• Alabama inmate coughs, heaves 13 minutes into execution

    A man who killed an Alabama convenience store clerk more than two decades ago was put to death Thursday night, an execution that required two consciousness tests as the inmate heaved and coughed 13 minutes into the lethal injection. Ronald Bert Smith Jr., 45, was pronounced dead at 11:05 p.m., about 30 minutes after the procedure began at the state prison in southwest Alabama. Smith was convicted of capital murder in the Nov. 8, 1994, fatal shooting of Huntsville store clerk Casey Wilson.

    The Canadian Press
  • Doctor who once traded drugs for sex disciplined a third time by regulator

    Dr. Randy Raymond Allan has been disciplined for a third time by Manitoba's physician regulatory body and handed a six-month licence suspension for misleading investigators. In the previous case, the college found Allan allowed a nurse practitioner at the clinic where he worked to use his billing number to bill Manitoba Health for patients Allan did not see himself.

    CBC
  • Ontario shoppers feeling ripped off by mall gift cards

    When Bahador Ayoubzadeh showed up at Ottawa's St. Laurent Shopping Centre with a shiny plastic gift card recently, he thought he had $100 to play with. You forget your card and suddenly everything is gone.," Ayoubzadeh told CBC's Ontario Today on Thursday. Earlier this week, the Ontario legislature unanimously passed Bill 47, Potts' private member's bill to ban expiration dates on points consumers accrue through loyalty plans like Air Miles.

    CBC
  • Russia threatens retaliation over latest round of Canadian sanctions

    Canada has quietly imposed additional sanctions on Russian nationals over the annexation of Crimea and Moscow's ongoing support for separatists in eastern Ukraine. The new measures, including asset-freezing and a prohibition on business dealings, were passed by the Liberal cabinet on Nov. 28 and released, without much fanfare compared with the former Conservative government, on the Global Affairs Canada website the same day. There are 15 individuals named in the regulation, which was to be formally posted Thursday in the Canada Gazette, the government's official publication of record.

    CBC
  • Schools closed in several B.C. districts, SFU open as snow falls

    Snow began falling on B.C.'s South Coast early this morning.

    CBC
  • Making keepsake Christmas tree ornaments

    Thu, Dec 8: Decorating the Christmas tree can have a deeper meaning when the ornaments become time capsules of your family members. Minna Rhee learns how to make do-it-yourself keepsakes.

    Global News
  • Brampton man convicted of sexual assault has left the country

    A Brampton man convicted of sexual assault and possibly facing years in prison has managed to slip out of the country before being sentenced. Moazzam Tariq, 29, flew to Pakistan from Montreal on Nov.18, a Toronto court heard on Thursday, two weeks before his scheduled sentencing hearing. In October, Tariq was found guilty of sexually assaulting a Toronto woman who was too drunk to consent to sex.

    CBC
  • Union president Jones challenges Trump on Carrier

    The union president slammed by Donald Trump on Twitter challenged the president-elect Thursday to back up his claim that a deal to discourage Carrier Corp. from closing an Indiana factory would save 1,100 American jobs. "He overreacted, President-elect Trump did," United Steelworkers Local 1999 President Chuck Jones told CNN. Trump and Vice-President-elect Mike Pence — governor of Indiana — visited Carrier's Indianapolis factory Dec. 1 to celebrate the deal.

    The Canadian Press
  • Hungry students flocking to campus food banks

    Chris Zhang made a lot of sacrifices when he left his home in China to study computer system engineering at Carleton University. "Starving, it's the worst," said Zhang, one of a growing number of international students making use of Carleton's Food Centre, the campus food bank. Campus food banks are a relatively new phenomenon in Canada but they've swiftly become an important supplement for the student diet.

    CBC
  • Historians shrug as two prime ministers erased from Canadian banknotes

    Losing two of Canada's wartime prime ministers from the country's $50 and $100 bills won't be a step backwards for a country that has plenty to learn about itself, a pair of leading history buffs say. Soon after the federal government announced Thursday that the faces of William Lyon Mackenzie King and Sir Robert Borden would be dropped from the banknotes, Historica Canada weighed in, saying there will always be ways to pay tribute to the two men. "We think that history is a moving target," said Anthony Wilson-Smith, CEO of Canada's largest independent organization devoted to enhancing awareness of Canadian history.

    The Canadian Press
  • Meadow Lake, Sask., landlord accused of sexually assaulting tenants

    A landlord in Meadow Lake, Sask., is being accused of sexually assaulting at least two of his tenants. Meadow Lake RCMP first received a complaint in October. RCMP said a second victim — also a former tenant — came forward shortly after.

    CBC
  • Defendant's pal: Will Smith's wife and I tried to calm him

    A friend of the driver on trial for killing former New Orleans Saints star Will Smith told a jury Thursday that he tried to restrain Smith in the heated exchange of words following an April 9 traffic crash. "I grabbed Mr. Smith and asked him to please chill out," Kevin O'Neal said. Unlike other witnesses, O'Neal gave no indication that the argument had cooled before shots were fired that night, although Smith's wife Racquel had tried to push her husband back and calm him down.

    The Canadian Press
  • 2 people dead, another in serious condition after Manotick crash

    Two people died in a crash between a car and a dump truck near the intersection of Mitch Owens and Manotick Station roads.

    CBC
  • More people apply to become Mounties under new rules

    There are early signs that changes to the RCMP's application process are leading to a big bump in recruits. The police force changed its application requirements six months ago with the aim of simplifying the process and making more people eligible to apply. Now, recruits don't have to be Canadian citizens, they can put off taking the physical fitness test until they've been accepted at the RCMP's training division and university graduates no longer have to take the national police force's entrance exam.

