• U.S. calls Chinese death sentence against Canadian 'politically motivated'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    U.S. calls Chinese death sentence against Canadian 'politically motivated'

    The United States has denounced a death sentence imposed on a British Columbia man in China as "politically motivated," adding heft to Ottawa's effort to intensify international pressure on Beijing to spare his life and to release two other detained Canadians. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland conferred Tuesday and "expressed their concerns about the arbitrary detentions and politically motivated sentencing of Canadian nationals," U.S. deputy spokesman Robert Palladino said in a statement Wednesday. Earlier this week, a Chinese court applied the death penalty to Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, who was originally sentenced in 2016 to a 15-year term for drug smuggling.

  • Musk tweets Tesla to end customer referral plan because of costs
    News
    Reuters

    Musk tweets Tesla to end customer referral plan because of costs

    (Reuters) - Tesla Inc's customer referral incentive plan will end on Feb. 1, the electric carmaker's Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk tweeted on Thursday, citing costs. Musk tweet https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1085779971333705728ed that the referral program is ending because "it's adding too much cost to the cars, especially Model 3". The billionaire in the past few months has been pushing for cost-cutting initiatives to boost the company's profitability. ...

  • UK's Prince Philip, 97, escapes unhurt after road crash near royal estate
    News
    Reuters

    UK's Prince Philip, 97, escapes unhurt after road crash near royal estate

    Queen Elizabeth's husband, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, 97, was involved in a traffic accident while driving on Thursday near the Sandringham estate in eastern England, Buckingham Palace said. "The Duke of Edinburgh was involved in a road traffic accident with another vehicle this afternoon," it said in a statement. The accident took place close to the Sandringham Estate." Local police attended the scene, the palace added.

  • Trudeau's refreshed cabinet meets in Quebec amid economic uncertainty, China tensions
    News
    CBC

    Trudeau's refreshed cabinet meets in Quebec amid economic uncertainty, China tensions

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his revamped cabinet met in Sherbrooke, Que., on Wednesday, the start of a three-day retreat to deal with pressing economic, environmental and international issues while setting the Liberals on course for this year's federal election. Economic uncertainty, a contentious carbon tax, stalled pipelines and a need to diversify trade partners are some of the top domestic priorities, while U.S. relations and rising tensions with China are also on the table. To offset potential losses, they're targeting seats now held by the NDP in vote-rich Quebec.

  • Hundreds of Rohingya families flee India after deportations
    News
    Reuters

    Hundreds of Rohingya families flee India after deportations

    India's Hindu nationalist government regards the Rohingya as illegal aliens and a security risk, and has ordered that tens of thousands of them who live in scattered settlements and slums be identified and repatriated. This month it deported a Rohingya family of five to Buddhist-majority Myanmar, the second expulsion in three months. "Many people in India have given statements like launching a 'kill movement'," said Mohammed Arfaat, a Rohingya youth leader who left for Bangladesh in October after six years in the northern Indian city of Jammu.

  • This Toronto police cadet just might be your #10YearChallenge competition
    News
    CBC

    This Toronto police cadet just might be your #10YearChallenge competition

    If you're anywhere on social media, you've seen the #10YearChallenge.

  • Apple, Amazon called out for 'incorrect' Taiwan, Hong Kong references
    News
    Reuters

    Apple, Amazon called out for 'incorrect' Taiwan, Hong Kong references

    The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) said in a report this month that 66 of the world's 500 largest companies had used "incorrect labels" for Taiwan and 53 had errors in the way they referred to Hong Kong, according to China's Legal Daily newspaper. Beijing considers self-ruled Taiwan a wayward province of China and the former British colony of Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 and operates as a semi-autonomous territory.

  • News
    Reuters

    New Zealand asks unruly British tourists to leave

    A group of British tourists has been asked to leave New Zealand after they were reported for shoplifting, littering, threatening residents and causing chaos, an immigration official said on Thursday. The family, who are traveling on British passports, were involved in a series of incidents in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city, and Hamilton this week that have shocked New Zealanders. Peter Devoy, assistant general manager for Immigration New Zealand (INZ), told Reuters five individuals from the group had been served with Deportation Liability Notices, the first stage in the deportation process.

  • 'I walk away happy with no regrets': Esks linebacker J.C Sherritt retires
    News
    CBC

    'I walk away happy with no regrets': Esks linebacker J.C Sherritt retires

    After spending his entire eight-year career with the Edmonton Eskimos, American-born linebacker J.C. Sherritt has announced he's hanging up his cleats for good. The Esks announced Sherritt's retirement from the CFL on Wednesday morning. A few days after the 2018 season ended, Sherritt, 30, said he realized it was time to retire.

