• AP Interview: Taiwan may help if Hong Kong violence expands
    News
    The Canadian Press

    AP Interview: Taiwan may help if Hong Kong violence expands

    TAIPEI, Taiwan — Taiwan’s top diplomat said Tuesday that his government stands with Hong Kong citizens pushing for “freedom and democracy,” and would help those displaced from the semi-autonomous Chinese city if Beijing intervenes with greater force to quell the protests.Speaking to The Associated Press in the capital, Taipei, Foreign Minister Joseph Wu was careful to say his government has no desire to intervene in Hong Kong’s internal affairs, and that existing legislation is sufficient to deal with a relatively small number of Hong Kong students or others seeking to reside in Taiwan.But he added that Hong Kong police have already responded with “disproportionate force” to the protests. He said that any intervention by mainland Chinese forces would be “a new level of violence” that would prompt Taiwan to take a different stance in helping those seeking to leave Hong Kong.“When that happens, Taiwan is going to work with the international community to provide necessary assistance to those who are displaced by the violence there,” he said.Chinese paramilitary forces have deployed to the Chinese city of Shenzhen, just outside Hong Kong, since the protests began in June. Neither they nor the thousands of Chinese military troops garrisoned in Hong Kong itself have been deployed to confront the protesters so far.“The people here understand that how the Chinese government treats Hong Kong is going to be the future way of them treating Taiwan. And what turned out in Hong Kong is not very appealing to the Taiwanese people,” Wu said.China’s Communist Party insists that Taiwan is part of China and must be reunited with it, even if by force. Modern Taiwan was founded when Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists, who once ruled on the mainland, were forced to retreat to the island in 1949 after the Communists took power in the Chinese Civil War.Beijing has suggested that Taiwan could be reunited under the “one country, two systems” model that applied to Hong Kong after the former British colony was returned to China in 1997. That agreement allowed Hong Kong to keep its civil liberties, independent courts and capitalist system, though many in Hong Kong accuse Beijing of undermining those freedoms under President Xi Jinping.Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has said that the “one country, two systems” model has failed in Hong Kong and brought the city to “the brink of disorder.”Government surveys earlier this year showed that about 80% of Taiwanese citizens oppose reunification with China.Wu spoke a month before Taiwanese voters go to the polls for presidential and parliamentary elections on Jan. 11. Opinion surveys suggest that Tsai, a U.S. and British-educated law scholar who rejects Beijing’s claims to Taiwan, is on track to secure a second term over her more China-friendly rival, Han Kuo-yu of the Nationalist Party.China severed links with Taiwan's government after Tsai took office in 2016 because of her refusal to accept Beijing’s claims on the island. It has since been increasing diplomatic, economic and military pressure on Taiwan.That includes sending aircraft carriers through the Taiwan Strait — the most recent transit was last month — and peeling away Taiwan’s few remaining diplomatic allies. Two more, the Solomon Islands and Kiribati, switched their diplomatic recognition to Beijing in September.A second term for Tsai would see a continuation of Taiwan's tough stance against its much larger neighbour.“If President Tsai is reelected, we'll continue to ... maintain the status quo across the Taiwan Strait. We'll continue to send out goodwill gestures to China," Wu said. “We want to make sure that the Chinese have no excuse in launching a war against Taiwan.”Taiwan, known officially as the Republic of China, lacks a seat at the United Nations. It counts on its 15 official diplomatic allies, which are mostly small and poor, to help bolster its claims to international legitimacy.Safeguarding diplomatic relations with those remaining countries is a top priority for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Wu said.“I think our relations with these 15 countries are quite strong at this moment and we don't worry that much," he said.Taiwan also has unofficial relationships with several other countries, including the United States, which does not support its independence but is bound by law to ensure its defence.The Trump administration has increased support for Taiwan even as it is embroiled in a trade war with China. The U.S. this year agreed to sell 66 F-16 fighter jets worth $8 billion to Taiwan, prompting complaints by China.Wu said Taiwan's relationship with the U.S. is the best it has been in 40 years — a reference to the four decades since Washington formally shifted its diplomatic relations with China from the government in Taipei to the one in Beijing.The ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China is creating both opportunities and challenges for Taiwan, Wu acknowledged. Taiwanese companies are big investors in China, and some are moving their businesses off the mainland as the trade war drags on, he said, citing $23 billion of investments pledged by companies relocating operations back to Taiwan.But he said Taiwan enjoys “strong bipartisan support” in Washington and is not concerned that its status with the U.S. could be used as a bargaining chip in the trade negotiations.“We are being assured ... by very senior Trump administration officials that their relations with Taiwan is independent of relations with any other country and to the United States, Taiwan is a very important partner," he said.Adam Schreck, The Associated Press

  • South Korea's Moon to visit China for trilateral with Japan amid North Korea tension
    News
    Reuters

    South Korea's Moon to visit China for trilateral with Japan amid North Korea tension

    South Korean President Moon Jae-in will visit China next week for a trilateral summit with Japan amid rising tension over stalled denuclearization talks between North Korea and the United States, Moon's office said on Tuesday. Moon is scheduled to arrive in China on Dec. 23, one day before the planned trilateral meeting in the southwestern city of Chengdu with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, his spokeswoman Ko Min-jung told a briefing.

  • Van attempting to cross picket line creates tension at Co-op refinery
    News
    CBC

    Van attempting to cross picket line creates tension at Co-op refinery

    It was a tense scene at the Co-op Refinery on Monday night as Unifor members on the picket line surrounded and stopped a van that was trying to enter the refinery complex.Roughly 720 Unifor Local 594 employees at the refinery on the north edge of Regina were locked out last Thursday afternoon and tensions between the union and management have been climbing in recent days.On Monday evening, a press release from the union said they expected there to be a confrontation between police and Unifor members. The release claimed the Regina Police Service "indicated that they intend to escort a supply vehicle into the Co-op Refinery through legal picket lines."The release explained the van would try to enter the refinery at Gate 2 on 9th Avenue.However, when the vehicle showed up, Unifor members blocked the van from entering, resulting in a stand-off between union members and the running vehicle. Members of the Regina Police Service and police vehicles were on scene during the confrontation.Police spokesperson Elizabeth Popowich said officers spoke with people on both sides and tried to get them to reach an agreement."We don't take sides in a labour dispute," she said. "Our job is to keep the peace."Unifor members waved flags as they walked in a tight circle in front of the van, at one point chanting as they blocked the vehicle from moving forward.The van remained in place for several hours. Eventually, some time before 9 p.m., the picket line made way and the van was allowed to enter the complex, Popowich said.

