A timeline of every COVID-19 case in Canada throughout July 16-31

·125 min read
Passengers wear face masks on a Halifax Transit ferry as it arrives in Dartmouth, N.S. on Friday, July 24, 2020, the first day they have been mandatory on public transit. Masks will become mandatory in most indoor public places in Nova Scotia on Friday and the province's health minister says it will be up to the public to carry out its responsibility to wear them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Passengers wear face masks on a Halifax Transit ferry as it arrives in Dartmouth, N.S. on Friday, July 24, 2020, the first day they have been mandatory on public transit. Masks will become mandatory in most indoor public places in Nova Scotia on Friday and the province's health minister says it will be up to the public to carry out its responsibility to wear them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians are increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

This is a timeline of cases dating from July 16-31. For the latest cases around Canada, you can click here.

July 31

More cases linked to Boucherville day camp outbreak; Quebec jumps back to over 140 daily cases

Quebec health officials continue to identify cases linked to a Boucherville day camp, which is located on Montreal’s South Shore.

There are now 19 secondary patients that are connected to the initial 27 cases that were identified among children and staff at Les Ateliers de Charlot l’Escargot.

Four additional secondary cases were confirmed in the lastest 24-hour stretch, according to CBC, who received confirmation from the regional public health authority.

The secondary cases are primarily siblings, parents and friends of the initial patients.

An outbreak was initially declared July 20. All children and employees who were at the camp between July 13-21 have to isolate at home for at least 14 days from their last time at the location.

Les Ateliers de Charlot l’Escargot joined four other day camps with COVID-19 infections on the South Shore, according to CBC.

The Boucherville camp will have to now stay closed for at least 11 more days, while the outbreak has raised concerns about the potential of COVID-19 spreading among children and staff once school restarts in the fall.

Throughout the province, Quebec health officials recorded 164 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, along with one additional death.

For a second straight day, officials announced that a data problem led to an error in the previous day’s update. Instead of 122 cases on Thursday, the province should have announced 139 new cases of COVID-19.

The latest daily update ends its two-day stretch of reporting fewer than 140 daily cases. The province has now reported at least 140 cases on 14 of the last 16 occasions. Before the recent stretch, it had not identified more than 140 cases since June 25.

Quebec’s streak of at least 100 daily cases continues, now entering its 20th straight day. It’s part of a worrisome trend, considering between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

Throughout the pandemic, Quebec has identified 59,312 cases of COVID-19. That includes 5,674 fatalities and 50,886 people who have recovered from the virus. Of the province’s now 2,752 active cases of COVID-19, there are 189 people in hospital (down by 19) and 15 in intensive care (down by three).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed a record-high 17,293 tests for COVID-19, which is above its goal of 14,000.

Officials recently launched a “massive” round of testing, in which they investigated all doctors and staff in order to contain a outbreak at a hospital in St-Eustache. Since Monday, there have been 14 patients and 11 employees who have tested positive, with outbreaks reported in three of the hospital’s 13 units.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,772 total cases (up by 71), but the spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city. The Laurentides region has 3,877 (up by 34), the Montérégie region has 8,779 cases (up by 32), the Laval region has 6,052 (up by 17), and Lanaudière has 4,497 (up by seven).

Passengers wear face masks on a Halifax Transit ferry as it arrives in Dartmouth, N.S. on Friday, July 24, 2020, the first day they have been mandatory on public transit. Masks will become mandatory in most indoor public places in Nova Scotia on Friday and the province's health minister says it will be up to the public to carry out its responsibility to wear them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Passengers wear face masks on a Halifax Transit ferry as it arrives in Dartmouth, N.S. on Friday, July 24, 2020, the first day they have been mandatory on public transit. Masks will become mandatory in most indoor public places in Nova Scotia on Friday and the province's health minister says it will be up to the public to carry out its responsibility to wear them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Nova Scotia no longer has zero active COVID-19 cases as mask policy comes into effect

Nova Scotia reported two cases of COVID-19 on Friday, the first for the province in over two weeks.

The last time officials identified a case was on July 15. By July 26, all of its remaining patients had recovered, leading to zero active cases.

The two recent patients are in the Central Zone and recently travelled outside of Canada. They’ve been following self-isolation rules since returning.

Nova Scotia continues to share the Atlantic bubble with the other three Atlantic provinces, allowing them to travel between their provincial lines without having to self-isolate for 14 days after arrival and departure.

Premier Stephen McNeil said his government wants to find the safest way to reopen to the rest of Canada, but the province “is not there yet” and a timeline remains unclear.

"We cannot continue to keep ourselves locked down," McNeil said. "There are many parts of the country that are doing as well as we are.

"There's certainly a level of anxiety in our provinces about doing that. But we need to make sure that as we protect the public health of our citizens, we ... begin to look at the economic health."

On Friday, the province started applying its mask policy, making them mandatory in most public spaces, such as shopping centres and gyms, as well restaurants and bars when people are not eating or drinking.

Nova Scotia Health Minister Randy Delorey said the province doesn't plan to take a "strong-arm approach to enforcement" and will instead take the honour-system approach. Failure to adhere to the order could result in "fines and other provisions," but Delorey said there are no plans to enforce it.

"The reason that it's important to make masks mandatory now, even with few active cases, is part of being prepared for the likely occurrence of a second wave,” Delorey said.

Throughout the pandemic, Nova Scotia has had 1,069 cases of COVID-19. That includes 64 victims of the respiratory virus, and 1,003 people who have recovered. The two patients announced Friday are the only active cases in the province.

British Columbia reports one of its highest daily increases in months

British Columbia reported 50 newly identified patients of COVID-19, including five epi-linked cases, as its concerning case trend continues.

It’s the biggest jump in daily cases since July 18, and the second biggest since April 28.

The latest update marks the 21st day of the last 23 that the province has recorded at least 20 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed the 20-daily case mark since June 3.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 3,641 cases of COVID-19 in British Columbia. That includes 3,168 people who have recovered (up by 13 since Thursday). Of the 278 active cases of COVID-19, there remain five people in hospital and two in intensive care.

The death toll is now 195, after a COVID-19 related death in the Vancouver Coastal Health region in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

“There has been one new health-care facility outbreak at Dania Home in the Fraser Health region. There are now two long-term care facilities and one acute-care facility with active outbreaks,” said a press release by health officials.

Ontario returns to over 100 daily cases of COVID-19; Ottawa surge continues

Ontario reported 134 new cases of COVID-19, which ends a two-day streak of reporting fewer than 100 daily cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not done so since March 24.

Of the most recent patients, 26 were identified in Ottawa, 24 in Windsor-Essex, 20 in Peel, and 19 in both Toronto and Southwestern Public Health. Twenty-eight of the province’s 34 public health units reported five or fewer cases, while 16 of them reported zero.

The cases were identified after the province completed 30,033 tests for COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Ottawa has recently seen a surge in cases, many of them linked to private house gatherings. According to CBC, the national capital had 40 active cases on June 30. That number now stands at 271.

"These numbers are concerning," said Dr. Vera Etches, Ottawa's medical officer of health.

"They don't appear to be linked to the implementation of Stage 2 and Stage 3, rather, what we're seeing is primarily linked to our social behaviours and indoor gatherings."

On Friday, Ontario also reported three additional deaths on Friday, raising the death toll to 2,775 in the province. They are among Ontario’s 39,209 cases of COVID-19, including 35,074 recovered patients, up by 168 since Thursday’s update.

Of the province’s 1,360 active cases of COVID-19, there are 78 people in hospital (down by six), which includes 29 people in intensive care (up by two), and 15 who require a ventilator (down by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 17 active outbreaks among facilities in the province. In those facilities, nine residents are currently infected (down by three) and 37 staff members.

Saskatchewan continues to identify cases in ‘communal living settings’

Fourteen new cases were identified in Saskatchewan’s latest 24-hour stretch, which includes nine “from multiple communal living settings across the province.”

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,319 reported cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 1,008 people who have recovered, up by 24 since Thursday. Of the 293 active cases of COVID-19 that remain, there are 15 people in hospital (up by one), while there remain six in intensive care (up by one).

One case was recently removed from the province’s total since it involved an individual who was not a Saskatchewan resident, according a press release.

As of Friday, the South region has 109 active cases, the Central region has 83 and the North has 62. The Far North has five active cases, after being home to 348 patients throughout the pandemic.

In the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, a record-high 1,804 COVID-19 tests were performed, for a total of 98,510.

Another Alberta resident dies at Edmonton LTC

One additional person died in Alberta’s latest 24-hour stretch, and it’s once again in connection to an outbreak at the Good Samaritan Southgate Care Centre in Edmonton.

Throughout the pandemic, 22 residents of the long-term care facility have passed away. There are currently 49 active cases among residents, down by five since Thursday. According to the latest figures, there are 16 active cases among employees, while eight have recovered along with six residents.

On Friday, Alberta Health Services also announced 127 new cases of COVID-19, after completing 8,384 tests for COVID-19. The province has now reported over 100 cases in 13 of the past 16 days. Before the recent stretch, the province hadn’t recorded a triple-digit daily case increase since May 1.

Throughout the pandemic, Alberta has had 10,843 cases of COVID-19. That includes 9,261 people who have recovered, up by 148 since Thursday, and 196 victims. There are now 1,386 active cases in the province (down by 22), which includes 86 people in hospital (down by five) and 17 people in intensive care (down by one).

Six new cases in Manitoba

Health officials announced six new cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba, increasing its total case count to 415.

Two of the new cases were identified in the Prairie Mountain Health region, three in the Interlake-Eastern health region, and one in the WInnipeg region.

Of the province’s total cases, 337 people who have recovered (up by 12 since Thursday) and eight people have died. Of the 70 active cases that remain, there remain six people in hospital, but there are now five in intensive care (up by one).

An additional 1,073 laboratory tests were completed on Thursday, bringing the total number of tests completed since early February to 88,621.

July 30

‘A punch to the gut’: Toronto report shows people of colour make up 83 per cent of city’s cases

Toronto Public Health unveiled data on Wednesday to shed light on the ethno-racial identity and income of COVID-19 cases in Canada’s most populous city.

“There is growing evidence in North America and beyond that racialized people and people living in lower-income households are more likely to be affected by COVID-19 infection,” said Dr. Eileen de Villa, the medical officer of health for Toronto.

“We believe it is related to poverty and racism.”

The data shows that those who identify as a person of colour represent 83 per cent of the cases, while they make up 52 per cent of the population. The white population makes up 48 per cent of the population, but only 17 per cent of the cases.

Population data is current as of the 2016 Census, while COVID-19 case data was collected between May 20 and July 16 in Toronto.

Credit: Toronto Public Health
Credit: Toronto Public Health

Of the cases identified between May 20 and July 16, Black people made up 21 per cent of the city’s cases, even though they represent nine per cent of Toronto’s population.

Race data is similar across those who identify as male or female. However, those who are male and identify as South Asian and Indo-Caribbean make up 23 per cent of the cases, even though they make up 13 per cent of the male population.

De Villa said that the data also shows that East Asian and white people are under-represented compared to the size of those populations.

Dr. Kwame McKenzie, the CEO of the Wellesley Institute, which is a Toronto-based think tank that aims to improve health equity in the Greater Toronto Area, called the data "very concerning."

"They seem to confirm our worry that racialized populations and low-income residents of Toronto are doing worse during the pandemic," said McKenzie.

"The data should lead to urgent action...We clearly need a pandemic response which protects racialized groups and low-income groups, and that means we need to do some things differently."

In terms of income, 51 per cent of reported cases in Toronto were from people living in low-income households, though only 30 per cent of the city's population is considered low income. People in households of at least five people make up 27 per cent of cases, while making up only 20 per cent of the population.

Credit: Toronto Public Health
Credit: Toronto Public Health

Those part of households that make under $30,000 a year make up 14 per cent of Toronto’s population, but they comprise of 27 per cent of the cases. In comparison, those in households with incomes of at least $150,000 make up 21 per cent of the population, but only 6 per cent of the cases.

Those under 30 years old and who make under $30,000, they make up 34 per cent of the cases, even though they represent 14 per cent of that age demographic. Among those 30-59 who make $30,000-$49,999, they comprise of 27 per cent of the cases, but represent 13 per cent of that age demographic.

Of those who are at least 60 years old and make under $30,000 they make up 32 per cent of the cases, and 18 per cent of the age demographic. In a stark comparison, those who make at least $150,000, make up three per cent of the cases, and 17 per cent of the population.

Credit: Toronto Public Health
Credit: Toronto Public Health

Toronto Public Health said that the reasons for the difference in data are unclear, but according to the City of Toronto they could include:

  • Existing health disparities linked to social and economic factors

  • Stress caused by racism and other forms of discrimination

  • Challenges in participating in the public health response to COVID-19, including

    • difficulties in limiting COVID-19 exposure because of being an essential worker, and

    • difficulties in physical distancing because of overcrowding

  • Inequitable access to health care and social services

"If we want to protect our communities, we need urgently to increase access to affordable, healthy housing. Our racialized populations are much more likely to be overcrowded. Low-income populations are much more likely to be overcrowded," said McKenzie, noting that overcrowding makes physical distancing difficult.

"Our racialized communities are also more likely to be essential workers. If we want to protect those communities, we need to properly protect essential workers. We need to protect them at work but we also need to protect them when they are home."

Data will now be shared monthly, and will be used to reduce inequities in how COVID-19 affects various populations in Toronto. The data currently does not consist of those living in long-term care or retirement senior homes, nor those who identify as Indigenous.

Toronto Public Health shared that some limitations of the data is that about 27 per cent of people did not have socio-demographic data collected.

