• Ford government cancels electricity conservation programs
    News
    CBC

    Ford government cancels electricity conservation programs

    Carolyn Bickerton, owner of Purewater Total Home Leisure  in Ottawa, says the decision to cancel the Poolsave program has been bad for business. Bickerton has taken part in the program for the past two years, and said it's been instrumental in both growing the company and reducing electricity consumption for pool owners. Bickerton said the program's cancellation, which supported sales and increased installation bookings, means she probably she won't be able to fill two summer jobs.

  • Trudeau calls May 6 byelection for B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trudeau calls May 6 byelection for B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith

    OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced a May byelection in British Columbia to fill a seat vacated by a former New Democrat MP.The Prime Minister's Office has set May 6 as the date for the ballot for Nanaimo-Ladysmith.The riding opened up when former NDP member of Parliament Sheila Malcolmson resigned in January to run successfully for the provincial New Democrats.Malcolmson was one of several NDP MPs who decided not to run again in October's federal election.The list includes B.C.'s Murray Rankin, Alberta's Linda Duncan, Ontario's Irene Mathyssen and David Christopherson, Quebec's Helene Laverdiere, Romeo Saganash, Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet and Anne Minh-Thu Quach, and B.C.'s Fin Donnelly.Bob Chamberlin, a long-serving chief councillor of a First Nation based on Gilford Island in the Broughton Archipelago off northeastern Vancouver Island, has said he intends to seek the NDP candidacy in Nanaimo-Ladysmith.Chamberlin has worked in the Kwikwasutinuxw Haxwa'mis First Nation and as vice president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs. He has also worked with Liberal and Conservative governments, served as chair of several agencies and boards, and advocated on a range of issues.Paul Manly, a researcher, filmmaker and communications specialist who has lived and worked in Nanaimo since 2002, is running for the Green party. Manly finished fourth in the riding in the general election of 2015, earning 19.8 per cent of the vote.The Conservatives have selected 32-year-old financial manager John Hirst to run in the riding while Jennifer Clarke, who lost the nomination to Hirst, will represent the new People's Party of Canada, led by Quebec MP Maxime Bernier.The Canadian Press

  • When Airbnb goes bad, grounded planes and limiting doctor visits: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet
    News
    CBC

    When Airbnb goes bad, grounded planes and limiting doctor visits: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet

