Powell said. "We're staying confident in one another."The series returns to Toronto for Game 6 on Saturday. A Game 7, if necessary would be back in Milwaukee on Monday. Lori Ewing, The Canadian Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Postmedia invests in The Logic's subscription-based digital news service

    TORONTO — Postmedia Network Inc. plans to buy a minority stake in The Logic Inc. — a digital-only Canadian media outlet with a mandate to break tech-focused news through investigative journalism, the two companies announced Wednesday.Andrew MacLeod, chief executive of Postmedia — owner the National Post and other publications — said that discussions began after he and Logic founder David Skok were introduced to each other a few months ago by a mutual acquaintance."And then we just realized there might be an opportunity to make something interesting happen. So it evolved," MacLeod said Wednesday in a phone interview.Some of the details are still being worked out by the two companies, such as the size of Postmedia's investment, but MacLeod said there will likely be some revenue sharing."We see it as an opportunity to utilize some of the content that The Logic produces and disseminate it across our network.""And then, as an investor in The Logic, we're incentivized to help them grow their digital subscription business and we would participate in that growth as a potential investor."But MacLeod said there will be "zero impact" or reduction of Postmedia's own editorial coverage "because we're very comfortable — in fact, we're very proud — of our existing editorial footprint."Postmedia's six-month series on innovation last year won one of the gold medals issued at SABEW Canada's Best in Business awards in April. The Logic's coverage also won golds in two categories at the same awards. Skok, The Logic's chief executive and editor-in-chief, wrote in a separate blog posting that the partnership will allow the startup operation to hire more reporters. Its current staff of nine, includes four reporters."We hope this will expand the debate on how Canada can continue to be a better place to live and work, and that we can develop our subscriber community as a result," Skok wrote. Companies in this story: (TSX:PNC.A, TSX:PNC.B)David Paddon, The Canadian Press

  • Brazil wireless carrier TIM uses equipment from China's Huawei for 5G tests
    News
    Reuters

    Brazil wireless carrier TIM uses equipment from China's Huawei for 5G tests

    "TIM wants to be the pioneer and lead 5G in both Brazil and Italy," Pietro Labriola, chief executive officer of TIM Participacoes said in a statement on Wednesday, adding that Florianopolis is the first city in Brazil to have a 5G antenna in the 3.5 GHz frequency. The local subsidiary of Telecom Italia SpA also has 5G testing initiatives in two other cities in Brazil, where it is partnering with Finnish telecomms equipment maker Nokia and its Swedish peer Ericsson , TIM said. According to Labriola, the development of 5G technology in Brazil, which is expected to take place next year, depends on the conditions of a frequency auction to be designed by local authorities.

  • Amazon rejects facial recognition, climate change proposals
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Amazon rejects facial recognition, climate change proposals

    NEW YORK — Despite pressure from civil rights groups, activist investors and its own employees, Amazon said Wednesday that shareholders at an annual meeting in Seattle voted against proposals related to two major social issues: climate change and facial recognition technology.The two proposals on facial recognition had asked Amazon to stop selling its technology to government agencies, saying that it could be used to invade people's privacy and target minorities.Earlier this month, San Francisco banned the use of facial recognition software by police and other city departments. Amazon has defended its facial recognition technology, saying that it helps law enforcement catch criminals, find missing people and prevent crime.The climate change proposal, backed by more than 7,600 Amazon employees, pushed the company to release a detailed plan on how it will curb its use of fossil fuels that power its data centres and planes that ship its packages.After the shareholding meeting in Seattle Wednesday, the employees said that they plan to continue to put pressure on Amazon to do more to reduce its impact on climate change. Amazon said it already has plans to release its carbon footprint later this year and has been working to cut shipping emissions.Amazon did not release shareholder vote totals on Wednesday, but said it will release them later this week in a government filing.Joseph Pisani, The Associated Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Judge considers public shaming in sentencing of naked man in grocery store

