• Why some Canadian farmers may soon tower 'head and shoulders' above their U.S. rivals in Japan
    News
    CBC

    Why some Canadian farmers may soon tower 'head and shoulders' above their U.S. rivals in Japan

    The local owners of Sunterra Farms hosted the men because, to crack one of the world's most desirable markets, their staff needed to see exactly how Japanese consumers liked their meat. "One of the guys that was on our [production] line said, 'These guys aren't butchers — they're artists,'" recalled Ray Price, president of Sunterra Farms. "It's really good," said Price, assessing the impact of the deal — called the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) — on his business with Japan.

  • Canada's review of Huawei won't be derailed by threats, Goodale says
    News
    CBC

    Canada's review of Huawei won't be derailed by threats, Goodale says

    Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale is brushing off recent threats from China's envoy to Canada, who warned of "repercussions" if the federal government bans the Chinese firm Huawei Technologies from supplying equipment to Canadian 5G networks. Goodale spoke to reporters Friday during the Liberal cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Que., a day after Ambassador Lu Shaye told the media at the Chinese Embassy in Ottawa that "there will be repercussions" if Canada bans Huawei from its 5G network.

  • Blair wants to make cabinet pitch on possible handgun ban within two weeks
    News
    CBC

    Blair wants to make cabinet pitch on possible handgun ban within two weeks

    The federal minister tasked with studying a handgun ban for Canada hopes to make a recommendation to cabinet within the next two weeks. Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Bill Blair has spent the last several months consulting with stakeholders across the country, looking for ways to restrict access to firearms for gang members and other criminals. "We've completed that study and we're compiling the results and I'll be going before the cabinet in the coming weeks with results of that review and some recommendations," Blair said during the Trudeau government's cabinet retreat in Sherbrooke, Que.

  • UK Queen Elizabeth's husband Philip, 97, recovers after car crash
    News
    Reuters

    UK Queen Elizabeth's husband Philip, 97, recovers after car crash

    Philip was at the wheel of his Land Rover when it collided with another car on a road close to the royals' Sandringham private residence in Norfolk on Thursday afternoon, Buckingham Palace said. While the woman driver and a female passenger in the other car which also had a baby on board needed hospital treatment for minor injuries, Philip was unhurt, although shaken. "It was an astonishing escape for everyone," said Roy Warne, 75, who pulled the prince from the wreckage.

  • Portugal airports to introduce separate passport lanes for Brits after Brexit
    euronews Videos

    Portugal airports to introduce separate passport lanes for Brits after Brexit

    Portugal has announced plans to open separate customs lanes for British tourists at its airports after the UK leaves the European Union, as it seeks to prevent a post-Brexit slump in its tourism industry. Prime Minister Antonio Costa said the new lanes would be opened at Faro airport in the Algarve and Funchal airport on the island of Madeira — both popular destinations for British holidaymakers. The lanes for UK nationals will be similar to those provided to tourists from the EU, he said. British holidaymakers are important to Portugal as they are the biggest group of tourists to the country. However, numbers have dipped recently as the pound has fallen against the euro amid concerns over Brexit. Portuguese Economy Minister Pedro Siza Vieira also sought to ease Britons’ worries this week, saying they wouldn’t need a visa even in the event of a no-deal Brexit. He also said British citizens living in Portugal would retain all their rights after the UK leaves the EU, including access to healthcare. “We are ready to do this unilaterally,” he told Reuters, adding that he hoped the UK would do the same for Portuguese people. Portugal and Britain are the world’s oldest allies, having forged relations through a 1386 treaty. Watch the video above to find out more about how Portugal and the British Embassy are trying to ease concerns among expats.

