McGill University student’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ parody explaining science goes viral

Lindsay Jolivet
Daily Buzz
Science Guru Remakes Bohemian Rhapsody
Ever wondered would Bohemian Rhapsody still carry such popular appeal if it was a song about science? Tim Blais has. In his A Capella Science video project, he has taken the song, added a sprinkling of scientific String Theory, some goofy video production and the results are already proving a huge online hit. Tim gained success last year with his cover of Rolling In The Higgs, an Adele-inspired song about the Higgs Boson. Credit: acapellascience.

A Canadian physics student has tuned the wonders of science to the melody of Bohemian Rhapsody, belting out an explanation of string theory in a viral video that's even caught the attention of Queen's guitarist.

McGill University graduate student Tim Blais' video Bohemian Gravity! has been viewed more than 1.5 million times since he uploaded it on Sept. 16 and got it shared by former Star Trek actor George Takei.

Queen's guitarist, Brian May, who is a Doctor of Astrophysics, also shared the video on his website.

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Several overlapping frames of Blais harmonizing with himself build throughout the song as the musical scientist delves into the theory that all matter and energy is composed of tiny, one-dimensional objects known as strings.

He poses the burning question that few of us understand enough to have ever asked:

"Space is a pure void, why should it be stringy?"

He'll tell you why.

Apparently, re-writing the lyrics of Bohemian Rhapsody into a complex scientific explanation of string theory is a tough job. Blais told CTV on Friday that he spent more than a year on the project, which he described as "massive."

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Before finishing Bohemian Gravity, he released a parody of Adele's Rolling in the Deep about the Higgs Boson particle.

Blais told CTV he's planning to take a break from research and record more scientific tunes.

People, find this man a guest role on the Big Bang Theory.

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