• Raptors' Masai Ujiri on winning, losing Kawhi Leonard, 'the shove,' and his own future with the team
    News
    CBC

    Raptors' Masai Ujiri on winning, losing Kawhi Leonard, 'the shove,' and his own future with the team

    As the Toronto Raptors' training camp in Quebec City nears, Canadian basketball fans may be asking themselves whether the Raptors have any chance of winning another NBA championship without star forward Kawhi Leonard. Raptors president Masai Ujiri's optimistic answer to that is simple: "100 per cent," he said in an interview with Adrienne Arsenault, co-host of CBC's The National. "I look at what this team has done and what we can learn from it. We learned how to win. And Kawhi taught us that. He brought us into that space," Ujiri said.He couches that by saying the team may not dominate the league this season, but adds he's confident the Raptors will win again now that they've tasted victory. 'A win for Africa'Arsenault sat down with Ujiri in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, where he was running a camp for young basketball hopefuls.Ujiri founded Giants of Africa in 2003 to organize camps across the continent to teach both basketball and life skills, in the hopes of developing the sport and developing young African leaders. At the camp, Ujiri repeatedly told the young players that the Raptors' NBA win was a win for Africa — using the momentum of the championship to encourage them to aim high.He pointed out there are two African-born players with the Raptors: Pascal Siakam was born in Cameroon and Serge Ibaka in the Republic of Congo.Many of the coaching staff are African-born as well, and Ujiri himself is widely touted as the only professional basketball executive from the continent. He was born in London but moved to Zaria, Nigeria, when he was two and spent his formative years there. All this, he emphasizes, means the Raptors' win is also an African win. Here, Ujiri talks about his first reaction when the Raptors won that final game in Oakland, Calif., on June 13:   The shoveShortly after the buzzer went off in Oracle Arena and the Raptors clinched the NBA championship, video surfaced of Ujiri trying to get down to the floor to celebrate with his team.It appeared some kind of altercation happened between him and a deputy sheriff in the arena, who was checking credentials. More than three months after the event, the Alameda County District Attorney's Office still hasn't decided whether to file charges against Ujiri. The D.A.'s office said the deputy was injured in the incident and still hasn't been cleared for full duties. Arsenault asked Ujiri about that alleged shove: Losing Kawhi The big question of the Raptors' post-season was whether Kawhi Leonard would stay or go.In the end, to the disappointment of Toronto fans, he decided to join the L.A. Clippers for the upcoming season. Here's what Ujiri says about losing Kawhi: Will Ujiri leave Toronto, too? With an NBA win under his belt, the next question on fans' minds is perhaps whether Ujiri himself will leave.He was reportedly courted by the Washington Wizards. Godwin Owinje, his friend and the co-founder of Giants of Africa, is based in D.C. And his mentor, Barack Obama, is there, too. Might Ujiri be wooed away? Here's what he says: Trading DeMarArsenault also asked Ujiri about a tough moment as Raptors president, which resulted in him being called all kinds of names — trading player DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio in 2018 as part of the deal to bring Kawhi Leonard to Toronto.  Here are Ujiri's thoughts on the controversial trade, in hindsight:

  • Iran asks West to leave Persian Gulf as tensions heightened
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Iran asks West to leave Persian Gulf as tensions heightened

    TEHRAN, Iran — Iran's president called Sunday on Western powers to leave the security of the Persian Gulf to regional nations led by Tehran, criticizing a new U.S.-led coalition patrolling the region's waterways as nationwide parades showcased the Islamic Republic's military arsenal.Hassan Rouhani separately promised to unveil a regional peace plan at this week's upcoming high-level meetings at the United Nations, which comes amid heightened Mideast tensions following a series of attacks, including a missile-and-drone assault on Saudi Arabia's oil industry.The U.S. alleges Iran carried out the Sept. 14 attack on the world's largest oil processor in the kingdom and an oil field, which caused oil prices to spike by the biggest percentage since the 1991 Gulf War. While Yemen's Iranian-allied Houthi rebels claimed the assault, Saudi Arabia says it was "unquestionably sponsored by Iran."For its part, Iran denies being responsible and has warned any retaliatory attack targeting it will result in an "all-out war." That's as it has begun enriching uranium beyond the terms of its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, which the U.S. unilaterally withdrew from over a year earlier.Rouhani spoke from a riser at the parade in Tehran, with uniformed officers from the country's military and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard beside him. The cleric later watched as marching soldiers carrying submachine guns and portable missile launchers drove past as part of "Holy Defence Week," which marks the start of the Iran-Iraq war in 1980.Rouhani said Iran was willing to "extend the hand of friendship and brotherhood" to Persian Gulf nations and was "even ready to forgive their past mistakes.""Those who want to link the region's incidents to the Islamic Republic of Iran are lying like their past lies that have been revealed," the president said. "If they are truthful and really seek security in the region, they must not send weapons, fighter jets, bombs and dangerous arms to the region."Rouhani added that the U.S. and Western nations should "distance" themselves from the region."Your presence has always been a calamity for this region and the farther you go from our region and our nations, the more security would come for our region," he said.He said Iran's plan would focus on providing security in the Persian Gulf, the Strait of Hormuz and the Gulf of Oman "with help from regional countries." Iran has boosted its naval co-operation with China, India, Oman, Pakistan, and Russia in recent years.The U.S. maintains defence agreements across the Persian Gulf with allied Arab nations and has tens of thousands of troops stationed in the region. Since 1980, it has viewed the region as crucial to its national security, given its energy exports. A fifth of all oil traded passes through the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf. The U.S. plans to send additional troops to the region over the tensions.The parades and manoeuvrs Sunday appeared aimed at projecting Iranian strength with naval vessels, submarines and armed speedboats swarmed across the Persian Gulf and troops showed off land-to-sea missiles capable of targeting the U.S. Navy. Commandos fast-roped down onto the deck of a ship, resembling Iran's July seizure of a British-flagged oil tanker.Iranian ship seizures, as well as oil tanker explosions that the U.S. blames on Iran, saw America create a new coalition to protect Mideast waters. So far, Australia, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and the United Arab Emirates have agreed to join it.Iranian parliament speaker Ali Larijani called the U.S-led coalition a "a new means for plundering the region," according to Iran's semi-official Tasnim news agency."We regard the emergence of such coalitions as the start of a new game to make the region insecure," Larijani said, according to Tasnim.Iran separately displayed its Khordad-3 surface-to-air missile that downed a U.S. military surveillance drone in the Strait of Hormuz in June.Sunday also marked the one-year anniversary of an attack on a military parade in Ahvaz that killed 25 people. Both separatists and the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the assault, while Iran blamed Saudi Arabia and the UAE for allegedly supporting the attackers. Both nations denied the claim, though a propaganda video published by a semi-official news agency in Iran close to the Guard later circulated threatening them with missile attacks.___Associated Press writer Jon Gambrell in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, contributed to this report.Nasser Karimi, The Associated Press

