• Oilpatch pushes for construction to start immediately on green-lit Trans Mountain pipeline
    News
    CBC

    Oilpatch pushes for construction to start immediately on green-lit Trans Mountain pipeline

    Alberta's energy sector is cautiously celebrating the federal government's approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion that will carry oil from Alberta to the coast of B.C."Today is the culmination of a lengthy and thorough review that considered the thousands of hours of environmental and technical studies, scientific evidence and meaningful engagement that were part of the comprehensive assessment," Trans Mountain president Ian Anderson said in an emailed release following the decision.The company said that in the 10 months since progress was halted on the $7.4-billion project after a Federal Court of Appeal decision, it's continued to advance planning work and has remained confident the pipeline expansion meets the National Energy Board's commitments. "It's a big deal, we've been waiting four years for new pipeline capacity so that we can access markets," said Richard Masson, an executive fellow with the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary and the former head of the Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission. "We've had lots of projects start up and now we don't have enough pipelines to get our product to market. And so we're actually curtailing production. So getting this pipeline approved is a step towards getting our economy healthy again."The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association said in an emailed release the delays have been costing Canadians $693 million each year, and it encouraged the government to move ahead immediately.And the Canadian Association of Pipeline producers said it expects an average increase of $20 billion of annual investment in the sector if Canada can enhance its domestic competitiveness, sustaining 120,000 jobs.But the fact the project has been approved by cabinet does not mean construction will start right away.Coming challengesThe company, a Crown-owned entity, will first have to make some required notifications and meet pre-construction conditions, according to a spokesperson. There also will likely be additional hearings at the National Energy Board in order to secure the company's preferred routing. Speaking on Tuesday afternoon, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said there will be shovels in the ground on the project this summer.Masson guesses major work won't start until next year, if there aren't major hiccups. Those potential delays include ongoing legal challenges, such as B.C.'s appeal to the Supreme Court to allow the province to restrict heavy oil shipments through its territory. Legal argumentsMasson expects groups opposed to the project will argue the federal government is in a conflict for approving a pipeline that it owns or that the consultations with First Nations were inadequate. "It's a long ways from an approval to a completed pipeline," said Masson.Many in the oilpatch see it as a critical project for the industry and it has become a political minefield for the federal government, sandwiched between fervent opposition and fervent support. Gary Mar, president of the Petroleum Services Association of Canada, said the government has created further roadblocks for itself by declaring a climate change emergency the day before the approval was announced. Trudeau bridged that apparent conflict by committing pipeline earnings — estimated to be $500 million a year in federal corporate tax revenue alone — to investments in clean energy projects. But Mar said it's just opening the project up to further scrutiny."It remains to be seen whether they'll have the commitment necessary to make sure that this project goes through to completion," Mar said. "I won't be optimistic until I see it constructed."One group says it's not as monumental a decision as it may seem, as both tanker traffic and approvals for major oil and gas projects could be impacted by two bills, C-48 and C-69, that are likely to be approved this week. The Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors says the decision to OK Trans Mountain is trivial in light of that pending legislation."This industry is on life support. Today's announcement does little to provide future certainty to drilling and service rig contractors as they continue to exit the Canadian market at an alarming rate," said Mark Scholz of the association in an emailed release.Question of ownershipFinance Minister Bill Morneau said the pipeline is a big first step in getting the sector going, and one that will have a strong economic outcome."We've had our own analysis to say this project is economic based on every single scenario we've been presented with," he said.He said a number of parties have reached out, from corporations to Indigenous groups, to express interest in buying the pipeline.Trudeau said the government is open to 100 per cent Indigenous ownership of the project."When it comes to potential Indigenous buy-in, we're not putting a limit on it," he said. Project Reconciliation, one of the Indigenous-led groups that has expressed interest in the project, said it sees it as a chance to "move from managing poverty to managing wealth."Suncor commended the government for opening the door to Indigenous involvement. "From our own experience, we know how beneficial working with Indigenous communities can be. These partnerships can provide a revenue stream for Indigenous communities so they can support services like education, daycare, elder care or housing," Suncor president Mark Little said in an emailed release. If built, the 1,150-kilometre expansion project would nearly triple the existing pipeline's capacity to 890,000 barrels a day. It would allow pipeline shipments from Alberta's oilpatch to coastal B.C.Tanker traffic from the Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, B.C., would increase from about five vessels a month to one a day.