De Villa said targeted testing, an increase in social supports such as voluntary isolation sites, and enhanced communication are short-term options to help those communities that are especially at risk.

“In the longer term, however, if we want to have a true impact, a real impact on improving health … we need to address these health inequities and get to the root cause of what underpins our overall health,” said de Villa.

“We need to focus on the social determinants of health, like affordable housing opportunities, access to employment and income supports and educational opportunities, and yes we need to address systemic racism.”

Coun. Joe Cressy, who is the chair of Toronto’s board of health, said that when he heard the statistics, it felt like “a punch to the gut.”

“Perhaps they shouldn’t surprise us. We know that race and income have long determined health status, but they do represent a call to action,” he said Thursday afternoon.

“COVID by no means created these racial and economic disparities in Toronto — they existed long before — but COVID has certainly exposed and taken advantage of them.”

This is not the first time that Toronto has shed light on the discrepancy in how COVID-19 affects different demographics. Earlier in the pandemic, the province released a neighbourhood breakdown which showed the COVID-19 infection rate among all areas of the city.

As of Wednesday, the City of Toronto has had 15,334 cases of COVID-19, the most of any of Ontario’s public health units. That includes 13,824 people who have recovered, and 1,153 people who have died after contracting the virus.

Five more fatalities linked to LTC outbreak in Alberta

Five fatalities occurred in Alberta’s latest 24-hour stretch, and they’re all connected to an outbreak at the Good Samaritan Southgate Care Centre in Edmonton.

Fifty-four of the 184 long-term care residents have active COVID-19 cases and 21 residents have died, as of Thursday morning. There are also 16 staff members who have contracted the virus, and eight who have recovered.

"This is a stark example of the devastation this virus can cause. I want to offer condolences to the families and friends of these individuals," said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health.

The update increases the province’s death toll to 195.

Hinshaw also announced 113 new cases of COVID-19 after health officials completed 8,670 tests for the respiratory virus. The province has now reported over 100 cases in 12 of the past 15 days. Before the recent stretch, the province hadn’t recorded a triple-digit daily case increase since May 1.

Throughout the pandemic, Alberta has had 10,716 cases of COVID-19. That includes 9,113 people who have recovered, up by 130 since Wednesday. There are now 1,408 active cases in the province (down by 22), which includes 91 people in hospital (up by four) and 18 people in intensive care (up by one).

Ontario starts new trend of reporting under 100 daily cases

Ontario reported 89 new cases of COVID-19, which marks the second straight day that the province has announced fewer than 100 daily cases.

Before the recent stretch, it had not done so since March 24.

Of the most recent patients, 15 were identified in both Ottawa and Windsor-Essex, while there were 12 in Peel and 10 in Toronto. Twenty-eight of the province’s 34 public health units reported five or fewer cases, while 17 of them reported zero.

The cases were identified after the province completed 27,676 tests for COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Ontario also reported three additional deaths on Thursday, raising the death toll to 2,772 in the province. They are among Ontario’s 39,075 cases of COVID-19, including 34,906 recovered patients, up by 165 since Wednesday.

Of the province’s 1,397 active cases of COVID-19, there are 84 people in hospital (down by seven), which includes 27 people in intensive care (down by one), and 16 who require a ventilator (down by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 17 active outbreaks among facilities in the province (up by two). In those facilities, 12 residents are currently infected (up by two) and 37 staff members (up by one).

Quebec announces data error, drops to below 140 daily cases for first time in almost two weeks

Quebec health officials announced 122 new cases of COVID-19, along with one additional death in its latest 24-hour stretch.

In a press release, officials announced that a data problem led to an error in Wednesday’s update. Instead of 176 cases, the province should have announced 112 new cases of COVID-19. That update would have ended the province’s 13-day streak of reporting at least 140 cases of COVID-19. Before the recent stretch, it had not identified more than 140 cases since June 25.

Quebec’s streak of at least 100 daily cases continues, now entering its 19th straight day. It’s part of a worrisome trend, considering between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

Throughout the pandemic, Quebec has identified 59,131 cases of COVID-19. That includes 5,673 fatalities and 50,886 people who have recovered from the virus. Of the province’s now 2,572 active cases of COVID-19, there are 208 people in hospital (up by 18) and 18 in intensive care (up by nine).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 16,397 tests for COVID-19, which is above its goal of 14,000.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,701 total cases (up by 45). On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Laval region has 6,035 (up by seven), Laurentides region has 3,843 (up by five), the Montérégie region has 8,747 cases (down by 11 due to the data error), and Lanaudière has 4,490 (down by one).

Manitoba identifies two new cases

Health officials announced two new cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba, involving two males in their 30s in the Prairie Mountain Health region.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 409 cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba. That includes 325 people who have recovered and eight fatalities. Of the 76 active cases that remain, there are six people in hospital, which includes four people in intensive care.

An additional 1,179 laboratory tests were completed on Wednesday, bringing the total number of tests completed since early February to 87,548.

One new death in Saskatchewan

Through a press release, health officials in Saskatchewan announced that one person in their 90s in the South region has passed away. It raises the death toll to 18.

Thirty-eight new cases were also identified in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, which includes 23 “from multiple communal living settings across the province.”

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,306 reported cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 984 people who have recovered, up by 55 since Wednesday. Of the 304 active cases of COVID-19 that remain, there are 14 people in hospital (down by one), while there remain five in intensive care.

The South has 119 active cases, the Central region has 80 and the North has 66. The Far North has five active cases, after being home to 348 patients throughout the pandemic.

In the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, 1,682 COVID-19 tests were performed, for a total of 96,706.

British Columbia continues to report over 20 cases of COVID-19

British Columbia reported 29 newly identified patients of COVID-19, as its concerning case trend continues.

The latest update marks the 20th day of the last 22 that the province has recorded at least 20 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed the 20-daily case mark since June 3.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 3,591 cases of COVID-19 in British Columbia. That includes 3,155 people who have recovered (up by 46 since Wednesday). Of the 242 active cases of COVID-19, there are five people in hospital (down by one), while there remain two in intensive care.

The death toll also remains at 194, since no COVID-19 related deaths were recorded in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

“There are no new community outbreaks, with no new cases on Haida Gwaii and 59 cases connected to Fraser Valley Packers Inc. Public health teams continue to support these active outbreaks,” said a press release by health officials.

July 29

‘Some will die’: Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe sends grim warning to Hutterite colonies about COVID-19

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe said of the 322 active cases in the province, 244 of them are in Hutterite communities, as worrisome trends continue.

The premier said that most of the province's 80 or so colonies have been co-operative in trying to contain COVID-19. However, there are some that have been resistant to testing and also unwilling to change parts of their communal lifestyle, such as worshipping and eating in large groups.

"This needs to change. ... Every single one of us in this province has been asked to and the vast majority have changed how we are living each and every day," said Moe, in a direct statement to Hutterite communities on Wednesday.

"You all need to as well. If you don't, many will get sick in your community. Some will get very sick. Some will die."

Moe said on Wednesday that health officials will visit all Hutterite colonies in Saskatchewan to provide information and guidelines to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Officials will also be making sure that non-essential travel restrictions are being followed, while continuing to perform testing and contact-tracing when necessary.

According to the Canadian Press, “Hutterites are Anabaptist religious groups who live communally in rural colonies across the Canadian and U.S. Prairies and share most personal property.”

On Wednesday, Saskatchewan announced 50 new cases of COVID-19, which marks its second-highest increase in daily cases since the start of the pandemic. Of those patients, 44 are from one “communal living setting” in the North region, according to a press release by provincial officials.

The Hutterian Safety Council has asked the Saskatchewan provincial government to stop identifying COVID-19 cases related to Hutterite colonies, since it has led to stigmatization issues in communities. Manitoba has stopped identifying Hutterite colonies in their daily reports as a result of similar issues, but Moe says that Saskatchewan officials have named other outbreaks in the past.

"No one in Saskatchewan should stigmatize anyone in their community, or is visiting their community, or should assume that because they may be Hutterite they have COVID," said Moe.

Updates from the rest of Canada’s jurisdictions

Ontario reported 76 cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, which marks the first time since March 24 that the province has recorded fewer than 100 daily cases. One more fatality was also announced, increasing the death toll to 2,769. Of the recent patients, 22 of them were identified in Windsor-Essex, which now remains the only region in Ontario to still be in Stage 2, after both Peel and Toronto were given the green light to move to Stage 3 on Friday.

Quebec health officials identified 176 new cases in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch. It’s now the 14th straight day that Canada’s worst-hit province has recorded over 140 cases and the 18th straight day it has recorded over 100. Before the recent stretch, Quebec had not identified more than 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions. On a positive note, the province didn’t record a new victim for the third time in the past week.

Nova Scotia continues to have no active cases of COVID-19, but health officials did announce one more fatality in the province, increasing the death toll to 64. The patient died several weeks ago, and health officials have been investigating the fatality to determine if COVID-19 was a factor. The individual was not a resident of a long-term care home.

Newfoundland and Labrador reported no new cases on Wednesday. There remain four active cases in the province, which were all identified last week. Prince Edward Island did not provide an update Wednesday, after all of its 36 patients recovered by Tuesday. New Brunswick’s active case count also remains at three, after not identifying any new patients in its latest 24-hour stretch.

No new cases were also identified in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Yukon is the only one with active cases, involving three residents who are currently travelling outside of the province. They’ll return to the territory once they’ve been cleared of the virus.

Manitoba health officials identified three new cases of COVID-19, but also announced that one case, which was reported on July 25, has been removed from its total case count. The individual had recovered from a previous infection from another province, according to a press release. The total case count in Manitoba is now 407, which includes 74 active cases.

Health officials in Alberta reported 133 new cases of COVID-19, which ends a two-day stretch of reporting under 100 daily cases. The province has now reported over 100 cases on 11 of the past 14 days. Before the recent stretch, the province hadn’t recorded a triple-digit daily case increase since May 1. As of Wednesday, there are 1,430 active cases in the province, with Calgary being home to 713 of them. Three more deaths were also reported at a Edmonton long-term care home, increasing the provincial death toll to 190.

British Columbia reported 41 newly identified patients of COVID-19, as its concerning case trend continues. The latest update marks the 19th day of the last 21 that the province has recorded at least 20 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed the 20-daily case mark since June 3. On Wednesday, officials also announced that there now 31 cases connected to Fraser Valley Packers Inc. in Abbotsford, as well as 20 positive tests on Haida Gwaii. In positive news, the outbreak at the neonatal intensive care unit at Vancouver’s St. Paul's Hospital has been declared over after an infant tested positive about two weeks ago.

July 28

There were 111 new cases of COVID-19 identified in Ontario on Tuesday. However bucking recent trends, only six of those cases were in Toronto. Ottawa region saw the most new cases with 25, and also one death related to COVID-19. Four deaths in total related to the virus were reported on Tuesday. In Quebec, there were three deaths linked to COVID-19, as well as 169 cases of the virus reported by the province. Two of the deaths were recent, while one was before July 20.

In Atlantic Canada, the news continues to be good — for now. New Brunswick health officials warned residents today to be prepared for the second wave of COVID-19, even though there have been no new cases in over a week in the province. It has been 13 days without any new COVID-19 cases in Nova Scotia. Newfoundland and Labrador remains at four active cases, three of which are related to a person who travelled from Ontario back to the province. Prince Edward Island says all of its current cases are recovered, bringing them back to no active cases.

Manitoba reported its eighth death related to COVID-19 on Tuesday. The man who was in his 70s was in southern Manitoba, and was not in hospital at the time of his death. It’s the first death related to COVID-19 in the province since May 5. There were also five new cases of the COVID-19 virus identified or probable in the province, including the most recently deceased individual.

There was also an additional COVID-19-related death in Saskatchewan today, brining the total number of deaths to 17. The deceased was in their 70s and from the southern part of the province, officials said. There were also nine new cases in the province.

Alberta announced 80 new cases in its latest 24-hour stretch, a slight decrease from the last week. There are currently 1,397 active cases in the province with more than half — 710 — in the Calgary zone. The province also announced two additional deaths. Alberta’s total case count and death toll are now 10,470 and 187.

In British Columbia, some better news was announced. For the first time since a public health emergency was declared, fewer than 10 patients are hospitalized with COVID-19, including three in intensive care. The province announced 23 new diagnoses and one death in its latest 24-hour report.

July 27

On Monday, Ontario reported 119 new cases of COVID-19 had been identified in the last 24-hour testing period, as well as one additional COVID-19-related death. The province did note, however, that some hospitals had not submitted data over the weekend, and there is likely to be a jump in the number of cases reported when they do. Quebec reported 145 new cases, but no deaths related to the virus. Today also marks the end of the two-week grace period for wearing a mask on public transit in the province; riders who do not abide by the mandatory mask policy can now be denied service.

Nova Scotia continued its positive trend, reporting no new COVID-19 cases for the last 12 days. The last case of the virus in the province was marked as resolved over the weekend, making it the only province with no active cases at present. The case count remains unchanged in New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island.

There were six new cases of COVID-19 identified in Manitoba on Monday. Officials have issued a potential exposure warning to customers and staff of Sherwood Grocery Store in Gull Lake. A person who has since tested positive went to the grocery store on July 19, 20 and 21. In Saskatchewan, 31 new cases were reported by the province on Monday. The cases are in the central (10), south, (9) Saskatoon (8) and north (3) regions.

British Columbia is reporting 81 new cases over the course of the last three days, bringing the province’s total case count to 3,500. Two more people died of COVID-19 in the province bringing the death toll to 193. In Alberta, 304 new cases were added over the last three days for a total of 10,390. Eight more people died, bringing Alberta’s death toll to 186. Dr. Deena Hinshaw put it plainly: “The curve is no longer flat in Alberta.”