  • A look inside the pet-friendly homeless shelter at the old Royal Victoria Hospital
    News
    CBC

    A look inside the pet-friendly homeless shelter at the old Royal Victoria Hospital

    On the third floor of the 103-year-old greystone Ross Pavilion, rooms abandoned when the Royal Victoria moved to the Glen site four years ago have been outfitted for a new clientele. Montreal's newest emergency shelter opened Tuesday night. The expectation is those numbers will increase as word gets out that all — men, women, trans people — are welcome here, and as the temperatures turn colder, said Sam Watts, CEO of the Welcome Home Mission.

  • Nunavut's overall employment rate drops in 2018, along with Inuit employment
    News
    CBC

    Nunavut's overall employment rate drops in 2018, along with Inuit employment

    Last year, there were 13,500 people with jobs in the territory and more than 2,000 people looking for work — most people looking for work were Inuit. The Inuit employment rate sits at 45 per cent, down from 47 per cent, while nearly all non-Inuit are employed (91 per cent).

  • Ottawa man caught up in 2-year tussle over birth name
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa man caught up in 2-year tussle over birth name

    When Claude Therien needed to replace his lost and expired passport in 2016, the 68-year-old submitted his birth certificate to Passport Canada to prove his Canadian citizenship. Therien was raised in a traditional French-Catholic family, and his baptismal name follows the centuries-old religious tradition of naming boys after Joseph, husband of Mary, mother of Jesus. According to tradition, that biblical moniker is followed by a godparent's name — in Therien's case, Louis — a given name and finally, the family name, accidentally given an extra "r" by Therien's father.

  • Harassment complaint launched against RNC chief
    News
    CBC

    Harassment complaint launched against RNC chief

    The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary's top officer is facing a harassment complaint. RNC Chief Joe Boland confirmed to CBC News a complaint has been launched against him by a uniformed officer in the force. Complaint not sexual A source tells CBC News the complaint was launched by a veteran officer who is himself facing an internal disciplinary investigation, and is not sexual in nature.

  • Tech group maps the least user-friendly bus stops for seniors in Fredericton
    News
    CBC

    Tech group maps the least user-friendly bus stops for seniors in Fredericton

    Fredericton Civic Tech, a group with a common interest in open source data and knowledge sharing to build digital tools for cities, combed through pages of data on bus stops in the city and ranked them based on a number of factors. Project leads Pierre Cormier and Kyle Roger gave the highest scores to stops with a shelter, a sidewalk, snow removal and accessibility. Then they used census data to map the areas where the most people over 50 live and projected where that population is likely to live in 2028.

  • P.E.I. losing child and adolescent psychiatrist
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. losing child and adolescent psychiatrist

    Dr. Anita Taj was hired last year for a one-year locum position at the Richmond Centre in Charlottetown. The province said it is working to recruit a permanent full-time replacement. Child and adolescent telepsychiatry is already offered at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital by Dr. Kizilbash, Health PEI said.

  • Salesforce to double presence in Ireland with 1,500 new jobs
    News
    Reuters

    Salesforce to double presence in Ireland with 1,500 new jobs

    Salesforce.Com will more than double its workforce in Ireland by adding 1,500 jobs, marking one of the largest single job announcements in the 70-year history of the state's foreign investment agency. The San Francisco-based cloud software maker currently employs 1,400 people in Dublin, the European hub for a number of major technology firms, and will add the new jobs over the next five years as it moves into a new 430,000 feet campus on the city's north docks. "Europe is Salesforce's fastest growing region, and Ireland has been a significant part of our success," Miguel Milano, Saleforce's international president, said on Friday.

