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Calgary man with autism testifies he killed his father for calling him 'useless'

Vincent Fong is on trial, accused of second-degree murder in the death of his father, Kwan Fong. (Facebook - image credit)
Vincent Fong is on trial, accused of second-degree murder in the death of his father, Kwan Fong. (Facebook - image credit)

A Calgary man with autism and obsessive compulsive disorder told jurors he killed his father because he called him a Chinese word meaning "useless."

The 41-year-old is on trial, accused of second-degree murder in the death of his father, Kwan Fong, 70.

On Tuesday, Vincent Fong testified in his own defence. He came across as childlike, struggling at times to be understood by the judge, court reporter and lawyers through near-constant stammering.

He also spun in a circle several times during his testimony.

Spinning 'for luck'

Jurors were told that Fong has autism, obsessive compulsive disorder and a below average IQ.

Prosecutor Margot Engley cautioned jurors that because of his diagnoses, Fong may respond in ways they might not expect.

He has admitted to killing Kwan Fong on Jan. 9, 2019. Jurors are now tasked with determining Fong's intent at the time of the killing.

Under questioning from his lawyer, Katherin Beyak, Fong testified that he spins "for luck."

But he said his father didn't approve.

'That's why I kill him'

Fong told Beyak that on the day of the killing, his father confronted him about his spinning.

"He said, 'you're not getting any better,'" said Fong.

Then his father called him a word in Chinese that means "useless," he said.

Fong said he wanted to punch his dad.

"He said, 'you want to push me down the stairs and make me dead?' I said 'yes,'" Fong testified.

"He called me that word, that's why I kill him."

'I cut his neck'

Fong said he pushed his father down the stairs and retrieved a knife and "tried to cut his head off."

"I cut his neck."

Beyak asked if his dad ever hit him.

Fong said "he has."

Fong's disabilities were glaring during his time on the witness stand.

During his testimony, court took a break when Fong became too agitated by the screen being used by the court reporter.

'Scared of my dad'

On his way to the witness stand after the break, Fong reached out to touch various items.

Beyak asked him why.

"Makes me comfortable," said Fong.

His lawyer then asked Fong why he'd previously said he was afraid of his dad.

"Scared of my dad more than my heart hates me," he said.

Court of King's Bench Justice Paul Jeffrey is presiding over the trial, which is set to continue on Wednesday.