  • Liberal MP Mark Gerretsen: Tories 'Playing With The Lives Of Future Generations' By Opposing Carbon Pricing
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Liberal MP Mark Gerretsen: Tories 'Playing With The Lives Of Future Generations' By Opposing Carbon Pricing

    A Liberal MP says the Conservative environment critic is playing with "the lives of future generations" by opposing carbon pricing to curb greenhouse gas emissions.Mark Gerretsen, the MP for Ontaro's Kingston and the Islands, made the charge in the House of Commons Tuesday while debating an Opposition motion from veteran Tory MP Ed Fast. The motion urges the House to "call on the government to repeal the carbon tax and replace it with a real environmental plan.""He's playing with the lives of future generations when he's making these claims in this House, in particular about putting a price on pollution and how ineffective it will be," Gerretsen said.Watch his exchange with Fast: Fast's vague motion, doomed to fail against the Liberal majority in the House, was tabled one day before Tory Leader Andrew Scheer will reveal his long-awaited climate plan."We are going to be rolling out our own environment plan tomorrow. It's going to give Canada a better chance -- the best chance -- to meet its Paris targets," Fast said during debate.In 2017, Tory MPs voted to implement the Paris climate agreement, which commits Canada to a 30 per cent cut in greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 2030. Since then, however, Scheer has backtracked to say his climate plan will "speak to" Paris targets. He has also called on Liberals to admit their current plan won't hit that goal.Fast dismissed the Liberal carbon pricing regime as a "craven tax plan," even though Liberals have committed that 90 per cent of revenues will go back to Canadians in the form of rebates. He accused the Liberals of ramming the plan "down the throats of provinces and territories." Liberal MP invokes the PopeFast also latched on to a recent report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer concluding Canada may need to hike its carbon price -- currently $20 per tonne and rising to $50 by 2022 -- to meet its international obligations.Gerretsen noted that he sat on the environment committee with Fast and knows he cares about the issue, which is why he finds the motion "deeply troubling."He noted that a Nobel Prize-winning economist and Pope Francis have endorsed carbon pricing in the fight against climate change. But Gerretsen also highlighted how, in 2008, former prime minister Stephen Harper promised to introduce a cap-and-trade system. Liberal online ads have highlighted a 2008 speech where Harper said such a plan would "effectively establish a price on carbon." In 2008, Conservatives knew that pricing pollution was the right thing to do. Today, Andrew Scheer and Doug Ford just want to make pollution free again. pic.twitter.com/aYwrqI6kFH -- Liberal Party (@liberal_party) November 30, 2018 "It's a basic economic principle that when you want to reduce something, you put a price on it," Gerretsen said.Fast, an international trade minister under Harper, responded that his former boss does not back carbon taxes. Fast also pointed to his home province of British Columbia, where a carbon tax of $10 per tonne was instituted in 2008, as a "perfect example of a failed carbon tax policy." He suggested the fact that B.C.'s carbon price has risen to $40 shows how easy it is for governments to hike the levy.But Fast also alleged that emissions are going "up and up and up" in B.C., proving the tax doesn't work. Emissions dropped by as much as 15 per cent after B.C. instituted the system more than 10 years ago, according to a 2015 academic study.Yet data released by the B.C. government shows GHG emissions in 2016 increased by 1.5 per cent from the previous year -- from 61.3 million tonnes to 62.3 million tonnes. However, that still represents a drop of 2.2 per cent from 2007, before the carbon tax was instituted, according to the government report. RELATED * Scheer Dodges Question About Extreme Weather And Climate Change * May The Only Federal Leader Who Showed Up At Climate Emergency Debate * Canada Needs To Hike Carbon Price To Hit Paris Climate Targets: PBO NDP MP Don Davies tried to pour cold water on the arguments made by Fast and fellow B.C. MP Dan Albas that the B.C. carbon tax hasn't had an impact on emissions."Since it was introduced in 2008, there has been a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in British Columbia of 2.2 per cent," Davies said."And by the way, one would expect carbon emissions to have gone up significantly in that time period, so the fact that there's actually an overall reduction shows that the carbon tax does work."Sean Fraser, the parliamentary secretary to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, later accused Fast and Albas of "cherry-picking" data.The debate comes on the heels of the House voting Monday night to declare climate change a national emergency. That Liberal motion, tabled by McKenna in May, passed by a vote of 186-63, with the support of New Democrats, Greens, and Bloc Quebecois MPs. Tory MPs, including Fast and Albas, voted against it.The full text of Fast's motion: That, given that the carbon tax will not reduce emissions at its current rate and it is already making life more expensive for Canadians, the House call on the government to repeal the carbon tax and replace it with a real environment plan.With earlier files

  • NDP's Jack Harris looking to take Ottawa seat back from Liberal Nick Whalen
    News
    CBC