  • Liberals pitch middle-class savings as second full week of campaign beckons
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Liberals pitch middle-class savings as second full week of campaign beckons

    OTTAWA — The Liberals tried to turn the page on Justin Trudeau's blackface controversy — and one-up their main rivals — with policy announcements Sunday again aimed squarely at middle-class Canadian wallets.The Conservatives promised more robust support for Canada's veterans, while the NDP pledged billions in funding to curb the effects of natural disasters on communities.Campaign-trail discussion largely shifted back to meat-and-potatoes policy after a steady diet of fallout from Trudeau's blackface scandal.Recently discovered images showing Trudeau in black or brown makeup at costume events before he entered politics had dominated the last few days of the campaign — offending many, raising questions about the Liberal leader's judgment and throwing his party's re-election efforts into disarray.Trudeau trekked to a residential neighbourhood in the ethnically diverse Toronto suburb of Brampton, Ont., to announce he would make the first $15,000 of income tax-free for most Canadians if given a new mandate.The Liberals would raise the basic personal amount by almost $2,000 over four years for people earning under $147,000 a year. It would save the average family $585 a year, Trudeau said.The announcement follows a pledge from Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer to cut the tax rate on the lowest federal income bracket (up to $47,630) to 13.75 per cent from 15 per cent over four years, which the party says would save a two-income couple earning average salaries about $850 a year.Trudeau contrasted his plan with Scheer's by emphasizing Canada's wealthiest one per cent would not benefit at all from the Liberal tax cut."Our plan lowers taxes the most for people who make less, gives the middle class some breathing room and ensures that the wealthy don't get an extra hand up," Trudeau said.The Liberal leader also promised to cut cellphone bills by 25 per cent. He said he would encourage companies to reduce their bills by that amount over the next two years, and if they are unable to meet that target, the Liberals would introduce further competition."Right now, Canadian cellphone plans are among the most expensive in the G7," Trudeau said.NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, who has promised a price cap on cellphone and internet services as well as a telecom consumers' bill of rights, chided Trudeau for promising to work with telecom firms."Again and again, Justin Trudeau says one thing to Canadians before the election but refuses to take on big corporations afterwards," Singh said.Scheer, meanwhile. ventured to Prince Edward Island to promise more support for veterans, hoping to reset the relationship between his party and the ex-military community after more than a decade of tensions with previous governments of all political stripes.The Conservative leader said as prime minister he would clear a backlog of veterans' benefit applications within two years and create a reliable pension system.Scheer also promised to strengthen post-service transition supports, help more veterans get service dogs, enshrine in legislation a guarantee that every veteran is treated with respect and gets services in a timely manner and support commemoration projects such as the National Memorial for Canada's War in Afghanistan."As prime minister I will take a personal interest in ensuring the commitments we made today are followed through on," he said.During a stop in Gatineau, Que., Singh pledged to add $2.5 billion to the federal government's disaster mitigation fund. He said the idea is to help people — like those in west Quebec who recently faced severe flooding — avoid disasters and be able to stay in their current homes.The national Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund has already set aside $2 billion to support large-scale infrastructure programs that help communities better manage such risks.The federal government says an increasing number of Canadian communities have experienced significant weather-related events and disasters triggered by natural hazards such as floods, wildland fires and droughts — calamities that are becoming more frequent due to climate change.Singh said "we can't just close our eyes" to the prospect of more weather-related disasters.Green Leader Elizabeth May had no big plans Sunday other than a fundraiser in Victoria.May was in Winnipeg on Saturday to talk up her party's plans to combat the opioid crisis by decriminalizing drug possession and improving social supports for people who use drugs.Asked about the proposal Sunday, Scheer said while he would not recriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, the Conservatives think making other drugs legal is a bad idea.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 22, 2019.— With files from Kelly Geraldine Malone and Morgan LowrieJim Bronskill, The Canadian Press

  • Arab lawmakers in Israel endorse Gantz for prime minister
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Arab lawmakers in Israel endorse Gantz for prime minister

    JERUSALEM — The Arab bloc in Israel's parliament abandoned its usual hands-off stance Sunday and endorsed former military chief Benny Gantz for prime minister, potentially giving him the edge over hard-line incumbent Benjamin Netanyahu.The historic move marked the first time in nearly three decades that the Arab parties backed a candidate for prime minster, reflecting their contempt for Netanyahu, who was accused of fomenting hatred of the Arabs during his re-election campaign."Benny Gantz is not our cup of tea," said Arab lawmaker Ahmad Tibi. "But we promised our constituents that we would do everything to topple Netanyahu, and the default here is recommending Benny Gantz."It will be up to Israeli President Reuven Rivlin to decide which candidate should be given the chance to form a coalition government and serve as prime minister — a usually pro forma task made difficult this time by last week's deadlocked parliamentary elections.Neither Gantz, the leader of the centrist Blue and White party, nor Netanyahu, head of the conservative Likud movement, has a majority in the 120-seat Knesset, or 61 members. But with the backing of the Arab parties, Gantz gained a slight advantage. He could have as many as 57 backers, compared with Netanyahu's 55.Maverick politician Avigdor Lieberman, head of the mid-size Yisrael Beitenu party, controls the final eight seats, making him the key powerbroker. But he announced Sunday that he isn't endorsing either candidate.The endorsement by the Joint List, a bloc of four small Arab parties that controls 13 seats, marked a turning point in Israeli politics. Arab parties have traditionally refrained from endorsing a candidate for prime minister, and they have never sat in a coalition government, not wanting to be seen as legitimizing Israeli policies.Although many Israeli Arabs remain angry at Gantz for leading the military's devastating war against Gaza militants in 2014, their fury toward Netanyahu runs much deeper. Netanyahu's campaign repeatedly accused the Arabs of trying to "steal" the election, drawing accusations of racism and incitement.There is also deep-seated anger over a law passed by Netanyahu's government in 2018 that declared Israel to be the nation-state of the Jewish people. Arabs believe the law codifies discrimination.Though the Arab parties are still expected to stay out of Gantz's future government, their endorsement reflects a growing desire of Israel's large Arab minority to take a more active role in shaping the country.In an op-ed piece in The New York Times, Ayman Odeh, the leader of the Joint List, argued that his move should end Netanyahu's political career and provide a watershed moment for Israel's Arab minority."If the centre-left parties of Israel believe that Arab Palestinian citizens have a place in this country, they must accept that we have a place in its politics," he wrote. "There is no shared future without the full and equal participation of Arab Palestinian citizens."Netanyahu reacted by saying: "As we warned, the Arab parties that oppose Israel as a Jewish and democratic state and glorify terrorists recommended Gantz for prime minister."The Arab parties' decision does not guarantee Gantz will be prime minister. The president usually appoints the candidate with the most supporters, but not necessarily. Rivlin has wide discretion.In last week's vote, Blue and White won 33 seats, while Likud took 31.The deciding factor looks to be Lieberman, who is demanding a broad unity government with the two major parties that will be secular and exclude the ultra-Orthodox Jewish parties and Arabs. That appears to be the compromise emerging between Blue and White and Likud, though both are insisting upon leading it.Complicating matters is Blue and White's refusal to sit with Netanyahu because he faces a likely indictment on corruption charges.Odeh said he is planning on becoming opposition leader in the case of a unity government. As the leader of the largest party in opposition, he would be entitled to the position, which includes meetings with visiting world leaders and access to sensitive security information.Rivlin has not indicated which way he is leading. But he said he interpreted the will of the people as yearning for a "stable" government. "And there can't be a stable government without the two big parties," the 80-year-old president said.Last week's vote was Israel's second election in five months. Netanyahu was unable to form a coalition after April's balloting.In calling a new election, Netanyahu had hoped to secure a narrow majority of hard-line and religious parties that would grant him immunity from prosecution on charges that could include bribery, breach of trust and fraud. But now that possibility appears to be off the table.Israeli law does not require a sitting premier to resign if indicted. But if he is charged, as is widely expected, he will come under heavy pressure to step down.Aron Heller, The Associated Press