July 26

Three infectious people attend ‘large party’ in Ont.’s Schomberg

York Region Public Health is urging anyone who was at a “large party” in Schomberg, Ont., on July 12 to get tested for COVID-19.

Three confirmed cases, and one probable case, have been linked to the party at 17,015 8th Concession in the Township of King. They involve people who are non-York Region residents, but health officials did not specify where they’re from.

“The three confirmed cases were infectious while at the party and cases reported that they did not practice physical distancing and did not wear a face mask or covering,” said a press release by health officials.

Anyone who was at the party from 6:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. may have been exposed to the respiratory virus. The alert was sent to assist with contact tracing efforts.

King Township Mayor Steve Pellegrini wrote in a Facebook post that he is "disappointed that individuals living in King chose to blatantly disregard the conditions that only permit a gathering of 10 people within your bubble and put our community at risk."

People who were at the party should self-monitor for symptoms until July 27 (14 days after the last possible exposure), but officials are also asking that all attendees get tested.

Throughout the pandemic, York Region has had 3,250 cases of COVID-19. That includes 240 active cases, since 2,760 patients have recovered and 250 have died as of Sunday. King has had the fewest cases (49) of the nine municipalities in York Region.

York was one of the seven regions on Friday that was allowed to move into Stage 3 of Ontario’s reopening plan. All regions are now in that stage, except for Toronto, Peel and Windsor-Essex.

On Sunday, Ontario health officials announced 137 new cases of COVID-19, along with four deaths and 119 recently recovered patients.

The latest cases were identified after health officials completed 26,144 tests for COVID-19. Among the recently identified patients, 39 are from Toronto, 26 are in Ottawa, 25 in Windsor-Essex and 12 in Peel. Fifty-seven of the cases involve people between 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. Fourteen of Ontario’s 34 public health units reported no new cases.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 38,680 cases of COVID-19 in Ontario. That includes 34,359 recovered patients and 2,763 victims. Of the 1,558 active cases that remain (up by 14), there are 87 people in hospital (down by 10), 29 in intensive care (down by one) and still 21 who require a ventilator.

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 12 active outbreaks among facilities across the province. Sixteen residents remain infected and 41 staff members (down by one).

Nova Scotia has no more active cases of COVID-19

There are no active cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia as of Sunday, according to a press release by provincial health officials.

Throughout the pandemic, the province has had 1,067 total cases. Sixty-three people have died, while 1,004 people have recovered, including one in the past 24 hours.

Nova Scotia has also now gone 11 straight days without identifying a new COVID-19 patient. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 433 tests for COVID-19.

Nova Scotia is currently the only province in Canada without an active case. Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador are not far behind with two, three and four cases, respectively.

The Northwest Territories and Nunavut also have no active cases, while Yukon has three active cases involving residents who are currently travelling outside of the territory.

Saskatchewan continues to identify cases on Hutterite colonies

Saskatchewan health officials have identified 42 new cases of COVID-19, which includes 35 patients on Hutterite colonies in the province’s south, central, Saskatoon and north regions.

The latest update is tied for the second-highest increase in daily cases the province has reported throughout the pandemic, only behind the 60 cases it announced on July 22. Forty-two cases were also reported on July 23 and 16.

Over the course of the last five days, Saskatchewan has identified 208 cases, which includes 150 patients among Hutterite communities.

Over the weekend, officials did not provide an update of how many colonies currently have active cases. As of Friday, there were 21.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,178 cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 873 people who have recovered, which is an increase of 11 in the past 24 hours.

Of the 289 active cases that remain (up by 31), there are 153 in the South region (up by 13), and 80 in the Central region (up by six). The Far North continues to have 10 active cases, after it was home to 347 patients throughout the pandemic.

Among the active patients, there remain 13 people in hospital and four in intensive care.

To date, 91,183 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 1,396 tests in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

Four cases in a week for Newfoundland and Labrador after everyone else recovers

A fourth case of COVID-10 has been identified in Newfoundland and Labrador this week.

Before the recent stretch, all of its other remaining patients had recovered by July 17.

The latest patient that was announced Sunday involves a woman in the Central Health region between 20-39 years old. The case is a close contact of an existing case, according to health officials.

Earlier this week, two other cases were identified in the Central region that were linked to each other. The first one involved a man in his 20s who returned from Ontario, and the other was a female under 20.

Another case was also identified in the Eastern Health region, involving a resident who recently returned from Southeast Asia.

The four patients identified this week are the only active cases in the province. Throughout the pandemic, there have 266 cases in Newfoundland and Labrador, which includes three fatalities and 259 recovered patients.

To date, 23,657 people have been tested in Newfoundland and Labrador, after health officials completed 296 tests in their latest 24-hour stretch. .

Quebec continues to report over 100 daily cases with upticks in and around Montreal

Quebec health officials announced 169 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, and one additional death related to the respiratory virus.

It’s now the 11th straight day that Canada’s worst-hit province has recorded over 140 cases and the 15th straight day it has recorded over 100. Before the recent stretch, Quebec had not identified more than 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 15,602 tests for COVID-19. It marks the first time that Quebec has reached its goal of 14,000 on four straight occasions.

Among the province’s 58,583 total cases of COVID-19 are 50,812 people who have recovered, up by 109 since Saturday. The death toll now stands at 5,667.

Of the 2,104 active cases in the province (up by 59), there are 197 in hospital (down by nine), which includes 10 in intensive care (down by two).

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,475 total cases (up by 50). On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,648 cases (up by 35), Laurentides region has 3,785 (up by 22), Laval has 5,988 (up by 18), and Lanaudière has 4,460 (up by 11).

Six more cases in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified six new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total case count to 394.

Through a tweet, officials said that their data about the state of COVID-19 in Manitoba will be updated Monday, which should include details about the latest cases from over the weekend.

Of the province’s 394 total cases throughout the pandemic, there have been seven victims. As of Friday, 319 people have recovered. If no one has recovered since then, it would mean that there are 68 active cases in Manitoba.

On July 14, all of Manitoba’s initial cases were marked resolved. But since then, they’ve announced 69 new cases of COVID-19.

July 25

Quebec reports one of its highest increases in weeks, more bars voluntarily close in Montreal

Hundreds of people lineup at the COVID-19 testing clinic Tuesday, July 14, 2020 in Montreal. The city has recommended that anyone who has been in a bar since July 1, 2020 to get tested. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP)
Hundreds of people lineup at the COVID-19 testing clinic Tuesday, July 14, 2020 in Montreal. The city has recommended that anyone who has been in a bar since July 1, 2020 to get tested. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP)

Quebec health officials announced 171 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, and three additional deaths related to the respiratory virus.

The increase in daily cases is its second-highest since June 12, behind Tuesday’s update of 180.

It’s also now the 10th straight day that Canada’s worst-hit province has recorded over 140 cases and the 14th straight day it has recorded over 100. Before the recent stretch, Quebec had not identified more than 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 16,440 tests for COVID-19. It marks the first time that the province has performed over 16,000 tests on back-to-back occasions.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,425 total cases, up by 85 since Friday. On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,613 cases (up by 34), Laurentides region has 3,763 (up by 18), Laval has 5,970 (up by 11), and Lanaudière has 4,449 (up by eight).

According to Aaron Derfel of the Montreal Gazette, health officials said on Monday that there were 113 people who had tested positive after visiting bars, but it’s not for certain that they all contracted the virus at drinking establishments. Of those cases, 65 are believed to have been infected at three Montreal bars. Officials are also investigating eight cases linked to a possible fourth venue.

Derfel has repeatedly called out Quebec officials over their lack of transparency, and consistency, when updating their COVID-19 stats relating to bar outbreaks.

In the meantime, Quebec officials have continued to keep bars open, which were given the green light on June 25 as part of a grand reopening announcement. Instead of closing them, Premier François Legault and health officials have pegged the rise in cases on private parties, a spike in transmission among family contacts, health-care workers, and also an increase in testing.

On July 9, Quebec did decide to enforce new restrictions on bars, such as reducing capacity to 50 per cent. It was a move that was implemented after people in Montérégie tested positive for COVID-19, following a visit to a bar in Brossard and a couple of house parties, which have led to at least 20 infections.

Even with additional measures, some Montreal bars have taken it upon themselves to close. According to the Montreal Gazette, two more bars in Montreal closed their doors Friday after realizing how difficult it was to enforce safety measures amid COVID-19.

“Due to the recent increase of COVID cases we have decided that the only possible way to protect our staff and customers is by closing the bar for the next 14 days,” said the management of the Stock Bar in a Facebook post. “It has become evident that social distancing in a bar is nearly impossible.”

Despite a recent uptick in cases in Quebec, the province will be allowing public gatherings of up to 250 people starting Aug. 3, which is up from the previous limit of 50.

Among the province’s 58,414 total cases of COVID-19 are 50,703 people who have recovered, up by 88 since Friday. Of the 2,045 active cases in the province (up by 80), there are 206 in hospital (down by 14), while there remain 12 in intensive care.

Of the three most recent victims, two died in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, while the other occurred before July 18.

138 new cases in Ontario, mainly across four public health units

Ontario reported 138 new cases, one death and 140 recently recovered patients in its latest 24-hour stretch.

The recent patients were identified after the Ministry of Health completed 25,640 tests, which is above its current seven-day average of 25,640.

Of the recently identified patients, 33 were identified in Windsor-Essex, 23 in Toronto, 28 in Ottawa and 12 in Peel. Sixteen of the 34 public health units reported no new cases on Saturday.

Windsor-Essex, which has the highest infection rate per 100,000 people in Ontario, continues to deal with agri-farm outbreaks. Of its 33 recent patients, 19 are part of that sector, while another eight cases are believed to have stemmed from community spread.

There are six agri-farm outbreaks in Windsor-Essex region, which is down by two since Friday, but health officials did identify a new manufacturing outbreak in Tecumseh, for a total of three. An outbreak is declared when there are at least two employees who test positive within a reasonable timeframe.

The Windsor-Essex region has the highest number of agri-farms that are participating in Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program, according to the region’s medical officer of health Dr. Wajid Ahmed. Because of the continued spread of the virus, along with failed testing initiatives, Premier Doug Ford said on Friday that he is looking into mandatory testing for migrant workers who arrive in Ontario.

"I tried to work — work until you can't work any longer — with the folks. I would like to look into mandatory testing,” said Ford, noting that Windsor-Essex is expecting 3,000 more migrant workers to arrive.

“We have to check the constitution. I've got to make sure I go through the lawyers. I have to make sure to call the federal government. But what's the problem to get a quick test? I've been tested a couple times.”

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 38,543 cases of COVID-19 in Ontario. That includes 34,240 people who have recovered, and 2,759 victims.

There remain 1,544 active cases (down by three since Friday). Among those patients are 97 people in hospital (down by 44), 30 in intensive care (down by one) and 21 who require a ventilator (up by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 13 active outbreaks among facilities in the province. Sixteen residents remain infected (down by one), along with 42 staff members (down by nine).

Saskatchewan identifies more cases on Hutterite colonies after record-high testing

Saskatchewan health officials have identified 37 new cases of COVID-19, which includes 29 patients on Hutterite colonies in the central and south regions of the province.

For the second straight day, health officials have completed a record-high number of tests, this time with 1,799.

Over the course of the last four days, Saskatchewan has reported 166 cases, which includes 115 patients among Hutterite communities.

On Saturday, officials did not provide an update of how many colonies currently have active cases. As of Friday, there were 21.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,136 cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 862 people who have recovered, which is an increase of 14 in the past 24 hours.

Of the 258 active cases that remain (up by 23), there are 140 in the South region (up by eight), and 74 in the Central region (up by 18). The Far North continues to have 10 active cases, after it was home to 347 patients throughout the pandemic.

Among the active patients, there are 13 people in hospital (down by one), while there remain four in intensive care.

To date, 89,787 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan.

Four new cases in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified four new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total case count to 388.

Through a tweet, officials said that their data about the state of COVID-19 in Manitoba will be updated Monday, which should include details about the latest cases.

Of the province’s 388 total cases throughout the pandemic, there have been seven victims. As of Friday, 319 people have recovered. If no one has recovered since then, it would mean that there are 62 active cases in Manitoba.

On July 14, all of Manitoba’s initial cases were marked resolved. But since then, they’ve announced 63 new cases of COVID-19.

No new cases among the Atlantic provinces

Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick did not report any cases on Saturday.

Alberta, British Columbia, Nunavut, Yukon and the Northwest Territories don’t provide updated statistics on weekends, while Prince Edward Island only does so on rare occasions.

There remain three active cases in Newfoundland and Labrador, which were all identified this week. Nova Scotia has one active case, but has not announced a new patient since July 15. New Brunswick has three active cases, while the recent one was identified July 20.

For more on the three territories, Alberta and British Columbia, please see our updates from July 24.

July 24

Windsor-Essex has Ont.’s highest infection rate, Ford looks into mandatory testing for migrant workers

Premier Doug Ford said he’s looking into mandatory testing for migrant workers as agri-farm outbreaks continue to grow in the Windsor-Essex region, and testing initiatives continue to fall short.

The announcement came after Windsor-Essex reported 53 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, 43 of which are among workers in the agri-farm sector. The region also currently has the highest infection rate per 100,000 people in Ontario.

"If someone comes into our country ... that's a privilege," said Ford during a media conference, noting that Windsor-Essex is expecting 3,000 more migrant workers to arrive.