  • Female doctors fill Toronto church with song in honour of Dr. Elana Fric
    News
    CBC

    Female doctors fill Toronto church with song in honour of Dr. Elana Fric

    People packed a church in Toronto on Monday evening to hear a group of female physicians sing in honour of a doctor murdered by her husband three years ago.The concert, called Soul Medicine, was held at Leaside United Church, at 822 Millwood Rd., to raise funds for the three children of Dr. Elana Fric and to raise awareness of intimate-partner violence.Fric, a family doctor, was killed by her husband in 2016. All of the proceeds from the concert were to go to her children. Many of the songs sung at the concert were about love and overcoming obstacles."Physicians were deeply affected by her death. It was all happened behind closed doors. Nobody knew what was going on," concert organizer Cheryl Bower told reporters."They felt it was really important to keep her memory alive."Bower said one doctor organized the group, which has been rehearsing for 10 weeks. Most of the doctors did not know each other before the group was formed.She said the family is very grateful that the concert was organized."What I hope comes from tonight is an awareness that domestic violence is still very prevalent in our society. If we can do one thing to increase awareness, we have done our job," Bower said.Colleagues have said Fric was a vibrant, dedicated family physician at the Scarborough Hospital who juggled roles as an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Toronto and as a member of the health policy committee at the Ontario Medical Association.Fric was 40 years old when she was murdered. Her husband, Mohammed Shamji, 43, who was a prominent neurosurgeon, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in April of this year and is now serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole for 14 years.He attacked Fric, his wife of 12 years, in their family home two days after she served him with divorce papers, according to an agreed statement of facts that was read in court at the time of the case.Court heard that  Shamji repeatedly beat Fric on the night of her murder, breaking her neck and ribs before choking her to death as their three young children slept. Fric's body was found on Dec. 1, 2016, in a suitcase near an underpass in Vaughan, Ont., about 35 kilometres north of Toronto. Shamji had placed the suitcase in a vehicle and disposed of it in the Humber River.Fric was found to have died from strangulation and blunt-force trauma. During the case, court heard the couple's marriage was volatile and included both physical and verbal abuse of Fric by her husband.

  • Margaret Atwood and Laurie Anderson talk art, age and more
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Margaret Atwood and Laurie Anderson talk art, age and more

    NEW YORK — Margaret Atwood and Laurie Anderson, strangers until now, covered a wide range of topics in their first public conversation.Starting with their ages.“How old are you?" the 80-year-old Atwood, best known for the novel “The Handmaid's Tale,” asked Anderson, the celebrated multimedia artist, and eight years Atwood's junior. Once established that both grew up in the post -World War II era, they discussed Girls Scouts, cheerleading, living in a nuclear world and the hopes and obstacles for women in the arts.“I'm from Canada,” Atwood said. In the 1940s and 1950s, when she was coming of age, “there weren't any other artists,” man or woman and best option for a Canadian was moving elsewhere.Anderson, a native of Glen Ellyn, Illinois, who moved to New York in her 20s, remembered a more open-ended time when she and fellow artists and bohemians supported each other.“We didn't think about women and men,” Anderson said, and “We never thought we'd make a living.”Atwood and Anderson spoke Monday night in Manhattan before more than 100 people at the annual Chairman's Evening for the MacDowell artist colony, where creative people from different fields routinely interact. Previous pairings have included Martin Scorsese and Lin Manuel-Miranda and Lena Dunham and Ta-Nehisi Coates. The conversation was moderated by MacDowell chairman Michael Chabon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist.The Associated Press

  • Students call for more mental health supports after death at U of O
    News
    CBC

    Students call for more mental health supports after death at U of O

    University of Ottawa students are calling for compassion and more resources from the school after a student recently died by suicide.The medical faculty offered counselling services to its students Monday afternoon, following an email announcement this weekend.Dr. Melissa Forgie, vice dean of undergraduate medical education, tearfully embraced students as they gathered in an auditorium in Roger-Guindon Hall."Really it's a big family that's grieving. This has shaken our students and the faculty to the core," she said.Forgie said the medical faculty is required to have mandatory wellness checks and counsellors to support their students, but this death has raised questions over whether that's enough."We have lots of resources. Clearly we don't have it right. I don't think we have it right in health care. There's a stigma attached to mental health issues."Long waits a problem, students sayMaxime Lê, a masters student in communications with a specialization in public health, said the university's notifications about student deaths have been left students cold. There have been four death notifications this calendar year."The tone was just cold. It told us to just take care of ourselves," Lê said."If [the university] is telling us to take care of ourselves it means that it's not going to take care of us. It really shocked me and that's why I wanted to speak out."Lê has organized other students who are calling for more resources with regard to mental health because he says it takes months of waiting to get help."They feel abandoned. Sure, you have that call, but when they call you [back] three months later, it may be too late," he said.Natasha-Lyne Roy, a member of the University of Ottawa Student Union, said she sought private therapy when faced with the wait."I don't think we should wait until someone's life is in danger before acting urgently. We should take it as seriously as someone who broke a bone," she said. She wants to see resources to prevent burnout and depression and help cope with the anxiety of student life.Counselors added in Sept.Students voted to increase their fees in April to cover the cost of additional counselling services.The university matched the amount and a total of eight counsellors have been added to Student Academic Success Services in September, according to the administration. They have seen a spike in demand for those services.Michel Guilbeault, vice-president of student services for the university, said students can drop in to see counsellors immediately but there are waits in the wider health system."There is a shortage of psychologists in the region. It may be for psychiatric help. That's more the medical field. That's where we're seeing a lot of the wait times," he said.Guilbeault said the university is facing the same trends as wider society. While he confirmed there have been four death notices sent to students in the last year, he said the university does not comment on cause of death."The university is a microcosm of society. There is a crisis with youth suicide, 24 per cent of all death for 15-24 [year olds], so yeah, I would say it's a big problem," he said."One death is one death too many on this campus and we're trying to take steps to better support our community."Guilbeault said the university is training students and staff to recognize they need help as well as empowering them with self-care techniques.Need help? Here are some mental health resources: * Association québécoise de prévention du suicide: 1-866-APPELLE (1-866-277-3553) * Ottawa Suicide Prevention: 613-238-3311

  • Province dedicates $200K to Inkerman bridge design, committee says
    News
    CBC

    Province dedicates $200K to Inkerman bridge design, committee says

    The provincial government has committed $200,000 to design a new recreational bridge in the northeastern village of Inkerman, according to the committee dedicated to rebuilding the old train bridge.Glenda Robichaud, the chair of the Inkerman Bridge Committee, said the government also accepted a three-year plan to rebuild the wooden bridge."I just can't wait to see the new bridge design and we can't wait to … be a partner in this adventure," Robichaud said.The old kilometre-long bridge connecting the southern part of the Acadian Peninsula to the north was destroyed by arson in 2017. It was part of the New Brunswick Trail system and was often used by snowmobile and ATV enthusiasts as well as by cyclists and pedestrians.Robichaud is encouraged by the funding news from Tourism Minister Robert Gauvin because tourism in Inkerman has suffered since the bridge was destroyed.The village lost the connection to the northern peninsula, and now people often pass by Inkerman when travelling on the trail system."It's a need here in Inkerman," Robichaud said. "We want that bridge back."The community has also been fundraising through Chase the Ace games. Its goal was to raise $500,000 for the reconstruction, but the committee has already reached $2 million.Robichaud said the committee is willing to offer the money to the bridge's construction if it's needed.Robichaud said construction will likely cost several million dollars."Last time that I spoke with the minister, he said it was $8.1 million but that the design isn't [done] yet," Robichaud said."So I don't know. We're going to wait and see what they say to us."