  • NDP pledges more money to prevent disastrous effects of climate change
    News
    The Canadian Press

    NDP pledges more money to prevent disastrous effects of climate change

    GATINEAU, Que. — The New Democrats promised Sunday to more than double the amount of federal money earmarked to prevent damage from natural disasters such as floods.NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh pledged to add $2.5 billion to the federal government's disaster mitigation fund, saying he wants to help people and businesses prevent problems."What we've seen for too long is that there's a crisis that happens and then afterwards there's a response," he said after meeting with property owners affected by recent floods in Quebec."A flood happens and the water damages a business, means it can't be opened (and) has to shut down or it damages homes, and instead of responding after the case what we're proposing is we give investments to municipalities right now so they can put in place the infrastructure to avoid this from happening."The national Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund has currently set aside $2 billion to support large-scale infrastructure programs that help communities better manage such risks.Projects must meet "national significance" criteria, such as reducing impacts on essential services, the health and safety of Canadians or a region's economic activity. There must be at least $20 million in eligible expenses for a project to qualify for funding under the program.Singh said the criteria are too restrictive. The funding also comes with cost-sharing requirements for provinces and municipalities, and the NDP leader said he would get rid of that hurdle as well as the minimum project amount."We would remove those barriers because our plan is to make sure it's accessible to everyone who needs it, and the goal is to avoid responding after a crisis and instead to prevent the crisis," he said.Singh said the idea is to help people avoid disasters and be able to stay in their current homes.The Federation of Canadian Municipalities welcomed the NDP announcement as a "critical first step."The federal government said an increasing number of Canadian communities have experienced significant weather-related events and disasters triggered by natural hazards such as floods, wildland fires and droughts.It said these events are growing in frequency as a result of climate change.The Liberals noted that they introduced the disaster mitigation and adaptation fund, and said that communities across the country have received funding to offset costs of building better protections.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 22, 2019.The Canadian Press

  • Cowboy poetry honours wild west
    News
    CBC

    Cowboy poetry honours wild west

    For those of us without cowboy roots, poetry might not immediately come to mind when we think of the wild, wild west. But according to performers and members with the Alberta Cowboy Poetry Association, storytelling is an important tradition in cowboy culture — and one they are keeping alive.The association had its Trail's End Gathering this weekend, at the Wild Wild West Event Centre just west of Calgary, featuring more than a dozen music and poetry performers. Under a vaulted ceiling strung with lights, they took the stage to honour the west with their words. 'They would make up stories, and gradually ... they developed into poetry' "Back in the old days on the trail, cowboys ... had no entertainment. They probably had a harmonica amongst them. There's no guitars, such as we see nowadays," said Jesse Colt, a rancher, poet and author from Bragg Creek who performed at the event. "They would make up stories, and gradually over the years, they developed into poetry." Todd Nakamura, the vice president of the Alberta Cowboy Poetry Association, says that for him, cowboy poetry is a collection of stories and memories — but originally, spoken word was used to calm the cattle."If we're out on night watch, in order to keep the cows nice and calm and not scattered throughout the bush, we'd tell them stories or sing songs," Nakamura said. "To me, it's a celebration of things that have come and gone."'Cowboy poetry should really be a story with a punchline'A variety of storytelling styles were on display at the event. Some performance artists were accompanied by guitar, some words and performances modernized, and some were historical.According to Colt, there's an art to the style and structure of cowboy poetry that makes it authentic."Cowboy poetry really should be a story with a punchline," Colt said."We hope to preserve our history by means of cowboy poetry and music. A lot of it is fairly modern now, but true cowboy poetry would have either history in it, or a lesson in it that's based on the past."Nakamura says a large component of the storytelling is making sure we don't take our history for granted."We have to remember who came before us, and made this province and this country what it is today," he said.'We all have a connection to the Old West'Phyllis Rothwell, the president of the Alberta Cowboy Poetry Association, says they welcome anyone who wants to come and listen — but for the musicians and poets, an understanding of the west is important."You don't have to be a cowboy, but it helps if you know the vernacular, and if you can tell authentic stories that have some sort of hook into cowboy life," Rothwell said.According to Rothwell, the cowboy culture they hope to preserve isn't so far away, even with modernization and the passage of time."If you go not very far from here, you'll find lots of ranches, ranchers, cowboys, rodeo people," Rothwell said.  "We all have a connection to the Old West. And [there] might be several centuries of change and innovation, but there's a connection."

  • History brought to life as Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue heritage site opens
    Global News

    History brought to life as Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue heritage site opens

    The Quebec Family History Society is offering history buffs a chance to learn about the heritage of a 250-year-old building in the heart of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. Global's Brittany Henriques reports.

  • Last day of summer goes out with a splash
    News
    CBC

    Last day of summer goes out with a splash

    Giggles of delight filled the afternoon air as dozens of families enjoyed the cool water at the splash pad in Fredericton's Wilmot Park Sunday. For many it was a welcome way to spend the last day of summer, with high temperatures reaching 27 C. Ann Harriman said her son, Dominick MacPherson, wanted to do something fun for the last day of summer. "We wanted to enjoy the sun. It's a beautiful day." Harriman was at the splash pad at 10 a.m. and said she invited all her friends to join her with a post on Facebook. When asked how much fun her son was having, Harriman said "a lot," adding he even made some new friends. Harriman said they are frequent visitors to the park and the splash pad. Five year old friends Nathaniel Allison and Nicholas Dickinson said their favourite feature of the splash pad was the bucket because the "water falls down and splashes." Both agreed it was the best way to spend a hot day. The Autumnal Equinox will officially arrive at 3:50 a.m. EST on Monday, Sept. 23, with rain and warm temperatures forecast for most of the week.