    NDP's Jack Harris looking to take Ottawa seat back from Liberal Nick Whalen

    To a standing ovation and the surprise of no one, Jack Harris will be the NDP's candidate for St. John's East when Canadians go to the polls in October. The longtime New Democrat said his reason for running was clear. "I still have the belief that I have a contribution to make," Harris said at the the party's nomination meeting Tuesday night in St. John's, where he was acclaimed. "I feel strongly about what we have to offer as a party."Harris was upset by Liberal Nick Whalen in 2015 as the province of Newfoundland and Labrador went totally red; with Whalen taking 48 per cent of the vote and Liberals taking all seven federal seats.With NDP MP star Charlie Angus by his side, the two took jabs at the Liberal party, the members of parliament representing this province and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for not following through on campaign promises.    "We do need to have other voices in Ottawa," said Harris."There are serious problems that need to be addressed and we don't hear them addressed. I think that has got to change."Competition in St. John's EastEarlier on Tuesday Bob Cadigan, the former president and CEO of Noia which represents the oil and gas industry sent out a statement laying out his intentions to seek the Conservative nomination in St. John's East. "I've seen the representation that we have in Ottawa, and to be honest, I think we need a stronger voice," Cadigan said. "I think I can be that stronger voice."Cadigan said he is seeking help from some former provincial politicians."I've reached out to some former premiers to get their sense on what the issues are," he said."I think former premier Brian Peckford sees me as a champion for the Atlantic Accord that he originated. I think I can do the job."Cadigan wouldn't say who else he's been in touch with, but that it will come out if he gets the nomination.The race in St. John's East is heating up with months to go until people actually vote on Oct. 21.  CBC News contacted Nick Whalen's office for a comment on Tuesday's two announcements but did not immediately receive a reply. Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Calgary seeks public input on residential street parking changes

    Street parking in neighbourhoods can be a hotly debated topic — and the city wants to hear about it from all Calgarians.Calgary is undergoing a review of the residential parking permit program in hopes of balancing the changing needs of citizens.Calgarians and businesses have been invited to provide input online before June 26 at engage.calgary.ca/rpp.There are 80 residential parking permit zones across each quadrant of Calgary. Only people who live in those zones may park on those stretches.Between the 80 zones, more than 40,000 parking permits are issued each year.That's exponential growth, the city says, since the parking permit program began in 1974.Anyone interested — even if you don't live in such a zone — is invited to attend one of two open houses. There's one Tuesday from 5:30-8 p.m. at Hillhurst Sunnyside Community Association, 1320 5th Ave. N.W., and another on Saturday at Cardel Rec South, 333 Shawville Blvd. S.E., from 9 a.m. to Noon.City administrators will attend to explain how street space is shared and how the permit program is financed. The options for offering input come as a result of feedback gathered earlier this year from 900 participants, who shared their thoughts on the current program.

  • 33K pounds of cocaine seized in one of biggest US drug busts
    News
    The Canadian Press

    33K pounds of cocaine seized in one of biggest US drug busts

    PHILADELPHIA — U.S. authorities seized 33,000 pounds, or 15,000 kilograms, of cocaine from a ship at Philadelphia's port in what they described as one of the largest drug busts in American history.They said the haul could have been worth more than $1 billion on the street.The U.S. attorney's office in Philadelphia announced the massive bust on Twitter on Tuesday afternoon, saying that law enforcement agents found the cocaine on a ship at the Packer Marine Terminal. Two members of the crew were arrested and face federal charges.Agents with dogs swarmed the colossal ship Tuesday afternoon, including one officer who could be seen climbing into the back of a large red container on wheels. Court documents said the bust began Monday.An affidavit alleged that crew members helped load the cocaine onto the MSC Gayane while it was at sea off the west coast of South America. Citing an interview with one of the crew members, authorities said a total of 14 boats approached the vessel on two separate occasions during its voyage. Several crew members allegedly helped transfer bales of cocaine.The ship's second mate, Ivan Durasevic, and another crew member, Fonofaavae Tiasage, were charged with conspiracy to possess cocaine aboard a ship. An online court docket did not list attorneys for the defendants. It wasn't clear whether other crew members would face charges.The drug seizure is the latest in a series of large cocaine busts along the East Coast. In a March bust in Philadelphia, drug dogs sniffed out 1,185 pounds (538 kilograms) of cocaine worth about $38 million — at that time the city's largest seizure of the drug in more than two decades.In February, customs agents seized 3,200 pounds (1,451 kilograms) at the Port of New York and New Jersey with a street value estimated at $77 million. That was the largest cocaine bust at the ports since 1994.Online ship trackers said the vessel detained in Philadelphia sails under the flag of Liberia and arrived in Philadelphia after 5 a.m. Monday. The ship's previous ports of call were the Bahamas on June 13, Panama on June 9, Peru on May 24 and Colombia on May 19, records show.Federal authorities say Colombia is the primary supplier of cocaine to the U.S.The MSC Gayane's owner, MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co., said in a statement it was "aware of reports of an incident at the Port of Philadelphia in which U.S. authorities made a seizure of illicit cargo." The privately owned Swiss shipping company said it "takes this matter very seriously and is grateful to the authorities for identifying any suspected abuse of its services."Patrick Trainor, a spokesman for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Philadelphia, said that based on current prices in the area, the street value of the haul is around $525 million to well over $1 billion.Tuesday's seizure did not set a U.S. record. A 1989 bust in downtown Los Angeles netted almost 43,000 pounds (19,504 kilograms) of the drug.___Michael Rubinkam reported from northeastern Pennsylvania.___This story has been corrected to show that the MSC Gayane arrived to the Bahamas on June 13, not June 31.Michael Rubinkam And Matt Rourke, The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    P.E.I. looking to add propane-powered school buses by 2020

