20-year-old Abbotsford man fined for trying to see how fast his mom's car could go, say police

·2 min read
Police in Abbotsford took this photograph of a 2003 Mazda Protégé, which they say was being driven at a speed of more than 200 km/h on Highway 1 early Sunday morning. (Abbotsford Police Department - image credit)
Police in Abbotsford took this photograph of a 2003 Mazda Protégé, which they say was being driven at a speed of more than 200 km/h on Highway 1 early Sunday morning. (Abbotsford Police Department - image credit)

Police in Abbotsford, B.C., say a 20-year-old man is facing nearly $800 in fines after being caught trying to see how fast his mother's car would go.

"This driver made some incredibly poor choices that put other motorists and himself at risk," said Const. Paul Walker in an email to CBC News.

According to Walker, the suspect drove past an unmarked police vehicle in the early hours of Sunday morning going more than 200 kilometres per hour along Highway 1 at Sumas Way. The Fraser Valley roadway has a posted speed limit of 100 kilometres per hour.

When police managed to stop the vehicle, a 2003 Mazda Protégé, its engine was smoking from being driven so hard.

Police said the man was the only passenger in the car and was not impaired.

"When asked why he was travelling at this speed, the driver responded he wanted to see how fast the car could go," wrote Walker. "Of note the vehicle he was operating was his mother's."

Walker also said that the driver was a novice driver, which is the middle step of ICBC's graduated licensing system.

Walker said the driver is not known to police. The department has not revealed his identity to the public.

Police issued tickets for excessive speed ($483), driving without consideration ($196), and failing to display N ($109).

Abbotsford Police Department
Abbotsford Police Department

The vehicle will be impounded for seven days and the driver will be responsible for towing and impounding fees.

He is also facing penalty points on his driving record that will result in paying premiums to ICBC to renew his license.

Walker said that the superintendent of motor vehicles could recommend further enforcement in the case such as suspending the driver's license.

"Given that the driver is a new driver, this is a probable outcome," wrote Walker.

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