  • Family of multi-millionaire who died mysteriously in Ethiopia searches for answers
    News
    CBC

    Family of multi-millionaire who died mysteriously in Ethiopia searches for answers

    Friends, family and members of the Ethiopian community gathered at a packed church on Saturday to grieve and remember Michael Gebru — a man they say remained a generous soul concerned about his community despite going from laid-off assembly plant worker to multi-millionaire. Gebru, 41, died under mysterious circumstances in his home country of Ethiopia last week. Just two years ago, his life changed in an instant when he won the lottery, thinking at first that he'd netted about $15, only to realize he'd won $10.7 million.Asked at the time what he planned to do with the money, the Scarborough resident said, "I've always said that if I won the lottery, I'd help people in need."That's exactly what he did, say those who knew him. Gebru only bought a home for himself a few weeks ago — one he would never get to live in, they say."It took him a long time to think about himself," said family member Atakilti Asefaw.Community and church were Gebru's first priority, said Asefaw, adding he donated to several churches in Toronto, Ethiopia and Somalia after acquiring his newfound wealth.Questions still swirling"Some people would change because they have money, so they'd go a different way," said Asefaw. "He didn't change."Amid the mourning are a string of questions still swirling around Gebru's death. Friends and family say they still don't know exactly what happened to him, but told CBC News they worry he was targeted for his money.The exact circumstances of his death remain under investigation. "I remember when Mickey had the good fortune of winning the lottery. He was very concerned at first that everybody, if they heard the news, of course, would be coming to him expecting to get some assistance. And so he was trying to manage the information. Unfortunately that didn't happen," said Everton Gordon, a close friend of Gebru's.The family is now appealing to the Canadian Embassy in Ethiopia for help, saying they've heard little from local police. CBC News contacted the embassy but has yet to receive a response.In a statement to CBC News on Friday Global Affairs Canada said, "Our thoughts and sympathies are with the family of a Canadian citizen who died in Ethiopia. Consular services are being provided to the family."Spokesperson Angela Savard said the department could not provide further information, citing the Privacy Act.'We celebrate his life'Gebru was buried in Ethiopia on Monday, but those who knew and loved him back at home in Scarborough wanted to do something to honour him at his home church, holding a prayer service and vigil there Saturday. His niece, Hanna Tegegne, said she last saw Gebru about two weeks ago, before he flew to Ethiopia. The two spoke about the start of the new school year and spending time together when he got back."That never happened," the 14-year-old told CBC News through tears, adding she's missed school since her uncle's death.For now, friends and family are remembering Gebru as humble, generous, someone who loved laugh and brought joy to those around him."We mourn his death, but we celebrate his life," said Gordon. "Because those of us who were part of his life, we enjoyed every minute."

  • News
    CBC

    'Sneaky way to make people feel othered': Sherwood Park resident rips down anti-Muslim sticker

    A Sherwood Park resident who removed an Islamophobic sticker from a sign near her bus stop says she's angry about the attempt to spread hate in her community. Trish Agrell-Smith said she was headed to a bus stop near Fir Street and Cedar Street last week when she spotted the sticker on the back of a sign."The sticker is not a platform for sharing ideas. It is an anonymous, subtle, sneaky way to make people feel othered," she said.Text on the sticker asks if Islam is a religion of peace, and lists a website where readers can learn more. The web address leads to a crudely constructed blog featuring lengthy posts that draw on racist ideas, referencing white supremacist tropes and warnings against multiculturalism and diversity.The sticker was too high up for her to reach when she first spotted it so she returned after work with her husband, bringing along a stool and a scraper and removed the sticker. She decided to post about it on social media, to make the point that this kind of message isn't acceptable."It's not my place to speak on anyone's behalf, but I would really hope that what action I have taken can provide the opportunity for others to have a platform," she said.The Alberta Muslim Public Affairs Council (AMPAC) programs director Trent Daley said Sunday that there have been other instances of stickers put up around Edmonton to promote specific hate groups. In this case, the attack seems to just generally be directed at Muslims, he said. Daley described the website's content as "rambling."It's just concerning about the kind of media that they're trying to use, especially during an election — that's typically when hate incidents spike," he said.Daley said AMPAC will be following the situation closely, trying to make sure that if a particular group or individual is found to be responsible for the stickers, they can open up a dialogue with them. He said AMPAC is working with authorities, and that anyone who sees one of the stickers should call authorities to have it removed so the stickers can be identified and confirmed. Strathcona County councillor Brian Botterill thanked Agrell-Smith. Amarjeet Sohi, the federal Liberal candidate for Edmonton Mill Woods, tweeted his support for the Muslim community in Sherwood Park."If you spot one of these hateful stickers, please contact the appropriate authorities. We must stand strong, be there for one another, and work together to tackle racism and hate in all its forms," Sohi wrote.A spokesperson for RCMP said Sunday that police have yet to receive any reports about the stickers.

  • News
    CBC

    Musician Alex Cuba releases Sublime new album

    Coming up with an album title is one of the last things singer-songwriter Alex Cuba does when creating new music. Cuba says he always tries to find the perfect word or phrase that will translate in English, Spanish and French.When he was listening to his latest work, he thought it sounded "sublime." He looked up the meaning of the word online, and something clicked."It said, in Spanish, 'only art can make you feel the sublime' and that's what totally put a stamp on it," Cuba told Hot Air host Margaret Gallagher while explaining how and why he named his seventh album Sublime.For this latest album, the Cuban-born, Smithers, B.C. based artist decided to do something he's never done before. He played every single instrument on the album himself. Cuba described the process as "fun" and said he can look back and be proud that he made that decision. But, with pride came a bit of doubt. "The album came out way better than I expected," Cuba said while laughing as he explained that he's always been comfortable playing string instruments, but had never played percussion on an album before.  The Latin Grammy and Juno award-winning musician recorded the album in B.C., Cuba, Spain and Mexico and worked with some of Latin music's biggest players including Kelvis Ochoa, Silvana Estrada, Leonel García, Omara Portuondo, Alex Ferreira and Pablo Milanés. The Canadian impact Cuba has lived in Canada for 20 years, with most of those spent in Smithers. He said living in Canada has had a huge impact on his sound and has enhanced his North American influence. "Canada helped make my influence authentic," said Cuba. One song on the new album, Cantando de Alegría, specifically reflects things that have happened to him in Canada. He said people have approached him to say his music changed their lives or helped them through a difficult time. "Even for people who don't understand what I'm singing about, they still feel the music," Cuba said. Cuba's seventh album, Sublime comes out Sept. 20. He will also be touring B.C. in November. To listen to the full interview with Alex Cuba, click on the audio link below:

  • Jon Hamm Shouts Out The Ontario Origin Of Yukon Gold Potatoes In New Ad
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Jon Hamm Shouts Out The Ontario Origin Of Yukon Gold Potatoes In New Ad