    CBC
  • Man charged with manslaughter in death of teen found near Morley

    A man has been charged with manslaughter in the death of a Calgary teenager whose body was found Monday in a remote area near Morley, Alta. Matin Hamid Ahmet, 21, was arrested late Wednesday in the death of Ezzulddin Al-Ogaidi, 17. Calgary police say Ahmet is charged with manslaughter, careless use of a firearm, pointing a firearm, possession of a weapon for dangerous purpose, possession of a firearm without a licence and possession of a weapon obtained by crime.

    CBC
  • 'More children are going to get hurt,' province warned on eve of review

    The man who led Alberta's last task force on children who die in provincial care says more kids are going to get hurt while the government conducts yet another review of the children-in-care system. "It's pretty frustrating to hear that this is the exact same process that the previous Conservative government went through about two years ago," said Tim Richter who chaired the Alberta Child Implementation Oversight Committee in 2014. "It's really about implementing the recommendations that have been made.

    CBC
  • The second Metro Vancouver snowstorm: what you need to know

    Environment Canada has issued a warning that 10 to 20 centimetres is expected for Metro Vancouver, the Sunshine Coast, Sea-to-Sky Region, the Fraser Valley, and virtually all of Vancouver Island. There will be a possible break after that before picking up in the afternoon — but at that point, the snow will likely turn to rain at lower elevations (most of Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, and the southwest Fraser Valley). B.C.'s transportation minister isn't ruling out shutting down the Alex Fraser Bridge and several lanes on the Port Mann, if the storm is as bad as expected.

    CBC
  • Man paralyzed in hatchet attack sues province for failing to keep up with care costs

    When Michael Levy was 18, he was attacked by three other teens at a youth dance in Surrey, B.C. The three 17-year-olds were armed with bottles, bear spray and a hatchet. Now, 10 years later, Levy is suing the province for allegedly refusing to increase his payments to match the climbing costs of his care as his caregivers' rates increase over the years. The suit alleges the province has also refused to compensate for the resulting care cost increases.

    CBC
  • Syrian newcomers agree language training is key to finding work

    When war forced Enana Jaber to leave Iraq with his wife and four sons, they sought refuge in Canada. Since December 2015, New Brunswick has taken in 1,554 refugees. With federal assistance payments for refugees running out after their first year in Canada, the provinces are now left to foot the bill.

    CBC
  • Quebec First Nation lays claim to downtown Ottawa, including Parliament Hill

    A Quebec First Nation has filed a lawsuit seeking aboriginal title over much of downtown Ottawa, including Parliament Hill. "The Algonquin Anishinabe Nation has never surrendered its title to the Kichi Sibi lands," says the band's statement of claim filed Wednesday in Ontario's Superior Court. The claim includes islands in the Ottawa River, as well as a long portion of its south bank that includes Parliament, the Supreme Court, the National Library and the Canadian War Museum.

    The Canadian Press
  • A grim tally soars: More than 50,000 overdose deaths in US

    Health officials say more than 50,000 Americans died from drug overdoses last year, the most ever. The disastrous tally has been pushed to new heights by soaring abuse of heroin and prescription painkillers, a class of drugs known as opioids. The new numbers were part of the annual tally of deaths and death rates released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'The laws ain't strict enough,' drunk-driving victim complains

    A Fredericton man who erupted in court against the drunk driver who cost him his left leg is calling for tougher laws against drunken driving. Michael Burden lost his leg below the knee this summer after Robert Drew Shannon drove into the motorcycle carrying Burden and his wife, Kendra. "The justice system in Canada has to change the laws of drinking and driving," Burden said Thursday on CBC's Maritime Noon. "Not just for me, for every person who's ever been hit on a highway or on a street or anything.

    CBC
  • Saskatchewan's Wall, B.C.'s Clark get premiers gathering off to fractious start

    Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is flatly asserting he won't be signing any agreement today on a national carbon price, while B.C.'s Christy Clark says elements of the deal may have to be set aside for further assessment. Wall is dead set against a federally imposed tax on carbon dioxide emissions, saying Ottawa has failed to provide an economic analysis of the biggest tax change in a generation. "We're being asked to agree to a carbon tax that the federal government admits will cascade through the system for Canadians, and we're being asked to do it without a full assessment," he said in Ottawa.

    The Canadian Press
  • 'More and more people' looking for barrier-free homes, Toronto real estate agent says

    Forget fireplaces, granite countertops and stainless steel appliances — soon hot property listings could also prominently feature wheelchair ramps or other accessible design elements. Jeffrey Kerr is a real estate broker with Re/Max in Toronto and one of only two realtors in the province who concentrates exclusively on barrier-free sales listings. "Demand has been increasing," he told CBC Toronto in an interview.

    CBC
  • South Korean president is impeached in stunning fall

    South Korean lawmakers on Friday impeached President Park Geun-hye, a stunning and swift fall for the country's first female leader amid protests that drew millions into the streets in united fury. After the vote, parliamentary officials hand-delivered formal documents to the presidential Blue House that stripped Park of her power and allowed the country's No. 2 official, Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn, to assume leadership until the constitutional Court rules on whether Park must permanently step down. Once called the "Queen of Elections" for her ability to pull off wins for her party, Park has been surrounded in the Blue House in recent weeks by millions of South Koreans who have taken to the streets in protest.

    The Canadian Press

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