"I tried to work — work until you can't work any longer — with the folks. I would like to look into mandatory testing. ... We have to check the constitution. I've got to make sure I go through the lawyers. I have to make sure to call the federal government. But what's the problem to get a quick test? I've been tested a couple times.”

According to the Ministry of Health, Windsor-Essex surpassed Toronto for having the highest infection rate per 100,000 people on July 18. But for months, outbreaks among agri-farm workers have continued to grow, while testing initiatives have caused confusion between officials and employers.

"It is definitely stressful, concerning and we've been dealing with this for quite some time now. For some it may be just a number as well, but it also means the time, the energy [and] the efforts that our staff are putting in are also multiplied significantly," said Windsor-Essex’s medical officer of health Dr. Wajid Ahmed on the infection rate.

As of Thursday evening, the infection rate in Windsor-Essex stands at 484 per 100,000 people. Toronto’s infection rate is 448, while the Ontario average is 257.

Credit: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
Credit: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

Windsor-Essex is currently dealing with eight agri-farm outbreaks, with six in Kingsville and two in Leamington. Throughout the pandemic, 1,002 of the region’s 2,124 cases have been in the agri-farm sector, according to the local health unit.

It’s unclear how many of the cases involve migrant workers. Over the course of the pandemic, hundreds have been infected, and two have died in Windsor-Essex.

Each year, about 20,000 migrant workers come to Ontario to work in greenhouses and on farms, many from Mexico, Guatemala and the Caribbean. They’ve been required to self-isolate upon arrival as part of the Quarantine Act, but there have been reports of them facing inadequate working and living conditions.

The Windsor-Essex region has the highest number of agri-farms that are participating in Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program, said Ahmed.

“It doesn’t hurt anyone, you come into the country, you self-isolate for two weeks, you get tested and it makes everyone feel more comfortable,” said Ford on his proposed testing initiative.

Credit: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit
Credit: Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

On Thursday, Ontario’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. David Williams, said that testing in the region was “starting back up again” after what he called confusion and a lack of communication with agri-farm employers.

As of July 6, only 19 of the 176 farms in the region had been tested after participating in an on-farm testing effort. After two weeks, that number had stayed the same. But now, Williams and Ford say the goal is to test every farm in the region, with health officials prepared to bring on-site labs to employers.

“Guys, I’m just going to cut to the chase here. If you have migrant workers, get them tested. Bottom line. Full stop. That’s it. We can’t keep playing this cat and mouse game,” said Ford to farmers.

“Sorry for being frustrated, but it’s like banging your head against a brick wall, begging and asking for it, and they’re just ignoring it.”

Ahmed said Friday that he himself won’t rule out mandatory testing on farms, but that so far farm owners have followed public health recommendations.

“I didn’t have to force anyone at this point. But in the worst case scenario, if we are in that situation because of the risk, that option will be available for me to use,” said Ahmed.

While the outbreaks have been a primary reason, Ahmed says that the spike in cases has also likely been the result of the region moving into Stage 2 of Ontario’s reopening plan. Leamington and Kingsville were the final two areas of the province to move into that stage on July 7.

Windsor-Essex is one of three regions that is still currently in Stage 2, after seven more regions made the shift on Friday for a total of 31. Ford said increased testing of migrant workers will help them contain the situation, and hopefully allow the region to move into Stage 3.

Ahmed said that the amount of cases in the region is currently “stretching” local hospital capacity in Windsor and Leamington.

“Sorry for being frustrated, but it’s like banging your head against a brick wall, begging and asking for it, and they’re just ignoring it”

Throughout Ontario, there have been 38,405 cases of COVID-19, which includes 34,100 recovered patients and 2,758 deaths.

On Friday, Ontario reported 195 cases, three deaths and 137 resolved cases in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Thirty-one of the recent cases were identified in the Toronto Public Health region, 27 in Ottawa, 18 in Peel and 13 in Chatham-Kent.

The 195 cases are the most since July 21, and the second most since June 29. The recent cases were identified after health officials completed 28,809 tests for COVID-19, which is above its seven-day average of 25,489.

After watching its active case count decrease for two straight days, it went up on Friday to 1,547. That includes 141 people in hospital (down by 13 since Thursday), 31 in intensive care (down by four) and 20 who require a ventilator (down by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 14 outbreaks among facilities in the province. There remain 17 residents who are currently infected, and 51 staff members (down by two).

Another case in Newfoundland and Labrador

A third case of COVID-19 has been identified in Newfoundland and Labrador this week.

The news comes after the last of the region’s previous cases were marked resolved on July 17.

Throughout the pandemic, the province has recorded 265 cases. Three of them now remain active.

The latest patient, a female between 20-39 years old, is in the Eastern Health region, according to a press release. The N.L. resident returned from Southeast Asia and was symptomatic while en route back to the province. She self-isolated upon her return to the province, and contact tracing is currently underway.

Officials did not indicate the flight she was on for her return to Canada.

The other two cases that were identified this week in Newfoundland and Labrador involve a male in his 20s who recently returned from Ontario. A close contact of his was also diagnosed a day later.

To date, 23,254 people have been tested in Newfoundland and Labrador, after health officials completed 270 tests in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

Alberta continues to report over 100 daily cases of COVID-19

Alberta health officials have identified 111 new cases in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, after completing 8,735 tests for COVID-19.

It marks the eighth day of the past nine that officials have announced at least 100 cases. Before the recent stretch, the province hadn’t recorded a triple-digit daily case increase since May 1.

Two more deaths were also recorded in the Edmonton region, increasing the death toll to 178. According to CBC, one of the victims was a woman in her 100s, linked to the Good Samaritan Southgate Care Centre, while the other was a woman in her 80s linked to Shepherd's Care Greenfield.

Throughout the pandemic, Alberta has had 10,086 cases of COVID-19. That includes 8,567 people who have recovered, up by 61 since Thursday.

There are now 1,341 active cases of COVID-19 across the province, which is a stark increase compared to 568 there were on July 10, according to Alberta Health Services.

The Calgary zone has 703 of the province’s active cases (up by 37), the Central zone has 167 (up by six), the South has 141 (up by seven), while the Edmonton zone still has 132, and the North has 90 (down by two).

Health officials did not hold a press conference Friday, but a day earlier the province’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said the recent numbers “need to be a wake-up call.”

Of the currently active cases, there are now 95 patients in hospital (down by 11 since Thursday), which includes 19 in intensive care (down by two). The province hit its peak with 113 overall hospital admissions on April 30, and 23 ICU admissions on May 1.

To date, 623,442 tests have been performed in Alberta.

Six more Hutterite communities in Saskatchewan with active cases

Saskatchewan health officials have identified 27 new cases of COVID-19 after completing a record-high 1,604 tests in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

Of the recent cases, 21 are from Hutterite colonies in the southwest and west-central regions of the province. Over the course of the last three days, Saskatchewan has reported 129 cases, which includes 86 on colonies.

There are now 21 Hutterite communities with active cases of COVID-19 in the southwest and west-central regions of the province, up by six since Thursday.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,099 cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 848 people who have recovered, which is an increase of 10 in the past 24 hours.

Of the 235 active cases that remain (up by 17), there are 132 in the South region (up by 21), and 56 in the Central region (down by four). The Far North has 10 active cases (down by one), after it was home to 347 patients throughout the pandemic.

Among the active patients, there are 14 people in hospital (up by one), while there remain four in intensive care.

To date, 87,988 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan.

B.C. reports one new community exposure event, another 20-case increase

Twenty-seven new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in British Columbia’s latest 24-hour stretch, including one epi-linked case, which ends its four-day run of at least 30 daily cases.

Despite the relatively lower daily update, the 27 cases are still part of a concerning trend in B.C. as the province tries to control the spread of the respiratory virus. The latest update marks the 14th day of the last 16 that the province has recorded at least 20 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed the 20-daily case mark since June 3.

Throughout the pandemic in B.C., there have been 3,419 cases of COVID-19, which includes 2,934 people who have recovered (up by 36 since Thursday). One-hundred and ninety-one people have died, including one in the past 24 hours.

There remain 294 active cases in the province, which is down by 10. Of those active cases, there are 12 people in hospital (down by four), while there remain three in intensive care.

Through a press release, health officials announced a new community outbreak in Haida Gwaii. There are 13 total confirmed cases of COVID-19 part of the outbreak, including one person who has recovered. The initial source of transmission is still being investigated.

“There also continues to be additional community exposure events throughout the province, including at Fossello’s clothing store in Kelowna,” said the press release by health officials.

On Thursday, officials announced that they’re going to add restrictions that limit the number of guests and visitors allowed at rental properties, including houseboats, rooms, Airbnbs and houses. The news came after a number of possible high exposure events, particularly in and around the Kelowna area, that have been linked to at least 70 cases.

Officials believe many of the infections in the Kelowna outbreak stemmed from two private parties at hotel resorts around Canada Day. Before the patients were notified by health officials of their infections, some of them visited Kelowna businesses. The virus continues to spread throughout the province in connection to the events, but it’s also led to at least seven public exposure warnings in B.C.’s Interior Health region.

One new case added to Yukon’s total

Yukon’s total case count increased to 14 on Friday, after officials were notified of another resident who tested positive outside of the territory.

On July 17, two other residents also tested positive while outside of the territory. The three patients remain the only active cases that belong to Yukon. None of them will be allowed to return until they are no longer infectious.

The cases will be added to Yukon’s total, since all provinces and territories have an agreement to report on the case count based on permanent residency.

Before the recent stretch, Yukon had not identified a case since April 20. All of its first 11 patients had recovered by May 1.

The last case to be identified in the Northwest Territories was on April 5. All five of its patients had recovered by April 20.

Nunavut remains the only Canadian jurisdiction to not have a confirmed positive patient. Throughout the pandemic, it has had four false positive tests.

Quebec continues to report triple-digit case increases

Quebec health officials have announced 163 new cases of COVID-19 and one new death in its latest 24-hour stretch.

It’s now the ninth straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases and the 13th straight day it has recorded over 100. Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded more than 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

Among the province’s 58,8243 total cases of COVID-19 are 50,615 people who have recovered, up by 110 since Thursday. Of the 1,965 active cases that remain (up by 52), there are 220 in hospital (down by one), which includes 12 in intensive care (down by two).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 16,256 tests for COVID-19, which is above its goal of 14,000.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,340 total cases, up by 66 since Thursday. On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,579 cases (up by 32), Lanaudière has 4,441 (up by six), Laurentides region has 3,745 (up by 18), and Laval has 5,959 (up by 17).

Nine more cases in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified nine new cases of COVID-19, increasing its total case count to 384.

The latest cases involve a girl between 10-19 years old, a man in his 60s, a man and a woman in their 40s, and a woman in her 20s from the Southern Health region.

The rest of the nine cases include two men in their 30s from the Interlake-Eastern Health region, a man in his 20s from the Prairie Mountain Health region, and a man in his 60s from the Winnipeg health region.

Health officials said on Thursday that they will no longer indicate which cases are on Hutterite communities, unless there's a risk to public health. The change comes after reports of colonies being profiled. The minister of a southwestern Manitoba colony also suggested he might file a human rights complaint against the province if health officials continued the practice.

As of Wednesday afternoon, there were 35 cases among Hutterite communities, according to CBC.

Of the province’s 384 total cases throughout the pandemic, there have been seven victims and 319 people who have recovered. There remain 58 active cases in Manitoba.

On July 14, all of Manitoba’s initial cases were marked resolved. But since then, they’ve announced 59 new cases of COVID-19.

An additional 1,640 laboratory tests were performed on Thursday, bringing the total number of tests performed since early February to 81,186.

July 23

‘This needs to be a wake-up call,’ says Alberta’s top doctor after case spike

The sharp rise in COVID-19 cases over recent weeks should act as a “wake-up call” for Alberta, said the province’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw.

On Thursday, Hinshaw announced 114 new cases of COVID-19, marking the seventh day of the past eight that officials have announced at least 100 cases. Before the recent stretch, the province hadn’t recorded a triple-digit daily case increase since May 1.

"This needs to be a wake-up call," Hinshaw said. "I am very concerned by these numbers."

As of July 23, there are 1,293 active cases of COVID-19 in the province, compared to the 590 there were on July 9, according to Alberta Health Services.

Of the currently active cases, there are now 106 patients in hospital, which includes 21 in intensive care — both near record-highs for Alberta. The province hit its peak with 113 overall hospital admissions on April 30, and 23 ICU admissions on May 1.

Of those in hospital, 24 are under the age of 60, and seven are under 40, said Hinshaw. One out of 50 cases between 30-39 has needed to be admitted to hospital. Among those 40-69, it’s one out of every 20. Of those in their 70s, one out every 10 have died, along with one of every four among those patients at least 80 years old.

"I believe the recent increase in numbers is in part reflective of the fact that fatigue has set in," Hinshaw said. "After several months of not catching the virus, it is easy to say that you feel fine, so why wash your hands? Why stay two metres apart in public? Why avoid sharing food at a barbecue?"

Hinshaw urged Albertans throughout the province to adhere to best practices, in order to have the virus better under control by early August. Cases have been spreading all throughout the province, said Hinshaw, such as in the Central zone, which has not seen high case numbers so far, but now has 33 patients in hospital, seven of them in the ICU.

Of the 1,293 active cases, the Calgary zone has 666 of them and 20 patients in hospital, while the Edmonton zone has 232 and 30, respectively, which includes 14 patients at Misericordia Community Hospital in connection to the outbreak.

“Surviving this virus can still be awful and life changing,” said Hinshaw, noting that research has shown that some patients can face a higher risk of diabetes and permanent lung damage after their infection. “For the sake of our families and communities, we need to act each day as though everyone we spend time with has the virus. Even among friends, and even if you feel perfectly healthy.”