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Wealth of Canadians divided along racial lines, says report on income inequality

    OTTAWA — Canadians who identify as visible minorities do not have the same access to investments and other sources of wealth as non-racialized people, suggests a new report on income inequality that looks at the financial impact of racism beyond jobs and wages."Employment income is the sole or main source of income for most Canadians, and labour market policies play a major role in improving or worsening income inequality," says the newly published report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, which looks at income inequality along racial lines."But labour markets are part of a broader political-economic context, where past and current policies have favoured some population groups over others," says the report. "This history of wealth accumulation for some but not others is a crucial contributor to racialized economic inequality today."There is little Canadian data examining wealth according to race, but Statistics Canada did include some details on income linked to net wealth — specifically, capital gains and income from investments — broken down by visible minority status in the 2016 census.The analysis in the report suggests a discrepancy between racialized Canadians, which is how the co-authors refer to those who identified as visible minorities in the 2016 census, and non-racialized, or white, Canadians. The data on visible minorities does not include Indigenous Peoples.Eight per cent of racialized Canadians over the age of 15 reported some capital gains in 2015, compared to about 12 per cent of non-racialized people. There was also a gap in the amounts, with racialized Canadians receiving, on average, $10,828 — 29 per cent below the average for white Canadians.There was also a gap when it came to money received through investments, such as rental income from real estate holdings or dividends from stocks.The analysis shows about 25 per cent of racialized people earned income from investments in 2015, while nearly 31 per cent of non-racialized Canadians received money through investments that year. The average amount earned was $7,774 for racialized people, and $11,428 for white people.Sheila Block, a senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives who co-authored the report, said looking at disparities in wealth, in addition to aspects of the labour market, sheds a new and multifaceted light on the issue of income inequality in Canada."When we broaden the lens to look at wealth, rather than just looking at income, it can give us a bigger picture of what the cumulative impact of racism is, both over an individual's lifespan, but also potentially from one generation to the next," said Block.She wrote the report with Grace-Edward Galabuzi, an associate professor of politics and public administration at Ryerson University, and Ricardo Tranjan, a political economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.Block said the data available in the United States shows the racialized gap when it comes to wealth is even greater than it is for income.She said better data could lead to more equitable and effective anti-racism policies.Statistics Canada said Monday the agency is open to finding a way to include race in its next survey of financial security, which collects information from Canadians on the value of their assets and the money they owe on everything from mortgages to credit cards.Andrew Heisz, the director of the agency's Centre for Income and Socioeconomic Well-being Statistics, said the format of the survey presents some challenges because it examines wealth at the family level, while visible minority status is recorded at the level of individuals. He also said the survey identifies the immigration status of families and the agency has done some research exploring the link between that and wealth."Nevertheless, Statistics Canada reviews the survey content before each new cycle and visible minority status could be considered for the next cycle of the survey, in 2022," Heisz said in a statement.One interesting finding from Monday's report was that racialized men have a higher employment rate than non-racialized men.A closer look at these numbers suggests this is age-related, as the employment rate for racialized men between the ages of 55 and 64 was 5.9 percentage points higher than for non-racialized men at that age. Below the age of 55, non-racialized men had higher employment rates."This higher employment rate for older racialized men may reflect less access to pension income and lower lifetime earnings, i.e., many in this group may not be able to afford to retire," says the report.The report also examines the gender gap, concluding that race plays an important role in income inequality between men and women too.According to the report, which used figures from the 2016 census, racialized women earn 59 cents for every dollar earned by non-racialized men. Racialized men, meanwhile, earn 78 cents for every dollar earned by their white male counterparts. The gap was narrowest, but not closed, between women, with racialized women earning 87 cents for every dollar earned by white women."I think it's important that we look at the gender wage gaps, rather than the singular gender wage gap," Block said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 9, 2019.— Follow @smithjoanna on TwitterJoanna Smith, The Canadian Press

  • 'The worst horror of my life': Families with missing loved ones react to recent discovery of human remains
    News
    CBC

    'The worst horror of my life': Families with missing loved ones react to recent discovery of human remains

    When Carson Poitras saw a news story on social media saying that human remains were found near Prince Albert, Sask., he says he thought, "Yes, we found her. They found our daughter."But when he called police he was told the remains are not believed to be those of his stepdaughter, Happy Charles. "It was so close to the Prince Albert area where our daughter was last seen. We had our hopes up that we could finally get some closure," Poitras said.The RCMP announced Friday evening they had found human remains, two days after the discovery was made during a police ground search in a rural area near Prince Albert. Happy Charles, 42, has been missing since early April 2017. Poitras and his wife Regina, Happy Charles's mother, said their family should have been told whether the remains belonged to their daughter before the news release was sent out. "It's very hard because I have to tell the girls," said Regina Poitras, referring to Charles's daughters. "They're always messaging me like, 'Who was it that they found? Was it mom?"The Poitras family is one of several who endure an emotional roller coaster each time human remains are found in Prince Albert and other parts of Saskatchewan. Brenda Chretien's son Dylan Chretien, 30, has been missing since Oct. 27 of this year. Police found his blue Toyota Tundra on Nov. 1 in the Nordale neighbourhood and said in a news release that they suspect foul play. Chretien said police told her last week that they could not confirm the deceased's identity until an autopsy is completed this week. "I'm sitting here in immense pain, waiting like the other families with bated breath, dreading the news if the remains are that of my son," she wrote in a message to CBC. "All I can say is I'm going through the worst horror of my life, I can't even begin to explain the torture and pain of the unknown." David Light, whose 31-year-old twin brother Donald is missing from Prince Albert, said his family received a call to let them know the remains found last week were not believed to be Donald's.He said the officers also told his father they could not confirm the identity until the autopsy is completed."They just prepped us because they knew that they were going to release the information and it was possible that tons of people would call us thinking that they had found Donald," said Light. He said he has no way of knowing if his brother's disappearance is suspicious or not. Donald's cellphone was last registered by a telecommunications network near the river where he regularly went for walks. "The night that he went missing I do recall not being able to sleep that night for no apparent reason," said Light."I try not to believe that that's a bad sign, I just hope it's [more of a] coincidence."'Advance notification may not be possible'RCMP spokesperson Rob King said making contact with families can take time because officers sometimes have to wait until a crime scene has been processed. "There can also be a number of current and historical missing persons investigations ongoing across the province and from various municipal police jurisdictions, so advance notification may not be possible in all cases," King said. "We always endeavour to determine identity and liaise with the family as soon as we can."If police feel they know the identity of the remains, they may notify the family, but caution that it cannot be confirmed until the autopsy is completed.

