Texas woman gives birth to two sets of identical twins on Valentine’s Day

On Valentine's Day, a Houston woman beat one-in-70-million odds and gave birth to two sets of identical twins.

Texas woman gives birth to two sets of identical twins HOUSTON, Texas - Tressa Montalvo remembers vividly the day her doctor told her she wasn't just having twins, she was having twins - twice. "When we got to Dr.

Tressa Montalvo, 36, delivered four boys — Ace, Blaine, Cash and Dylan — via caesarean section early Thursday morning at The Woman's Hospital of Texas in Houston.

"We tried to stick to the A-B-C-D theme when naming them," Tressa said. "We didn't expect it, we were trying for just one and we were blessed with four."

According to a news release from the hospital, Tressa and her husband, Manuel, had not been using fertility drugs, "and had just hoped for a little brother or sister for their 2-year-old son, Memphis."

At her 10-week ultrasound, Tressa's doctor told her she has having twins. At the following visit, a doctor heard a third heartbeat.

Not long after, the doctor told the Montalvos that they were having four additions to their family.

"Basically, I pumped my fist," Manuel, a plumber and tradesman, told the Houston Chronicle. "It was a home run."

The boys aren't quadruplets. Two boys shared one placenta and the other two shared another, making them two sets of identical twins, a statistical phenomenon.

The odds of conceiving two sets of identical twins are significantly higher with in-intro fertilization, about 1 in 10,000.

The four Montalvo boys were all born without complications with birth weights between 2 pounds, 15 ounces and 3 pounds, 15 ounces. Hospital officials expect they'll all grow up to lead healthy, normal lives.

See a slideshow of the newborns here.

While, with four babies, the Montalvos' have their hands full, Manuel still hopes they'll eventually have a little girl.

Tressa insists they'll wait a few years before deciding if they want to add to their brood:

"I don't think it will set in until we're all home how difficult it's going to be," Tressa, who was raised with six siblings, told the Houston Chronicle.

"I'm excited. I'm ready for the challenge," Manuel told KTRK.

"We do feel like we hit the jackpot yeah," Tressa added. "The biggest blessing ever. Tremendous."