• Attorneys seek information on aborted Alabama execution
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Attorneys seek information on aborted Alabama execution

    Execution team members stuck an inmate repeatedly in the lower legs, ankles and groin in effort to find a usable vein before the state called off the lethal injection, according to a Friday court filing by the inmate's lawyer. Attorney Bernard Harcourt said he is seeking more information about what happened during the attempted execution of his client, 61-year-old Doyle Lee Hamm, on Thursday night. U.S. District Judge Karon Bowdre on Friday ordered a medical examination of Hamm and directed the state to maintain material related to the attempt.

  • Suspect in Filipina's death in Kuwait arrested, wife sought
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Suspect in Filipina's death in Kuwait arrested, wife sought

    A Lebanese man suspected in the death of a Filipina maid whose body was found stuffed in a freezer in Kuwait has been arrested, the Philippine foreign secretary said Friday. Alan Peter Cayetano said he has told President Rodrigo Duterte about the arrest in Lebanon of Nader Essam Assaf but added that Assaf's Syrian wife, who is also a suspect in the death of Joanna Demafelis, remains at large. The discovery of Demafelis's body on Feb. 6 in the apartment in Kuwait City, where it had reportedly been kept for more than a year, sparked outrage and refocused attention on the tragic plight of poor Filipinas toiling mostly as maids abroad.

  • News
    CBC

    Provincial power plays: B.C. and Alberta test the boundaries in pipeline debate

    At the heart of the cooling dispute between Alberta and B.C. were two provinces flexing their muscles, testing the limits of their powers. Premiers Rachel Notley and John Horgan have both said they're working in the interests of the citizens they represent. Horgan said Thursday that British Columbia will be consulting its lawyers on a legal challenge that will determine the province's constitutional rights around regulating shipments from the pipeline.

  • End of B.C. wine ban means Calgary's Big Taste festival gets major sponsor back
    News
    CBC

    End of B.C. wine ban means Calgary's Big Taste festival gets major sponsor back

    The B.C. wine boycott is over and corks are popping all over the Calgary foodie community to celebrate. Following the announcement Thursday by Premier Rachel Notley that the two-week long boycott is over, came the news on Friday that the B.C. Wine Institute was back in as a sponsor of The Big Taste, a restaurant festival that pairs fine Calgary cuisine with quite a bit of B.C. wine. "After having to reluctantly step back from this year's festival, we are thrilled to have the opportunity to once again share and celebrate B.C. Wine with our Alberta friends," said B.C. Wine Institute President and CEO Miles Prodan.

  • “Stay off the Roads” – A warning after a major snowstorm hammers B.C.’s South Coast
    Global News

    “Stay off the Roads” – A warning after a major snowstorm hammers B.C.’s South Coast

    It was a slow commute as parts of Metro Vancouver were blanketed by more than 10 cm of snow. Meteorologist Kristi Gordon with how much came down and how much is still to come.

  • 'Flash mob round dance' in Saskatoon sends its love to Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie
    News
    CBC

    'Flash mob round dance' in Saskatoon sends its love to Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie

    ​A small crowd of people joined hands in front of Saskatoon city hall Friday night and performed what was dubbed a "flash mob round dance" in support of the late Tina Fontaine and Colten Boushie. The gathering came a day after a Winnipeg jury found Raymond Cormier not guilty of murdering Fontaine and two weeks after a jury in Battleford, Sask., found Gerald Stanley not guilty of murdering Boushie. The verdicts have sparked calls for change in Saskatchewan's justice system and in Manitoba's child and family services system.

  • Apple moves to store iCloud keys in China, raising human rights fears
    News
    Reuters

    Apple moves to store iCloud keys in China, raising human rights fears

    By Stephen Nellis and Cate Cadell SAN FRANCISCO/BEIJING (Reuters) - When Apple Inc begins hosting Chinese users' iCloud accounts in a new Chinese data center at the end of this month to comply with new laws there, Chinese authorities will have far easier access to text messages, email and other data stored in the cloud. Until now, such keys have always been stored in the United States, meaning that any government or law enforcement authority seeking access to a Chinese iCloud account needed to go through the U.S. legal system. Now, according to Apple, for the first time the company will store the keys for Chinese iCloud accounts in China itself.

  • News
    CBC

    'Shock' and 'heartbreak' after adopted pig ends up on dinner table

    One of the 57 animals the Nanaimo SPCA branch manager nursed back to health was Molly, a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig who finally found her forever home last month. Molly's owner isn't being charged, Davis said, but they'll be blacklisted by the SPCA and won't be allowed to adopt again from any of the province's locations. Jack was turned into the SPCA by a family who adopted him as a stray. "He was a little bit nippy at first, but we're working on that," Davis said.

  • News
    CBC

    Vancouver Island slopes gain new lustre with skier's freestyle gold

    Sharpe dominated the women's halfpipe Tuesday in Pyeongchang, South Korea, where no other competitor topped her best two runs. For Mike Manara, the director of sports for Mount Washington Alpine Resort near Comox, B.C. — where Sharpe grew up on the slopes — her achievement demonstrates the potential for athletes to excel outside the major sports training centres. Sharpe was one of four Vancouver Island athletes on the Canadian ski and snowboard team at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Corps: Agency worked to inform on Harvey flood risk

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Friday that leading up to and during Hurricane Harvey it "worked diligently" with officials to inform the public on flooding risks from Houston reservoirs that ended up inundating thousands of homes. The Corps' statement came in response to a Houston Chronicle report earlier this week that the agency failed to share with the public a forecast ahead of Harvey's arrival predicting that Barker and Addicks reservoirs would flood adjacent neighbourhoods . The Corps' forecast was made Aug. 24, the day before Harvey made landfall in South Texas.