  • Sensory-friendly experiences becoming more common in Calgary
    News
    CBC

    Sensory-friendly experiences becoming more common in Calgary

    Bright flashing multicoloured lights, booming holiday music, firewood burning in a hearth — the holiday season is truly a feast for the senses. But that's exactly the problem for those who are more sensitive to stimulus and may feel overwhelmed by the markers of the season.That's why more businesses, organizations and events are offering what is called sensory-friendly or sensory-relaxed experiences."Sensory-friendly activities are activities that have a decreased sensory component to them," says Trisha Williams, a pediatric occupational therapist and the owner of Spring Occupational Therapy."When you think about our five senses … in a sensory-friendly or sensory-relaxed environment, those things are lessened and the environment changes."She says that can include reducing noise, dimming lights or trying to lessen strong smells.Williams says that how we respond to stimulus is directly related to the wiring in our brain, and that situations that could be handled by some are unbearable to others.Adults and children who have autism spectrum disorders, learning disorders or high anxiety, even mothers with small babies, or people who have dementia — all can all benefit from these events."There is a whole slew of people out there whose bodies and brains don't interpret sensory information in the same way that you or I might," says Williams."Typically, we see children here at the clinic with autism. They are kind of the primary movers and shakers of this wave, you could say, of sensory-friendly events.Sensory-friendly in the citySeveral holiday-themed events in Calgary are turning down the stimulus while keeping the cheer alive.New this year at the popular Calgary Zoolights are Sensory Sundays, from 5 to 6 p.m., open to the public but altered for those who need it.Noticeably different is that there is no music playing, and any of the lights that move just shine instead.The popular attraction Lover's Lane is also turned off during that hour, and there is a calm room — full of blankets, cushions and dim lighting — for guests who are overwhelmed to take a pause. In addition to this, the zoo offers sensory friendly kits, and in the Enmax Conservatory, tucked in among the foliage is a quiet space to meet Santa."[We] really got focused on it this year by reaching out to our community partners who live in the space of sensory sensitivities and said what could we do to create a very unique experience that would be inclusive," says Alison Archambault with the Calgary Zoo.Shauna Visser has attended Zoolights during Sensory Sundays and says this was one of the first events where she could take her son, Caiden Phillips, who is eight years old and has non-verbal autism."The overload of the people and the sounds and everything is overwhelming, and this is actually the first time I've been able to enjoy Zoolights along with him because we haven't been so overwhelmed with everything," says Visser."I don't want to get emotional, but when we are able to do things as a family that sometimes you don't get to and you miss out on, it's pretty special."Relaxed Santa events are also popular in Calgary this year.They are usually categorized by taking place in a quiet setting with no lines, no flashing lights and no expectations of the children.Beyond the holidaysIt's not just during December that these events exist in the city.Inside Out Theatre's Good Host Program is dedicated to making theatre, music and other arts events in the city more accessible to the city's diverse audience.Riki Entz, who identifies as autistic and as having multiple disabilities, is a relaxed performance consultant with the Good Host Program. She helps to create a mandate for their relaxed performances."The demand is definitely there," says Entz.Entz says it is important to collaborate with those in the affected community when creating these events.She'll watch shows, making careful notes on things that could be altered before passing those recommendations along to the theatre productions. A little can go a long way, she says — for instance, not having a strict rule of staying in one's seat, or letting some audibly react to a show, rather than trying to remain quiet the whole time.Other neighbourhood staples like grocery stores are also adjusting in response to the demand for these types of services.Many Safeway and Sobeys locations across Canada offer sensory-friendly shopping hours on Mondays between 7 and 9 p.m.Lights are dimmed more than 50 per cent, no carts are to be moved and the staff use walkie-talkies instead of the PA system to communicate."The initial reaction is usually … 'Well, is the power out, what's going on?'" says Kyle Atherton, who works at Safeway's Montgomery location."But once you kind of explain … [customers] are generally very understanding. The community feedback has been overwhelmingly positive to this initiative."He says some customers shop exclusively during those hours, regardless of their sensitivities, as they are just seeking a bit more peace and quiet."In a way, all of us benefit," says Williams.

  • Heated exchanges at impeachment hearings
    CBC

    Heated exchanges at impeachment hearings

    There were heated exchanges at U.S. President Donald Trump’s impeachment hearings on Monday as Republicans maintain they are just a tactic to go after Trump.

  • Global stocks, dollar slip as U.S.-China trade deadline looms
    News
    Reuters

    Global stocks, dollar slip as U.S.-China trade deadline looms

    The dollar eased and global stock markets slipped on Tuesday as uncertainty kept risk appetite in check days ahead of the Dec. 15 deadline for a new round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports. Investors were again torn between remarks that suggested a positive outcome to the 17-month U.S.-Sino trade war but also indicated a deal might not come until after U.S. presidential elections in November 2020. Prospects for an initial "phase one" trade deal look good, acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said at a Wall Street Journal event.

  • News
    CBC

    Public trust and spending concerns on agenda for Calgary council next year

    Calgary city council plans to take a deeper look at its fiscal situation and how to rebuild public trust in city hall in the coming year. Councillors decamped from their usual chambers on Monday for a strategic look ahead in a meeting room at Ralph Klein Park in the city's southeast. Some of the things they decided to look into next year include spending, modernizing municipal government and regaining public trust.City Manager David Duckworth says the city doesn't have a spending problem, despite what some may say. "I've been hearing this for a while, and so from my perspective what I tend to do is I look at the budgeted spending per capita with the seven or eight largest municipalities in Canada," he said."And I can tell you that the City of Calgary is probably at the median or slightly below that."Farkas disagreesCoun. Jeromy Farkas disagrees with that assessment and says spending in the city has eroded public trust, something he wants to discuss in the coming year. "It's what businesses, homeowners, everybody else has been saying all along, and it's an uncomfortable question to ask, but this council needs a significant course correction if we're going to be able to regain the trust of Calgarians," he said. Duckworth says public trust tends to fall when the economy is struggling. He also points to a negative global trend when it comes to discourse about government. He thinks one option is to focus on better communication with Calgarians. Rebuilding trust will be the focus of a day-long meeting in January.