    "Mad Men" star Jon Hamm flexed his Canadian knowledge in a new commercial for food delivery service SkipTheDishes.In the ad, the actor is shown eating Yukon Gold fries, and asks his assistant to order more."Yukon's greatest creation," the other character quips."Everyone knows these were invented in Guelph," Hamm replies.The Ontario Agricultural College at the University of Guelph thanked SkipTheDishes and the actor for mentioning the origins of the spuds in the ad. "Everyone knows these [Yukon Gold Potato] were invented in Guelph"🥔🍟 Thanks Jon Hamm, @ArrivalsDep & @SkipTheDishes for the shoutout! We're proud of those spuds! Just in case you didn't know about the Yukon Gold: https://t.co/pcmAPCNFhc@plantagguelph@UofGResearch@uofgpic.twitter.com/pZBF4vzQoe -- Ontario Agricultural College (@UofGuelphOAC) September 20, 2019The potatoes were developed at the school in 1966 by Gary Johnston. The potatoes were the first in Canada to be marketed with a name instead of just a colour description. They were originally named after the Yukon River, because Johnston's other potato varieties were also named after waterways (Huron and Rideau), but a colleague suggested adding "gold" because of the tater's bright hue, according to Maclean's.SkipTheDishes, which is headquartered in Winnipeg, made another hyper-Canadian advertisement featuring the actor, this time name-dropping Yellowknife, Moose Jaw, Sask. and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.In the second commercial, the actor tells his assistant he's ordering food to celebrate officially becoming Canadian, but is told his citizenship application has been denied."What? But I already bought a moose jaw, and a yellow knife! And a Sault Ste. Marie, whatever that is!" the actor says.His assistant suggests he create a new country called "New Canada" instead, but Hamm says he's a "real Canadian."Moose Jaw's mayor, Fraser Tolmie, made a video inviting Hamm to visit "New Canada" and saying that if he were the prime minister of "New Canada" he would have him swear allegiance to Mac the Moose, a giant statue which was the subject of a small feud between Canada and Norway earlier this year.He also talks about the things "New Canada" would do differently, like turning Thursdays into Fridays and making maple syrup a beverage. He ends by saying he'll ask the people of "New Canada" to sign a petition to make Hamm a citizen, and if they get 1,000 signatures, he'll "do the most Canadian thing ever" and walk up to the actor and say "I'm sorry."Yes, the petition exists. It was almost a third of the way to its goal at the time of publishing. Hopefully you can join "New Canada" soon, Jon Hamm. If not, you can always count on having maple syrup and peameal bacon to keep you company.Also on HuffPost:

  • Advocates hope Queer Eye star's HIV-positive disclosure helps break stigma
    News
    CBC

    Advocates hope Queer Eye star's HIV-positive disclosure helps break stigma

    Advocates at a Winnipeg fundraiser in support of HIV awareness and funding are hoping the recent revelation made by Queer Eye star Jonathan Van Ness about being HIV-positive will help break the stigma around and educate people about those living with the diagnosis.Van Ness told The New York Times in an article published Saturday that, when he was 25, he fainted while working at a salon and went to Planned Parenthood to diagnosis his flu-like symptoms. There, he tested positive for HIV. "That day was just as devastating as you would think it would be," Van Ness, the grooming expert on the Netflix makeover show, wrote in his memoir Over the Top, which is set to be released on Tuesday and was quoted by the Times.The now 32-year-old says he hopes his disclosure will help break the stigma around HIV, and that others will come out and join him as a "member of the beautiful HIV-positive community."Barb Burkowski, an organizer of Sunday's Red Ribbon Walk & Run in Winnipeg, an event that aims to fight against HIV stigma and to raise money for programs and services for those living with HIV, says Van Ness coming out as HIV-positive can help those who aren't out. "We have people who have HIV and have a self-stigma where they don't want to come out," Burkowski told CBC News."If we have people that come out on a bigger level, it's more likely that people will feel a little bit better."Christine Bibeau, who has been living with HIV for 10 years, was a participant at Sunday's event."For a long time, I was a closet HIV-positive person," she told CBC News."One of the things I really remember was somebody close in my family, when I first had told them I was HIV-positive, right away phoned up somebody else because I had been at their baby shower and I held their baby. That kind of still sticks with me, 10 years later."Bibeau hopes to combat disinformation about HIV — Public Health Agency of Canada says HIV can't be spread by "casual contact" — noting she now has three children, all born after learning she was positive and all of whom are HIV-negative. She also said revelations like those made by Van Ness go a long way to helping."I would like to see more people being OK about being open about [being HIV-positive], because I think that comes into education," she said.Kyle Voth, who also participated in the event to support the cause, agrees."I think it's a really brave thing to do," he told CBC News."It's giving young people and both queer and straight people a really positive voice in [the HIV-positive] community about it. It's really great."Brent Young, who participated in Sunday's event in drag, said he was diagnosed and came out as positive during the AIDS era. He notes being positive is no longer the death sentence it once was and also applauds Van Ness for coming out."He has the platform where he can actively crusade," he said."It's also positive that other people can see this in the rest of the world, and say, 'Hey, somebody else has this too. I don't have to be alone any more."As of 2016, there were more than 63,000 Canadians living with HIV, according to estimates released by the Public Health Agency of Canada last year.Of those, an estimated 14 per cent were unaware or undiagnosed. It also says people taking appropriate amounts of antiretroviral treatment "pose effectively no risk of transmitting HIV infection to their sexual partner."

  • News
    CBC

    Quebec schools to receive $2.3 B in funding for renovations

    Quebec's Education Ministry is investing $2.3 billion in school renovations over the next three years, the minister announced Sunday. Education Minister Jean-François Roberge has promised to restore 60 per cent of schools across the province by 2022. "This is excellent news not only for students, but also for teachers and for all school staff," said Roberge, who was speaking in Montreal East.  He said the funds are a 155.7 per cent increase from the previous year. The $2.3 billion is in addition to the $1.7 billion for school construction and expansion announced earlier this year. CAQ treasury board president and the MNA for La Prairie Christian Dubé was also at the announcement. "Eighteen-thousand schools will be affected," Dubé said. "They're old, and we need to improve them."Schools from Montreal's five school boards will get $624 million of the funds. The amounts for each of the other regions of Quebec will be announced in the coming weeks, and the complete list of renovation projects by school will be available next fall, the minister said. Premier François Legault's election platform included promises of upgrades to schools.