    Students on P.E.I. could soon be travelling on propane-powered buses.In his address to the Atlantic committee of the Canadian Propane Association in Morell on June 13, Premier Dennis King said the P.E.I. government is looking at adding propane-powered buses to the school fleet as early as the fall of 2020.That was welcome news to the propane association, which has been lobbying for more use of the buses across the county.Nathalie St. Pierre, president of the Canadian Propane Association, said the buses run "the same, basically, as a normal bus," but are lower in greenhouse gas emissions.'Safe and clean environment'"The advantage is that you have a lot less —up to 98 per cent less — particulate, which is damage for the environment. And it runs really well in the cold weather. And, most importantly, it provides a safe and clean environment for the children."New Brunswick is getting 16 propane-powered school buses this summer for use in the fall, St. Pierre said.The average base price of a propane-powered school bus is about $122,000.More P.E.I. news

  • Who should bear the financial risk of flooding? Report lays out three options
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Who should bear the financial risk of flooding? Report lays out three options

    The federal government could help mitigate the cost of flood damage by creating a "high-risk" insurance pool to help lift the burden off the public purse, says a report released Tuesday by the Insurance Bureau of Canada. The high-risk scheme is one of three options laid out in the report, a product of months of work by a national working group co-chaired by the bureau and Public Safety Canada. For those that do, insurance payouts have surged to about $1 billion per year over the past six years, based on estimates in the report.

  • Sled Island 2019 features 250 bands. It's OK if you've never heard of most of them
    News
    CBC

    Sled Island 2019 features 250 bands. It's OK if you've never heard of most of them

    Even Sled Island festival manager Sean Petsche hadn't heard of all the bands performing at the Calgary interdisciplinary music festival, which kicks off Wednesday across the city.The 2019 edition of the popular festival features 250 bands performing at 35 different venues over the next five days. Throw in a smattering of standup comedy, film and visual art, and Sled Island becomes a festival unlike any other.Which makes it all that much more worth venturing out to visit, Petsche said, whether you're 18 or 60."Really, what the festival is, is it's basically an invitation to come discover some new stuff," Petsche said, in a Tuesday phone interview with Doug Dirks on the Homestretch."People go to restaurants and try food they've never tried before," he said."They go to the opera. They don't even know what the words mean. They give it a chance," he added."But somehow there seems to be this sticking point that if it's a rock band that I haven't heard of, then better not go. So we try and change that and get people to get out of their comfort zones a little bit."From stars to local bandsThis year's fest features independent artists and bands ranging from Julien Baker to Japanese Breakfast to Torche, as well as a large number of Calgary bands, Petsche said, might only be "playing their second or third show ever.""It really is a broad stroke of what's happening musically," he added.He added that the Sled website features an easy to use sampler of all 250 bands, each with a song available for streaming.And if you happen to feel that your indie music street cred badge expired a while ago, Petsche said that's not how indie music works anymore."It's not only 18-year-olds and early 20s," he said. "It really runs the range from 18 to 60 [year olds]."We've had people who have come to every Sled Island and this is our 13th, so we have bands that the members of the bands are over the age of 60."If you like music," he added, "it might be for you."WIth files from The Homestretch

  • News
    CBC

    Public health issues warning after measles case in Laval

    Provincial health authorities say someone carrying the measles virus may have exposed others to it in Laval last Thursday.The infected person visited a Walmart in Sainte-Dorothée sometime between 1:30 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. June 13.They then went to the Carrefour Laval shopping centre during the afternoon between 2:15 p.m. and 4 p.m.Authorities say the following people should be evaluated for a prevention shot: people with a weakened immune system, babies younger than 12 months and pregnant women who are not adequately vaccinated against measles.Anyone who is a part of these groups is being advised to call Info-Santé at 811. The preventative treatments must be administered by June 20 to be effective, the Quebec's Health Ministry said in a news release.The ministry added that anyone who is not part of the mentioned groups doesn't need special intervention.People who visited those locations should watch for symptoms up until early July — it can take up to 14 days for symptoms to show.Symptoms include: fever, cough, runny nose, stuffy nose, red and watery eyes and tiny white spots in the mouth.A person can be contagious four days before a rash appears and up to four days after.Measles is highly contagious and is most often spread when people first get sick or before they know they have measles.