Throughout the pandemic, Alberta has had 9,975 cases of COVID-19. That includes 176 victims, after two more were announced Thursday. Among those total cases, there are 8,506 people who have recovered from the virus, up by 70 since Tuesday.

To date, 614,692 people have been tested in Alberta, which includes the 8,222 tests that were administered in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

As Alberta continues to try and limit the spread of infection, Hinshaw wants people to continue to learn from the experiences of others who have battled the virus, and adhere to public health restrictions.

"We are all tired of COVID-19, but this virus doesn't care. We have no choice but to learn how to live with it," said Hinshaw.

"I think what we need to do right now is to make sure that people understand the guidance is not a list of suggestions that can be disregarded if they are inconvenient ... The message is clear.”

B.C. has its most active cases in months after another 30-patient increase

British Columbia health officials announced 30 new cases of COVID-19, including one epi-linked case, on Thursday.

It’s now the fifth time over the past six days that the province has recorded more than 30 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not done so since May 7.

Throughout the pandemic in B.C., there have been 3,392 cases of COVID-19, which includes 2,898 people who have recovered (up by 10 since Wednesday). One-hundred and ninety people have died, including one in the past 24 hours.

There remain 304 active cases in the province, which is the most it’s had since May 22. Of those active cases, there are 16 people in hospital (down by one), while there remain three in intensive care.

On Thursday, officials announced that they’re going to add restrictions that limits the number of guests and visitors allowed at rental properties, including houseboats, rooms, Airbnbs and houses.

The news comes after a number of possible high exposure events, particularly in and around the Kelowna area, that have been linked to at least 70 cases.

Officials believe many of the infections in the Kelowna outbreak stemmed from two private parties at hotel resorts around Canada Day. Anyone who was at Discovery Bay Resort (July 1-5) and Boyce Gyro Beach Lodge (July 1) has been asked to self-isolate.

Before the patients were notified by health officials of their infections, some of them visited Kelowna businesses, such as restaurants and bars. On July 10, Interior health issued an advisory to warn people that if they attended gatherings in the Kelowna downtown and waterfront areas from June 25 to July 6, that they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

“After observing footage from Kelowna, after observing footage of a drum circle in the Lower Mainland, I have to say to British Columbians come on, you’re better than that,” said Premier John Horgan on Thursday.

“We need bigger spaces and fewer faces, we need to make sure that we’re respecting not just our own space but other people’s space.”

One new death in Saskatchewan, cases continue to increase among Hutterite colonies

One person in their 60s in Saskatchewan’s North region has passed away after contracting COVID-19, increasing the province’s death toll to 16.

It’s the first fatality that the province has recorded since July 7.

On Thursday, the province also announced that 42 new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Saskatchewan, which is tied for its second-highest increase to its total case count throughout the pandemic.

A day earlier, the province had recorded a record-high 60 cases (48 among colonies), after registering 42 cases on July 16.

Of the most recent 42 patients that were identified in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, 17 are from colonies in the southwest and west-central regions of the province. There are currently 15 Hutterite colonies with active cases, down by two since Wednesday.

Saskatchewan officials are currently working with “communities where a significant number of cases exist to enact further restrictions on all non-essential travel into and out of their communities. This includes travel between Hutterite communities,” according to a press release.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,072 cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. That includes 838 people who have recovered, up by 13 since Wednesday.

Of the 218 active cases that remain (up by 28 since Wednesday), there are 111 in the South region (up by 18), and 60 in the Central region (up by three). The Far North has 11 active cases (up by three), after it was home to 347 patients throughout the pandemic.

Travel restrictions were previously imposed on Saskatchewan’s Far North, when it was the epicentre of the province’s situation.

Among the active patients, there remain 13 people in hospital, which includes four people in intensive care (up by one).

To date, 86,384 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 1,468 tests in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

Ontario reports zero deaths, relatively low daily case increase

Ontario reported 103 new cases of COVID-19, zero fatalities and 151 recently recovered patients in its latest 24-hour stretch.

Aside from when it reported zero deaths on July 6, the last time it announced no new fatalities was March 28.

The 103 cases are the fewest since July 17, and the second fewest since March 25.

The Ministry of Health completed 26,001 tests for COVID-19, which is above its seven-day average of 25,826. Of the cases, 24 were identified in the Toronto Public Health region, 23 in Windsor-Essex, 15 in Peel, and 14 in Ottawa. Twenty-one of the 34 public health units reported no new daily cases on Thursday.

There were 42 cases identified among people 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. There were also 35 cases among those between 40-59 years old.

Throughout the pandemic, Ontario has recorded 38,210 cases of COVID-19. That includes 33,936 recovered patients and 2,755 deaths. There remain 1,492 active cases in the province, down by 48 since Wednesday.

Among those active cases are 154 people in hospital, an increase of 36, and the most there have been since July 3. That includes 35 people in intensive care (down by two) and 21 who require a ventilator (up by two).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 15 active outbreaks among facilities around the province. There remain 17 active cases among residents (down by eight) and 53 among staff (down by 13).

No new deaths in Quebec, as it continues to report triple digits for daily cases

Quebec health officials have announced 142 new daily cases of COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch, but no new fatalities.

It’s now the eighth straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases, and the 12th straight day it has surpassed 100. Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded at least 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

The last time the province had announced zero fatalities was on June 22, and before that on March 29. The death toll now remains at 5,662.

Among the province’s 58,080 total cases of COVID-19 are 50,505 people who have recovered, up by 132 since Wednesday. Of the 1,913 active cases that remain (up by 10), there are 221 in hospital (down by 14), which includes 14 in intensive care (up by two).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 14,289 tests for COVID-19, which is above its goal of 14,000.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,274 total cases, up by 46 since Wednesday. On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,547 cases (up by 46), Lanaudière has 4,435 (up by eight), Laurentides region has 3,727 (up by 14), and Laval has 5,942 (up by 14).

One new case in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified one new case of COVID-19, involving a male in his Interlake-Eastern health region.

The latest patient increased the province’s total case count to 375. That includes seven victims and 319 recovered patients, up by one since Wednesday. There remain 49 active cases in the province, which includes one person in intensive care.

On July 14, all of Manitoba’s initial cases were marked resolved. But since then, they’ve announced 50 new cases of COVID-19.

An additional 1,262 laboratory tests were performed on Wednesday, bringing the total number of tests performed since early February to 79,546.

July 22

Saskatchewan reports its most ever daily cases, primarily among Hutterite communities

Sixty new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Saskatchewan, which marks the largest single-day increase to its case count since the start of the pandemic.

Of the recent cases, 48 are from Hutterite colonies in the southwest and west-central regions of the province. That includes 43 cases that are located in a single commune in the regional municipality of Lawtonia.

As of Wednesday, there are 17 Hutterite communities with active cases.

“Of course, [it] does not mean to suggest the risk clearly only resides in these communities ... The risk is widespread. There are sporadic cases throughout the province. But we do know that in community living settings, that is where you can get an explosive increase in cases,” said Saskatchewan’s chief medical health officer Dr. Saqib Shahab.

The province’s previous record-high for daily cases was set last week. On July 16, 42 cases were announced, with the vast majority on Hutterite colonies in the southwest and west-central part of the province.

Officials in Saskatchewan are now “working with the leaders of all communities where a significant number of cases exist to enact further restrictions on all non-essential travel into and out of their communities. This includes travel between Hutterite communities,” a press release read.

According to the Canadian Press, “Hutterites are Anabaptist religious groups who live communally in rural colonies across the Canadian and U.S. Prairies and share most personal property.”

Credit: CBC
Credit: CBC

Last week, officials said they didn’t want to enact further restrictions because of the cooperation they were receiving from Hutterite colonies. The relationship between Hutterite colonies and the Saskatchewan government was called into question in mid-June, when there was resistance to testing and the implementation of adequate COVID-19 protocols after outbreaks were declared in two Hutterite colonies inside the rural municipality of Maple Creek.

On Tuesday, the Hutterian Safety Council called on colonies in Western Canada to comply with regulations to help stave off stigmas. Cases of COVID-19 have also been identified among colonies in Manitoba and Alberta.

"The question we need to ask is, 'What are a minority of our people doing that brings suffering like this upon the rest of us?' Such situations are a golden opportunity to be a light to the world and show mainstream society that we have many great people among us," said a blog post by the Hutterian Safety Council.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 1,030 cases of COVID-19 throughout the province. That now includes 825 people who have recovered, up by 12 since Tuesday, while the death toll remains at 15.

Of the 190 active cases that remain, there are 93 are in the South region and 57 in the Central region of the province. The Far North now only has eight active cases, after it was home to 344 patients throughout the pandemic.

Travel restrictions were previously imposed on Saskatchewan’s Far North, when it was the epicentre of the province’s situation.

Among the active patients, there are 13 people in hospital, which includes three people in intensive care.

To date, 84,916 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan.

Ontario’s active case count decreases for the first time in almost a week

Ontario reported 165 new cases, two deaths and 207 recoveries in its latest 24-hour stretch.

There are now 1,540 active cases in the province, a decrease of 44 since Tuesday.

The update comes after five straight days of watching Ontario’s active case count increase. On Tuesday, the province recorded 203 new cases, which marked the first time it had surpassed 200 cases since June 29.

Of the 165 newly-identified cases, 39 of them were reported in Windsor-Essex’s public health unit, 33 in Ottawa, 28 in Toronto and 25 in Peel. Sixty-six of the cases were among people 20-39 years old, which is the most of any age group.

The latest cases were identified after health officials completed 23,990 tests for COVID-19, which is below its current seven-day average of 25,896.

Throughout the pandemic, Ontario has identified 38,107 cases of COVID-19. That includes 33,812 recovered patients and 2,755 victims.

Of the 1,540 active cases that remain, there are 128 people in hospital (up by eight since Tuesday), which includes 37 in intensive care (up by one) and 19 people who require a ventilator (down by four).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 16 outbreaks among facilities around the province. Twenty-five residents are infected (down by seven), while there remain 66 active cases among staff members.

B.C.’s Kelowna outbreak grows worse, health officials impose new restrictions for bars, clubs

Thirty-four new cases of COVID-19 were identified in British Columbia, as officials continue to identify patients linked to the Kelowna outbreak.

It’s now the fourth time over the past five days that the province has recorded more than 30 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not done so since May 7.

"The B.C. COVID-19 curve is trending in a direction we don't want it to go — upwards," said provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

There are now over 70 cases linked to community exposures in and around the Kelowna area, up from the 35 cases that there were as of Friday. Henry also said that there are now close to 1,000 people, spread throughout the province, that are in self-isolation after being in close contact with someone who tested positive in relation to the Kelowna outbreak.

“This means people are unable to work, see friends, enjoy the summer," said Henry.

Because of the recent spike in cases, Henry and health minister Adrian Dix announced Wednesday that new measures will be brought in for bars and nightclubs around the province.

All patrons will need to remain seated at their designated seat, alcohol self-service won’t be available, and dance floors will be closed. Owners must also enforce measures that will help reduce lineups and gatherings at pressure points in venues.

Officials believe many of the infections in the Kelowna outbreak stemmed from two private parties at hotel resorts around Canada Day. Anyone who was at Discovery Bay Resort (July 1-5) and Boyce Gyro Beach Lodge (July 1) has been asked to self-isolate.

Before the patients were notified by health officials of their infections, some of them visited Kelowna businesses, such as restaurants and bars. On July 10, Interior health issued an advisory to warn people that if they attended gatherings in the Kelowna downtown and waterfront areas from June 25 to July 6, that they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

“Contact tracing three or four people is much faster and easier than trying to reach 20 or 30 people. With each additional person, transmission is greater and more people are at risk, which means more people need to self-isolate and limit contact with others,” said a press release by Henry and Dix.

As of Wednesday, there are have now been 3,362 cases of COVID-19 in British Columbia. That includes 2,888 people who have recovered (up by 15 since Tuesday), while there remain 189 victims.

Among the province’s 285 active cases, there are 17 people in hospital (up by two), which includes three in intensive care.

Cases among Hutterite colonies in Manitoba continue to increase

Eight new cases of COVID-19 were identified in Manitoba, which includes seven on Hutterite colonies.

There have now been 374 cases of COVID-19 throughout the pandemic, which includes 318 recovered patients and seven victims in Manitoba. There are now 49 active cases in the province.

Cases have been appearing in Hutterite colonies in Manitoba since last week. Saskatchewan and Alberta have also reported cases involving colonies.

In Manitoba, an additional 722 laboratory tests were performed on Tuesday, bringing the total number of tests performed since early February to 78,283.

Alberta continues to report above 100 cases of COVID-19

Health officials in Alberta have identified 133 new cases of COVID-19 after completing 8,148 tests.

Over the course of the past seven days, Alberta has recorded at least 100 daily cases of COVID-19 on six different occasions. Before the recent stretch, it had not done so since May 1.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 9,861 cases in the province. That includes 8,436 people who have recovered (up by 73 since Tuesday). The death toll now stands at 174, after two more people died in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch.

According to CBC, the fatalities are both linked to an outbreak at the Good Samaritan Southgate Care Centre in Edmonton.

Across the province, there are now 1,251 active cases of COVID-19 (up by 58 since Tuesday). The Calgary zone has 635 of those cases (up by 46), and Edmonton has 236 (up by three). There are 102 people in hospital (up by nine), which includes 18 in intensive care (up by two).

To date, health officials have completed 606,465 tests for COVID-19.

Two cases in Newfoundland and Labrador in as many days

For the second straight day, Newfoundland and Labrador has recorded a new case of COVID-19.

