1 / 8

Light saber class in San Francisco

Jim Collum, foreground, and other students work on light saber skills during a Golden Gate Knights class in San Francisco, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. A group of San Francisco Star Wars fans who want to travel to a galaxy not that far away have created a combat choreography class for Jedis-in-training with their weapon of choice: the light saber. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Light saber training

A group of dedicated Star Wars fans, the Golden Gate Knights, participate in a light saber training class in San Francisco to practic the fight choreography seen in the movies.

  • NDP, Tories tied at 37 per cent support, new poll suggests; Liberals trail at 21
    News
    The Canadian Press

    NDP, Tories tied at 37 per cent support, new poll suggests; Liberals trail at 21

    The New Democrats have the same 37 per cent voter support as the Progressive Conservatives even though most people believe the Tories will win the Ontario election come June 7, a new poll suggests. While a sizable number of voters — more than one third of those asked — have yet to make a final decision about where their X will go come voting day, the survey indicates Andrew Horwath and her New Democrats are far and away the favoured second choice of voters. The poll finds that 63 per cent of Liberals would vote NDP as second choice, while 40 per cent of Tories now led by Doug Ford said the same.

  • Report: Airstrikes on Syria pro-government positions kill 12
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Report: Airstrikes on Syria pro-government positions kill 12

    Airstrikes overnight in eastern Syria killed at least 12 pro-government fighters, all reportedly foreign nationals, a war-monitoring group said Thursday. The Syrian government-run media blamed the strikes on the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group. In Damascus, the SANA news agency said coalition aircraft struck military positions between the towns of Boukamal and Hmeimeh in Deir el-Zour province.

  • Exhaustion, concern and relief on board first Hercules airlift for Manitoba fire evacuees
    News
    CBC

    Exhaustion, concern and relief on board first Hercules airlift for Manitoba fire evacuees

    Passengers on board the first military Hercules aircraft carrying residents from a fire-threatened Manitoba community were exhausted but relieved to be heading to safety Wednesday evening. Many of the passengers had been waiting more than 48 hours to leave their community of Little Grand Rapids, Man., forced out by a fire nearly half the size of Winnipeg that started on Monday. "I'm happy to get away," said Leena Leveque, shortly before takeoff.

  • N.B. women's shelters use new law to protect clients from abusive partners
    News
    CBC

    N.B. women's shelters use new law to protect clients from abusive partners

    The Fundy Region Transition House says two women have already been granted emergency intervention orders under New Brunswick's Intimate Partner Violence Protection Act, which took effect May 1. "We're on our third [application] now in three weeks," said executive director Lynne Matheson. Province-wide, the Department of Justice and Public Safety says it received 17 applications between May 1 and May 22.

  • News
    CBC

    Festivals feel squeezed by alcohol permit price hike

    Smaller festivals are reconsidering the sale of alcohol at their venues after the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario increased the price of special events permits to $150 a day. As of April 1, festivals and other events in Ontario, big or small, would have to pay $450 for a three-day festival to receive a special events permit allowing the sale of alcohol.

  • News
    CBC

    Cyclist who died in Seattle cougar attack remembered in Montreal as pioneer for inclusive biking

    A Seattle cyclist who died in a rare cougar attack last Saturday was known as a pioneer for more inclusive biking — a passion that grew while living in Montreal and completing an MA at McGill University. SJ Brooks, 32, died after a cougar attack while mountain biking in a remote area near North Bend, Wash., about 50 kilometres east of Seattle. Brooks was cycling with Issac Sederbaum, a fellow advocate for inclusive cycling. Sederbaum was also attacked by the cougar and was released from hospital Wednesday after suffering lacerations and other injuries.

  • UN chief concerned by cancellation of US-NKorea summit
    News
    The Canadian Press

    UN chief concerned by cancellation of US-NKorea summit

    The U.N. chief said Thursday he is "deeply concerned" by the cancellation of the planned summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Guterres' comments came as he laid out his disarmament agenda, warning that nuclear agreements between states are threatened like never before.

  • News
    CBC

    Europe's tough new data privacy laws will benefit Canadians, too

    Chances are, over the past few days you've been getting emails from the apps and mailing lists you subscribe to, alerting you to their new privacy policies. Here's what you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). "If they want to use it for something else later on, they have to come back to you and get positive consent," says Ann Cavoukian, founder of Privacy by Design, a philosophy that is central to the GDPR.