  • Alberta privacy commissioner shares guide on GSA disclosure
    News
    CBC

    Alberta privacy commissioner shares guide on GSA disclosure

    In a rare move, Alberta's privacy commissioner has weighed in on a pending piece of legislation, providing school boards with a guide on when it's reasonable to disclose students' participation in gay-straight alliances.The advisory from commissioner Jill Clayton doesn't make any changes to provincial privacy laws, but focuses on making student privacy rights more clear.In a statement, Clayton said she has been following the hotly debated question of when it's appropriate for a teacher to tell a guardian their child is in a GSA."There have been many perspectives in this debate and various interpretations – or misinterpretations – about how Alberta's privacy laws apply to a student's participation in a GSA," said Clayton Tuesday. Commissioner's office spokesperson Scott Sibbald said the goal of the advisory is to provide school boards with an easy-to-understand framework of the Personal Information Protection Act and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.'Interpretation and discretion'The advisory notes both acts apply to student participation in GSAs and other clubs. However, there are some exceptions under PIPA where disclosure could be necessary, like for the purposes of an investigation or in an "emergency that threatens the life, health or security of an individual or the public."Other exceptions could be considered matters of opinion, including those under the FOIP Act.If, for example, "disclosure will avert or minimize a risk of harm" or "disclosure would not be an unreasonable invasion of the individual's personal privacy," a student's personal information could be shared.Rakhi Pancholi, NDP MLA for Edmonton-Whitemud, said that's a problem."There's a lot of provisions in the act that allow for interpretation and discretion, and I think that's part of our concern," said Pancholi, a lawyer who led the drafting of the Education Act while working for the government from 2008 to 2013.Sibbald acknowledged that ensuring all schools interpret the framework the same way would be challenging. But, he said if there are concerns about how the rules are being followed, schools would need to prove the disclosure of a student's personal information was justified."The approach seems to be to out kids first and then expect them to go to the privacy commissioner to assert their privacy," Pancholi said."If the Minister of Education thinks that that's what kids should do — be outed and then go to assert their privacy rights — I think that's really troubling because that's not actually helping kids."Education Minister Adriana LaGrange said she believes in the ability of staff at Alberta schools to interpret the framework in a way that keeps students safe."We trust teachers to make decisions each and every day regarding the health and often times even mental health and wellness of our students," LaGrange said. "We are continuing to place our trust in our teachers and administrators to do that good work."LaGrange said she's pleased the commissioner weighed in, as it confirms the United Conservative Party government's repeated statements that protections for LGBTQ students in Alberta will be the strongest in Canada.Minors' privacy rightsBill 8, introduced on June 5, amends the Education Act that was passed but never proclaimed by past Progressive Conservative governments.The new act does not have the Bill 24 protections enacted by the NDP in the fall of 2017, which made it illegal for teachers to potentially out students by telling guardians if their child joined a GSA.LaGrange said she'll ask her minister's youth panel this summer if schools boards should make an effort to inform students of those rights.Clayton also said students must understand they have rights under privacy laws.Her advisory also highlighted how schools should consider if a student is a mature minor before disclosing their information. A mature minor is someone "who understands the implications of giving consent such that a school would need the student's consent and not that of the parent to disclose," according to the advisory.Pancholi said making that distinction is challenging."Kids who are 12 or 13 or 14 years old are not going to be considered mature minors. Their consent is not going to be sought by school administrators before their personal information is disclosed to parents."

  • This crane is helping REM workers build the new light rail more quickly and quietly
    News
    CBC

    This crane is helping REM workers build the new light rail more quickly and quietly

    Delivery of the new, $6.3 billion light rail transit system is rapidly approaching and crews are using a new construction method they say is more effective — and less messy — than pouring concrete.The horizontal crane is called a launching gantry. Two cranes will build an elevated platform of about 13.5 kilometres all the way to Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.REM workers said the system is better for people living near the sites."This is a way to reduce the impact on the environment, on the people around," said Stefan Balan, the director of the Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue—Airport line.The long beam carries prefabricated concrete segments, each weighing about 50 tonnes.Workers lock the pieces into place to build the track bed, and the machine slides back to tackle the next span.Watch: The horizontal crane being used to build the elevated REM platforms. It's the first time the system's being used in Quebec. The machine can finish one 40-metre span in about two days,The slabs are made in a factory near Drummondville.

  • Biden leading in swing state Pennsylvania despite rural Trump support
    CBC

    Biden leading in swing state Pennsylvania despite rural Trump support

    Supporters of Donald Trump and Democratic front-runner Joe Biden are gearing up for a campaign and an election in which their state will play a key role.

  • UK PM candidate Johnson: Britain must leave EU by Oct. 31 or pay the price
    News
    Reuters

    UK PM candidate Johnson: Britain must leave EU by Oct. 31 or pay the price

    Boris Johnson, the frontrunner to be Britain's prime minister, repeated his pledge on Tuesday that he would take the United Kingdom out of the European Union by Oct. 31, saying otherwise the government would face a catastrophic loss in trust. "We must come out on the 31 Oct. because, otherwise I am afraid we face a catastrophic loss in politics," Johnson said in a televised debate with the other four remaining candidates seeking to be Britain's next leader.