The news comes after the last of the region’s previous cases were marked resolved on Friday.

Throughout the pandemic, the province has recorded 264 cases. Only two of them now remain active, since three people have died and 259 have recovered.

The latest patient, a female under the age of 20, is a close contact of the patient that was identified Tuesday, which involves a male between 20-29 years old who recently returned from Ontario. Both cases are in the Central Health region.

Quebec continues to stay above 100 daily cases

Quebec health officials have announced 142 new daily cases of COVID-19 in its latest 24-hour stretch.

It’s now the seventh straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases, and the 11th straight day it has surpassed 100.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded at least 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

On Wednesday, the province also announced four fatalities, increasing the death toll related to COVID-19 to 5,662.

Among the province’s 57,938 total cases throughout the pandemic are 50,373 people who have recovered, up by 75 since Tuesday. Of the 1,903 active cases that remain, there are 235 people in hospital (down by 12), which includes 16 in intensive care (up by one).

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 11,760 tests for COVID-19, which is below its goal of 14,000.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,228 total cases, up by 61 since Tuesday. On July 11, officials asked anyone who’s been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward.

The spread of COVID-19 also continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,462 cases (up by 39), Lanaudière has 4,427 (up by 15), Laurentides region has 3,713 (up by 13), and Laval has 5,904 (up by eight).

July 21

New cases of COVID-19 continued to be reported across Canada on Tuesday, with a disturbing trend of young people being the majority of those cases.

There were 203 new cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, with the majority being people under the age of 39. Peel, Ottawa and Windsor-Essex regions saw increases of 57, 43 and 24 new cases, respectively. Peel health officials say that the jump in cases can be attributed to a backlog recently cleared in their testing system, and the real increase is actually 22 from the last 24 hours. There were also 30 new cases reported in Toronto.

Quebec saw 180 new cases in the province, and one death linked to COVID-19. One of the new cases was a child attending a day camp in the Gatineau region. Slightly more than half of the total new cases reported were in the Montreal region.

In Atlantic Canada, one new case emerged. Newfoundland and Labrador reported a travel-related case involving a man in his 20s who had recently returned from Ontario. Prince Edward Island saw no new cases, nor did Nova Scotia, which has had no new cases for six days in a row. New Brunswick had no new reported cases, either.

In Manitoba, 12 new cases were identified, and the province discussed plans to open casinos and movie theatres as soon as Saturday. Saskatchewan identified eight new cases of the respiratory virus, however the province is moving forward with easing more restrictions this week, including allowing door-to-door solicitors and the resumption of yard and garage sales.

In a statement, British Columbia announced 30 new cases and a warning to residents that the province’s curve is “trending upwards.” There are 266 active cases in B.C. now. Alberta is sounding the alarm after days of “very concerning” case reports. On Tuesday, the province announced 141 new cases and two deaths. There are currently 1,193 active cases in the province.

July 20

On Monday, Canada saw some regions report slightly higher daily cases than previous weeks, but deaths related to COVID-19 remained quite low.

Ontario reported 135 new cases of the virus, and one additional virus-related death. The province also announced it would have more regions enter Stage 3, however Toronto, Peel and Windsor-Essex regions will remain in Stage 2 at this time. Quebec reported two deaths related to the virus, as well as 150 newly-reported cases from the last 24 hours. While Quebec had been below the 100 new cases mark previously, the last seven days has all seen the number of new cases between 109 and 166.

Most of Atlantic Canada remained flat and saw no new cases in any of the provinces, however New Brunswick had one newly-reported case of COVID-19 linked to a recent travel case through close contact. Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island have all been without a new case for five days, ten days and six days respectively.

The Haida Nation has also reported its first case of COVID-19, as a resident of Haida Gwaii self-reported a positive COVID-19 test result on Friday. The residents of the island community off the north coast of B.C. had expressed concern earlier when two fishing lodges in the islands reopened recently, despite travel to the islands remaining restricted.

Manitoba saw 18 new cases reported over the weekend leading into Monday, ten of which are tied to three Hutterite communities in the province. There are currently 29 active cases in Manitoba, 20 of which are in those communities. Saskatchewan reported 19 new cases in the province, with patients located in the central, Saskatoon, north and south regions.

British Columbia is sounding the alarm after a surge in cases were reported over the weekend. B.C. saw 102 new cases since Friday afternoon’s announcement, bringing the province’s total to 3,000, including 253 that are still active cases. Alberta reported 368 new cases over the weekend (165 on Friday; 106 on Saturday; and 97 on Sunday). The province now has 1,109 active cases.

July 19

Quebec reports its most cases in a month

Quebec health officials have announced 166 new daily cases of COVID-19, the most since June 19.

It’s now the fourth straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases, and the eighth straight day it has surpassed 100.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded at least 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

The increase in cases comes as Quebec continues to process tests, after officials on July 11 asked anyone who’s been to a Montreal bar since Canada Day to get tested for COVID-19.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 15,864 tests for COVID-19, which is its highest output since the start of the pandemic, and above its goal of 14,000.

As of Wednesday evening, at least 45 cases have been linked to 14 venues. Montreal public health officials have yet to provide updated statistics, a move that has drawn criticism over its lack of transparency.

On Friday, Premier François Legault said that Quebec’s bars will remain open, after they were given the green light on June 25. Officials instead believe that private gatherings are the root of the problem as cases continue to rise in the province.

On July 9, Quebec decided to enforce new restrictions on bars. It was a move that was implemented after people in Montérégie tested positive for COVID-19, following a visit to a bar in Brossard and a couple of house parties, which have led to at least 20 infections.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 28,000 total cases, up by 49 since Saturday. But the spread of COVID-19 continues to gain pace in surrounding areas of the city, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,395 cases (up by 52), Lanaudière has 4,381 (up by 26), Laurentides region has 3,676 (up by 10), and Laval has 5,904 (up by five).

On Sunday, the province also announced one fatality, increasing the death toll to 5,655.

Among the province’s 57,466 total cases throughout the pandemic are 50,050 people who have recovered, up by 23 since Saturday. Of the 1,761 active cases that remain, there are 251 people in hospital (up by three), which includes 18 in intensive care (up by three).

Ontario reports worst two-day stretch this month, cases rise in Windsor-Essex’s agri-farm sector

Ontario reported 164 new cases, three deaths and 113 resolved cases in its latest 24-hour stretch.

The announcement comes a day after the province recorded 166 cases, for a two-day total of 330. It’s the most the province has recorded in a two-day stretch since June 29-30, when it logged 414 cases.

Of the recently identified 164 cases, 80 of them were diagnosed in public health units part of the Greater Toronto Area and 37 in Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. Twenty-eight of Ontario’s 34 public health units reported five or fewer cases, while 15 reported no new patients at all.

The latest cases were identified after labs administered 26,890 tests for COVID-19, which is above Ontario’s seven-day average of 24,972.

The agri-farm sector in Windsor-Essex continues to produce new cases of COVID-19, with four outbreaks in Kingsville and two in Leamington. Of the 38 patients identified in the region’s latest 24-hour stretch, 19 are part of the agri-farm sector. Nine are the result of community spread, which has been gaining pace in the region.

The latest update comes a day after the region recorded 47 cases, including 41 in the agri-farm sector. Throughout the pandemic, Windsor-Essex has had 1,964 confirmed cases, with 915 of them in the agri-farm sector, according to local health officials.

Many of the infections have been among migrant workers, who have been subject to inadequate living and working conditions. Two of the three migrant workers who have died in Ontario throughout the COVID-19 pandemic were in the Windsor-Essex region.

Windsor-Essex’s infection rate of 458.8 per 100,000 people is the highest in Ontario, according to the Ministry of Health. Toronto, where there have been 13,876 cases as of Sunday, has the second-highest with 444.7, while Ontario’s average stands at 253.

Windsor-Essex was one of 10 regions that was not allowed to enter Stage 3 of Ontario’s reopening plan on Friday. Kingsville and Leamington were the final two areas to make the transition to Stage 2 on July 7.

Throughout the pandemic, Ontario has reported 37,604 cases of COVID-19. That includes 33,407 recovered patients and 2,751 victims. For the second straight day, the province’s active case count has risen, this time to 2,751.

Among those active patients are 101 people in hospital (down by four since Saturday), which includes 34 in intensive care (up by one) and 23 who require a ventilator (up by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 17 outbreaks among facilities around the province. As of Sunday, 40 residents are infected (up by one), and 60 staff members (down by three).

Manitoba reports 18 cases in a week, just as everyone else recovers

Health officials in Manitoba have identified six new cases of COVID-19, but have not provided additional details on the individuals.

Health officials said in a tweet that their online data will be updated on Monday, which will include more information.

Throughout this week, Manitoba has identified 18 cases of COVID-19. All of its other patients had recovered by July 14 or died due to the respiratory virus. It had also gone 13 straight days without reporting a new COVID-19 patient.

According to CBC, seven of Manitoba's most recent cases have been on at least two Hutterite colonies, which includes five new cases on a colony in the Interlake-Eastern Health region.

Throughout the pandemic, Manitoba has had 343 cases of COVID-19. That includes seven people who have passed away.

As of Friday, at least 318 people have recovered in Manitoba after contracting the respiratory virus. If no one has recovered since then, it would mean that there are 18 active cases in the province.

One new case in New Brunswick

New Brunswick has reported one new case of COVID-19, which marks its first since July 15.

The latest case involves an individual between 50-59 years old in the Fredericton region. The patient is a close contact of a recently confirmed travel-related case, and is currently self-isolating.

Throughout the pandemic, New Brunswick has identified 169 cases after completing 48,808 tests. Only four of them remain active, since two people have died after contracting the respiratory virus, and 163 have recovered as of Sunday.

Throughout the rest of the Atlantic provinces, there remain no active cases in Newfoundland and Labrador, after all of its remaining cases were marked resolved on Friday. Nova Scotia has two active cases, but has not identified a new patient for a fourth straight day.

Prince Edward Island did not provide an update this weekend, but on Friday it announced that it had nine active cases, after its latest was identified July 14.

Alberta, British Columbia, Nunavut, Yukon and the Northwest Territories also don’t provide updated statistics on weekends.

Five new cases in Saskatchewan

Five new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Saskatchewan’s latest 24-hour stretch, increasing the total case count to 943.

For the second straight day, the province has removed cases that were announced on July 11 (three cases today, and one Saturday).

Of the recently identified cases, one is in the Saskatoon region and the other four are in the Central region of the province.

Among Saskatchewan’s 943 total cases are 799 people who have recovered, up by one since Saturday.

Of the 129 active cases that remain, 44 of them are in the South and 56 are in the Central region of the province. There are now only four active cases in the Far North, which is home to 340 of Saskatchewan’s cases throughout the pandemic.

Twelve people are currently in hospital, down by four since Saturday, which includes three patients in intensive care (up by one).

To date, 81,624 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 1,295 tests in their latest 24-hour stretch.

For the past two weekends, health officials in Saskatchewan did not provide weekend updates, since the spread of COVID-19 had slowed down. But over the course of this week, the province has seen an uptick.

On Thursday, Saskatchewan recorded a record-high 42 cases, with the vast majority of those cases among Hutterite communities in southwest and west central Saskatchewan. Health officials have not held a press conference since Friday to provide an update or to indicate how many of the recent cases are among colonies.

July 18

Cases continue to rise in Ontario’s Windsor-Essex

Ontario has reported 166 new cases, two fatalities and 132 resolved cases in its latest 24-hour stretch.

The 166 patients are the most the Ministry of Health has reported since July 9. They were identified after 28,849 tests for COVID-19 were completed, which is above its current seven-day average of 24,806.

Sixty-eight of those patients were identified in public health units in the Greater Toronto Area. Forty-seven of the patients were diagnosed in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, which continues to face agri-farm outbreaks with 41 of the recent cases in that sector.

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has now surpassed the Toronto Public Health Unit for the highest infection rate in Ontario, according to the Ministry of Health. They are now 450.1 cases per 100,000 people in Windsor-Essex, compared to 443.9 in Toronto, while the average rate in Ontario is 251.9.

Out of Windsor-Essex’s 1,926 cases throughout the pandemic, 855 of them are part of the agri-farm sector, according to local health authorities.

Many of the infections are among migrant workers, who have been subject to inadequate living and working conditions. Two of the three migrant workers who have died in Ontario throughout the COVID-19 pandemic were in the Windsor-Essex region.

As of Saturday, there are six agriculture workplace outbreaks — four in Kingsville, two in Leamington — in the region. On July 7, Kingsville and Leamington in Essex County were the final two areas to make the transition to Stage 2 of Ontario’s reopening plan.

According to the Windsor Star, there’s also recently been an increase in community spread in Windsor-Essex. Medical officer of health Dr. Wajid Ahmed attributed the uptick to the area’s denser population, as well as the increase in people who have been gathering at businesses.

Windsor-Essex was one of 10 regions that was not allowed to enter Stage 3 of Ontario’s reopening plan on Friday.

Throughout the pandemic in Ontario, there have been 37,440 cases of COVID-19, which includes 33,294 people who have recovered and 2,748 victims. There remain 1,398 active cases, which is up by 32 since Friday.

Of the active cases, there are 105 people in hospital (down by three), which includes 33 in intensive care (up by three) and 22 who require a ventilator (up by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 17 active outbreaks around the province in facilities. Thirty-nine active cases remain among residents (down by three) and there are 63 among staff (up by one).

Quebec reports most cases in almost a month

People wear face masks as they wait to enter a department store in Montreal, Saturday, July 18, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. The wearing of masks or protective face coverings is mandatory in Quebec as of today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
People wear face masks as they wait to enter a department store in Montreal, Saturday, July 18, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. The wearing of masks or protective face coverings is mandatory in Quebec as of today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Quebec health officials have announced 158 new daily cases of COVID-19, the most since June 19.