  • News
    Reuters

    Publicis starts test phase of 'Marcel' internal network aimed at performance boost

    Advertising group Publicis will unveil its internal collaborative network "Marcel" on Thursday and hopes to have 90 percent of its staff using it by 2020, in a move designed to improve the interaction between Publicis' various agencies. Chief Executive Arthur Sadoun stunned the industry last year by announcing Publicis would skip all awards events and trade shows, including the Cannes Lions event -- the world's biggest advertising industry conference -- to develop the network. "Marcel" will provide a daily digest to all employees who opt in, Publicis said in a statement.

  • Canadian Armed Forces arrive in Twin Lakes to bolster dike, protect homes
    News
    CBC

    Canadian Armed Forces arrive in Twin Lakes to bolster dike, protect homes

    Craig Hunter, a homeowner who lives along the shoreline, said around 100 servicemen arrived on Tuesday, working through the night to move thousands of sandbags. Hunter says he's not planning to leave, despite the fact that he's still under evacuation order.

  • What if scientists are wrong about theory of Alzheimer's disease?
    News
    CBC

    What if scientists are wrong about theory of Alzheimer's disease?

    In a darkened room at Toronto's Krembil Research Institute, Dr. Donald Weaver is looking at a screen covered in green fluorescent dots. Weaver, a neurologist and chemist, was testing a compound to see if it could prevent the clumping of a protein called tau which creates distinctive tangles in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Failure is normal for researchers engaged in the frustrating search for drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  • Abortion: What do Ireland's women think?
    BBC News

    Abortion: What do Ireland's women think?

    In Ireland on the 25th of May, voters will decide in a referendum whether they want to change their Constitution in regards to the country's regulation of abortion. It is a highly emotive and sensitive issue in the country enshrouded in silence and shame. The BBC's Nuala McGovern, who grew up in Dublin, speaks to Irish women about whether this should be a moment of change for Ireland.

  • Flood victims could be denied $300K assistance because of insurance changes
    News
    CBC

    Flood victims could be denied $300K assistance because of insurance changes

    Some B.C. flood victims might not be eligible for Disaster Financial Assistance because of a change in the flood insurance that's available in B.C. The provincial Disaster Financial Assistance (DFA) program pays victims of flooding and other natural disasters up to $300,000 —  but only for losses that were uninsurable. "That was seven per cent of the more than 400 applications filed," said Johanna Morrow, the manager of recovery and funding program at Emergency Management B.C. (EMBC).

  • StandardAero Summerside expanding, adding 80 jobs
    News
    CBC

    StandardAero Summerside expanding, adding 80 jobs

    StandardAero Summerside — formerly known as Vector Aerospace — is getting a 30,000 square-foot expansion that will bring an additional 80 jobs to the facility. Jeff Poirier, vice president and general manager for StandardAero, says work currently done in Winnipeg will now be transferred to Summerside. "Summerside's reputation in the industry for great quality, great turn time and superb customer service allowed them to transfer this work that was formerly done in Winnipeg to Summerside with very little concern," Poirier said.

  • U.S. launches criminal probe into bitcoin price manipulation: Bloomberg
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. launches criminal probe into bitcoin price manipulation: Bloomberg

    (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Justice has launched a criminal probe into whether traders are manipulating the price of bitcoin and other digital currencies, Bloomberg reported on Thursday. The investigation concerns illegal practices that can influence prices such as spoofing, or flooding the market with fake orders to trick other traders, Bloomberg said, citing four people familiar with the matter. Federal prosecutors are working with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the report added. Neither the Justice Department nor the CFTC were immediately available for comment. ...

  • Burnaby Board of Trade calls for revenue-neutral mobility pricing ahead of today's TransLink report
    News
    CBC

    Burnaby Board of Trade calls for revenue-neutral mobility pricing ahead of today's TransLink report

    The Burnaby Board of Trade has released its own report on mobility pricing, ahead of a potential road pricing scheme set to be released at the TransLink Mayors' Council meeting Thursday morning. The report argues addressing congestion by reducing traffic at peak times should be the primary objective of any proposed road pricing system. Board President and CEO Paul Holden said that congestion and revenue neutrality are the two main priorities.