  • News
    CBC

    Diver missing in St. Lawrence identified as U.K. man

    The diver who was reported missing in the St. Lawrence River last week has been identified as a man originally from the U.K. who spent years working as an instructor in Honduras.Thomas (Andy) Phillips, 46, was reported missing after he failed to resurface while diving off of MacDonell Island, about 15 kilometres west of Cornwall, Ont., on June 11, Ontario Provincial Police said.Phillips is originally from the U.K. but has spent the last 20 years travelling around the world as a professional diver, according to his biography on the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) website.On its Facebook page, the Utilia Dive Centre in Honduras said Phillips is an incredible instructor who has done much to build the local industry. "For 20 years, Andy Phillips developed and fostered both the diving community and industry on Utila and by extension, Central America. Utila as we know it — unique and exuberant — exists as it does because of him," reads the post.   The search for Phillips continues with the help of the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry OPP marine unit, police said.

  • Netflix announces 2 more seasons of 'Queer Eye'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Netflix announces 2 more seasons of 'Queer Eye'

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Netflix's show "Queer Eye" says it's bringing fabulousness to the masses for two more seasons.

  • PHOTOS: Toronto celebrates Raptors victory with parade through the city
    Yahoo Canada News

    PHOTOS: Toronto celebrates Raptors victory with parade through the city

    Thousands of Toronto Raptors fans took to the streets to celebrate the Canadian team’s historic victory as NBA champions.Players rode through the city on double-decker buses, with Toronto superstar Drake, as people waited to get a glimpse of the team and the Championship trophy.

  • News
    CBC

    Not a hair out of place: Gender-neutral pricing comes to Edmonton salons

    A growing number of salons in Edmonton are making a point to offer prices based on style of cut, rather than the client's gender.Adara Hair became the first salon to advertise their new pricing scheme three years ago, and more recently, Horseshoe + Ponytails and Beauty Parlour have followed suit.The discrepancy in prices and attitudes at many salons and barber shops can put off customers looking for a trim without judgment.  "I went to lady salons for many years even though I had a short haircut and I was getting charged $60 to get essentially a men's cut," said Julie Ferguson, a performance artist in Edmonton who goes by the stage name Niuboi and identifies as non-binary."I shaved my head because I could just go to a barber and pay $20, but then the problem was that I was going to predominantly male spaces where they just didn't understand who I was and were always awkward about it," Niuboi said."When I would say, 'This is what I want' — and I said this very clearly — I wouldn't get that 'Absolutely sir' attitude and would get more 'Oh, are you sure that's what you want?"Niuboi stopped going to barbers after learning about Adara Hair's pricing scheme.Niuboi said it's an issue many people in the city, whether non-binary or trans, encountered frequently, often because hair stylists are trained to cut hair for either men or for women exclusively and are unsure how to adapt to a different set of clients."It's a big step in the salon industry," said Daniel Bullock, a hair stylist at Horseshoe + Ponytails."When they see that we have gender-free pricing, [they see] that we're not going to judge them based some preconception of what would be a masculine versus and feminine haircut and we're just going to listen to what they want," Bullock said.Bullock said he's heard from people within the queer community about the growing movement toward offering these services, though he isn't aware of any barber shops in the city advertising gender-neutral pricing.'New sense of beginning'Whether it's a change in season or a life change, summer is a busy time for many salons with people looking to freshen up their look, said Jennifer Storey, owner of Adara Hair."For people who are transitioning or finding themselves or going through something new in their life, [a haircut] can be a whole new sense of beginning," Storey said.Since 2017, all Adara Hair's stylists have had safe space training, its website says. The salon is also part of the Dress Code Project, a directory that lists salons offering gender-neutral pricing across North America.In addition to being inclusive, the gender-neutral pricing was motivated by a desire to charge all their clients fairly, Storey said."We felt there something that wasn't quite right in the industry," she said.The price change discussion first came up when she and a male colleague at the salon noticed that they had the same style of hair."We had the exact same haircut, except I had a fringe and he didn't, but if we'd both walked up to a salon, and even our salon at the time, we would have been charged different prices and that just didn't seem right."Storey said finding salons with equal pricing is still more difficult than she'd like to see."The industry has a long way to grow," she said.

