Electronics recycling program expanding on P.E.I.

·3 min read
People can start bringing the newly added electronic devices to EPRA drop-off locations on P.E.I. starting on Aug. 1. (Jane Robertson/CBC - image credit)
People can start bringing the newly added electronic devices to EPRA drop-off locations on P.E.I. starting on Aug. 1. (Jane Robertson/CBC - image credit)

More household electronics and appliances are becoming eligible for Island Waste Management Corporation's (IWMC) free drop-off program on Aug. 1, at certain IWMC sites.

IWMC works with not-for-profit organization Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA) on the Recycle my Electronics program.

"They send these materials to specialized recyclers and they break down the components and recover all the different materials," said Heather Myers, disposal manager with IWMC.

"So things like glass, plastic, precious metals, like gold and copper, and then some of the metals of concern, like mercury and lead."

Myers said this helps make sure those materials are handled in an environmentally friendly manner. Other recovered materials, like the glass and plastics, will be sent back to the manufacturing chain to be reused for something new.

Home electronics like TVs, portable computers, computer accessories and home audio/visual equipment were already able to be dropped off at no charge.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

People can start bringing the newly added electronic devices to drop-off locations on P.E.I. starting on Aug. 1.

Here is a look at some of the products that will soon be free to drop off.

Kitchen countertop devices

This new category will allow almost all devices used in food preparation to be dropped off.

Things like microwaves, toasters, blenders, waffle irons, bread makers, kettles and coffee makers.

The main exclusion will be built-in over-the-range microwave ovens and microwave/range hood combinations.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Personal care accessories

These would be electronic devices most commonly found in the bathroom setting.

Hair dryers, straighteners, electronic toothbrushes and hair cutting tools like trimmers or razors are examples of what is acceptable.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Time and weight measurement devices

This would include things like electronic scales and digital clocks.

Floor, carpet and garment care appliances

Irons, steamers and vacuums would be included in this category.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Air-treatment appliances

This category includes things like fans, air purifiers, heaters, aromatherapy diffusers and humidifiers.

It does not include dehumidifiers or air conditioners as those devices have refrigerants in them.

Those can be dropped off as well, but would end up being sorted with large appliances like refrigerators and deep freezers so the refrigerants can be safely removed.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Myers said it was good to see the program is expanding on the Island. Waste is diverted on P.E.I. through recycling, incinerated or taken to a landfill.

Electronic devices that will now be recycled will mean they are removed from the Island waste stream.

"Keeps it out of the landfill on P.E.I. and anything that we can keep out of the landfill is a good thing," Myers said.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Special summer waste

People who are visiting P.E.I. are encouraged to visit the IWMC website to learn about the different streams for waste but there are some specific summer items that continue to raise questions.

Even though there are small metal staples, wooden boxes like the ones used for local strawberries can be put in the compost bin.

The wooden boxes with larger nails like, clementine boxes, would be put in the waste bin.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

Shells from mussels, clams, oysters and lobster carcasses are also compostable.

Myers recommends people put seafood waste in a compostable container in a sealed plastic bag and then put it in the freezer.

Jane Robertson/CBC
Jane Robertson/CBC

This will help keep the smell down before putting the compost in the green bin right before scheduled pickup day.

For people looking to get more information about how to sort their waste on P.E.I., Myers encourages they check out the IWMC website for more specific details.

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