  • 'More than we expected': Ocearch spots 5 great white sharks off Cape Breton
    News
    CBC

    'More than we expected': Ocearch spots 5 great white sharks off Cape Breton

    Five great white sharks have been spotted and three of them have been tagged in Ocearch's latest expedition off the coast of Cape Breton."I think that is more than we expected, especially when we're only about halfway through the trip," Chris Fischer, the founder and expedition leader of Ocearch, said in a phone interview on Sunday.The U.S.-based shark research organization is currently off Scatarie Island, near Hay Island.They started around Sept. 14 and expect to be out until Oct. 4. Then the next stop is West Ironbound Island on Oct. 6.Two of the tagged sharks are mature males, Murdoch and Sydney, and the other is a mature female named Unama'ki.Sydney was 3.7 metres long, Murdoch was 3.9 metres long and Unama'ki was 4.7 metres long. In addition to being tagged, each shark received a full health assessment."So, interesting to see that all the sharks we've engaged with out here have all been fully mature animals," Fischer said. "I think that's something significant that was different than what we saw down in Lunenburg last year."Off Lunenburg, Fischer said they sampled seven animals — five males, two females — and only three were mature. The others were "sub-adults."'The trip's already made'Temperatures off Scaterie Island, Fischer said, are "a little cold" but that "doesn't seem to have run off the sharks."Prior to making the trip to the island, Fischer said he had no idea what to expect. He said they were hopeful because Hilton, a celebrity great white shark with more than 51,000 followers on Twitter, was traced in those waters last year."Having three sharks already tagged, for me, the trip's already made," Fischer said. "When you're coming to a place no one has ever been before and you don't know what's going to happen, that's a pleasant surprise."The goal of the shark research is to find out as much as possible about the Canadian great white shark — where it  forages, mates, gives birth, migrates and where females gestate."And that's so you can keep the recovery going because as the white shark goes, the whole system goes," he said. "If the white sharks are thriving up here, there's going to be more fish for your commercial and recreational fisheries."Fischer says there are "hundreds and hundreds of seals" around Scaterie Island.He said past research has indicated that when there are great white sharks around, seals feed one-fourth as much each day as they do when white sharks aren't there."So as the white shark population recovers, it will keep those seals pinned up on the beach," he said. "They stay there until they're almost starving and then they go out and get a little food and then they get back out because they might get eaten."Details on shark tracking are on Ocearch's website.MORE TOP STORIES

  • These were the biggest news stories in Toronto this summer
    News
    CBC

    These were the biggest news stories in Toronto this summer

    The (unseasonably hot) last day of summer has arrived in Toronto — bringing with it a chance to look back on the biggest stories of the season. Let's start at the beginning. Remember June 21? The city was still riding high on the Raptors' NBA Finals win just a week earlier, and the world was gawking at drone footage of the city's jam-packed victory parade. On our site, that footage sparked a larger conversation about the fairness of rules for drone operators — and whether they were being enforced vigorously enough. Other city celebrations also caught your attention this summer. There was the rainbow-bright photos and videos of Pride weekend and the debut of topless dancers at this year's Caribbean Carnival. And don't forget the celebrity cameos: Taylor Swift helped a Mississauga student pay her tuition, Tom Hanks stopped into a Leslieville coffee shop during TIFF, and Mick Jagger, recovered from recent heart surgery, wowed the crowd at a Rolling Stones show in Oro-Medonte, Ont. Sex-ed and patronage scandals Despite an extra long summer break for the Ontario legislature, there were still big stories from the provincial government as well. Amid an expanding patronage controversy, Premier Doug Ford's chief of staff, Dean French, stepped down in late June. Then, in August, there was the arrival of revised sexual education curriculum for Ontario students and later, a major wave of criticism for the province for its decision to move forward with municipal funding cuts. And, most recently, there was a harder look Ontario's legal cannabis store rollout amid the news that the province lost $42 million selling weed since legalization — a story which stood in stark contrast to the city's never ending tussles with resilient illegal dispensary chains like Cafe. Gun Crime Another dominant story this summer: a spike in gun crime in the GTA. The city watched in horror as 17 people suffered gunshot wounds over the August long weekend, including at a North York nightclub and at a mansion rented on Airbnb on the Bridle Path. More recently, there was the death of teenager Jonathan Davis, who police describe as an innocent bystander to a "ambush-type" attack that saw a Malton parkette sprayed with bullets.Other major crime stories this summer included the disturbing deaths of four people in a Markham home in late July. Sources told CBC that the 23-year-old man charged with murder in that incident sent online messages immediately after, writing that he had "just slaughtered" his entire family. Though their bodies were eventually discovered in Manitoba, the search for murder suspects Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky also made it to Ontario in early August, when a spike in tips led the provincial police to set up a special team to investigate. Many of you also searched for more details on the fatal Muskoka boat crash that involved TV personality Kevin O'Leary — though provincial police remain tight-lipped about what happened. Odds and endsFinally, there were the oddball stories, which made up some of the most-read articles over the last three months.There were concerns about fake honey being snuck into Canada, a report on a passenger who was left, asleep, on an Air Canada plane, and a Toronto garage that made its debut on the real estate market for $600,000.  The undisputed winner, however, is the Scarborough homeowner who was told to rip up the artificial turf she'd installed in front of her home because it violated a bylaw. The fight over turf struck a chord with readers, who left 1,400 comments arguing for and against the fake grass.

  • New washer, dryer could be difference between life or death for Terrace firefighters
    News
    CBC

    New washer, dryer could be difference between life or death for Terrace firefighters

    The arrival of a simple set of household appliances could be a lifesaver for Terrace firefighters.The City of Terrace has budgeted $50,000 to purchase a washer and dryer for the fire hall, meaning firefighters will no longer have to use local laundromats to clean their contaminated gear.The purchase is critical because for firefighters, unwashed gear can sometimes pose a greater health risk than fire itself."We worry about picking up carcinogens from here onto your skin, which will cause cancer," Terrace Fire Chief John Klie told Daybreak North host Carolina de Ryk. "It's also possible to bring that stuff home to your family if you're not cleaning your gear properly."Klie also said the soot that sticks to gear after it is exposed to smoke can make it more flammable if it is not washed off.He told de Ryk it wasn't always considered critical to clean gear during his 40-plus year career and when he first started out, it was a badge of honour to have dirty gear."All junior firefighters wanted to be seen as a veteran so the easy way to look like that was dirty gear," said Klie. Now that the dangers of dirty gear are well-known, some firefighters hose themselves down at the scene of the fire right after they finish fighting it, he added.A 2018 study by the University of the Fraser Valley, found that 86 per cent of all firefighter workplace fatality claims were blamed on cancer and firefighters are killed by cancer at a rate about three times higher than the general population.Klie said he has had two colleagues diagnosed with cancer, one with leukemia and one with lung cancer."It's close to home," said Klie.The department previously had a washing machine, but it broke in February. The new appliances are expected to be installed by mid-November.To hear the complete interview with Terrace Fire Chief John Klie on Daybreak North, click on the audio link below:

  • Guerrilla gardeners in Halifax cultivate with rebellious twist
    News
    CBC