  • From kindergarten to Grade 6: Kids reflect on what they've learned on the eve of graduation
    News
    CBC

    From kindergarten to Grade 6: Kids reflect on what they've learned on the eve of graduation

    As 12-year-old Eva Rashed gets ready to leave West Kent Elementary School, her seven years of lessons and learning can be summed in one phrase."The best ... really the best. This school is like a memory that will stay in my mind forever," she said. "It has great staff, great students, great everything."Rashed is one of the Grade 6 students who will be graduating from West Kent and moving up to Queen Charlotte Intermediate School in the fall.It's a bittersweet time for many of them, with an equal mixture of nervousness and excitement.'Very excited'Golnar Saegh, 12, is looking forward to the new challenges."I'm very excited because there's a lot of stuff that I want to try. I think I'm going to either play the trombone or trumpet when I go to Grade 7," she said. "I'm going into French immersion and there's a lot of stuff changing and the school is huge and there's a lot of sports teams that I'd like to try out for, and clubs. … Hopefully I don't get into a class of complete strangers."Golnar feels positive about her move to junior high but didn't want to make any predictions.  "I don't want to jinx anything," she said with a laugh.'Little bit nervous'Eleven-year-old Zoe Connor is feeling a little daunted but hopeful about the future."It's going be fun I think, but I'm a little bit nervous because I'm scared that I'm never going [to] remember my locker combination," she said. "I'm scared that none of my friends are going be in the same class. But hopefully I'll make new friends."Ethan Mayne, also 11, is leaving elementary school with some solid life lessons."Some of the biggest lessons I am leaving with is respect yourself, pay attention, just be nice to others. I think the first year in kindergarten is so important because you learn all your life values," he said. "I hope to get the most out of junior high by working hard and trying my best and supporting my friends." And Mayne is already hoping to suit up for one of the Queen Charlotte sports teams."I'm excited about all the sports I can participate in and meeting new teachers that are all pretty nice."Looking to the pastMost of this class has been together from the very beginning of their school career.Six years ago, the class was interviewed about what they learned in kindergarten. Lessons like how to listen, share, take turns and respect others were at the top of their list.The importance of building healthy friendships also really resonated with the kids. At five years old, Zoe Connor had a pretty definite idea when asked about what makes a good friend."What makes a good friend? How you get along with them. You play with them and if you get along and don't fight then you make … a new friend. That's how you make a new friend. It's very easy to get along, you know."Recess is more fun with friends, six-year-old Golnar agreed."It's funner to play with your friends, not alone. Because when you're alone you kind of feel sad and lonely. So I like playing with a group. We play house. We play tag. We have lots of fun."Ethan Mayne had lots of wisdom to share after he finished his year in kindergarten at the age of five. "We have listening behaviour, I'll tell you all of them: Body still, hand up, mouth quiet, eyes watching, ears listening," he said."You can't tattle tale. We can't be mean to people, they're not allowed to do that."In the years since kindergarten, the importance of friends has only grown deeper, especially for Eva. When asked what makes a good friend, her answer was simple."Loyalty. They keep their words. And you know they don't exclude you from anything, like they cheer you up if you're ever feeling sad," she said. "Friends are good people. In life, some friends can even feel like family to you."These four students are looking forward to joining the Queen Charlotte family next fall.And CBC plans to check with them again when they graduate in three years time, to see what new lessons they've learned.More P.E.I. news

  • City to study ban on sale of plastic bottles at its facilities
    News
    CBC

    City to study ban on sale of plastic bottles at its facilities

    The City of Ottawa has taken the first step toward one day eliminating the sale of bottled water at its own facilities.During Tuesday's meeting of the environmental protection, water and waste management committee, councillors voted unanimously to ask staff to study the feasibility of eliminating single-use plastics and foam plastics at City Hall, recreation centres and other municipal buildings.The motion was tabled by Somerset Coun. Catherine McKenney."You should be able to come to City Hall and expect not to eat a meal off of foam plates or use plastic forks and knives," McKenney said. "Those are the types of things we have to start thinking about in our city facilities."Coke contract still in effectMcKenney's motion directs staff to find ways to eliminate single-use and foamed plastics where there is an environmentally responsible alternative, and include the report as part of the city's upcoming update of its solid waste plan.While it's unclear what that will mean for vendors at city facilities, it seems certain any ban will stem the sale of bottled water. "I don't think it's just symbolic," McKenney said. "I'm happy to see that we'll be moving forward looking for a way to eliminate them here."Any ban of bottled water sales at city facilities would have to wait until the city's contract with Coca-Cola expires, however. Under the agreement, signed in 2011, Coca-Cola paid the city $135,000 per year for five years for exclusive "pouring rights" at city facilities. Coca-Cola's products include bottled water.But the city's contract with the beverage company will only lapse when it reaches a minimum sales volume, and that could take another three years, according to staff.The motion also directs staff to boost its educational campaign promoting tap water and dispelling the myth that bottled water is of better quality.