  • News
    CBC

    Without benefits, some Calgarians find cost of dental visits hard to swallow

    An office manager laid off from her position at a Calgary restoration company in January says dental work is a luxury she just can't afford."Taking my daughter to the dentist is definitely delayed, as well as myself. Without benefits, it's pretty expensive to get her in for a routine checkup," Jenny Harker told the Calgary Eyeopener."I am a single mom, so it's just me paying for anything for me and my daughter. I have put it off this entire year because I had no other choice."She says roughly $125 for her seven-year-old daughter's routine checkup no longer fits her monthly budget right now.She's not alone, and some dentists are taking note.A dentist who operates in Calgary and Airdrie recently posted a Groupon offer for some basic services usually covered by benefits.That offer slashed a regular fee of $625 for dental exam, cleaning and X-rays down to $225.That dentist is probably reacting to the current job situation in the province. Last month alone, Alberta lost 18,000 jobs. That's a record.Men under 25 are now experiencing an unemployment rate of almost 20 per cent. Those dire numbers were last seen in the early 1980s.CBC News reached out and rounded up some perspectives from a social media group for moms.Jackee Rumford says her family hasn't been to a dentist in years."Hubby has a broken front tooth we can't afford to fix," she said.Her four-year-old granddaughter needs emergency dental work, but Sandra Burton says the little girl's parents lost their benefits and can't afford the upfront costs.Janice Herben says she hasn't been to a dentist since she was laid off 2½ years ago.A dentist practising in Calgary for more than four decades says he has seen his share of boom and bust cycles, but he's noticed a change this time."Initially, the effect was that we were quite busy. People were being laid off, getting packaged out. They still had benefits they wanted to take advantage of," Dr. Eli Markovich said."That has subsided quite a bit. Now, we are not as busy as we used to be, but my practice is still quite steady."Bigger problems down the roadHe notes not all of his peers can say that, though.A northeast dentist of about eight years says it might be time to tweak the business model."I feel like we have to work a little bit harder and more efficiently to try and get the patients in who want to," Dr. Kellen Smith said."But we have a solid base of patients who still have benefits and ones who don't but still come in. There all lots of people out there losing insurance who maybe can't prioritize dentistry the way others can."Dr. Mintoo Basahti, vice-president of the Alberta Dental Association and College, says people without benefits are cutting back on visits but that can lead to bigger problems down the road.For example, a cavity that goes untreated for long enough could require the tooth to be pulled.Lower-cost optionsMeanwhile, Harker says she looks forward to a time when dental visits aren't a financial concern."I worry about her health, I worry about her teeth," Harker said of her daughter."But the cost for even just a routine checkup is pretty hard when you are not working. Every month, I have been trying to fit it into my budget and it just hasn't worked out."Some lower cost dental options exist. Many dentists offer payment plans. There are public health dental clinics that offer reduced fees at places like the Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre and Sunridge Mall.

  • Quidi Vidi Brewery gets green light for patio, neighbours fearful of noise
    News
    CBC

    Quidi Vidi Brewery gets green light for patio, neighbours fearful of noise

    Sharon McCann had hoped her home in Quidi Vidi Village would be a quiet place to retire in. She fears that a new patio addition to the brewery across the street means that won't be possible. "It's a unique geological area which has any ambient noise bouncing off the rocks," McCann told reporters on Monday evening."I can't imagine what that's going to be like on a warm summer night with half the patrons being out on the deck drinking."McCann said she is not against the brewery, but isn't happy with the "unbridled expansion" in the area that is affecting some people who live there. And that is something that city hall worked to fix.At Monday evening's council meeting, Coun. Hope Jamieson offered up an amendment to the proposal that would see the patio shut down at 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday. But those hours extend to 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights."I spoke with some residents this afternoon and we discussed the potential for an earlier closure to help mitigate that," Jamieson said."To create a compromise, shall we say, between those who live around it and the needs of the brewery itself."The application to the city states there will be no outdoor speakers to amplify sound.The city rules say that an outdoor eating establishment, like the Quidi Vidi Brewery, is allowed to operate within 150 metres of a residential zone. But parking is always a problem in the village. The city's decision note said that it's improved thanks to 30 formal parking spaces on Cadet Road and an additional 30 spots on the north side of Cuckhold's Cove Road. Parking problemsResident Randy Walsh thinks the deck will mean more parking woes."They've got 30 employees and there's 30 parking spaces," he said."They're not all rubber stamped for the microbrewery. There's other people in the village."Walsh, who attended a public meeting on the outdoor expansion, isn't happy with city hall who voted unanimously to approve the application."We're not impressed with council and its deceitful presentation — traffic has never been addressed down there and it's about time to do it right," he said.Jamieson, who spoke with Walsh before Monday night's council meeting, understands the residents concerns when it comes to parking."Traffic and parking is a perennial concern in the village and the city is taking consistent steps to look at that and see what we can do," she said."We're working on new signage to direct people to places they can park around the village that will ease the disruption on residents."Those signs should be erected in 2020. As for McCann she hopes silence will fill her golden years. "This was meant to be a quiet place where we came to spend our retirement years and that sure backfired."Read more articles from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Stolen chairs returned to Calgary outdoor piano installation

    Chairs and platforms that were stolen from an outdoor art installation in Sunnyside have been returned."It's a Christmas miracle," Tamara Lee, the placemaking artist behind the project, tweeted on Monday.If you've walked or driven under the LRT bridge on Memorial Drive and 9A Street in northwest Calgary in the past three months, you may have found yourself treated to an impromptu concert.The installation, called Quartet, invites passerbys to spontaneously tickle the ivories of an outdoor piano or take a seat and listen on chairs attached to platforms surrounding the instrument.On Dec. 2, someone stole the three chairs and the heavy platforms they were securely attached to. "Very disappointing but also baffling," she said at the time.The chairs — and heavy platforms — mysteriously reappeared on Monday, Lee said, with no clues as to where the items had gone.It was the second time the installation has been revived.In November, the front panel was torn off the 850-lb., 100-year-old Doherty upright piano.Within a few hours of discovering the damage she had heard from two neighbours — one who offered to build a box around the piano and secure it for free, and another who said if the piano was too damaged, he'd be happy to donate his to the cause.The entire Bow to Bluff corridor is set to undergo a revamp, and the team behind that redesign has expressed interest in integrating the Quartet installation in a more permanent fashion in the future.