    Miss something this week? Don't panic. CBC's Marketplace rounds up the consumer and health news you need.Want this in your inbox? Get the Marketplace newsletter every Friday.Does your doctor have a 'one issue per visit' rule?An Ontario woman tweeted out a notice at her doctor's office, which asked patients to only bring up "one issue" per visit. The post attracted attention online, with some people, including doctors, against the policy and others praising it, saying it helps with wait times. Some physicians say it's a symptom of the fee-for-service system. 737 Max jets stay grounded Air Canada will keep Boeing 737 Max 8 jets grounded until at least July 1, hoping to ease customer travel concerns. The announcement comes after Transport Canada closed Canadian airspace to the aircraft following the Ethiopian Airlines crash. Air Canada also says its jets have all additional safety systems.Have a tire warranty? Read the fine printA B.C. man bought tires with a 112,000-kilometre warranty and he says they wore out after 30,000 kilometres, but the manufacturer Continental Tires rejected his claim. The company told Go Public the tires showed "uneven wear," making the warranty inapplicable. One consumer advocacy expert says "it's a problem — and it's industry-wide." Search is on for plastic alternativesAs Newfoundland and Labrador considers banning single-use plastic bags, researchers at Memorial University are searching for new materials to make plastic biodegradable. They say carbon dioxide could be key to a purified polymer that could serve as a more environmentally friendly option. Check out our story on why it's so hard to shop plastic-free.Calls for action on vaccine alternativesIn British Columbia, government officials are looking into reports that some homeopathic and naturopathic practitioners have promoted products called "nosodes" or "homeoprophylaxis" as alternatives to vaccines. The officials refer to a study that found "no antibody response" to homeopathic remedies. Watch our story on how easily we got Health Canada to license our bogus kids' cough remedy.What else is going onYou may not have a choice but to use self-checkout. Some customers at Shoppers Drug Mart and Real Canadian Superstore say they were forced to use self-checkout. But Loblaw Co., which owns both retailers, says stores are expected to give customers the option of a cashier checkout. Walmart Canada faced similar criticism when they ramped up self-checkout efforts last year.Starbucks looks to go greener with a recyclable and compostable to-go coffee cup. In Canada, the cup launches in Vancouver first. A strawless lid has already launched at stores in Toronto.Construction of new homes in Canada will continue to fall for the next two years, according to a new report. Higher borrowing costs and tighter lending rules are being blamed for the housing slowdown. The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) says home sales sank to their lowest in over six years in February.Rogers Media sells off its remaining magazine brands. Chatelaine, Maclean's, Canadian Business and other magazines have been sold to the same publisher as Toronto Life. The deal is expected to close in April.The latest in recallsThis wall outlet doesn't meet Canadian standards for electrical products; these Koala Baby sleepers could be a flammable; the wall anchors supplied with these wall-mounted range hoods could cause the hood to pull away from the wall; the handle on these onion soup bowls could break, posing a burn hazard; this sleepwear for kids could pose a flammability hazard and this line of O'Brien Watersports water skis could break. (If any links to these recalls don't work for you try using another internet browser.)This week Marketplace investigates When Airbnb goes wrong: A note from Charlsie AgroWhat happens when your Airbnb stay goes from booked to bust? This week on Marketplace we look at some of the most common complaints from travelers, including last-minute cancellations and how to avoid them.Plus, we go undercover to investigate a sneaky new trend taking the home sharing platform by storm: covert Airbnbs. They're listings in buildings where home sharing isn't welcome. How can you spot them, and what to do if you find yourself being told to take the back entrance, avoid the lobby and even lie? We talk to industry experts to get their top tips.I hope you'll tune in. You can watch the episode  below or stream it on CBC Gem.

  • Iran to cement ties with Lebanon, Hezbollah despite U.S. pressure
    News
    Reuters

    Iran to cement ties with Lebanon, Hezbollah despite U.S. pressure

    Iran said on Sunday it would expand its ties with Lebanon in spite of the "provocative and interventionist" call by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for Beirut to choose sides, Iranian state television reported. On a regional tour to drum up support for Washington's harder line against Tehran, Pompeo said on Friday that Lebanon faced a choice - "Bravely move forward as an independent and proud nation, or allow the dark ambitions of Iran and Hezbollah to dictate your future". Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qasemi dismissed Pompeo's remarks.

  • The making of militants in India's 'paradise on earth'
    News
    Reuters

    The making of militants in India's 'paradise on earth'

    In blood red font on the photo was scribbled his new allegiance: the Hizbul Mujahideen, or 'The Party of Warriors', the largest of the militant groups fighting to free the mostly-Muslim Kashmir from Indian rule. Owais is one of a rising number of local militants fighting for independence of Kashmir - an insurgency being spread on social media amid India's sustained, iron-fisted rule of the region. Hundreds of thousands of Indian troops and armed police are stationed in this lush region at the foot of the Himalayas.

  • Dartmouth boxing club sending 5 fighters to national championships
    News
    CBC

    Dartmouth boxing club sending 5 fighters to national championships

    A Dartmouth, N.S., boxing club is sending five of its fighters to the Canadian Boxing Championships this spring. Tribal Boxing Club's owner and head coach, Bridget Stevens, is excited to see some familiar faces make the competition in Victoria in late April. The boxers headed to the championships are Renae Cowal, Natali Fagan, Eddie James, Holly McDonald and Mohamed Milad.