  • Brexit 'plan B', Greek government, Lyon fire: Europe briefing
    euronews Videos

    Brexit 'plan B', Greek government, Lyon fire: Europe briefing

    1. Brexit 'Plan B' The leader of Britain's House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, announced on Thursday that the British government will reveal its next Brexit steps on Monday. This comes after the government was defeated last week in a vote which forced it to outlay its Brexit strategy within three days if the Withdrawal Agreement was rejected. Leadsom also announced that lawmakers will debate and vote on May's Brexit 'Plan B' on January 29. Watch our correspondents in London and Brussels break all the latest developments down in the video player above. 2. France activates 'Hard Brexit' plan France has activated its "Hard Brexit" plan, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said on Thursday. The announcement comes just two days after British MPs voted against the Withdrawal Agreement agreed with EU leaders, increasing the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit. "We can regret this rejection or rejoice in it, but in any case what is certain is that the hypothesis of a Brexit without an agreement is less and less improbable," Philippe told reporters. The French government started working on its contingency planning, in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal, in April 2018, Philippe said. Some of the measures triggered included a €50 million investment plan in ports and airports and the creation of 600 jobs in areas including customs. Philippe conceded however that there's "more work" to be done, particularly "to defend the interests of French fishermen." 3. Macedonia name change Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras survived a vote of no-confidence on Wednesday , which was triggered after the resignation of Defence Minister Panos Kammenos and his right-wing Independent Greeks' party over an accord to end a long name dispute Greece and Macedonia. His victory paves the way for the name change to be ratified by Greek parliamentarians, opening the door for the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to join the EU and NATO. The agreement was criticised on Wednesday by Russian President Vladimir Putin and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. Lavrov said the name change might be a tactic by the US and other Western countries to destabilise the Balkans. 4. Lyon fire A huge fire broke out on the rooftop of a university in the French city of Lyon on Thursday morning. At least three people were slightly injured in the blaze, which is believed to have been triggered by the explosion of a gas bottle as a result of building works. Shortly after 10 a.m., the university said that the fire was "under control" and that some of the buildings, which had been evacuated, had been re-opened. 5. Turkey deports Dutch journalist Dutch financial newspaper Financieele Dagblad revealed on Thursday that Turkey has deported one of its journalists citing "security-related concerns." The newspaper said in an article posted online that its correspondent Ans Boersma, was detained upon visiting an immigration office to extend her visa. Editor-in-Chief Jan Bonjer said he was "profoundly shocked" by the move, which he described as a "flagrant violation of press freedom." Boersma, 31, said on Twitter that she had been declared an "unwanted person" in Turkey. Here's how we covered the developments this morning:

  • Thai universities tap into rising Chinese demand
    News
    Reuters

    Thai universities tap into rising Chinese demand

    The 28-year-old history student is among thousands of Chinese who join Thai universities every year, according to Thai government data, which shows their annual enrolment numbers have doubled since 2012. Hit by years of declining enrolment of Thai students, the institutions are scrambling to meet this recent surge in demand as Chinese students look for alternatives to Western schools. Chada Triamvithaya, an academic at King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang who has been researching Chinese migration patterns in Thailand, said universities currently make twice the amount in tuition fees from Chinese students as they do from locals.

  • Ex-Michigan governor says he will resign university post in Nassar fallout
    News
    Reuters

    Ex-Michigan governor says he will resign university post in Nassar fallout

    Nassar, who was a team doctor for USA Gymnastics, was sentenced to up to 300 years in prison in two different trials last winter after more than 350 women testified that he abused them. Engler said in a letter published by the university the chair of MSU's board of trustees advised him that a majority of the panel had asked that he step down, and that he would abide by their request and resign as of Jan. 23. Board chair Dianne Byrum had called a meeting on Thursday to discuss firing Engler, a three-time former governor of Michigan, after he told the Detroit News that some of Nassar's victims were "enjoying" being in the spotlight.

  • Exclusive: India's e-commerce curbs could hit online sales by $46 billion by 2022: PwC draft analysis
    News
    Reuters

    Exclusive: India's e-commerce curbs could hit online sales by $46 billion by 2022: PwC draft analysis

    Under the changes, e-commerce firms in India will from Feb. 1 not be able to sell products via companies in which they have an equity interest or push sellers to sell exclusively on their platforms. Announced in December, just months before a general election due by May this year, the rules were seen as an attempt by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government to appease millions of small traders and shopkeepers, who form a key voter base and say their businesses have been threatened by global online retailers. Industry sources told Reuters the policy would delay or derail some investment plans and push companies such as Amazon and Flipkart to create new, more complex business structures.