  • News
    CBC

    A person in Nunavut has died of whooping cough, health department says

    A person in Nunavut has died of whooping cough, the territorial government confirmed Monday morning.A spokesperson for Nunavut's Health Department said that they will not be releasing information on the deceased or which community the death took place in, citing respect for the family and patient confidentiality.Deaths from whooping cough are uncommon. According to the spokesperson, less than 1 in 1,000 cases across Canada result in death. Earlier this month, a case of the disease was confirmed in Iqaluit; it was the first instance of whooping cough in the territory's capital since 2016.That year marked the start of two outbreaks in two years, which resulted in hundreds of cases, but no declared fatalities.Known officially as pertussis, whooping cough is a contagious infection of the throat and lungs that spreads from person to person. It can be very serious or fatal.Anyone can get whooping cough, but the most severe cases are in children under the age of one, according to the Nunavut Department of Health.Symptoms can include: * trouble breathing; * vomiting after coughing; * cough followed by an unusual "whoop" sound; * coughing that is worse at night; * a high fever that lasts more than three days.The Nunavut government says the infection is preventable with a vaccine. The government is urging Nunavummiut to check if their immunization records are up to date. Vaccinations are free at local health centres.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario cancels planned future cuts to legal aid; this year's cut remains

    TORONTO — Ontario's attorney general is cancelling planned cuts to legal aid funding, but this year's 30-per-cent budget cut is being made permanent.Doug Downey announced Monday that the current funding level will continue, but there won't be further reductions to Legal Aid Ontario's budget."We had a lot of consultation and we talked to people in the field who are delivering service, receiving the service, those trying to run the agency, so we decided that we are at a level where it's sustainable, it's efficient and there's opportunity to expand service with current funding," he said.A $133-million cut to legal aid, which was supposed to rise by $31 million by 2021-22, was one of the first of a flood of cuts to trickle out after the Progressive Conservative government's spring budget.Legal Aid Ontario chair Charles Harnick said there have been some issues as a result of the lower funding, such as trouble deploying duty counsel and seeing job losses at legal aid clinics. But, he said, the organization was mostly able to avoid a direct impact to one-on-one client services."I'm very grateful that there will be no further reductions to our budget," he said. "It allows us to have the stability that we need to plan and to continue to move forward."NDP critic Gurratan Singh called for a full reversal of this year's cuts."The lion's share of the cuts have gone forward," he said. "We've seen the impact of that. It's had real impacts today."Downey made the announcement after he introduced legislation that would make changes to more than 20 different acts, with a goal of modernizing parts of what he called an "outdated, complex" justice system.Some of those changes will affect Legal Aid Ontario — changes that Harnick called positive — including allowing it to use a mix of service providers, such as private practice lawyers and community legal organizations, and expanding its scope to include summary advice, alternative dispute resolution services, and unbundled legal services for part of a case.The union representing legal aid lawyers is decrying wording in the new legislation.Currently the law says Legal Aid Ontario "shall" provide representation to low-income people in criminal, family, clinic and mental health law, but the new bill uses the word "may.""This change in law might sound like semantics but for thousands of poor Ontarians turning 'shall' into 'may' is the difference between being guaranteed a lawyer and losing their right to legal representation," said Dana Fisher, vice-president of the Society of United Professionals' Legal Aid Ontario Lawyers' local."Combined with the Ford government's severe and cruel Legal Aid Ontario cut, this bill amounts to passing the buck to Legal Aid Ontario to implement cuts without the agency being constrained by a legal mandate that protects the vulnerable people who need legal aid."Another change includes a "more stringent test" for certifying lawsuits as class actions."It's very easy to get certified as a class action," Downey said. "It's very simple. So that's what people were doing, is they were certifying the class actions then they were getting to work about trying to make the case and if they couldn't make the case then it just sat dormant."The legislation would also require people to file judicial review applications within 30 days, sharply increase the maximum fine for lawyers guilty of professional misconduct from $10,000 to $100,000, and stop judges and justices of the peace removed from office due to misconduct from billing taxpayers for legal fees."It's offensive when I'm required to sign off on fees for somebody who's been found to have done misconduct as a judge or a JP and we have to pay their legal fees," Downey said. "For those who are accused of misconduct but not found to have done something, then I think it's fair."Other proposed changes include allowing for notarization online, removing some requirements for people applying for the legal authority to manage a small estate, and making it easier for the government to seize property under a civil forfeiture in uncontested cases.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 9, 2019.Allison Jones, The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    'He made everybody feel special': Lucky Stratis, Windsor restaurateur dead at 59

    If you're in the food business in Windsor, Ont., you know who Lucky Stratis was — a proud Greek-Canadian and a hospitality maverick, who most recently owned On a Roll Sushi.Stratis died suddenly on Dec. 8 at just 59 years old. "He's someone [who] had been in the food business his entire life," said Rino Bortolin. "He's someone you looked up to. He was always around and always involved."Stratis got his hands dirty in his dad's kitchen at the Olympus restaurant on Wyandotte Street when he was just 10 years old. Outpourings of support for his family and love for Lucky covered social media pages in Windsor Monday. "You weren't just the dishwasher or the musician, you were part of the business [to him]," said Bortolin. "He's had a hand in so many businesses over the last half a century."Stratis was a "serial" restaurant owner, who in the past had also owned The Whistling Kettle."He made everybody feel special," said Bortolin. "He wasn't doing it for the customers coming in, it was for the employees and all the people who worked with him."Stratis's funeral is Thursday at 10:15 a.m. at Families First.

  • News
    CBC

    Bathurst withdraws from Anse-Bleue wind farm project

    A planned wind farm in the Bathurst, N.B., area was struck a major blow on Monday.City council rejected a request for funding for the Chaleur Ventus Energy Project that is to be built in Anse-Bleue, about 56 kilometres northwest of Bathurst.At a special meeting of council the city said the project was no longer profitable and that there were issues around social licence.The city was the majority partner in a group aiming to build five windmills on the site.The project has been controversial for people living in the small community since it was announced in November.Resident Patrick Thériault told Radio-Canada that 85 per cent of the community signed a petition against the wind farm, which was then submitted to Bathurst city council.The city is a partner with Fredericton-based Naveco Power and NB Power.If built, the farm was expected to generate enough electricity to power 9,000 homes.