  • News
    CBC

    Darn your socks, help the planet

    Want to tread lightly on Mother Earth? You can start by fixing the hole in your sock, according to the folks at the Ottawa Tool Library. Since last spring, the tool lending library has been hosting free events where skilled volunteers help visitors learn to fix everything from small appliances to musical instruments and vintage video games.

  • Heads up: Partial subway closure Saturday between St. Clair, Sheppard-Yonge stations
    News
    CBC

    Heads up: Partial subway closure Saturday between St. Clair, Sheppard-Yonge stations

    There will be no subway service between St. Clair and Sheppard-Yonge stations all day on Feb. 24. There won't be a traditional north-south shuttle bus service on Yonge Street during the closure. The TTC advises that commuters can take the University side of Line 1, and additional express service on all major east-west routes will be in place to connect customers to the University side.

  • Dalhousie students fight North Korean propaganda with floating USB drives
    News
    CBC

    Dalhousie students fight North Korean propaganda with floating USB drives

    A group of students at Dalhousie University in Halifax is helping a North Korean defector strike at the heart of Kim Jong-un's regime — not with weapons, but with the truth. Students in the international development studies program are taking part in former political prisoner Jung Gwang-il's worldwide push to send USB flash drives into North Korea. The campaign is called Flash Drives for Freedom, and the drives can contain Western media, South Korean TV shows or any other message that normally wouldn't reach a people who live without internet or any other contact to the outside world.

  • News
    CBC

    Canadian athlete Dave Duncan arrested, released in South Korea

    Canadian ski cross athlete David Duncan, his wife Maja, and Ski Cross high performance director Willy Raine were arrested and released Saturday after police in South Korea say a vehicle was stolen, with the driver legally impaired at the time of arrest. The legal limit in South Korea is 0.05. A CBC News source says the Duncans and Raine have been been restricted from leaving South Korea, although it's unclear whether their passports have been confiscated.

  • News
    Reuters

    Senior Chinese politician under investigation for disciplinary violations: Xinhua

    A senior Chinese politician has been removed from his administrative positions and is under investigation for suspected "serious disciplinary violations", state media Xinhua said on Saturday. Yang Jing will be kept under observation for one year, Xinhua said, citing the Communist Party's graft buster, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI). It said the steps had been approved by the Central Committee, the ruling Communist Party's governing body, and the CCDI.

  • Are you over 50? City of Fredericton wants to hear from you
    News
    CBC

    Are you over 50? City of Fredericton wants to hear from you

    The City of Fredericton has launched a survey of its older population to find out what would make the city a better place to live as they age. The questionnaire is a project of the city's Age-Friendly Community Advisory Committee.

  • Saint John Energy heat-pump rentals continue to boom
    News
    CBC

    Saint John Energy heat-pump rentals continue to boom

    Two years after Saint John Energy started offering rentals for mini-split heat pumps, the popular program has exceeded 3,000 unit rentals. Launched in 2016, the utility covered the cost of installing the units and the heat pump for customers who commit to a minimum three-year rental. Initially, it catered only to Saint John customers, but it soon began to expand its reach to other cities in the province.

  • News
    CBC

    Former Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown sends notice of libel to CTV News

    The notice names the CTV Television Network, its parent Bell Media Inc., as well as several journalists, some named and some unknown, who worked on the stories. Brown has denied the accusations made in the CTV report from the outset and was allowed to enter the party's leadership contest earlier this week.

  • News
    CBC

    Second Opinion | Long flight? Staying home and binge watching TV? Risk of deep vein thrombosis either way

    This is an excerpt from Second Opinion, a weekly roundup of eclectic and under-the-radar health and medical science news emailed to subscribers every Saturday morning. If you haven't subscribed yet, you can do that by clicking here. It can also happen after binge watching TV. Research published this week in the Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis found that spending hours blowing through a season of Black Mirror or Stranger Things increases your chances of developing a potentially fatal blood clot.

  • How Islanders can confess their innermost secrets
    News
    CBC

    How Islanders can confess their innermost secrets

    You can reveal your most intimate secrets in the confessional this weekend — at a Charlottetown coffee shop. "We are going to pre-record random confessions from strangers — or anybody — and we're going to play them anonymously and then talk about them," said podcast co-creator Tamara Steele.

  • Cider provider: Newfoundland company celebrates launch of first drinks
    News
    CBC

    Cider provider: Newfoundland company celebrates launch of first drinks

    For Marc Poirier, one of the founders of the Newfoundland Cider Company, the apple trees around Milton, N.L., were an untapped treasure — until now. "In the Milton area, it's amazing," Poirier told CBC's On the Go on Friday. The Newfoundland Cider Company is celebrating the release of its first products.

  • Death toll from twin blasts in Somalia's capital rises to 21
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Death toll from twin blasts in Somalia's capital rises to 21

    Authorities say the death toll in a pair of explosions Friday evening in Somalia's capital has risen to 21. The director of Aamin Ambulance service, Dr. Abdirahman Abdulqadir, gave the new toll Saturday. It was confirmed by police Capt. Mohamed Hussein, who said it was based on figures from hospitals.

  • A first-hand look at a snowy afternoon commute
    Global News

    A first-hand look at a snowy afternoon commute

    The daily drive for many Metro Vancouver residents was either pure hell or not so bad at all. Aaron McArthur took us along for the ride.

  • News
    CBC

    Long winter taking toll on Calgary charity that feeds those in need

    For the past five years, Leftovers Calgary has co-ordinated 72 delivery routes a week, using 200 volunteer drivers and one small transport truck bought with help from a corporate sponsor.