  • Problems with new Charlottetown well field delaying environmental study
    News
    CBC

    Problems with new Charlottetown well field delaying environmental study

    A government-funded study aimed at shaping P.E.I.'s water use rules is up to two years behind schedule because of ongoing problems with Charlottetown's newest well field in Miltonvale Park.  

  • Mystery company at heart of $53M potash mine lawsuit
    News
    CBC

    Mystery company at heart of $53M potash mine lawsuit

    Five years ago an unknown Alberta-registered company, HB Construction, picked up some land, vehicles and equipment following the collapse of another company, Comstock Canada Ltd. of Burlington, Ont. Thrown into the deal at no extra charge was ownership of a lawsuit Comstock had earlier launched against a couple of big players in Canada's corporate world: PotashCorp of Saskatchewan and AMEC Americas Inc. The suit relates to disputes that arose between Comstock and those companies in 2009-2010 during construction of PotashCorp's now-closed mine in Penobsquis.

  • N.S. Gaming Corp. will no longer pay expenses for committee experts
    News
    CBC

    N.S. Gaming Corp. will no longer pay expenses for committee experts

    Months after coming under fire for paying the travel bills of three expert witnesses, the Nova Scotia Gaming Corp. says it will no longer pay the expenses of experts who testify before committees at Province House. The corporation faced criticism last October, including from Premier Stephen McNeil, for funding about $7,100 of flights and hotel bills for three experts connected to the Ontario-based Responsible Gambling Council. The corporation's revenue is derived from casinos, video lottery terminals and lottery sales, which flows directly to provincial coffers.

  • Maker of bomb-defusing kids' game apologizes, halts sales after complaints
    News
    CBC

    Maker of bomb-defusing kids' game apologizes, halts sales after complaints

    The company behind Cut The Wire, a bomb-defusing game for children, has offered an apology following complaints from parents that it's inappropriate and insensitive. "We're very sorry for any concern the game may have caused," said Jochem van Rijn, president of YULU, in a statement to CBC News this week. In response to the criticism, he said YULU — an international games-maker — is no longer shipping Cut The Wire to North American markets.    And after fielding complaints from customers, Walmart in Canada has pledged to not restock the product. Target in the U.S. said it has removed the game from store shelves. Recommended for children ages six and up, the goal of the game is to defuse a brightly coloured ticking toy bomb connected to numerous wires before it pretend-explodes. "Defuse or lose!" says the product's packaging. "We created Cut The Wire as a fun strategy game for kids where the object is to defuse the device and be the hero," said van Rijn.  But some parents believe that a "fun" game involving a toy bomb sends the wrong message to children, particularly in an era of terrorism threats. "I was totally flabbergasted by it," said Sveta Melchuck, who recently saw Cut The Wire at a Walmart in Montreal. "It was absolutely shocking that anyone would have an idea of having kids play with a representation of an explosive device."  No longer shipping to Canada Melchuk is happy YULU will no longer ship the game to Canada, but is concerned about it being sold elsewhere. Cut The Wire is still featured on YULU's website.  "If they say they're not shipping it to North America, it means that whatever inventory they have, they still intend to sell it," she said. "Where are they going?" Sharon Butler, who discovered the product at Walmart in London, Ont., also has concerns about a kids' game where players race to defuse a toy bomb. She too is pleased that YULU is halting North American sales but questions the sincerity of the company.  "Are they sorry for it, or are they just sorry they got caught and they're getting a bad rap?" Both Butler and Melchuk are also displeased that Walmart is still selling Cut The Wire in Canadian stores. As first reported by CBC News, Walmart said last week, following complaints from shoppers, that it has no plans to reorder the game. But the retailer is still selling off its current stock. "I think it's wrong," said Melchuk.  When Target started fielding criticism about the game in late October, the U.S. company pledged to remove it. The retailer told CBC News last week that it was no longer selling the item in stores. But last Friday, Ben Aguirre, of Santa Clara, California, found at least a dozen Cut The Wire games on sale at a local Target and tweeted about it.  "If the retailer said in October that it'd stop selling the product, then it surprises me that it's still on shelves," said Aguirre in an interview. The parent of two young children believes Target shouldn't have sold the game in the first place. "It's kind of appalling." The retailer told CBC News it's working with the Santa Clara store to ensure the game is removed. "This product should no longer be available at Target," spokesperson Lee Henderson said in an email. Some like it Retail consultant and former toy buyer Bruce Winder says if a company is concerned about a product that has sparked complaints, it should immediately pull the item rather than let it linger on store shelves. "That's not an optimal solution because you're still going to make people angry and still confuse people," said Winder with the Retail Advisers Network in Toronto. Not everyone takes issue with Cut The Wire's presence in stores. More than 600 readers commented on the original CBC News story about the game, many of them stating they didn't have a problem with the product. CBC News also informally polled readers on its Snapchat channel, asking whether or not the game desensitizes children to dangerous items. Of the 48,000 who responded, only about one quarter answered "Yes." Andy Wilson says he's not bothered by the game, but was still taken aback on Thursday when, following complaints, he found it prominently displayed at Walmart in Terrebonne, Que. "I was astonished," he said. "I actually don't find the toy particularly offensive but I get why some would." Winder says a kids' product is worth removing from store shelves even if it only offends a small number of people. "It's a very controversial area, and you're talking about a sacred part of our society, which is children."