It’s now the third straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases, and the seventh straight day it has surpassed 100.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded at least 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

The increase in cases comes as Quebec continues to process tests after officials on July 11, asked anyone who’s been to a Montreal bar since Canada Day to get tested for COVID-19. As of Wednesday evening, at least 45 cases have been linked to 14 venues. Montreal public health officials have yet to provide updated statistics.

On Friday, Premier François Legault said that Quebec’s bars will remain open, after they were given the green light on June 25.

“The problem isn’t in bars, it’s in private gatherings,” Legault said, noting that private parties and barbecues are a bigger cause of concern. Under Quebec rules, both indoor and outdoor gathering must be limited to a maximum of 10 people.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 14,448 tests for COVID-19, which is its highest output since May 27, and above its goal of 14,000.

On Saturday, the province also announced seven fatalities. Two of them occurred in its latest 24-hour stretch, while the other five occurred before July 10, increasing the death toll to 5,654.

Among the province’s 57,300 total cases throughout the pandemic are 50,027 people who have recovered, up by 88 since Friday. Of the 1,619 active cases that remain, there are 248 people in hospital (down by 12), which includes 15 in intensive care (down by one)

Montreal remains the epicentre with 27,951 total cases, up by 88 since Friday. But the spread of COVID-19 continues to gain pace in other parts of the province, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,343 cases (up by 32), Lanaudière has 4,355 (up by 10), Laurentides region has 3,666 (up by 15), and Laval has 5,899 (up by four).

On Saturday, Quebec also became the first province in Canada to require mask-wearing in all indoor public places.

No new cases among the Atlantic provinces

Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick did not report any cases on Saturday.

Alberta, British Columbia, Nunavut, Yukon and the Northwest Territories don’t provide updated statistics on weekends, while Prince Edward Island only does so on rare occasions.

There remain no active cases in Newfoundland and Labrador, after all of its remaining cases were marked resolved on Friday. Nova Scotia has two active cases, but has not identified a new patient for a third straight day. New Brunswick has three active cases, while the last one was identified July 15.

On Friday, Yukon announced two cases involving residents who were diagnosed outside of the province. They will return to the territory after they recover.

Two presumptive cases of COVID-19 were identified in Nunavut on July 15, but officials are still awaiting further additional test results to confirm the diagnoses. Two other cases in Nunavut have already turned out to be false positives throughout the pandemic, as it remains the only Canadian jurisdiction to not have a confirmed positive patient.

The last case to be identified in the Northwest Territories was on April 5. All five of its patients had recovered by April 20.

For more on the status of COVID-19 in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, please read our updates from July 17.

One new case in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified one new case of COVID-19, but have not provided additional details on the individual.

It marks the 12th patient that Manitoba recorded this week. All of its other patients had recovered by July 14 or died due to the respiratory virus.

Throughout the pandemic, Manitoba has had 337 cases of COVID-19. That includes seven people who have passed away. Health officials said in a tweet that their online data will be updated on Monday.

As of Friday, at least 318 people have recovered in Manitoba after contracting the respiratory virus. If no one has recovered since then, it would mean that there are 12 active cases in the province.

Six new patients identified in Saskatchewan

Six new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Saskatchewan’s latest 24-hour stretch, increasing the total case count to 941.

“One case reported July 11 as positive in the South has been updated to a negative result and removed from the total cases,” according to a press release by health officials.

Of the recently identified cases, three are in the South, while there’s one each in the North, Central and Saskatoon regions.

Among the province’s 941 total cases are 798 people who have recovered, up by five since Friday.

Of the 128 active cases that remain, 47 of them are in the South and 52 are in the Central region of the province. There are now only four active cases in the Far North, which is home to 340 of Saskatchewan’s cases throughout the pandemic.

Eight people are currently in hospital, down by four since Friday, which includes two patients in intensive care (up by one).

To date, 80,329 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 1,339 tests in their latest 24-hour stretch.

For the past two weekends, health officials in Saskatchewan did not provide weekend updates, since the spread of COVID-19 had slowed down. But over the course of this week, the province has seen an uptick.

On Thursday, Saskatchewan recorded a record-high 42 cases, with the vast majority of those cases among Hutterite communities in Southwest and West Central Saskatchewan. Health officials did not hold a press conference Friday or Saturday to provide an update or to indicate how many of the recent cases are among colonies.

July 17

Dr. Bonnie Henry, Dr. Howard Njoo express concern over latest COVID-19 trends

British Columbia health officials have identified 28 new daily cases of COVID-19 — the most since May 8 — as COVID-19 infections linked to parties in Kelowna continue to increase.

Over the last nine days, the province has recorded at least 20 cases on eight different occasions. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed that mark since June 3.

Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.'s provincial health officer, held a last-minute press conference on Friday to discuss the recent news and trends. Eight more cases, for a total of 35, have now been linked to events that occured in Kelowna’s waterfront district between June 25 and July 9.

"This is one of the more concerning issues to us," Henry said. "We recognize that there have been a number of events that have happened there and we need people to start thinking about how we can socialize safely over the coming weeks."

Henry said they expect more cases to appear in the upcoming days, since they’re now in the “third-generation” of cases as the virus continues to spread between contacts. Hundreds of people are currently being tracked to see if they’ll develop symptoms.

Officials believe many of the infections stemmed from two private parties at hotel resorts around Canada Day. Anyone who was at Discovery Bay Resort (July 1-5) and Boyce Gyro Beach Lodge (July 1) has been asked to self-isolate.

Before the patients were notified by health officials of their infections, some of them visited Kelowna businesses, such as restaurants and bars. On July 10, Interior health issued an advisory to warn people that if they attended gatherings in the Kelowna downtown and waterfront areas from June 25 to July 6, that they may been exposed to COVID-19.

"People may not recognize that they are ill or that they have mild symptoms but they can still spread the virus to others," said Henry. "Make sure that we don’t let COVID steal our summer.

“Many new cases are individuals in their 20s and 30s and transmission is directly connected to social events. You need to be aware that while the severity of illness for those in their 20s and 30s is typically much less, your ability to spread to others is just as high.”

Health Minister Adrian Dix said earlier this week that the cases involve people who live in three regions of the province, including the Interior, Fraser and Vancouver Coastal Health regions. The Kelowna cluster has also been linked to the Krazy Cherry fruit farm in Okanagan, where there are now four cases of COVID-19.

Dix said some of the people gathering in Kelowna did not know each other before the hotel party.

On Friday, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer Dr. Howard Njoo said there is “some cause for concern” about the recent increase in cases nationwide.

Over the past week, an average of 350 new cases per day have been identified, compared to a daily average of 300 earlier in the month. On Thursday, over 437 new COVID-19 cases were reported, followed by 405 on Friday.

“This coincides with increasing reports of individuals contacting COVID-19 at parties, nightclubs and bars, as well as increasing rates of transmission among young Canadians in some jurisdictions across the country,” Njoo said at a press conference on Friday.

On July 11, Montreal public health officials asked anyone who has been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward. At the time, there were eight cases linked to five bars. There are now 45 cases linked to at least 14 bars, as of an update Wednesday evening.

The province has since added restrictions to bars. It’s a move that was implemented after people in Montérégie tested positive for COVID-19, following a visit to a bar in Brossard and a couple of house parties, which have led to at least 20 infections.

Across other parts of Canada, such as in Ontario and Alberta, people under the age of 40 continue to make up the majority of daily cases. Health experts have said that increased social gatherings, where physical distancing rules have not been ignored, have been behind some of the spikes.

“I was young once and I can remember when I was younger I thought I was invincible, you can do anything, don’t worry about it, it will be OK,” said Njoo. “I would tell young people, including my own kids...you need to also take some personal responsibility, it’s not only to protect your health but to protect all others in our society.”

No more active cases in Newfoundland and Labrador

Health officials in Newfoundland and Labrador have announced the province now has no active cases of COVID-19.

All of its 262 cases have been resolved; 259 people have recovered, while three have died.

It’s the second time throughout the pandemic that all of its cases have been marked resolved.

On July 10, the province announced one new case of COVID-19, involving a man in his 50s who had recently returned from the United States. The news came after 43 days of no new cases, a stretch in which all of its remaining patients had also recovered by June 18.

Newfoundland and Labrador is now the only province with no active cases of COVID-19.

The Atlantic bubble is still in place among Atlantic provinces, allowing residents to travel between jurisdictions without having to self-isolate. As of Friday, Nova Scotia has two active cases out of 1,067 total patients since the pandemic’s start. Prince Edward Island currently has nine (and 36 COVID-19 diagnoses in total), while New Brunswick has three (of 168 cases). None of the Atlantic provinces announced any new cases Friday.

Quebec adds thousands of recoveries with new guidelines, Canada drops to below 5,000 active cases

On Friday, Quebec health officials started to implement new guidelines for defining recoveries, which is in line with what other provinces have followed. Instead of requiring a negative test to declare a recovery, cases will now be marked resolved 14 to 28 days after the patient was initially diagnosed. The duration is based on factors such as if they’re immunocompromised or if they’re at least 80 years old.

Because of the revision, Quebec added 23,686 recovered patients to its tally of 49,939 on Friday. They are among the province’s 57,142 cases throughout the pandemic. The death toll is 5,647, which is up by one since Thursday, while there now remain 1,556 active cases in Quebec.

As of 11 a.m. on Friday, there have been 109,518 cases of COVID-19 in Canada, which includes 8,837 deaths and 96,623 recoveries. There are 4,058 active cases nationwide, compared to the 27,603 active cases there were a day earlier (down by 85 per cent).

On Friday, Quebec health officials announced 141 new cases of COVID-19, marking the second straight day that it has recorded over 140 cases, and the sixth straight day it has surpassed 100.

Before the recent stretch, it had not recorded at least 140 cases since June 25. Between June 26 and July 11, it stayed below 100 daily cases except on two occasions.

On Friday, Premier François Legault said that Quebec won’t close bars, a day after officials said they were considering the move. He said of the 141 recently identified cases, 97 of them involve health-care workers.

“The problem isn’t in bars, it’s in private gatherings,” Legault said, noting that private parties and barbecues are a bigger cause of concern. Under Quebec rules, both indoor and outdoor gathering must be limited to a maximum of 10 people.

On July 11, Quebec officials asked anyone who’s been to a Montreal bar since Canada Day to get tested for COVID-19. As of Wednesday evening, at least 45 cases have been linked to 14 venues.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 14,344 tests for COVID-19, which is its highest output since May 27, and above its goal of 14,000.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 27,863 total cases, up by 76 since Thursday. But the spread of COVID-19 continues to gain pace in other parts of the province, in some cases in connection to bars and parties. The Montérégie region has 8,311 cases (up by 33), Lanaudière has 4,345 (up by 12), Laurentides region has 3,651 (up by seven), Laval has 5,895 (up by nine).

Of the 1,556 active cases that remain in Quebec, there are 260 people in hospital (down by 17) and 16 in intensive care (down by four).

Infant tests positive in B.C. hospital outbreak

Among British Columbia’s 28 latest cases is an infant who is linked to an outbreak at a Vancouver hospital, St. Paul’s, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Dr. Bonnie Henry said the infant is not exhibiting symptoms at the moment.

Vancouver Coastal Health is still investigating how the virus was introduced in the setting. Henry could not share now people have contracted the virus, but that “there's a very small number, so less than 10 people, who were in the exposed group."

The maternity ward is unaffected and remains operational, but the NICU has been shut down, while patients have been transferred to a temporary satellite unit. The NICU provides 24-hour care for premature babies and other newborns with serious health problems.

Among the latest cases is also a worker from Alberta at BC Hydro's Site C dam project in northern B.C.

The latest update increases the province’s total case count to 3,198. That includes 2,802 people who have recovered, up by 13 since Thursday.

There are now 207 active cases in the province, which includes 18 people in hospital (up by three), and two in intensive care (down by one). No new deaths were recorded, as the death toll remains at 189.

Alberta once again reports a triple-digit case increase

Alberta health officials have identified 105 new cases of COVID-19, which marks the second straight day that it has recorded triple-digits. Before the recent stretch it had surpassed 100 daily cases since May 1.

It’s also the sixth straight day that the province has recorded more than 80 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not eclipsed the 80-case mark since May 10.

“One of the most significant areas of risk are social gatherings, especially where people are not following social distancing,” said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer earlier this week. “I’m concerned about reports of people that feel that public health measures are no longer important.”

The most recent cases were identified after Alberta health officials completed 6,479 tests for COVID-19, for a total of 566,972.

Among the province’s 9,219 total cases throughout the pandemic are 8,193 patients who have recovered, up by 51 since Thursday.

Two new deaths were also reported, involving a woman in her 80s linked to the Father Lacombe Nursing Home outbreak in Calgary and a woman in her 90s linked to the Good Samaritan Southgate Care Centre outbreak in Edmonton. The death toll now stands at 167.

There are now 859 active cases in the province, up by 52. The Calgary zone is home to 385 of those active cases (up by 23) and the Edmonton zone has 213 (down by four). Sixty-eight people are in hospital (down by one), which includes 13 in intensive care (up by five).

Yukon records its first case since April

Two Yukon residents have tested positive for COVID-19 while travelling in another province, according to a press release by Dr. Catherine Elliott, the territory's acting chief medical officer of health.

The individuals acquired the virus outside Yukon and currently have mild symptoms as they recover in self-isolation. They will return to the territory once they are no longer infectious.