  • Some Shoppers Drug Mart staff say they're 'fed up' over pressure to push self-checkout
    News
    CBC

    Some Shoppers Drug Mart staff say they're 'fed up' over pressure to push self-checkout

    "They're trying to get us to force [customers] to go to self-checkout," said a cashier at a Shoppers Drug Mart in Ontario. At the time, Loblaws stated that it expects stores to always offer customers the choice of checking out with a cashier. The cashier said she suspects the company's goal is to get customers used to the technology so it can cut cashier jobs.

  • Bringing back the love for Palm Wine music
    BBC News

    Bringing back the love for Palm Wine music

    Traditional Palm Wine music has been losing popularity in Ghana in recent years, but an ambitious four-piece band are working hard to bring back the love. Kwan Pa ('the right path') perform indigenous Ghanaian music and are entertaining crowds of young and old alike. Between them the members play a wide range of traditional instruments, including the seprewa (harp-lute), frikyiwa (castanet), shekere (big rattle), gome (square bass drum), ppanlogo drums and the acoustic guitar. The quartet, who released their first album in March 2019, told BBC Africa they have their sights firmly set on bringing Palm Wine music to the international stage. Video Journalist: Sulley Lansah.

  • 'Heartbeat of the drum' ties cultures together at Cambridge Bay festival
    News
    CBC

    'Heartbeat of the drum' ties cultures together at Cambridge Bay festival

    The community hosted its second annual multicultural festival. Dene drummers from Detah, N.W.T., took part, as well as a father-son hoop dancing duo from near Edmonton, Dance Africa from Kamloops, B.C., pow wow dancers, and local Inuit drummers and square dancers. "It was a beautiful event," said Cambridge Bay Mayor Pam Gross.

  • Engineer questions repair strategy for Quinpool Road bridge
    News
    CBC

    Engineer questions repair strategy for Quinpool Road bridge

    Repair work that's expected to take at least four months to fix a bridge on Quinpool Road in Halifax could have been less disruptive had CN Rail chose a different approach, says a local structural engineer. On April 1, CN will begin repair work to the roughly 100-year-old bridge structure found on the stretch of road between Armview Avenue and MacDonald Street. The repair work will include removing concrete spandrel walls, constructing a new concrete arch, reconstructing the spandrel walls, waterproofing the arch and making concrete repairs to the wingwalls and abutment face, CN spokesperson Alexandre Boulé said in an email.

  • Mounties seeing smaller number of blood samples than expected under drug-impaired driving law
    News
    CBC

    Mounties seeing smaller number of blood samples than expected under drug-impaired driving law

    The Royal Canadian Mounted Police were expecting to see their national forensic labs flooded with requests for blood tests after Canada's new impaired driving law came into effect, but they've seen just a small number so far. The force's National Forensic Laboratory Services operation receives bodily fluid samples, including blood and urine, that require forensic toxicology analysis to hold up in court. The Liberals' new impaired driving legislation introduced three new drug-related offences for drivers who have consumed drugs within two hours of driving.

  • How Joe Fafard's legacy is living on in Ottawa
    News
    CBC

    How Joe Fafard's legacy is living on in Ottawa

    Even if you've never been inside the National Gallery of Canada, you would have seen Joe Fafard's work just from passing by the building.

  • Canada Reads 2019: The defenders, the books and what's at stake
    News
    CBC

    Canada Reads 2019: The defenders, the books and what's at stake

    Fredericton-born comedian Ali Hassan will host for a third year. The winning Canada Reads author typically gets a major boost in sales and joins an elite club of previous winners that include André Alexis, Kim Thuy, Lisa Moore, Lawrence Hill, Hubert Aquin and Michael Ondaatje.

  • As this Newfoundland artist waits for a transplant in Ottawa, his heart remains at home
    News
    CBC

    As this Newfoundland artist waits for a transplant in Ottawa, his heart remains at home

    Like so many other Newfoundlanders with a failing organ, Peter Lewis, facing declining health and handed few options, found himself in the air one winter night, on his way to the mainland in order to qualify for life-saving surgery. Lewis, an impressionist and owner of downtown St. John's fixture Peter Lewis Gallery, hasn't stopped painting since he moved to Ottawa in January. Lewis left St. John's to qualify for a heart transplant.