    PRINCE ALBERT, Sask. — A Saskatchewan man convicted of running naked through the aisles of a grocery store and into a meat cooler won't spend any further time in custody.Calvin John Jobb, who is 51, has been sentenced to four months in jail, but was credited for time already served in remand.Provincial court Judge Mary McAuley noted in her sentencing report that Jobb has been publicly humiliated since a video of his run in the buff at the Prince Albert Superstore in March went viral online.She also pointed out that some people, including store employees, were traumatized by his actions, while others “thought it was hilarious.”Jobb, who has been sentenced for various offences 68 times before, faces 18 months of probation and isn't allowed to go to the Superstore.He also has to write a letter of apology to staff and pay $196 to cover the cost of meat and other food that had to be thrown away after his arrest.He is banned from bars and liquor stores, and must seek counselling for his alcohol addiction.“He caused humiliation to himself and his family,” McAuley said in court Wednesday. “He scared people and he is remorseful and has apologized.”Court heard previously that on March 3 Jobb had smoked what he thought was marijuana, but what was actually crystal meth. He said he had never smoked the drug before, began hallucinating and believed someone was trying to kill him.His lawyer, Robert Rooney, clarified that his client was convinced people had put electronic tracking devices in his clothes and that’s why he removed them.Witnesses saw Jobb swing a broom stick, yell at customers, damage cash registers and jump into one of the meat coolers. It took four officers to get him out of the store and, at one point, he grabbed one of their Tasers.Court was told Jobb’s criminal record dates back to 1984. The Crown was asking for 12 months in jail, but McAuley said she considered significant factors in his Gladue report.A Gladue report is a pre-sentencing review which considers an Indigenous offender’s background.Jobb's report said that he was exposed to alcohol and drugs when he was growing up and experienced sexual abuse when he was seven and again while attending residential school.McAuley addressed Jobb directly and told him it was his responsibility to overcome his past.“If you come back to this court in the future and say, ‘My past got to me again’ it becomes less potent," she said. "Your job is to turn your life around. Break the cycle. It is a generational cycle and if you don’t (break it) you’ll pass it down to your kids.” An emotional Jobb responded with an apology and said he continues to take steps to address his problems.(paNOW)Teena Monteleone, paNOW, The Canadian Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    US stocks fall on mixed earnings, trade tensions; oil slumps