Elliott did not specify which province the two travellers are in.

“We were anticipating that we would have cases among Yukoners and these two cases do not change the risk for Yukon. These persons were not infectious while in Yukon,” Elliott said.

The cases will be added to Yukon’s total, since all provinces and territories have an agreement to report on the case count based on permanent residency.

It marks the first case to be added to Yukon’s case count since April 20. All of its first 11 patients had recovered by May 1.

Two presumptive cases of COVID-19 were identified in Nunavut on July 15, but officials are still awaiting further additional test results to confirm the diagnoses. Two other cases in Nunavut have already turned out to be false positives throughout the pandemic, as it remains the only Canadian jurisdiction to not have a confirmed positive patient.

The last case to be identified in the Northwest Territories was on April 5. All five of its patients had recovered by April 20.

Ontario records its second highest testing output, sees encouraging results

Ontario recorded 111 more cases, nine fatalities and 101 recoveries in its latest 24-hour stretch.

It’s the fourth time in the past month that Ontario has recorded 111 new cases, which is the second-lowest mark since March 25. The smallest increase was recorded Wednesday (102).

The latest patients were identified after Ontario completed 31,163 tests for COVID-19, which is its second highest testing output, leading to a 0.4 per cent positive test rate.

Of the recently identified 111 patients, 53 of them were between 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. Fifty-nine of the cases were identified in the Greater Toronto Area, and 21 in the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, which has faced outbreaks among farm and migrant workers for months.

Throughout the pandemic, Ontario has recorded 37,274 cases of COVID-19. That includes 33,162 people who have recovered, and 2,746 victims.

There are now 1,366 active cases in Ontario, up by one since Thursday. Among those patients are 108 people in hospital (up by two), which includes 30 in intensive care (up by three) and 21 who require a ventilator (up by one).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 18 active outbreaks across the province in facilities. There remain 36 active cases among residents (down by nine), while there remain 62 among staff.

Five cases among a Hutterite colony in Manitoba

Health officials in Manitoba have identified five new cases of COVID-19 on a Hutterite colony in the Interlake-Eastern health region.

The latest cases were announced through a press release. Health officials said an investigation is ongoing. The reason for transmission has not yet been announced. The five cases involve two men (one in his 60s, one in his 30s) and three women (in their 60s, 30s and 20s).

They join the other six cases that have been identified this week, for a total of 11, which are the only active cases of COVID-19 in the province. Throughout the pandemic, 336 cases of the respiratory virus have been diagnosed in Manitoba: 318 have recovered so far and seven have died.

Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba's chief public health officer, wouldn’t confirm Thursday if any of the six people who tested positive in recent days are from Hutterite colonies.

Cases among Hutterites communities have also been identified in Saskatchewan, which reported a record-high 42 cases on Thursday, with the vast majority among Hutterites.

Saskatchewan identifies 13 new cases of COVID-19

Thirteen new cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Saskatchewan’s latest 24-hour stretch, increasing the total case count to 936.

The news comes a day after the province recorded a record-high 42 cases, with the vast majority of those cases among Hutterite communities in southwest and west central Saskatchewan. Health officials did not hold a press conference Friday to provide an update or to indicate how many of the recent cases are among colonies.

Of the 13 latest patients, eight are in the Central region, two in the Regina region, while one each is in the Far North, North and South regions.

Among the province’s 936 total cases are 793 people who have recovered.

“There are two new recoveries, one in the Far North and one in the South,” said a press release by officials. “However, three cases were removed from recovered status and reactivated. This can happen if public health determines an individual has relapsed or developed additional symptoms.”

Of the 128 active cases that remain, 49 of them are in the South and 51 are in the Central region of the province. There are now only four active cases in the Far North, which is home to 340 of Saskatchewan’s cases throughout the pandemic.

Twelve people are currently in hospital, up by one since Thursday, which includes one patient in intensive care (down by one).

To date, 78,990 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 139 tests in their latest 24-hour stretch.

On Friday, Saskatchewan Health Authority also issued an advisory to notify people that a person visited a couple of Regina businesses while they were infectious with COVID-19. The individual visited Costco Regina on July 6 between 3-4 p.m., and a KFC on 3998 Albert St. South that same day between noon-2 p.m.

Anyone who attended the businesses during the listed times should be self-monitoring for symptoms for 14 days after their visit or seek a testing referral.

Two domestic flights have also been added to Saskatchewan’s list of “affected flights,” which involve a confirmed case of COVID-19; AC 8629 Toronto-Saskatoon on July 9 and WS605 Toronto-Regina on July 6.

People who were on the flights are being asked to self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days.

July 16

Saskatchewan reports its largest ever increase in cases

Health officials have identified 42 new cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan, marking the biggest single day increase to its total case count since the start of the pandemic.

Previously, the most daily cases Saskatchewan had reported was on May 4 with 32 infections.

Of the most recent patients, 31 of them were identified in the South, six in the Central region, four in the Saskatoon region and one in the North. Warren Kaeding, Saskatchewan’s minister of rural and remote health, said the vast majority of new cases are related to a growing outbreak among Hutterite communities in southwest and west central Saskatchewan.

“The Saskatchewan Health Authority is working closely with Hutterian Safety Council, local moderate leadership, local municipalities and the business community to control the further spread of the virus. Of course, this includes aggressive testing and contact tracing, which has detected these positive cases and will likely find many more in the days ahead,” Kaeding said.

“They’ve done a lot of their own limitations… I have talked to community leadership, and they certainly appreciate the efforts that Hutterites are doing to minimize the risk to outside of their communities and into the surrounding communities.”

On Wednesday, Saskatchewan Health Authority updated its list of 14 rural municipalities and areas that have increased risk of COVID-19 transmission, with cases “on a number of Hutterite communities in these municipalities.” Health officials in Saskatchewan and Alberta have asked people to not discriminate against Hutterite communities, with some cases in Alberta also linked to colonies as a result of interprovincial travel.

Due to the recent increase in cases, officials have implemented visitor restrictions at Cypress Regional Hospital and at long-term care homes in southwest and west central Saskatchewan. The Swift Current hospital will only allow family members for compassionate reasons, while visitation for long-term care homes will be restricted to outdoor visits and end-of-life care.

Kaeding said that at the moment stricter measures are not needed, but they may be considered moving forward. In April, the government restricted travel to and from the Far North due to an increase in cases. Kaeding said northern communities requested the restrictions, but Hutterite colonies haven’t.

“If we were not getting the cooperation, the tremendous cooperation we have been with Hutterites in particular, we would maybe have to consider something like that,” said Kaeding.

Initially, in mid-June, there was resistance to testing and the implementation of adequate COVID-19 protocols after outbreaks were declared in two Hutterite colonies inside the rural municipality of Maple Creek. But that has since changed, with colonies inviting health officials into their communities.

"The big change was coming to them instead of having to bring everybody to us," which "has been one of the reasons why we're finding the cases which we need to know about," said Scott Livingstone, the health authority's chief executive officer.

The most recent update of 42 infections increases the province’s total case count to 923. That includes 794 people who have recovered, up by three since Wednesday.

Of the 114 active cases that remain, 49 of them are in the South and 40 are in the Central region of the province.

There are now only four active cases in the Far North, which is home to 339 of Saskatchewan’s cases throughout the pandemic. The La Loche community, which was the province’s epicentre, has zero active cases as of Wednesday evening.

Eleven people are currently in hospital, up by three since Wednesday, while there remain two patients in intensive care.

To date, 78,851 COVID‐19 tests have been performed in Saskatchewan, after health officials completed 2,157 tests in their latest 24-hour stretch.

More cases linked to Montreal bars as Quebec considers its options

Quebec health officials announced 142 new cases of COVID-19, which is the most it has reported since the province also recorded the same amount of daily cases on June 25.

On Thursday, ten fatalities were added to its death toll of 5,646. Nine of the deaths occurred in the past 24 hours, while the other victim died before July 8.

The increase in cases comes as Montreal and surrounding areas continue to fight the spread of COVID-19 in connection to bars, which were allowed to reopen June 25.

On July 11, Montreal public health officials asked anyone who has been to a bar in the city since Canada Day to get tested, prompting thousands to come forward. At the time, there were eight cases linked to five bars. There are now 45 cases linked to at least 14 bars, as of an update Wednesday evening, according to Aaron Derfel of the Montreal Gazette.

“At this moment, we haven’t ruled out closing the bars,” Quebec Premier François Legault said.

A decision on closing bars and nightclubs is expected to come in the upcoming days, not weeks, said health minister Christian Dubé, who noted he’s “a little worried” about the uptick in cases. In the meantime, Dubé wants to establish a clear connection between the rise in cases and the questioned establishments.

Montreal remains the epicentre with 27,787 total cases, up by 258 since a week ago today. But the spread of COVID-19 continues to gain pace in other parts of the province in connection to bars and parties. The Laurentides region has 3,644 cases (up by 72) and Montérégie has 8,278 (up by 190).

Last week, officials added restrictions on bars to help control the spread. For example, they can only operate at 50 per cent of their capacity, customers must be seated, and last call is at midnight. Health officials are currently having trouble with contact tracing, since bars did not have customer registries in place until Friday.

“We tightened the rules,” Legault said. “But yes, I have concerns.”

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 57,001 cases of COVID-19 in Quebec. That includes 26,253 recovered patients, up by 156 since Wednesday. Of the 25,102 active cases that remain, there are 277 in hospital (down by eight), while 20 patients remain in intensive care.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its outputs from two days prior. In its latest 24-hour stretch, the province completed 12,041 tests for COVID-19. The province is below its goal of 14,000, but it’s the most health officials have completed since June 5.

With mass testing underway in Montreal, which has led to lines as long as five hours, three new testing sites are set to open this week.

Alberta reports its largest spike in cases in months

Alberta health officials have identified 120 new cases of COVID-19, which marks the most cases and the first time it has recorded triple-digits since May 1.

It’s also the fifth straight day that the province has recorded more than 80 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not eclipsed the 80-case mark since May 10.

“One of the most significant areas of risk are social gatherings, especially where people are not following social distancing,” said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer. “I’m concerned about reports of people that feel that public health measures are no longer important.”

Hinshaw said that the majority of the new cases involve people under the age of 40.

Among the province’s 9,114 total cases throughout the pandemic are 8,142 patients who have recovered, up by 15 since Wednesday. Two new deaths were also reported, as the death toll reached 165.

There are now 807 active cases in the province; 362 of them are located in the Calgary zone (up by 50), and 217 in the Edmonton zone (up by 23). Sixty-nine people are in hospital (up by five), which includes eight in intensive care (down by one).

On Thursday, Hinshaw announced that the Calgary-Centre and Calgary-Elbow are under "watch" for COVID-19, since the areas have risen above 50 active cases per 100,000 people.

At the Misericordia Community Hospital in Edmonton, there are now 53 cases linked to the “full facility outbreak,” which was declared July 8. Seventeen patients are currently in hospital in connection to the outbreak, while eight have been discharged. Nineteen staff members have also tested positive, while seven people have died.

According to the CBC, who received confirmation from Alberta Health Services, two people linked to the outbreak weren’t staff or patients but "tested positive in the community."

B.C. continues to report more than 20 cases of COVID-19

Twenty-one new cases of COVID-19, including three epi-linked cases, have been identified in British Columbia’s latest 24-hour stretch.

It marks the seventh day of the last eight that the province has recorded at least 20 cases. Before the recent stretch, it had not surpassed the 20-daily case mark since June 3.

The latest update increases the province’s total case count to 3,170. That includes 2,789 people who have recovered, up by 36 since Wednesday.

There are now 192 active cases in the province, which includes 15 people in hospital (up by one ), and three in intensive care (down by two). No new deaths were recorded, as the death toll remains at 189.

Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.'s provincial health officer, said there are now four cases linked to the Krazy Cherry fruit farm in Okanagan. Twenty-seven cases have also been linked to events that occured in Kelowna’s waterfront district between June 25 and July 9.

Health officials said the initial infections are believed to have stemmed from two private parties held around Canada Day, involving people mainly in their 20s and 30s. Some of the infected patients went to other local businesses, before they were contacted by public health teams, prompting exposure warnings to the public.

Ontario sees 111 more cases

The province reported on Thursday that 111 more cases of COVID-19 had been recorded. There were also five more deaths. This brings the total number of COVID-19 cases and related deaths up to 37,163 and 2,737 respectively.

It’s the third time in the past month that Ontario has recorded 111 new cases, which is the second-lowest mark since March 25. The smallest increase was recorded Wednesday (102).

Ontario’s seven-day case average is now 116 out of 24,376 tests, the lowest it’s been since March 28, when an average of 2,606 tests were being performed.

Of the recently identified 111 patients, 64 of them were between 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. Seventy of the cases were identified in the Greater Toronto Area.

Ontario also reported 141 more recoveries, bringing the total number of people who have recovered from COVID-19 to 32,920, or 89 per cent of reported cases.

There are now 1,365 active cases in Ontario, the fewest since March 30. Among those patients are 106 people in hospital (down by nine since Wednesday), which includes 27 in intensive care (down by four) and 20 who require a ventilator (down by two).

According to the Ministry of Long-Term Care, there are 19 active outbreaks across the province in facilities. There remains 45 active cases among residents (down by four), and 62 among staff (down by 55).

One new case in Manitoba

A man in his 30s in Manitoba’s Southern health region has tested positive, increasing the province’s total case count to 331.

Six active cases remain in Manitoba, since 318 people have recovered and seven people have died after contracting the respiratory virus as of Thursday.

An additional 734 tests were completed on Wednesday, bringing the total number of tests performed since early February to 73,042.

Timelines of cases prior to July 16