  • Mother died in Pukatawagan First Nation house fire
    News
    CBC

    Mother died in Pukatawagan First Nation house fire

    The father of a woman who died in a house fire in a northwestern Manitoba First Nation this week said his relatives who escaped the fire are carrying survivor's guilt. "Some of them, you know, blame themselves," said Jimmy Colomb Sr., who lost his daughter Daisy, 41, in the midday fire. Community members have identified the woman as Daisy Colomb, a mother who was reported sleeping while the fire raged.

  • Apps and social media helping Calgary Muslims navigate Ramadan 2018
    News
    CBC

    Apps and social media helping Calgary Muslims navigate Ramadan 2018

    Muslims in Calgary are turning to their mobile devices to help organize their busiest time of the year: the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. There are more Ramadan-related apps than ever available to download, along with Calgary-based Facebook groups and pages that provide hyper-local resources and information for local Muslims. During Ramadan, Muslims don't eat or drink between dawn and sunset.

  • News
    CBC

    Peanuts to profits: Lambton College students win competition for helping African farmers

    Lambton College in Sarnia, Ont. has won a national contest for their work in a southern African country after training 30,000 farmers to become more efficient and successful. In addition, the project also included starting up a peanut butter company, building infrastructure for alternative energy, increasing the amount of clean water in the region and building a clinic. The project, called 'One Seed,' earned students the title of Enactus Canada National Champions — a competition that challenges universities and colleges around the world to come up with innovative ideas to help others.

  • News
    CBC

    Oilsands tailings pond approval terms shortened for former Shell facilities

    Tailings pond management plans for two former Shell Canada oilsands mines in northern Alberta have been approved by the Alberta Energy Regulator, but it said "deficiencies" in the projects must be addressed over the next three or four years. It said an amendment must be submitted by September 2021, by the current owner, Calgary-based Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., to address the Muskeg River mine plan's shortcomings, and by September 2022 for issues with the Jackpine mine's plan. "In its plans, (it) proposed extending the life of Muskeg River by 57 years and Jackpine by 53 years.

  • News
    CBC

    Sask. sexual assault centre reducing services due to lack of funding

    A sexual assault centre in North Battleford will be cutting some of their services due to a lack of provincial funding. The Battlefords and Area Sexual Assault Centre (BACAS) is the only provincially-funded outreach centre for people in northern Saskatchewan who have been been affected by sexual violence. It provides support and counselling for people around central and northern Saskatchewan, as well as prevention education programs for schools.

  • Speeding complaints prompt Yellowknife RCMP to amp up check stops in school zones
    News
    CBC

    Speeding complaints prompt Yellowknife RCMP to amp up check stops in school zones

    Drivers in Yellowknife may have noticed more check stops lately — especially near schools. The RCMP says it has increased its presence in school zones since April, after requests from community members. Construction worker Dave Sloan called the RCMP two weeks ago to ask them to increase their presence at J. H. Sissons School.

  • Scottoline has new publisher, writing book inspired by Roth
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Scottoline has new publisher, writing book inspired by Roth

    Lisa Scottoline, the bestselling crime writer, has a new publisher and is working on a different kind of book. G.P. Putnam's Sons told The Associated Press on Thursday that it had reached a six-book deal with Scottoline, who previously published with St. Martin's Press. The first novel in the series is called "Eternal," and Scottoline is citing Roth, who died Tuesday at age 85, as a reason for writing it.

  • Bloomfield Road residents petition to demolish damaged, vacant west Windsor homes
    News
    CBC

    Bloomfield Road residents petition to demolish damaged, vacant west Windsor homes

    The founder of the community organization called Bloomfield House has started the Bloomfield Freedom Project. Tea Jai Travis is getting signatures on a petition that his group will take to city council, urging the city to waive the by-law prohibiting the demolition of the derelict vacant homes in that area. Deborah Vollan said she and her neighbours see trespassers breaking into the homes frequently.

  • Toronto opening 800 emergency spaces to deal with influx of refugee claimants
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Toronto opening 800 emergency spaces to deal with influx of refugee claimants

    Toronto is opening two emergency reception centres to deal with an influx of refugee claimants, less than a week after the mayor warned that the current system was nearly at capacity. Beginning Thursday, Toronto will temporarily house refugee claimants and new arrivals in 400 beds at the Centennial College Residence and Conference Centre in the city's east end. Last Friday, Mayor John Tory said the city would have to take emergency measures if the federal and Ontario governments didn't act to relieve the growing pressure refugee claimants are putting on the city's shelter system.