    Stocks closed lower on Wall Street Wednesday, weighed down by a mixed batch of corporate earnings from big retailers and lingering uncertainty over the trade spat between the U.S. and China.Lowe's and Nordstrom were among the biggest decliners in the S&P 500 after the retailers reported quarterly results that fell short of Wall Street's expectations. Target bucked the trend, surging after its latest results handily topped analysts' forecasts.Chipmakers and other technology stocks also pulled the market lower, continuing a pattern of volatile trading as investors react to developments in the U.S. and China's trade dispute. Energy stocks also took losses, falling along with the price of crude oil. Small company stocks declined more than the rest of the market.The sell-off outweighed gains by health care companies, household goods makers and other sectors, reversing some of the market's gains from a day earlier."There's just so much uncertainty, it's really hard for anybody to frame how it's going to play out," said Karyn Cavanaugh, senior markets strategist at Voya Investment Management.The S&P 500 index fell 8.09 points, or 0.3%, to 2,856.27. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 100.72 points, or 0.4%, to 25,776.61. The Nasdaq composite slid 34.88 points, or 0.5%, to 7,750.84.The Russell 2000 index of small company stocks gave up 13.62 points, or 0.9%, to 1,531.63.Major stock indexes in Europe closed mixed.Bond prices rose, dragging the yield on the 10-year Treasury to 2.38% from 2.42% late Tuesday.Heightened tensions over trade have stuck the market in a rut for the last two weeks. The major U.S. indexes are all down more than 3% in May, although they are still holding on to gains for the year between 10% and 16%.The turbulent stretch of trading this month has been a change from the relative calm that dominated markets earlier this year, when a trade agreement appeared in the works.The U.S. has imposed 25% tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese imports and is planning to target another $300 billion, a move that would cover everything China ships to the U.S. China, meanwhile, has retaliated against $110 billion in U.S. products.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer wrapped up an 11th round of talks with Chinese counterparts earlier this month without reaching an agreement. More talks have yet to be scheduled.The trade war continues to be a wild card hanging over the market, said Jason Pride, chief investment officer of private wealth for Glenmede. The economy is in the late stages of a decade-long expansion and investors are questioning how much longer it can continue."Everybody is looking over their shoulders trying to figure out when this cycle will end," he said.Corporate earnings and federal monetary policy have ceased to be major concerns, Pride said. That leaves trade as the most closely watched and currently volatile issue.Meanwhile, investors appeared to shrug off the minutes from the Federal Reserve's last meeting of policymakers.The central bank released the minutes Wednesday afternoon, but the market barely budged. The minutes show some Fed officials still thought more interest rate increases might be needed to keep low unemployment from triggering unwanted inflation. Financial markets have been hoping that the Fed will start cutting rates soon to bolster growth further.At its last meeting, the Fed kept its key policy rate unchanged in a range of 2.25% to 2.5%, where it's been since the Fed hiked rates for a fourth time last year.Qualcomm and Apple drove the slide in technology stocks Wednesday. Qualcomm plunged 10.9% following a federal judge's ruling against the chipmaker in an antitrust case. Several other chipmakers also fell. Micron Technology fell 2.6%, Intel dropped 1% and Broadcom slid 2.2%.Tech stocks have swung between gains and losses this week after the U.S. proposed restrictions on technology sales to Chinese companies and then granted a 90-day grace period.Investors hammered Lowe's after the home improvement retailer slashed its outlook for the year following a weak first quarter. The company's shares tumbled 11.8%, its biggest single-day decline in more than 28 years.The latest results come a day after rival Home Depot reported solid first quarter financial results.Nordstrom also had a bad day, skidding 9.2% a day after the department store chain reported disappointing financial results. The company also cut its annual sales forecast.In contrast, Target had its best day since late 2017 after a surge in online sales lifted its first quarter profit well above Wall Street forecasts. The retailer has been aggressively expanding its online shopping options, including same-day services and in-store pickups. Its shares vaulted 7.8%.Energy stocks also fell after energy futures closed broadly lower. Halliburton lost 3.3% and Schlumberger slid 2.9%.Energy futures finished lower Wednesday. Benchmark U.S. crude fell after the U.S. Energy Department reported a large increase in crude supplies for last week. It dropped 2.7%, settling at $61.42 per barrel.Brent crude, the international standard, closed 1.6% lower at $70.99 per barrel.Wholesale gasoline slid 1.4% to $1.99 per gallon. Heating oil gave up 1.5% to $2.05 per gallon. Natural gas fell 2.7% to $2.54 per 1,000 cubic feet.Gold inched up 0.1% to $1,274.20 per ounce, silver added 0.3% to $14.45 per ounce and copper slid 1.4% to $2.69 per pound.The dollar fell to 110.29 Japanese yen from 110.63 yen on Monday. The euro strengthened to $1.1160 from $1.1158.Damian J. Troise And Alex Veiga, The Associated Press

  • Daniel Craig to have ankle surgery, 'Bond' film remains on schedule
    News
    Reuters

    Daniel Craig to have ankle surgery, 'Bond' film remains on schedule

    James Bond actor Daniel Craig will undergo ankle surgery after injuring himself while filming the spy franchise's latest installment, but the movie remains on schedule for an April 2020 release, producers said on Wednesday. A posting on the official James Bond Twitter account said the surgery was minor and that Craig hurt himself while shooting in Jamaica. "Production will continue whilst Craig is rehabilitating for two weeks post-surgery.

  • Soldiers' families not told of Afghan war memorial tribute
    Global News

    Soldiers' families not told of Afghan war memorial tribute

    A memorial to Canadian veterans who died in Afghanistan has been placed inside a government building that is not accessible to the public. As Mercedes Stephenson reports, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is now facing questions over why the families of fallen soldiers weren't informed about the tribute.

  • High water levels may push LaSalle to move Strawberry Festival to Vollmer complex
    News
    CBC

    High water levels may push LaSalle to move Strawberry Festival to Vollmer complex

    The annual Strawberry Festival in LaSalle may be moved this year to the Vollmer Culture and Recreation Complex if town council decides to go ahead with what administration is recommending.Its usual location, Gil Maure Park, has been affected by high water levels resulting from April and May rains.Portions of the road nearby have water pooling and there is puddling throughout the park, according to a report to council."There's no forecast that the water levels are going to go down in the next month," said Coun. Jeff Renaud."So at this point, we have standing water in the park, we have water over the roads at times down by the water, as well as water over the boat ramp."The festival is outdoors, complete with carnival rides. Vollmer, which Renaud said is designed for festivals, will be able to accommodate the stage, outdoor vendors and carnival rides.In the report, staff recommends shuttle buses pick up and drop off people throughout the festival, which can help alleviate parking congestion and concerns.Another option is to partner with Transit Windsor to add a shuttle service during fireworks.The report said even with the change in location, the parade date and route wouldn't be changed and will remain on Front Road on Saturday morning.Staff estimates that the relocation could cost roughly $45,000. Most of the cost is from new electrical and water requirements.Renaud said the move would only be for this year and that there are no plans for the town to move this festival permanently.Town council is meeting Thursday to make a decision.