  • Up to 13 feared dead in volcanic eruption off New Zealand
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Up to 13 feared dead in volcanic eruption off New Zealand

    TAURANGA, New Zealand — A volcano off the New Zealand coast erupted Monday with a towering blast of ash and scalding steam as dozens of tourists were exploring its moon-like surface, killing five people and leaving eight others missing and feared dead, authorities said.Helicopter crews landed on White Island despite the danger and helped evacuate the dozens of survivors, some of them critically injured.Hours after the disaster, authorities said the site was still too dangerous for rescuers to search for the missing. But aircraft flew over the island repeatedly, and “no signs of life have been seen at any point,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.The missing and injured included New Zealanders and tourists from Australia, the U.S., China, Britain and Malaysia, the prime minister said. Some of those who were exploring White Island volcano were passengers from the Royal Caribbean cruise ship Ovation of the Seas, docked on neighbouring North Island.“My god,” Michael Schade tweeted as he posted video of the eruption. “My family and I had gotten off it 20 minutes before, were waiting at our boat about to leave when we saw it. Boat ride home tending to people our boat rescued was indescribable.”His video showed a wall of ash and steam around White Island and a helicopter heavily damaged and covered in ash. He said one woman was badly injured but seemed “strong” by the end.The terrifying disaster immediately raised questions of why people were allowed to visit the island some 30 miles (50 kilometres) off mainland New Zealand after scientists had noted an uptick in volcanic activity in recent weeks. White Island is the tip of an undersea volcano.Authorities said 47 people were on the island at the time. Some were walking along the rim of the crater just before the eruption. In addition to the dead and missing, 31 survivors were hospitalized and three others were released, officials said. Some of the victims were reported severely burned.The eruption took place about 2 p.m. and consisted of two explosions in quick succession, the prime minister said. It sent a plume of steam and ash an estimated 12,000 feet (3,660 metres) into the air. One of the boats that returned from the island was covered with ash half a meter (yard) thick, Ardern said.Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said 13 Australians were hospitalized and 11 others were believed to be among the missing or dead.“Ï fear there is worse news to come over the course of perhaps today or over the next few days," he said. “This is a terrible tragedy, a time of great innocence and joy interrupted by the horror of that eruption.”The GeoNet agency, which monitors volcanoes and earthquakes in New Zealand, had raised the alert level on White Island on Nov. 18 from 1 to 2 on a scale where 5 represents a major eruption, noting an increase in sulfur dioxide gas, which originates from magma deep in the volcano. It also said that volcanic tremors had increased from weak to moderate strength.Ardern said White Island is a “very unpredictable volcano,” and questions about whether tourists should be visiting will have to be addressed, “but for now, we're focused on those who are caught up in this horrific event.”Brad Scott, a volcanologist with research group GNS Science, said the alert level on White Island is often raised and then dropped without any eruption. He said there hadn't been any major problems with tourists visiting the island in the past, though there had been some close calls.He would not venture an opinion on whether it was safe enough for tourists immediately before Monday's eruption.After the disaster, GeoNet raised its alert level to 4, later dropping it to 3.“In the scheme of things, for volcanic eruptions, it is not large," said Ken Gledhill from GeoNet. “But if you were close to that, it is not good.”White Island is New Zealand’s most active cone volcano. About 70% of the volcano lies under the sea.Twelve people were killed on the island in 1914 when it was being mined for sulfur. Part of a crater wall collapsed and a landslide destroyed the miners' village and the mine itself.The remains of buildings from another mining enterprise in the 1920s are now a tourist attraction. The island became a private scenic reserve in 1953, and daily tours allow more than 10,000 people to visit every year.The island is also known by the indigenous Maori name Whakaari.___Perry reported from Wellington, New Zealand.Nick Perry, The Associated Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Engineer behind collapsed Radiohead stage will face disciplinary hearing

    TORONTO — An engineer who signed off on a Radiohead concert stage that collapsed and killed a man six years ago will face a professional misconduct hearing despite his argument that he has since retired, a panel decided Monday.Domenic Cugliari faces professional misconduct charges in the June 16, 2012, stage collapse ahead of an outdoor concert in Toronto that killed drum technician Scott Johnson and injured three other members of the band's road crew.Cugliari filed a motion Monday to have the charges stayed, saying the Professional Engineers Ontario disciplinary panel did not have jurisdiction to hear the case because he is no longer an engineer.The panel heard Cugliari resigned from the engineering association when he retired in July 2018, about six years after the stage structure and tonnes of equipment crashed down.The five-member panel denied the request, which came in advance of Cugliari's scheduled disciplinary hearing, saying their reasons for the decision will follow at a later date.Scott Thompson, Cugliari's lawyer, cited a portion of the Professional Engineers Act that was amended in 2017 in arguing that the engineering association had no jurisdiction in the case."The powers of the disciplinary committee only reference the word 'member,' not 'former member,'" Thompson said."We say, reading the legislation as a whole, it doesn't address the issue, it doesn't give the disciplinary committee the authority to deal with a former member." The engineering association's lawyer, Leah Price, argued that nothing changed when the legislation was updated in 2017. She said the panel still has jurisdiction over members who have resigned."Their resignation doesn't give them a get-out-of-jail-free card," Price said. "He resigned while the investigation was underway."Thompson scoffed at Price's remarks, saying his client did not resign "to avoid the process."Cugliari declined to comment on the proceedings outside the tribunal.A coroner's inquest into Johnson's death last spring heard that plans for the stage were riddled with mistakes, the wrong building components were used in key areas and the construction was running behind schedule.Cugliari testified he did not check to see if the correct parts were used because he trusted the contractor.The criteria of the inquest was not to lay blame, and a jury returned with a slew of recommendations designed to prevent future deaths.Charges were laid under the province's Occupational Health and Safety Act against the show's promoter Live Nation, contractor Optex Staging and Cugliari.They were later stayed because the matter took too long to get to trial.The Johnsons told The Canadian Press in late November that no one responsible for their son's death has apologized.When asked Monday he wanted to apologize to the Johnsons, Cugliari said: "We will in due time."This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 9, 2019.Liam Casey, The Canadian Press

  • UPEI looking into medical school options, says president
    News
    CBC

    UPEI looking into medical school options, says president

    The president of UPEI says the idea of adding a medical school at the university is "absolutely" being considered, but he says much more research needs to be done first. P.E.I. is the only province without a medical faculty. The idea of creating one in the province started to gain momentum during this year's federal election campaign, with the NDP making it a campaign promise — and Island candidates from various parties supporting the idea. "I think when the public talk about an issue, it's very important for a public institution like our university to take the conversation seriously, and figure out, is it doable or not," said UPEI president Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, in an interview with CBC News: Compass host Louise Martin. Abd-El-Aziz said the university is currently in the examination phase, looking at if it would be possible to establish a medical faculty, and what it might look like.Gathering informationAbd-El-Aziz said the university's research includes trying to figure out what kind of medical school would be needed on P.E.I., and what the relationships with other schools and provinces would look like.As well as looking locally at the other Maritime provinces, Abd-El-Aziz said he is interested in looking at what has worked well in other countries, such as Ireland. And, he said, he expects there could be lessons to learn from the development of Canada's newest medical school, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, which was established in 2005 through a partnership between Laurentian and Lakehead universities. "We are gathering a lot of information," Abd-El-Aziz said. 'Part of the solution'Supporters of a medical school on P.E.I. have billed it as a possible solution to help alleviate P.E.I.'s doctor shortage.Abd-El-Aziz said he personally does not think establishing a medical school would do much to help with the shortage in the short term, "because starting a medical school from A to Z will take a lot of time." "Will it help in attracting doctors to come to the Island? Probably it will. But I don't like to say that the medical school would be the solution. It's a part of the solution."More P.E.I. news