    Guerrilla gardeners in Halifax cultivate with rebellious twist

    A group of climate change activists gathered at the Quinpool Common in Halifax on Sunday with hoes and shovels in hand.As a part of climate week, a non-profit group called Extinction Rebellion is taking action. At the root of the idea, they're gardening.But the group says it's guerilla gardening that sets them apart."I'm a part of the generation that's going to see the worst of climate change," said Jen Hall, a member of the Halifax Extinction Rebellion group. "I'm not happy about that."Guerilla gardening seeks to reclaim unused green spaces within the city, said Hall.The garden on the Quinpool Common has about 10 raised beds for food and flowers.Hall said the group is also planting beds dedicated to pollinating insects to provide habitat and food for them. About 20 people showed up to help."It feels empowering. We're looking to make something that can be useful for the community."Hall said it's more than just having a few pretty flowers to look at, although it's a perk."We want to encourage people to come together as a community, investigate alternate ways of producing foods and to promote food security," said Hall.Guerilla gardening does not always receive a positive reception. Most guerilla gardens are planted in urban settings, typically on land owned by the municipality.People who want to start these types of gardens are usually aware they can be removed at any time. Hall said their efforts are still worth the time. The group used materials that had been discarded to build the garden. They also received some donations."We wanted to show people how you can transform waste into food, essentially," said Hall.Aven Fisher, a member of group who lives in the Quinpool area, said a community garden is a better use of space than another condo or swimming pool."I'd like to see more stuff the whole community can use and participate in, especially in a way that combats climate change like growing food and knowing about nature," said Fisher."People are worth saving. Everyone needs to pitch in and help."The group will be holding climate-based events for the rest of week.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Filmmaker preserving N.L.'s piano stories — before they disappear
    News
    CBC

    Filmmaker preserving N.L.'s piano stories — before they disappear

    A musician and filmmaker has documented the stories of some of the province's pianos, as she says more and more of the instruments are disappearing.Ivy Lin has spent seven years working on a series of short films called Clavier Chronicles, capturing the stories of pianos — and their effects on people's lives — from around the world.One of Lin's most recent films features four pianos in St. John's, Fogo Island and Twillingate.She says the inspiration for the series came from a New York Times article about one of the oldest piano moving companies in the United States, written by Daniel Watkin."He discovered that they'd been hired to remove pianos from households to [bring them to] the community dump," she said."These piano movers were originally trained not to hurt pianos when they moved them, but now they are hired to remove the piano and basically just push them out of the back of the truck because people just didn't want them anymore."As a piano player for most of her life, Lin said she wanted to show the importance the instrument can have in people's lives. The series of short films has taken her around the U.S. and Asia documenting piano stories.  "Pianos are everywhere … it's almost like the first instrument lesson that all parents want their kids to take," she said.But Lin said Newfoundland was one place that she always wanted to visit."The starkness and the beauty of the nature reminded me of Scandinavia." On a trip to the province in 2016, Lin filmed four piano stories, including one with pianist Laura Madonna Murray at the Inn of Olde in Quidi Vidi."After I finished filming and came back, I just couldn't stop smiling every time I watched that footage," she said. "I wanted to capture the moment when the piano started interacting with the player and also people around it."Despite what she says is a decline in the number of people playing piano, Lin is hopeful for the future of the instrument. I think they will still be around and people will still love having them around. \- Ivy Lin"Pianos have been around for a long time, and sometimes they're just a very nice piece of furniture to look at, and sometimes they become part of the family," she said."A good piano — if you take good care of it and you tune it and it's in a comfortable environment — it could last up to 80 years, at least. I think they will still be around and people will still love having them around."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Albania quake has 340 aftershocks, people afraid to go home
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Albania quake has 340 aftershocks, people afraid to go home

    TIRANA, Albania — Fear and safety hazards kept many residents of Albania's capital of Tirana and the port city of Durres out of their homes Sunday after an earthquake the day before injured 105 people and damaged hundreds of buildings.Albania's Institute of Geosciences, Energy, Water and Environment said more than 340 aftershocks have followed the 5.8 magnitude earthquake that hit Saturday afternoon near Durres.About 600 houses, most built before 1990, suffered damage in the quake, which also temporarily knocked out power and water facilities in Tirana, Durres and some western and central districts, authorities said.The U.S. Geological Survey and the European-Mediterranean Seismological Center recorded the rupture on Albania's western Adriatic Sea coast as a magnitude 5.6 quake.It was felt along the western coast and far to the east. Many people ran outdoors when the quake hit at 4:04 p.m. At least 500 spent the night in temporary shelters.Inspectors evaluated damaged structures Sunday. Some Tirana residents were kept out of damaged homes deemed unsafe."Luckily, oil wells were not damaged." Defence Minister Olta Xhacka said.In Durres, residents afraid of going back into their homes and apartments planned to spend a second night away. Army troops put up tents at a soccer stadium where food and a medical team were sent.Authorities also sent counsellors to every family coping with post-quake fear. Education Minister Besa Shahini said all schools would be closed Monday in Tirana, Durres and Elbasan, the places the earthquake hit hardest. She said 98 schools had damage but only two were declared unsafe."People are not ready emotionally (to send children to school)," Shahini said.Prime Minister Edi Rama said he had phone calls from his Italian, French, German and other European counterparts offering assistance.Located along the Adriatic and Ionian Seas, Albania is earthquake-prone and registers seismic activity every few days.Llazar Semini, The Associated Press

  • 'I can carve my own path:' Mechanic shop provides employment to at-risk youth
    News
    CBC

    'I can carve my own path:' Mechanic shop provides employment to at-risk youth

    A Calgary mechanic is repairing more than just engines.He's working with at-risk youth who don't have fathers to help them succeed, giving back for the help he received in his formative years.The program is called Father and Sons Small Engine Services."We hire, train, certify youth at risk, kids that have barriers to employment. In large part, children that don't have a positive role model in their fathers,"  said founder Jason De Leeuw. "So, Father & Sons was created in order to give a positive outside mentorship from a father-like figure and develop skills in the workplace for youth that have barriers to employment."The employees do everything from finances to customer service, and pick up a skilled trade — small engine and equipment repair. "When I was a little bit younger, 16 or so, my father passed away. It was kind of a rough time. I ended up in group homes, and I had a couple brief stays at a shelter," said mechanic Tim Skyrie, now in his early 20s. "And I found myself with my first house working a part-time dead end job with really no skills. De Leeuw gave Skyrie a chance."That was a big realization for me, is that I have options. And that wasn't something that I really felt before," Skyrie said. "I felt like life was something that kind of happens to me. Do you know what I mean? Now I feel like I have more say over it. I can carve my own path if I choose, if I work hard enough."De Leeuw said he himself was once a troubled youth and knows it's possible to turn things around, with a little support."A criminal background means very little to me. If an individual has shown a true turning around, or a true desire to change their life, then that's what we need in order for them to be successful," he said. "I was a youth at risk myself. I had barriers to employment myself. I had issues that I needed assistance with."De Leeuw lost his father to health issues for most of his adolescence, and by the age of 19, he was inflicting self-harm. "And had I not had somebody come alongside me and bring me out of that, I probably would have committed suicide myself."De Leeuw said mentorship was the thing that helped him change his own life, and he wants to do the same for others."I found that after there was sustainable mentorship from the outside, positive influences in my life, that it effectively changed the course of my history," he said.Skyrie said the opportunity has changed the way he looks at himself.He's more independent and has taken a money management course. "I feel like I've matured quite a bit since being young and mad at the system, and mad at God, and all that kind of stuff," he said. "I've settled down a little bit more. I'm a little bit more comfortable in my own skin."Skyrie said he's looking forward to paying it forward someday."Life is kind of what you make it," he said.

