• More than 20 child killers sent to healing lodges since 2011, figures show
    News
    CBC

    More than 20 child killers sent to healing lodges since 2011, figures show

    More than 20 child murderers have been transferred to Indigenous healing lodges since 2011, according to numbers from Public Safety Canada. At least 14 of those offenders were held in healing lodges while the previous Conservative government was in power. The federal government released those numbers in response to a request from CBC News Network's Power & Politics in the wake of a wave of outrage over child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic's transfer to an Indigenous healing lodge in southern Saskatchewan last December.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario government to raise threshold for official party status

    The Ontario government is raising the number of seats in the legislature required to achieve official party status, just months after the provincial election that saw the Liberals slip below the current threshold. Progressive Conservative House Leader Todd Smith said Tuesday the new minimum — to be laid out in the fall economic statement later this week — will be 10 per cent of the house, or 12 seats, up from eight. "When we saw the legislature shrink in size in 1999, the number of seats needed for official party status shrunk as well.

  • Bridging the 'genomic divide': Lack of Indigenous DNA data a challenge for researchers
    News
    CBC

    Bridging the 'genomic divide': Lack of Indigenous DNA data a challenge for researchers

    A prominent U.S. senator turned to genetic testing last month to try to prove her claim that she had Indigenous ancestry. Because the data is missing, Indigenous geneticists Krystal Tsosie of Vanderbilt University and Matthew Anderson of Ohio State University argue that Warren's test results, which showed Native American ancestry six to 10 generations ago, are a reach. Many more researchers have joined the discussion regarding Warren's DNA test results, weighing in on the problems inherent in using genetic databases to unearth Indigenous ancestry.

  • Prince Charles at 70: Why he's been 'banging the drum' to make a difference, but says he won't meddle as king
    News
    CBC

    Prince Charles at 70: Why he's been 'banging the drum' to make a difference, but says he won't meddle as king

    Prince Charles has been predestined for one job since the age of three — and he's had plenty of time to think about the way he'll shape the role. The heir to the throne turns 70 on Wednesday, still waiting to be king, although no one except him can say for sure what kind of monarch he will be. At Dumfries House, south of Glasgow, patrons can get to know rare breeds of pigs, turkeys and chickens, enjoy an organic meal fit for a royal and learn to use a professional-grade sewing machine.

  • Goldman Sachs bankers 'cheated' Malaysia over 1MDB: PM Mahathir
    News
    Reuters

    Goldman Sachs bankers 'cheated' Malaysia over 1MDB: PM Mahathir

    KUALA LUMPUR/SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said bankers at Goldman Sachs Group Inc "cheated" the country in dealings with state fund 1MDB and that U.S. authorities have promised to help return the fees the Wall Street bank earned from the fund. Goldman's stock fell to a near two-year low on Monday after Malaysian Finance Minister Lim Guan Eng said his country would seek a "full refund" of the around $600 million in fees the bank earned from raising $6.5 billion for the fund. A Goldman Sachs spokesman on Monday said in an email to Reuters that the bank denied any wrongdoing.

  • Barriers to accessibility at Calgary's new Central Library
    News
    CBC

    Barriers to accessibility at Calgary's new Central Library

    Some Calgarians are raising concerns over accessibility at Calgary's new Central Library. "I think it's a landmark for Calgary to be proud of. Unfortunately, I think they missed the mark in terms of accessibility and in terms of being able to reach the entire community of Calgary," said Sean Crump, head chair and CEO of Universal Access, a company that consults on and certifies accessible buildings.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Opposition calls for probe into Ford aide's role in OPG staffer's alleged firing

    Ontario's opposition parties are calling for an investigation into allegations that a senior aide to Premier Doug Ford interfered in staffing matters at one of the province's Crown corporations. A Globe and Mail report published Tuesday alleged that Dean French, Ford's chief of staff, personally asked the Ontario Power Generation to fire Alykhan Velshi, who used to hold a key role in the office of Ford's predecessor — former Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown.

  • Emotional health of students on the decline, TDSB census shows
    News
    CBC

    Emotional health of students on the decline, TDSB census shows

    New data from Canada's largest school board indicates its students' emotional and physical health has declined over the last five years. More than 200,000 people responded to the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) census that asks students, as well as parents, to score everything from quality of education to support to emotional wellbeing. Since 2012, students between Grades 7-12 reported that their emotional wellbeing dropped nearly 10 per cent, from 69 to 60 per cent in 2017.

  • 12-year-old plan to rejig Edmonton's 105th Avenue back on the table
    News
    CBC

    12-year-old plan to rejig Edmonton's 105th Avenue back on the table

    The vision to revitalize 105th Avenue in downtown Edmonton is more than 12 years old, but despite a tight upcoming four-year budget the project may be getting a new lease on life. The city is dusting off plans to turn what's also known as Columbia Avenue into a more pedestrian and bike friendly stretch between 97th Street and 116th Street. In 2006, council at the time approved design plans for the streetscaping but the project didn't go any further.