  • Plant a pollinator-friendly garden this spring: 5 things to know
    News
    CBC

    Plant a pollinator-friendly garden this spring: 5 things to know

    With spring around the corner, green-thumbed Islanders might be looking for ways to attract pollinators to their home gardens. "A tremendous amount of our food crops are dependent upon pollinators. If we lose our pollinators we will be putting our food system into a very precarious situation," said Phil Ferraro, general manager at the P.E.I. Farm Centre in Charlottetown.

  • Fixing federal payroll IT system could almost double its cost, says memo
    News
    CBC

    Fixing federal payroll IT system could almost double its cost, says memo

    Another federal payroll system needs an overhaul after it was put together quickly and on the cheap – and the repair is expected to cost almost as much as the system itself. The system, which converts paper documents into electronic versions, is used to store payroll information needed for the dysfunctional Phoenix program at the Miramichi, N.B., federal pay centre. The imaging system was created in 2013 at a cost of $409,456 in Matane, Que., where a federal office verifies individual pay requests received in paper form, then converts them to digital images.

  • 6 gems of wisdom from Island seniors
    News
    CBC

    6 gems of wisdom from Island seniors

    Have you ever wondered what the recipe is to a longer, happier life?

  • Man whose son died in Mackenzie River takes emotional 1,200-km bike ride to raise money
    News
    CBC

    Man whose son died in Mackenzie River takes emotional 1,200-km bike ride to raise money

    The mud was up to Laval St. Germain's ankles and his legs struggled to force the pedals on his bike forward on a 1,200 kilometre trek from Yellowknife to Norman Wells, N.W.T. The mission for St. Germain, a well-known adventurer and pilot from Calgary, was to deliver a check for $5,000 to the Sahtu Search and Rescue Society, to be used for this year's expenses. "It'll all be worth it, every single pedal stroke, and every single penny, if we save one life," St. Germain said.

  • Slogging through March this year? Try doing it in 1880
    News
    CBC

    Slogging through March this year? Try doing it in 1880

    March is a long month, thanks to the lousy weather and the lack of a long weekend. But if you think the closing days of winter are tough now, you might not have made it through until April in the 1800s.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Philly chilly in September, so nude bike ride set for August

    PHILADELPHIA — Naked bicyclists say they were so cold riding around Philadelphia last September that this year they'll do it in August.

  • Abu Dhabi aims to lure start-ups with investment in new technology hub
    News
    Reuters

    Abu Dhabi aims to lure start-ups with investment in new technology hub

    U.S. tech giant Microsoft will be a strategic partner, providing technology and cloud services to the businesses that join the hub as the capital of the United Arab Emirates continues its push to reduce reliance on oil revenue. Abu Dhabi derives about 50 percent of its real gross domestic product and about 90 percent of central government revenue from the hydrocarbon sector, according to ratings agency S&P. The emirate launched a 50 billion dirham ($13.6 billion) stimulus fund, Ghadan 21, in September last year to accelerate economic growth. The new initiative, named Hub 71, is linked to Ghadan will also involve the launch of a 500 million dirham fund to invest in start-ups, said Ibrahim Ajami, head of Mubadala Ventures, the technology arm of Mubadala Investment Co. The goal is to have 100 companies over the next three to five years, Ajami said.

  • Dennis Oland in his own words: What he told his murder retrial
    News
    CBC

    Dennis Oland in his own words: What he told his murder retrial

    Dennis Oland spent three days in the witness box earlier this month, testifying in his own defence at his murder retrial in Saint John.

  • About a million children affected after southern Africa cyclone, UNICEF estimates
    News
    CBC

    About a million children affected after southern Africa cyclone, UNICEF estimates

    UNICEF is estimating about a million children are affected by a cyclone that struck southern Africa 10 days ago, destroying homes and flooding areas of Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi. There are at least 1.8 million people in need of immediate assistance, requiring supplies such as food, blankets and medicine, Stapleton told CBC News on Sunday.

