• Katherine Kitts sentenced to 14 months in jail for sexually exploiting student

    A former educational assistant who was working at Sir Robert Borden High School in Ottawa has been sentenced to 14 months in jail for sexually exploiting a student over a two-year period. Katherine Kitts, 46, was arrested in 2014 after a mother found sexually explicit texts on her son's phone and contacted police with concerns about Kitts's relationship with him. The offences happened between April 2012 and April 2014 while Kitts was working at Sir Robert Borden High School.

    CBC
  • 'Why do we have 4 car seats?': Saskatoon man uses family pictures, sarcasm to respond to federal tax review

    It looks like Devin Dubois is headed back to his family photo albums for the second year in a row to provide evidence for a federal tax review. In 2014, during a tax review, the Canada Revenue Agency asked Dubois for a wide range of information— including proof that he and his wife were Canadian citizens.

    CBC
  • Parents angry Montreal teachers wore headdresses on 1st day of school

    A Montreal borough school has infuriated some parents after handing out construction paper headdresses on the first day of classes. Two teachers at Lajoie elementary school in Outremont were wearing First Nations headdresses and giving paper ones to the children to wear, according to parent Jennifer Dorner.

    CBC
  • Suddenly unsure on immigration, Trump trying to clear it up

    It's been the driving issue of Donald Trump's campaign. Ten weeks before the election, however, buffeted by conflicting advice from aides and advisers, Trump has seemed to be in full indecision mode. It also underscores how little his Republican campaign has invested in the nitty gritty of outlining what he would do as president, especially when compared with the more detailed plans of his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

    The Canadian Press
  • Hunters fend off wolves after dog attacked at wilderness camp

    Only a few hours after the group had set up camp for their week-long adventure, they heard noises outside their tent. When Andrew Stanley went outside to see what was happening, he saw two husky-sized wolves attacking his dog, Charlie. One wolf had the dog by the neck, and the other was biting the dog's legs, back, and belly. When Stanley approached with his rifle, the wolves let go of his dog and fled, but not before Stanley was able to shoot one of the wolves dead.

    CBC
  • 'Laughable': Critics slam McDonald's ad for preservative-free McNuggets

    By now you may have caught the new McDonald's TV commercial promoting Chicken McNuggets without artificial preservatives. The ad ends with a father lovingly brushing back his daughter's hair while she dines on preservative-free, processed chicken pieces. Adding that line to a commercial selling McNuggets has some health advocates crying foul.

    CBC
  • Carol Kane says Gene Wilder gave her a second chance

    At age 23, Carol Kane was fresh off a Best Actress Oscar nomination with no prospects on the horizon. Then Gene Wilder called. "Out of the blue I got a call from Gene saying that he'd like to meet me about 'The World's Greatest Lover,'" Kane said Monday.

    The Canadian Press
  • Syrian refugee sponsors face difficult choice

    New Brunswickers who have waited seven months and longer to welcome and support Syrian refugees are bracing for a difficult choice. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) will soon present sponsors with the option of cancelling their original commitments to Syrian parents and children who have been delayed by medical and security screening. Instead, sponsors will be offered a "replacement" family already cleared for travel by the federal government.

    CBC
  • Why crossbows aren't regulated

    Although last week's slayings have prompted public discussion about licensing crossbows, Friedman says that the focus should be on those who are already banned from using weapons. While crossbow deaths are rare in Canada, there was another fatality in Toronto within the past six years.

    CBC
  • Sask. man recovering in hospital after wolf attack at Cameco mine

    A 26-year-old man is recovering in hospital after being attacked by a wolf while on shift at a northern Saskatchewan mine. Cameco spokesperson, Rob Gereghty told CBC News that a contractor at the mine was mauled by an unprovoked wolf while taking his lunch break outside. According to Gereghty, this is the first time anything like this has happened at the Cigar Lake mine. He said conservation officers are currently at the mine dealing with the situation.

    CBC
  • 'Duck pond' on my driveway is city's fault, Regina homeowner says

    A Regina man says he's got a "duck pond" in front of his house because the city refuses to fix the crumbling street. In a letter to the city, Doug Kozak says he has waited more than a decade for the city to repair his road — which, fittingly enough, is named Lake Street. "We have been dealing with a pond at the end of our driveway for more than 10 years," he said in his submission, which is on the agenda for tonight's city council meeting.

    CBC
  • Police release cause of death in triple homicide involving crossbow

    Mon, Aug 29: Toronto police say autopsies of the three victims in last week's triple homicide are complete. The woman died of ligature strangulation and the two male victims found nearby were fatally stabbed in the neck with a crossbow bolt and an arrowhead. Christina Stevens reports.

    Global News
  • Good boy! Dogs know what you're saying, study suggests

    BERLIN — Scientists have found evidence to support what many dog owners have long believed: man's best friend really does understand some of what we're saying.