  • B.C. NDP to introduce ride-hailing legislation in November
    News
    CBC

    B.C. NDP to introduce ride-hailing legislation in November

    The provincial government is expected to introduce long awaited ride-hailing legislation this month. Premier John Horgan said Tuesday he expects to have it before the House and passed before MLAs rise for their Christmas break. Horgan said the government has to look into changes to insurance packages and a requirement for criminal record checks for drivers.

  • Juul curbs sales of some e-cigarette flavours, but not in Canada
    News
    CBC

    Juul curbs sales of some e-cigarette flavours, but not in Canada

    Vaping giant Juul Labs Inc. is stopping its sales of some e-cigarette flavours in U.S. stores to deter use by kids and teens, but is not doing the same in Canada. "All flavours are compliant with Canadian regulations," Davis said, noting that the company had "chosen to voluntarily limit" them in the U.S. "as part of the discussions" between Juul and the FDA.

  • Hot tips for avoiding hypothermia in the backcountry from a Squamish paramedic
    News
    CBC

    Hot tips for avoiding hypothermia in the backcountry from a Squamish paramedic

    As temperatures drop and snow covers mountaintops around the province, outdoor adventure-seekers have one more hazard to watch for — hypothermia. Jean-Marc Savoie has been dealing with cases of hypothermia first-hand for years as both a B.C. Ambulance paramedic on the North Shore and in Squamish and as a backcountry skier. In his 11 years as a paramedic, many of the injured people he's treated during the colder months are in some stage of hypothermia.

  • Ocelot cub discovers rescued manatees, tries to play with them
    Rumble

    Ocelot cub discovers rescued manatees, tries to play with them

    At first, this adorable rescued Ocelot cub was just checking out the water, but Manatees are very curious animals, and they know that when we tap the water is to give them their bottles, so when she did it, they went to her. As every kitten, she is also very curious, and was fascinated by the young Manatees, and she soon learned that they came when she tapped the water, so she would do it, then wait for them to come over, and observe them until they swam away... and then do it all over again! Both the Ocelot and the Manatees are orphans, and had to be rescued at a very early age, and now live at a rescue center. They are all still young, which makes them even more curious and wanting to make new friends and play. The Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is a small wild cat, but it is the biggest member of the genus Leopardus, which also includes the Margay (Leopardus wiedii), the Northern Tiger Cat (Leopardus tigrinus), the Andean Mountain Cat (Leopardus jacobita), the Kodkod (Leopardus guigna), the Geoffroy's Cat (Leopardus geoffroyi), Pampas Cat (Leopardus colocolo), and the Southern Tiger Cat (Leopardus guttulus). It is native to the Americas and can be found in various habits, such as tropical forests, thorn scrub regions, savannah grasslands, marshes and mangrove forests. The Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis), as the name suggests, is native to the Amazonian rivers of South America. It is the smallest species of manatee described so far, although there is the possibility of a smaller one, the Dwarf Manatee (Trichechus pygmaeus), but it is not recognized as a species at the moment. The Amazonian Manatee shares the Trichechus genus with the West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) and the West African Manatee (Trichechus senegalensis), but is the only species that lives exclusively in freshwater.

  • Northern Pulp admits it is likely to miss 2020 effluent deadline
    News
    CBC

    Northern Pulp admits it is likely to miss 2020 effluent deadline

    The owners of a pulp and paper mill in Pictou County, N.S., say it's unlikely a new effluent treatment pipeline will be ready in time for the government-imposed deadline of January 2020. The deadline matters because the mill's provincial industrial approval expires Jan. 30, 2020 and a functioning effluent treatment system is required. Guillot said the company intends to submit an environmental assessment at the end of January 2019 for a new pipeline outfall in the Northumberland Strait four kilometres outside Caribou.

  • Edmonton bus driver safety shield project to cost $11.7M
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton bus driver safety shield project to cost $11.7M

    The city's executive committee approved agreements on Tuesday with two contractors that will provide an $11.7 million upgrade to Edmonton buses, including the installation of safety shields for drivers. A new city report says Vapor Bus International will install shields on all city buses in an effort to improve transit operator safety — a hot topic since late September, when a bus driver was stabbed at the Mill Woods Transit Centre. Mississauga Bus Group of Companies will provide an additional $4.75 million in heating and air conditioning upgrades for the enclosed workspaces.