  • U.N. Rights chief Bachelet says feels 'sorry' for Brazil under Bolsonaro
    News
    Reuters

    U.N. Rights chief Bachelet says feels 'sorry' for Brazil under Bolsonaro

    U.N. human rights chief Michelle Bachelet, who earlier this month came under personal attack from Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro, says she feels sorry for Brazil, according to a Chilean media report published on Sunday. Bolsonaro, a far-right former army captain, accused Bachelet of "meddling" in Brazil´s affairs after she raised concerns about a jump in killings by Rio de Janeiro police, backtracking on democratic norms and attacks on indigenous communities.

  • Communities in Green Bay concerned after two weeks without running water
    News
    CBC

    Communities in Green Bay concerned after two weeks without running water

    Residents in Nicky's Nose Cove and surrounding communities are concerned about their aging water supply system after going without running water for two weeks. The water was turned back on Friday, however residents say there are still issues with the system, and because there has yet to be a permanent fix, they are worried they will be without running water again. "It's stressful for everyone," said Karen Harcourt, a resident in Nicky's Nose Cove."You don't know when the water is going to come back on."Harcourt said for 14 days straight, she went to the pump house up to twice a day with dozens of containers in order to flush the toilet, do the dishes and take a bath. "A lot of the population in our area is older folks … we kind of look out for each other and hope that everybody is getting the water that they need," she said.The water supply services Nicky's Nose Cove, Jackson's Cove, Silverdale and Langdon's Cove.Harcourt said they have been having problems with the water for the last couple years but the current issue involves air entering the intake system and its causing the pump to overheat. She said a minor fix has been made but nothing permanent."Even with the water being back on … it's still in the back of your mind. How long is it going to keep running? And when is it going to stop running again."Harcourt has penned a letter to government officials, asking for a solution.The local MHA, Brian Warr said the Department of Municipal Affairs and Environment has been notified and an engineer has been contacted. "The consultant is currently compiling some historical engineering information, like drawings, to develop an understanding of the system and possible solutions," said Warr. The engineer will also be completing a Municipal Capital Works application to ask the province to fund the project. "I am going to suggest that the system is in the area of 40 or 50 years old and it needs some upgrading. I am committed to getting that done for the LSD (local service district)," he said."Water being such a valuable part of our everyday living, I want to make sure that we give these communities good clean drinking water."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    New book details 50 years of the Sierra Club in B.C.

    In some ways, the British Columbia of 1969 had some striking similarities with the British Columbia of 2019: it was a time when many people in the province were concerned about the environment and had a desire to make real social change.It was against this background — fighting for the protection of wild spaces like the Nitinat Triangle and the West Coast Trail in the early 70s to the great logging battles on Vancouver Island culminating in the War of the Woods in 1993 — that the Sierra Club of B.C. developed as an influential force for environmental change in Western Canada.Diane Pinch, a Victoria, B.C.-based writer and long-time volunteer with the environmental club, has documented the club's history from its beginnings in the province in 1969 to present day in a new book called Passion and Persistence: Fifty Years of the Sierra Club in British Columbia.The Sierra Club was originally started in San Francisco in 1892. Pinch says the B.C. chapter of the club was launched in part by Terry Simmons, a graduate student at Simon Fraser University from California.At the time, a large resort development was planned for the ski hill on Cypress Mountain and many people were concerned developers would clear cut trees in the area. "Simmons came up the idea of getting Sierra Club involved," Pinch said. "[It] seemed to make more sense to have this club that had a lot of knowledge about how to do a proper campaign." Although some area of the Cypress site was clear cut, the provincial government, facing pushback from activists, eventually designated the area as a provincial park in 1972.Modern day movementPinch said another thing she tried to document in the book is the shift from local environmental movements in the past to how people grapple with more complex issues like climate change in the modern day. "It is difficult," said Pinch. "It's not something you can show pictures about, like, you know, trying to save the Vancouver Island marmot. It's not this very little creature that people, you know, that say oh let's get out there and do something about that."Still, Pinch says the passion and persistence of the group — which still boasts thousands of members and volunteers — can still make a difference."I'm hoping that the readers will go away with a feeling of hopefulness and optimism that it is possible to make change."Listen to the interview with Diane Pinch on All Points West:

  • 2 dead, 2 others critically injured after a string of electrocutions in a single day
    News
    CBC

    2 dead, 2 others critically injured after a string of electrocutions in a single day

    Ontario's Electrical Safety Authority is pleading with people to stay safe around power lines after two people were killed by electrocution and two others were critically injured in a single day in Ontario.The authority said in a news release that the injuries stem from three incidents where workers on job sites came into contact with overhead electrical wires."This was a cluster of events that we haven't seen before, and we don't understand at this point in time if this was just an aberration," said Joel Moody, chief public safety officer with the Electrical Safety Authority (ESA)."What we do know is that these instances happened, and unfortunately there were two deaths and two critical injuries … and ESA wants to extend our condolences to those families who were affected by these incidents."The provincial Ministry of Labour has confirmed that one of the deaths happened just before 9 p.m. Thursday, when a worker died in Vaughan."A worker sustained fatal injuries due to an electrical contact when [a] drill boom made contact with overhead power lines," said spokesperson Charlene Millett in a statement.She said the worker was employed by Pontil Drilling Services, which, according to the business's website, does work ranging from geotechnical and environmental drilling to utility locating.The company declined a request for comment.The ministry says it has issued six requirements to the drilling company and its investigation is still ongoing.A second person died on Sept. 19 at a private residence in Kawartha Lakes, near Peterborough. The ministry says two self-employed workers were trimming a hedge in an elevated work platform when it made contact with a power line.One person died, while the other sustained critical injuries, Millett said. Two ministry inspectors went to the scene, but no orders were issued.The third electrocution happened on the same day in Scarborough, when a worker was injured when a tower crane hit an overhead power line.The ministry says the employer in that case was construction company Darcon Inc. The company didn't immediately respond to a request for comment."Our thoughts are with the family and colleagues of the workers who passed away," Millett said. "Our investigation is ongoing."According to the ESA, there are usually only two electrical deaths a year in Ontario on average, which makes two in a 24-hour period all the more unusual."Those two deaths are two deaths too many," Moody said.In the last 10 years, 19 people have died from electrocution in the province, he said.All electrical incidents are preventable, he added.The ESA recommends a number of tips when working around electrical wires, including watching for hidden power lines that can be hidden by foliage, being aware while driving dump trucks, and keeping equipment away from power lines.adam.carter@cbc.ca