  • Stay away from popular Saint John sliding hill, officials warn
    News
    CBC

    Stay away from popular Saint John sliding hill, officials warn

    On Thursday, "No Trespassing" signs were posted on the sliding hill, which occupies several hectares of rolling slope at the northern end of the airfield off Loch Lomond Road. The move to discourage sliding is part of bigger changes happening at the Saint John Airport. The top of the slope is being converted into a runway safety area — intended to prevent damage to airplanes in the event they overshoot, or otherwise stray, from the runway.

  • Sunday could be 'a wintry mess' of a day on P.E.I.
    News
    CBC

    Sunday could be 'a wintry mess' of a day on P.E.I.

    Sunday will bring Prince Edward Island everything winter has to offer, according to a special weather statement issued by Environment Canada. On Thursday, CBC meteorologists Jay Scotland and Tina Simpkin said current forecasts show the Island could get hit particularly hard. The heaviest of the snow looks to fall north of the storm's track where amounts over 30 centimetres are possible on P.E.I., according to an Environment Canada weather statement.

  • How this Toronto tattoo artist changes lives in India
    News
    CBC

    How this Toronto tattoo artist changes lives in India

    Amber Gotzmeister never imagined her work as a tattoo artist would result in young men and women in India being allowed to get married. The co-owner of The Good Geisha, a downtown Toronto cosmetic tattoo shop, started her career correcting cosmetic tattoos, like tattooed eyebrows in need of a fix. It's a badly needed service in a country where 300 cases of acid attacks were recorded in 2016, according to the organization Acid Survivors Trust International (ASTI).

  • Getting back on the bus: Woman struck in 1995 has this advice for Ottawa riders
    News
    CBC

    Getting back on the bus: Woman struck in 1995 has this advice for Ottawa riders

    For years, Tanya Reid would feel her body start to shut down every time she saw a bus go by. The Mississauga, Ont., woman was struck by a public transit bus on Feb. 2,1995, after she stepped off at a stop and began crossing the street on a green light.

  • P.E.I. farmers can grow knowledge about soil health with new testing
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. farmers can grow knowledge about soil health with new testing

    Farmers on P.E.I. will soon have a new way to measure the health of their soil, using a testing package developed by the P.E.I. Department of Agriculture. Researchers from the department have been gathering soil samples for two years at 250 sites across the Island. "It's looking at a chemical, biological and a physical component of your soil and coming up with a soil quality index and seeing how productive your soil is," said Kyra Stiles, from the department's sustainable agriculture section.

  • Most fuel prices up, with diesel again making the biggest leap
    News
    CBC

    Most fuel prices up, with diesel again making the biggest leap

    For the second week in a row, diesel has jumped at least five cents a litre in Newfoundland and Labrador.  

  • 6-year-old helps rescue family from car crash in Nova Scotia
    News
    CBC

    6-year-old helps rescue family from car crash in Nova Scotia

    Soaking wet and suspended upside down by her seatbelt, Candice Hicks knew she was in trouble. On Nov. 1 Hicks had been driving from Amherst to Oxford, N.S., about a 30 minute drive away, to pick up her father. Hicks's six-year-old daughter Sophia, her four-year-old son Ethan and two-year-old daughter Elise were all travelling with her.

  • Oilpatch CEOs support Indigenous bid for Trans Mountain
    News
    CBC

    Oilpatch CEOs support Indigenous bid for Trans Mountain

    Some oilpatch CEOs are supporting a bid by Indigenous groups in Western Canada to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline and the proposed expansion project. Indigenous leaders are in Calgary this week to find consensus on what type of ownership and management system would be ideal. The Indian Resources Council (IRC) is behind the potential bid and said the majority of its 134 member First Nations are interested in an ownership stake.