  • Lunar eclipse to darken Canadian skies this weekend — here's how you can see it
    News
    CBC

    Lunar eclipse to darken Canadian skies this weekend — here's how you can see it

    On Jan. 20 or 21 (depending on where you are in the country), Canada will be treated to a total lunar eclipse. It's being hailed on social media as the "super blood wolf moon," though it's not really different from any other total lunar eclipse. That is, it'll still be magnificent.  The reason for the dramatic name comes from three happenstances. First, the moon will be almost at perigee — or the closest point to Earth in its elliptical orbit. When this happens during a full moon, non-astronomers refer to the development as a "super moon," since the celestial body will appear slightly larger in the sky. But individuals will be hard-pressed to visually tell the difference.  During a total lunar eclipse, the moon can turn a coppery-reddish colour as Earth's atmosphere scatters the light from the sun, which will lie directly behind it. Light with longer wavelengths — like orange and red — refract, or bend, around the Earth where it eventually reaches the moon. Finally, full moons are given monthly names, and this one happens to be the "wolf" moon. Canada is optimally placed to see it, given that there are clear skies. The entire nine-and-a-half-hour event can be seen from coast-to-coast-to-coast, though what we'll actually be able to see will last just over four hours. First, the moon will enter the penumbral phase, where it glides through Earth's outer — and much fainter — shadow. You likely won't be able to see any real difference during this phase. Then, the fun begins as the moon enters the umbra or darker shadow. At first, it'll look like something took a bite out of its western limb. This is the beginning of the partial eclipse. About 90 minutes later, it will reach totality. It's unknown if the moon will turn a coppery red or remain dark, which is another possibility. The process then goes in reverse as the moon begins its exit through the umbra and eventually the penumbra. Unlike a solar eclipse, you can look at a lunar eclipse. And the best thing is, you don't need any special equipment to watch it: just step outside, look up and find the moon. Of course, watching any celestial event is dependant on the weather. Canadian winters usually come with a lot of cloud. Even if you're clouded out, you can still watch it online. The Virtual Telescope Project will begin its airing at 10:30 p.m. ET. TimeandDate.com will begin their coverage at 10 p.m. ET.

  • Councillor wants Halifax to take closer look at Uber, Lyft
    News
    CBC

    Councillor wants Halifax to take closer look at Uber, Lyft

    A Halifax councillor wants the municipality to consider how to handle ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft. Matt Whitman said a new food delivery service is just a way for the industry to test the waters. A comprehensive review of Halifax's taxi industry has been underway since April 2017. A report is expected to be presented to the transportation committee in February.

  • MV Gallipoli, plagued by controversy and delays, almost ready for the water
    News
    CBC

    MV Gallipoli, plagued by controversy and delays, almost ready for the water

    The MV Gallipoli, following a 16-month, $10-million ordeal, could once again be transporting passengers, freight and vehicles on the Ramea-Grey River-Burgeo ferry run in the coming days. "We're looking at in the next week or two," Transportation Minister Steve Crocker said Thursday. It would bring an end to more than a year of controversy and cost escalations that included an unusual mishap, the termination of a contract, and the eventual bankruptcy of Burry's Shipyard in Clarenville.

  • Should sports teams ditch the term 'midget'? This Brockville dad says yes
    News
    CBC

    Should sports teams ditch the term 'midget'? This Brockville dad says yes

    Jason Edgley of Brockville, Ont., has a step-son who loves sports, but the prospect of him joining the local "midget" hockey league makes the family cringe. Now, the family is hoping the message will spread to other teams and sports organizations.

  • With 2020 wastewater deadline looming, CBRM coming down to the wire
    News
    CBC

    With 2020 wastewater deadline looming, CBRM coming down to the wire

    It's going to be nip and tuck whether Cape Breton Regional Municipality meets next year's deadline under federal sewage wastewater treatment rules. Work on the last of the municipality's high-risk effluent systems has yet to start, but Wayne MacDonald, CBRM's director of engineering and public works, said a new infrastructure funding program might help. A decade ago, CBRM officials estimated it would take $454 million to comply with the rules for high-risk and low-risk systems.

  • 'I don't feel safe': Yarmouth teen who endured vicious attack speaks out
    News
    CBC

    'I don't feel safe': Yarmouth teen who endured vicious attack speaks out

    The 17-year-old girl who endured a vicious attack in Yarmouth, N.S., believed she would never go home again if she didn't try to escape by jumping out of the car driven by her attackers. 