  • Edmonton police ask for help to solve 2016 murder of Colombian tourist
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton police ask for help to solve 2016 murder of Colombian tourist

    Exactly two years ago, Leonardo Duran-Ibanez was walking along a street in north central Edmonton with his brother-in-law, Elias Malkum. The 42-year-old was visiting from Colombia, staying with his sister and Malkum. Duran-Ibanez was beaten to death.

  • Moir, Virtue P.E.I. figure skating show stormed out
    News
    CBC

    Moir, Virtue P.E.I. figure skating show stormed out

    The Thank You Canada figure skating show that was planned for Thursday evening at Credit Union Place in Summerside, P.E.I., has been cancelled. High winds forecast for P.E.I. Wednesday and Thursday meant event organizers were worried the Confederation Bridge would be closed to high-sided vehicles.

  • After unsuccessful drilling, no wells are being explored off Nova Scotia
    News
    CBC

    After unsuccessful drilling, no wells are being explored off Nova Scotia

    There are now no exploratory drilling projects happening off the coast of Nova Scotia, says a spokesperson for the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board. On Nov. 9, Hess Corporation, which partners with BP Canada in the Scotian Basin Exploration Drilling Project, announced the Aspy D-11/D-11A well drilling reached a depth of 7,400 metres, but didn't find commercially viable quantities of hydrocarbons. Sadie Toulany, a spokesperson for the offshore petroleum board, said BP Canada is moving to permanently seal the well.

  • Teen struck at crosswalk outside high school says she's 'really lucky' it wasn't worse
    News
    CBC

    Teen struck at crosswalk outside high school says she's 'really lucky' it wasn't worse

    Katherine Taylor-Hood said her mind went completely blank as soon as she was hit. The 15-year-old says she was on her way to school Thursday morning and in the middle of the crosswalk on Bonaventure Avenue in St. John's, right in front of Holy Heart of Mary High School. Taylor-Hood said she looked both ways before she crossed and didn't see anything coming.

  • Central P.E.I. tourism group seeks direction for next 3 years
    News
    CBC

    Central P.E.I. tourism group seeks direction for next 3 years

    The association promotes both Green Gables Shore on P.E.I.'s north coast and Red Sands Shore on its south coast. "We did really, really well," said Derrick Hoare, the association's president. This year, the group enlisted the help of both the Dunne Group and the Lowther Group to research what role members would like to see their organization play in P.E.I.'s tourism industry.

  • Sherwood Park community centre deemed structurally sound, but remains closed
    News
    CBC

    Sherwood Park community centre deemed structurally sound, but remains closed

    The community centre in Sherwood Park have been deemed structurally sound after a pair of explosions sparked a massive police investigation last week. The explosions happened in the Strathcona County Community Centre's parkade on Nov. 6, which was damaged in the initial explosion, according to a news release from Strathcona County. Cleaning efforts have begun in County Hall, which is expected to be restored by next week.

  • 'Terrified for the people behind me'
    BBC News

    'Terrified for the people behind me'

    A survivor of the Californian wildfires, which have killed at least 42 people, has told the BBC of her escape. Sorrell Bobrink, whose neighbourhood has been completely destroyed, fled the town of Paradise with her son and pets. She described a journey through roads surrounded by flames and feelings of chaos and shock at how quick the fire took over. Dozens of people remain missing as California continues to burn. At least 6,607 residences have been destroyed in the county along with 1,032 commercial and other structures.

  • Coco the cow hops fence, evades capture: 'I've never had one do that'
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Coco the cow hops fence, evades capture: 'I've never had one do that'

    A Newfoundland farmer is on the lookout for an escaped cow that hopped his farm's fence last Thursday. Coco was last spotted on Saturday, two days after she leapt over the fence and escaped the farm in Conception Bay South, 30 kilometres west of St. John's. "I've had cows for my lifetime and I've never had one do that," said farmer Barry Scott.

  • Jasper Avenue faces closures as city hosts Grey Cup festivities
    News
    CBC

    Jasper Avenue faces closures as city hosts Grey Cup festivities

    Jasper Avenue will be partly or completely closed to traffic in the coming days to make way for Grey Cup festivities. Edmonton is hosting the 106th Grey Cup at Commonwealth Stadium on Sunday, Nov. 25. Jasper Avenue will be partially closed from 97th Street to 96th Street beginning at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, with that section of the road fully closed beginning at 6 p.m., festival organizers said Tuesday in a news release.

  • NATO looks to startups, disruptive tech to conquer emerging threats
    News
    Reuters

    NATO looks to startups, disruptive tech to conquer emerging threats

    General Andre Lanata, who took over as head of the NATO transformation command in September, told a conference in Berlin that his command demonstrated over 21 "disruptive" projects during military exercises in Norway this month. Participants also met behind closed doors with chief executives from 12 of the 15 biggest arms makers in Europe.