  • Judges on Twitter? Ethical guidance for those on the bench under review
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Judges on Twitter? Ethical guidance for those on the bench under review

    TORONTO — Whether Canadian judges should be active on Twitter, Facebook or other social media and what involvement they should have in community life are among issues under a review that aims to modernize ethical guidance for those on the bench.As part of the first such update in 20 years, the body that regulates judicial conduct has launched consultations as a way to gauge public sentiment on acceptable conduct for federally appointed judges as it seeks to update and streamline its guide: "Ethical Principles for Judges.""As society evolves, so do the ethical issues that judges sometimes face," Chief Justice Richard Wagner said in a statement.While bedrock principles for judges such as integrity, independence and impartiality are not up for debate, the review focuses on six themes — some new, some in need of updating: Social media, public engagement, post-retirement, self-represented litigants, case management, settlement conferences and judicial mediation, and professional development."The work of judges has changed. Society has evolved. New and emerging ethical questions are before us," the Canadian Judicial Council says in a background paper. "Reflecting this changing environment, council is reviewing the current ethical principles to ensure they continue to provide guidance for judges in a manner that reflects evolving public expectations."Public feedback is requested by way of an online survey in which respondents are asked to agree or disagree with a series of statements such as: "Judges should not identify themselves as judges on social media" or "Judges should not use social media to 'like,' 'friend' or 'share' about matters that could come before the courts, generate negative debates (political or others) or be the subject of controversy."Underlying many of the questions is to what extent judges should be socially reclusive and whether it's fair or even desirable to demand a judiciary that is isolated and aloof from the kind of active if ordinary social engagement most Canadians take for granted."Judges, of course, have private lives and should enjoy, as much as possible, the rights and freedoms of citizens generally," the guide states. "Moreover, an out of touch judge is less likely to be effective."The current document makes it clear that its aim is to provide ethical guidance and "shall not be used as a code or a list of prohibited behaviours."However, breaches could lead to disciplinary consequences under the Judges Act, up to and including the rare step of being forced from the bench. In November, for example, the council rapped a well respected Ontario Superior Court justice for accepting a temporary dean's posting at an Indigenous law school — the kind of dilemma the revised guide should help to resolve. The matter, still before the courts, provoked angry criticism of the judicial council itself.Mixing personal and public interests can also backfire, such as in the case of Frank Newbould, who resigned as a judge under a cloud over his participation at a community meeting to consider a land-claim settlement in an area in which he had a cottage."To an increasing degree, judges engage with the wider community to inform and educate the public about the role of the judiciary in maintaining the rule of law, and to participate in opportunities that allow them to become better informed about the communities they serve," the council says in its background paper. "This theme considers the ethical challenges that this engagement presents."One emerging area of concern is the growing number of judges who return to law practice after retirement from the bench. That raises questions about whether they should be allowed to pursue job opportunities before retiring, or use their former position to further a post-bench business career. Another survey question asks respondents to express views on the statement: "In general, former judges should not argue a case or appear in court."The internet age also makes it easy for judges, like anyone else, to access information online, raising the question of whether they should avoid looking for material relevant to a matter before them.Neither the Canadian Superior Courts Judges Association nor the judges section of the Canadian Bar Association was willing to discuss the review.Colin Perkel, The Canadian Press

  • West coast musician keeps French heritage and his family history alive in rural N.L.
    News
    CBC

    West coast musician keeps French heritage and his family history alive in rural N.L.

    It can come as a shock to visitors, from both home and abroad, to discover thriving rural Newfoundland communities where French is the first language for many residents. "When I greet people at the door here at the community centre, whether they're French or not I don't know for sure, but I'll always answer with with 'Bonjour, comment ca va, ca va bien' and then they realize we are French," said musician Robert Felix, who works with a Francophone association in Black Duck Brook (L'Anse-à-Canards). Felix said many visitors come from Quebec, France and French areas of the Maritime provinces through the Port au Port Peninsula, also known as the French Shore, on Newfoundland's west coast.