  • 6 things to do in Toronto this weekend
    News
    CBC

    6 things to do in Toronto this weekend

    This weekend is expected to be freezing cold. But if you are willing to bundle up and have some fun, there are a lot of pretty cool events you can go to. Here is a list:

  • Killer of 2 Moncton police officers in 1974 loses appeal of parole decision
    News
    CBC

    Killer of 2 Moncton police officers in 1974 loses appeal of parole decision

    Richard Bergeron, serving a life sentence for the first-degree murder of two Moncton police officers in 1974, has lost another attempt to get unescorted temporary absences from prison. The appeal division of the Parole Board of Canada upheld an earlier decision rejecting Bergeron's request. Bergeron had asked if he could leave prison to set up a bank account in British Columbia's Fraser Valley and move to a community residential facility on Vancouver Island.

  • Chinese drone maker DJI uncovers corruption, sees $150 million loss
    News
    Reuters

    Chinese drone maker DJI uncovers corruption, sees $150 million loss

    China's SZ DJI Technology Co Ltd, the world's largest maker of consumer drones, has discovered several cases of serious corruption at the company and expects 2018 losses of more than 1 billion yuan ($150 million) as a result, it said on Friday. "DJI condemns any form of corruption strongly and has set up a high-level anti-corruption task force to investigate further and strengthen anti-corruption measures," it said. "A number of corruption cases have been handed over to the authorities, and some employees have been dismissed," it added.

  • Extreme cold weather warning in place Friday for Saskatoon, northern Sask.
    News
    CBC

    Extreme cold weather warning in place Friday for Saskatoon, northern Sask.

    Extreme wind chills are expected for a large section of Saskatchewan Friday morning. A large cold weather mass has settled across a band of the province stretching from the Saskatoon area to the far north. "It's pretty much a big flow of northerly air straight out of the arctic," said Environment Canada lead forecaster Brad Vrolijk.

  • Drilling machines help frantic search of trapped Spanish boy
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Drilling machines help frantic search of trapped Spanish boy

    Heavy machinery has been brought in by rescuers in southern Spain who plan to drill vertical tunnels next to a deep borehole to reach a 2-year-old boy trapped there for five days. "The terrain's geology is complicated, and that's slowing down the works," said Angel Garcia, the leading engineer co-ordinating the search-and-rescue operation, on Friday. Spaniards are holding their breath with every setback in the against-the-clock race to reach Julen Rosello, who fell into the 110-meter (360-foot) deep waterhole on Sunday.

  • AT&T ads returning to YouTube, two years after pulling back over content
    News
    Reuters

    AT&T ads returning to YouTube, two years after pulling back over content

    AT&T is one of the largest U.S. brand marketers by total ad spend, according to research firm eMarketer, and its return caps off a tumultuous period for YouTube beginning in March 2017, when major advertisers including Verizon Communications Inc and Johnson & Johnson , left the platform after their ads played during videos featuring hate speech or other disturbing material. As brands eventually returned to YouTube, AT&T remained a major advertiser that held back. After 22 months of working closely with Google, AT&T said it was confident "that there is a near-zero possibility" its ads could end up appearing next to inappropriate or unapproved content on YouTube, Fiona Carter, AT&T's chief brand officer, said in an interview.

  • Cricket: Supreme Court to rule on Indian players suspended for remarks about women
    News
    Reuters

    Cricket: Supreme Court to rule on Indian players suspended for remarks about women

    Indian cricket administrators recalled all-rounder Hardik Pandya and batsman KL Rahul from a tour of Australia and charged them with misconduct and indiscipline after remarks condemned on social media as sexist, racist and misogynist. A committee of administrators (COA) that is running Indian cricket this week asked the top court to appoint an ombudsman to investigate the case and punish the cricketers if they were found to have brought disrepute to the game. The involvement of the top court stems from a 2017 decision to fire officials of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) for failing to reform one of the game's richest bodies after a spate of corruption scandals and to set up the COA that reports to it.