    The Canadian Press
  • The 10 Most Violent Cities In The World

    The city of Caracas has topped the list of the world’s most violent cities. Based on the number of homicides per 100,000 people the Venezuelan capital fared the worst, with 120 murders, followed by Honduras’ San Pedro Sula, which saw 111 homicides per 100,000 residents. South and Central American cities dominated the list, taking nine out of ten places. The data includes cities with a population of more than 300,000 people and where homicide statistics are made available.

    Matilda Long
  • 19,000 tickets gone in 80 minutes for Rogers Place open house

    Almost 20,000 free tickets for an open house at Rogers Place were scooped up in 80 minutes on Monday by those wanting an inside look at the new arena in downtown Edmonton. "(People) want to see what it's like on the inside, they've seen what it's like on the outside and I'm expecting a lot of people wanting to have a look," said Rick Daviss, executive director of the downtown arena project for the City of Edmonton.

    CBC
  • Teen says sending her to U.S. for mental health care saved her life

    Two years ago, when she was 14, Chloe White struggled with anxiety, depression and addiction.

    CBC
  • 7 of the strangest problems B.C. police officers were punished for last year

    The annual report of the Office of the Police Complaint Commissioner, released today, gives a window into the long and multi-level disciplinary process police officers face when accused of wrongdoing. Today's report provides summaries of all substantiated allegations against police officers — within the OPCC's jurisdiction — that ended between between April 1, 2015, and March 31, 2016.

    CBC
  • Ontario guaranteed-income pilot moves ahead with new report

    The long-debated idea of a guaranteed minimum annual income for Canadians moves a small step closer to reality this week. Former Conservative senator Hugh Segal delivers a report this week on how the "basic income pilot" announced in Ontario's February budget might work. The Ontario government earmarked $25 million this fiscal year to establish a pilot project in the province sometime before April 2017, and appointed Segal in late June as an unpaid special adviser.

    CBC
  • Prince George man says dog saved him during frightening bear attack

    A Prince George man says his loyal golden labrador, Charlie, saved him after he crossed paths with a black bear in the woods outside Prince George on Saturday afternoon. Tony Manuge, 52, was walking his dogs, Charlie and Jake, a four-month-old black lab puppy, on a trail near the University of Northern British Columbia when a black bear "burst out of the underbrush" and charged him.

    CBC
  • Mayor John Tory accepts Twitter challenge to ride in hot subway car

    After being challenged on Twitter, Toronto Mayor John Tory has agreed to take a ride in one of the city's subway cars with air conditioning that isn't functioning.. Bianca Spence first issued the challenge in July after enduring sweltering subway rides on her regular commute. A representative for Tory said that he is now in touch with Spence, looking for the right time for the pair to take a ride together from Kipling station to Kennedy station on Line 2, which is where the subway cars without air conditioning have been in service.

    CBC
  • Vancouver ESL school closes suddenly, 600 students out of class

    The sudden closure of a Vancouver language school has left 600 students out of class, and almost 100 school staff out of a job. Teachers at Vancouver English Centre (VEC), an English as a second language (ESL) school in downtown Vancouver, have been on strike for the last four weeks, seeking their first collective contract. Union representatives say they showed up to the school at 9 a.m. Friday morning for a private mediation session, but instead found a group of confused students and staff gathered outside.

    CBC
  • Jeffrey Gillis, former RCMP officer, to challenge legality of search warrant

    A former RCMP officer who is facing weapons charges is challenging the legality of the search warrant that resulted in 12 weapons charges. Jeffrey Rae Gillis, 43, has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Judge Orr is already handling a separate case in which Gillis is charged with assault.

    CBC
  • Statistics Canada celebrates 'best census since 1666'

    On the long list of what Canadians love, it seems you can add filling out census forms to pastimes such as watching hockey and listening to The Tragically Hip. Statistics Canada is celebrating its "best census ever" after 98.4 per cent of the census population filled out their long-and short-form questionnaires this year. This was the first year for the reinstated mandatory long-form census since the Conservative government cancelled it for the 2011 census, replacing it with a voluntary national household survey.

    CBC
  • Hundreds of firearms removed from Summerside fire debris

    After a fire destroyed a farm equipment dealership in Summerside, P.E.I., a priority for investigators was digging through the debris and making sure hundreds of firearms were safely removed and taken to a secure location. "We don't like firearms lying around," said Provincial Fire Marshal Dave Rossiter on Monday. On Saturday at around 11 a.m., a fire broke out at Green Diamond Equipment Ltd. The fire was extinguished in about three hours, but the building was destroyed.

    CBC
  • Chinese woman dead after single vehicle accident on Dempster Highway

    In a release Monday, the RCMP said three other people, two adult females and one adult male, exited the vehicle and sustained injuries. The RCMP said all four people in the vehicle were from China and the Consulate-General of the Peoples Republic of China has been contacted. "Driving the Dempster Highway is a popular activity with both locals and tourists alike.  Please travel safely when on our remote Northern roads," said RCMP spokesperson Marie York-Condon.

    CBC