N.W.T. reports 38 new cases of COVID-19, issues 16 public exposure notices

·3 min read
The virus that causes COVID-19 shown isolated from a patient. The number of cases rose slightly for the second day in a row in the N.W.T. It now stands at 376, after peaking at 460 last Thursday. (NIAID-RML/Reuters - image credit)
The virus that causes COVID-19 shown isolated from a patient. The number of cases rose slightly for the second day in a row in the N.W.T. It now stands at 376, after peaking at 460 last Thursday. (NIAID-RML/Reuters - image credit)

The number of active COVID-19 cases across the Northwest Territories rose slightly Thursday, after the chief public health officer reported 38 new cases.

There are now 376 active cases, an increase of 20 since Wednesday. It's the second day in a row that an increase in the number of overall cases was reported, after it reached a peak of 460 last Thursday.

Ninety per cent of the cases in the territory are in four communities: 205 in Yellowknife, Dettah and Ndilǫ, an increase of one since yesterday; and 133 cases in Behchokǫ̀, 13 more than yesterday.

At a news conference Thursday, N.W.T. Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Kami Kandola said the number of cases peaked last week and has been on a downward trend since. She said she expects the overall trend to continue to go downward.

At the same time, the N.W.T. government said it will launch a voluntary vaccine passport program that will allow non-essential businesses to have more people in their establishments. Non-essential businesses in the four communities are currently limited to having 10 people indoors.

Public exposure notices

The Office of the Chief Public Health Officer (OCPHO) also issued 16 public exposure notices Thursday, including eight in Yellowknife, three in Inuvik, two in Fort Simpson, and one in Hay River.

It also issued notices for two flights: Northwest Air flight 507 from Fort Smith to Yellowknife on Oct. 4, and Northwest Air flight 508 from Fort Smith to Yellowknife on Oct. 5.

Partially vaccinated and unvaccinated passengers on both flights are required to isolate for 10 days and arrange to get tested for COVID-19. Vaccinated passengers are asked to self-monitor for symptoms. Should they develop, passengers must isolate and arrange for testing.

The full list of public exposure notices is available here.

Cases in other communities

Thirteen cases are reported in the Hay River and K'atl'odeeche First Nation area, an increase of one since Wednesday, while Fort Smith is reporting six cases, the same as yesterday.

There are six cases reported in Fort Simpson. They were first reported Wednesday. At the news conference Thursday, Kandola said the exposure has been well contained.

"We do not feel there will be an impact to other residents in Fort Simpson," she said.

There are six cases in Inuvik, an increase of four since yesterday.

The OCPHO declared an outbreak at the homeless shelter and the warming centre in the community yesterday. Health Minister Julie Green said at the news conference on Thursday that the territory has made sure that people who need to isolate in Inuvik, whether they're homeless or not, can do so at the Mackenzie Hotel.

There are also two cases in Fort Good Hope, one more than yesterday, and three in Whatì, also one more than yesterday.

There remains one case in each of Łutsel Kʼe, and Norman Wells.

There is no longer a case being reported at the Northwest Territories Power Corporation's Snare Hydro System worksite.

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