  • Cameras won't be installed in Dartmouth park where teen was killed
    News
    CBC

    Cameras won't be installed in Dartmouth park where teen was killed

    Surveillance cameras will not be installed in a Dartmouth, N.S., park where 18-year-old Chelsie Probert was stabbed to death in June 2017.A safety audit of Farrell Park made 13 recommendations for improvements, including whether to install cameras.A report on the idea was delayed while new rules were created for the use of video cameras.Other safety improvements to Farrell Park have been completed, including removing underbrush and adding more lighting.But municipal staff have decided it is not a good location for cameras because of the layout and the power upgrades that would be needed."Within a park, it's very complicated," said Diane Chisholm, the municipality's regional manager of facilities. "It's quite expensive, so it would be a last resort."Tony Mancini, the councillor who represents the district where Farrell Park is located, pointed out that crime has actually decreased in Dartmouth North over the past two years.One location where video cameras may be installed is the Acadia Centre in Lower Sackville.The centre houses a library, recreation programs, the councillor's office and Acadia Park is located next door.Coun. Steve Craig that there was an altercation Sunday night in the park between 10 and 15 youth."I do believe we need high-resolution video there to help," he said.Chisholm said the municipality is aware of what's happening in the park and is looking at installing cameras.Not all councillors are on board with the idea of using cameras."I worry we are sacrificing our liberties," said Coun. Richard Zurawski. "I value my privacy."Zurawski is not convinced cameras reduce crime, but instead just move it to another area.MORE TOP STORIES

  • News
    CBC

    U of O hires outside expert to look into carding incident

    The University of Ottawa has hired an independent legal adviser to look into an incident in which a black student skateboarding said campus security officers demanded he produce identification and then handcuffed him for two hours.Lawyer Esi Codjoe, who currently works at a Toronto law firm and is a former vice chair of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, has been selected to investigate the incident.Student Jamal Boyce posted about the incident online after it happened on June 12. He said he had been skateboarding on campus when officers approached him and demanded he produce identification.Codjoe has been asked to complete the work as quickly as possible and her report will be made public, the university promised in a news release sent on Tuesday.In addition to looking at the specific incident, she is being tasked to look at the university's policies and how university security officers apply provincial trespass laws.She is also mandated to look at how those policies may impact racialized communities.

  • Official reminder of how to deal with forest fire smoke
    Global News

    Official reminder of how to deal with forest fire smoke

    Today's Global News Hour at 6 Health Matters is brought to you by Pharmasave. With all signs pointing to a potentially bad wildfire season, officials are reminding people how to prepare for bad air quality. Linda Aylesworth reports.

  • Canadian companies avoided up to C$11 billion in taxes in 2014, report finds
    News
    Reuters

    Canadian companies avoided up to C$11 billion in taxes in 2014, report finds

    Canadian companies avoided paying up to C$11.4 billion ($8.5 billion) in corporate taxes in 2014, the Canada Revenue Agency said in a report on Tuesday, in the first report of its kind on the tax gap in the country. The "tax gap" is the difference between taxes that would be paid upon all obligations met and the taxes actually collected. Previous reports have analyzed the gap in the personal income tax system and in offshore tax havens held by Canadians.

  • U.S. agency to vote on auctioning key unused parts of 2.5 GHz band for 5G
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. agency to vote on auctioning key unused parts of 2.5 GHz band for 5G

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission will vote in July on whether to auction a key band of largely unused 2.5 GHz spectrum to help advance next-generation 5G wireless networks and scrap requirements that it be used for education, the agency said on Tuesday. The FCC in May 2018 voted to consider releasing additional key 2.5 GHz mid-band spectrum reserved in the 1960s for what is now known as the Educational Broadband Service. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement the proposal would give existing users more flexibility in how they use the spectrum.

  • Costs up, completion delayed on City of Whitehorse's new operations building
    News
    CBC

    Costs up, completion delayed on City of Whitehorse's new operations building

    Construction of the City of Whitehorse's new operations building is behind schedule, and on track to cost about $4.2 million more than expected.According to city staff, the cost has gone up because of issues with the design of the building. The architecture firm has had to make about 200 changes to the design specifications, and that's meant additional costs and delays. "They've been fine-tuning and working with the design, coming up with solutions, working with the contractor and revising the design in order to fill in these gaps, that ideally probably should have been included in the original design," city engineer Wayne Tuck told councillors on Monday.The operations building will house the city's fleet maintenance, waste and water services, transit and engineering departments. It's being built off of Range Road, near the top of Two Mile Hill. A tender for the construction was awarded in 2017 to Ketza Construction, at a price of $39.2 million. The revised price is now about $43.5 million. A report to city council says it's typical to allow for up to 5 per cent in "contingency allowances" on a project of this size. But the revised cost of the operations building is about 11 per cent more than the original bid.Some councillors are not happy. "I'm just going to express my extreme frustration on behalf of the contracting community, regarding the management of this project," said councillor Samson Hartland.Tuck told council that the architecture firm, Toronto-based RDHA, has not been charging for its additional work to modify the building's design."The 200 changes certainly are significantly more than we would expect for a project like this, and RDHA recognizes that," Tuck said.The additional costs relate to the Ketza's work to make the changes, and the longer time frame to compete the building. The original completion date was Jan. 31, 2019; it's now estimated to be mid-September.   Tuck says the good news is that even though the project is costing more than expected when the tender was awarded, it's still technically under-budget.The whole project is now estimated to cost about $52,425,000. That's under council's originally-approved budget of $54,940,000.