  • Wanna cover Miss America? Buy a ticket, 3 media outlets told
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Wanna cover Miss America? Buy a ticket, 3 media outlets told

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — The Miss America Organization has denied credentials to at least three media outlets seeking to cover this year's competition, including its longtime hometown newspaper, The Press of Atlantic City.Others who received denials in recent days include The Washington Post and Bravura, a lifestyle magazine.No reasons were given for the denials, which were communicated by email to the media outlets. The emails also suggested representatives of affected outlets attend events that are open to the public.In a statement, the Miss America Organization,which moved this year's competition from the Atlantic City boardwalk in New Jersey to the Mohegan Sun casino in Connecticut, defended its right to decide who should be credentialed.W.F. Keough, executive editor of The Press of Atlantic City, said his newspaper is reapplying for credentials.“The Press of Atlantic City has been covering Miss America for nearly 100 years, so we're disappointed to have been arbitrarily excluded from this year's finals,” he said in a statement. If the paper remains barred, Keough said it will do its best to report on the competition anyway.Regina Hopper, president and CEO of the Miss America Organization, did not respond to messages seeking comment between Thursday and Monday, and it was not immediately clear if any other media outlet seeking credentials had been denied. Several outlets that had routinely covered the competition said they did not seek credentials this year.The Press and the Washington Post had both covered criticism of the Miss America Organization from numerous state groups unhappy with how the competition was being run. Changes brought about by the group's new leadership included the elimination of the swimsuit competition.Miss America began in 1921 on the Atlantic City boardwalk as a way to extend the summer tourism season past Labor Day weekend. It grew over the decades and, aside from a brief detour to Las Vegas, had been held in Atlantic City for most of its nearly 100 years.The finale is scheduled for Dec. 19.___Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryACWayne Parry, The Associated Press

  • The biggest snubs and surprises of the 2020 Golden Globe nominations
    News
    CBC

    The biggest snubs and surprises of the 2020 Golden Globe nominations

    There were more than a few surprises in the nomination list for the 2020 Golden Globes — and not all of them positive.While Netflix's resounding success signalled a changing of the guard when it comes to the types of projects recognized, some of the films and series left off the list spoke more loudly to fans.Women were once again ignored in the best director field, other wildly popular shows were completely shut out and some virtually unknown films were honoured above more well-known ones.Here's a breakdown of some of those snubs and surprises from the nominations list, as well as a look at why some fans are upset.SNUB: Movies directed by womenDespite a large crop of successful movies directed by women this year, the Golden Globes didn't give a nod to any of them. Like last year, the best director nominations were given to only men: Bong Joon-ho for Parasite, Sam Mendes for 1917, Todd Phillips for Joker, Martin Scorsese for The Irishman, and Quentin Tarantino for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.Greta Gerwig, who was also previously denied a best director nod for her 2017 film Lady Bird, is potentially the most notable exception for Little Women, though there were also complaints that Lulu Wang (The Farewell), Marielle Heller (A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood), Lorene Scafaria (Hustlers) and others weren't recognized.It's not an entirely new phenomenon: In the 77-year history of the Golden Globes, only five women have ever been nominated for best director, and only one — Barbra Streisand in 1984 for Yentl — has won.SNUB: CatsDespite months-long buzz and persistent ad campaigns, voters didn't appear to enjoy Cats, the star-studded Andrew Lloyd Webber remake. With a cast that includes Judi Dench, Ian McKellen, Idris Elba, Jennifer Hudson and Taylor Swift rendered as cats with "digital fur technology," the film was not considered for any performance or technical awards.That didn't equal a complete shutout: they did receive a best original song nomination for Beautiful Ghosts, written by Swift for the movie.SNUB: Schitt's CreekThere was similarly little love for Canadian sitcom Schitt's Creek. Despite the series running its sixth and final season this year, it earned no nominations either in the outstanding comedy series category or for its stars, including Eugene Levy or Catherine O'Hara.Though ignored by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the group of journalists who vote for the Globes, it is up for five awards for the 25th Annual Critics' Choice Awards.For that ceremony, both Levy and O'Hara are in the running for best comedy actor and actress awards respectively, while Dan Levy and Annie Murphy are among the nominees for best supporting actor and actress in a comedy series.SURPRISE: Netflix dominatesThe nominations also loudly announced the arrival of a new moment in film and television: the streaming era. Netflix dominated the list with a total of 34 nominations, with the most going to Noah Bambach's Marriage Story. The family drama led the pack with six nominations, more than any other film, while Netflix's The Irishman scored five. Dolemite is My Name and The Two Popes — also Netflix productions — found significant success as well. The Two Popes is nominated for best motion picture, best actor (Jonathan Pryce) and best supporting actor (Anthony Hopkins) in the drama category, along with best screenplay, while Dolemite is nominated for best motion picture and best actor (Eddie Murphy) in the musical or comedy category.Competing streaming service Amazon gained two best television series nominations (Fleabag and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel) and best foreign language motion picture (Les Misérables), while Apple entered the awards field for the first time with their TV drama series The Morning Show earning three nominations, marking the first time a streaming service has been nominated in its launch year.SNUB: Shia LaBeouf, smaller productionsAmid the popularity of films produced by streaming houses, smaller traditional productions seem to have suffered. Shia LaBeouf's intensely personal Honey Boy — which he both wrote and starred in — received no nominations, and neither did The Peanut Butter Falcon, which he starred in.At the same time, indie powerhouse A24 received only two nominations (for The Farewell), despite releasing The Lighthouse, Uncut Gems, Waves, Midsommar and The Last Black Man in San Francisco in the eligible period.SURPRISE: Where'd You Go, BernadetteThe little-known Where'd You Go, Bernadette may have opened and closed with a whimper and garnered mostly mediocre reviews, but scored a best actress nomination (musical or comedy) for its star Cate Blanchett. Blanchett is no stranger to the Globes; this will be the 10th nomination for the Australian actress, who currently has three wins.The film, based on the 2012 novel of the same name, had a budget of roughly $18 million US, but only managed to make around $10 million at the box office.SNUB: When They See UsWhen it comes to TV, Chernobyl, The Crown and Unbelievable unsurprisingly cleaned up, each earning four nominations. What surprised fans was Ava DuVernay's When They See Us failed to earn a single one, despite earning 16 Emmy nods — and two wins.The series, about the infamous Central Park Five case of 1989, captivated audiences earlier this year and was also the most recognized show in the Critics' Choice Awards nominations.