  • Pink cocoa creators want treat recognized as new chocolate
    News
    CBC

    Pink cocoa creators want treat recognized as new chocolate

    A mysterious pink-hued treat made from cocoa beans is officially debuting in North America this week. In Canada, there are officially only three types of chocolate: milk, dark and white. A fourth would have to be approved by Health Canada, and the federal agency says it hasn't received any request yet.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Police in western Quebec investigate attacks on various public utilities

    GATINEAU, Que. — Police forces in western Quebec are investigating a series of attacks on public utility installations and private business equipment that occurred over a one-month period earlier this spring.Montreal La Presse reported Wednesday as many as 15 sites were hit by bullets from a high-calibre rifle between mid-March and mid-April.Targeted sites included hydro towers, highway inspection installations and telecommunication company equipment. There were no reported injuries.Hydro-Quebec spokesman Louis-Olivier Batty said the damage to one of the corporation's towers cost between $75,000 and $100,000 to repair."There was no impact for our customers in Quebec but we have assessed there was an impact on our exports to Ontario," Batty said. "We are still pursuing our investigation but we can tell it was potentially limited and did not last very long."Police in Gatineau, the MRC-des-Collines police force and Quebec provincial police all confirmed they have open investigations into attacks on public utilities or on private business equipment.Gatineau police said they are investigating nine cases and are trying to determine whether a person they recently arrested in an unrelated case is linked to any of the utility or equipment attacks."The installations vary and the equipment and buildings that were targeted were all different," said Gatineau police spokeswoman Andree East.She said the damages to the various locations are believed to be in the tens of thousands of dollars.Provincial police said bullets were fired at installations belonging to Bell and Videotron in Quebec's Outaouais region. Shots were also fired, they said, at highway inspection installations in the same area.Eric Labonte, president the Quebec Brotherhood of Highway Traffic Controllers Constables, said the attacks on the installations are an example why his members should be armed like their counterparts in some other Canadian jurisdictions."Thankfully there weren't any employees, because there could have been serious injuries," Labonte said.The Canadian Press

  • Floating a new idea at Le Pays de la Sagouine in Bouctouche
    News
    CBC

    Floating a new idea at Le Pays de la Sagouine in Bouctouche

    The iconic but ice-battered wooden bridge at Le Pays de la Sagouine in Bouctouche will be repaired for this year's tourism season, but it won't be used. Instead, a floating dock will be added to link the mainland to the theatrical village on Île-aux-Puces in Bouctouche Harbour.

  • Officials: Last slave ship from Africa ID'd on Alabama coast
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Officials: Last slave ship from Africa ID'd on Alabama coast

    Researchers working in the murky waters of the northern Gulf Coast have located the wreck of the last ship known to bring enslaved people from Africa to the United States, historical officials said Wednesday. Remains of the Gulf schooner Clotilda were identified and verified near Mobile after months of assessment, a statement by the Alabama Historical Commission said. "The discovery of the Clotilda is an extraordinary archaeological find," said Lisa Demetropoulos Jones, executive director of the commission.

  • Security screening at Winnipeg library reducing crime
    Global News

    Security screening at Winnipeg library reducing crime

    Despite calls for new security screening at the Millennium Library to end, city staff say the new safety measures are making a positive difference.

  • Health authority board criticized for lack of transparency at public meeting
    News
    CBC

    Health authority board criticized for lack of transparency at public meeting

    The first open meeting of Nova Scotia's health authority board ended with the chair being questioned about the transparency of the meeting after he refused to release a report from the CEO, citing concerns in the accuracy of any reporting on it. While the meeting was public, reporters weren't allowed to record the session, as board chair Frank van Schaayk said it would be a distraction to their work. Reporters questioned van Schaayk about why a report discussed at a public meeting wasn't being made public.