People Are Peeing And Pooping All Over The Queen’s Balmoral Estate Because Of Lockdown

Lee Moran

Beware of the pathways on Queen Elizabeth II’s Balmoral estate in Scotland.

With public toilets closed during the coronavirus lockdown, some people have taken to peeing and pooping near busy walkways and monuments.

Staff at the British monarch’s 50,000-acre property in Aberdeenshire were forced to tweet guidance over the weekend on where and how visitors should go to the bathroom outdoors.

“If you need to pee, please do so at least 30 meters from lochs or streams,” they advised in one tweet. “If you need to defecate, do so as far away as possible from buildings, paths, water courses and farm animals. Bury faeces in a shallow hole and replace the turf.”

“Part of the problem is that we are seeing a lot of non biodegradable wipes being discarded in the countryside,” staff wrote in another post, noting how “people are choosing to relieve themselves right next to busy paths or monuments rather than move a little bit further away to avoid contamination.”

Visitors were also cautioned against using authority-run public toilets near Lock Muick. The bathrooms are currently closed.

“Unfortunately, people have been breaking into them and conditions inside are becoming unsanitary,” the estate wrote on Facebook:

The grounds and gardens of Balmoral Castle, where the queen usually stays in the summer, are currently closed to visitors.

The estate’s public pathways are still open to the public.

The queen has been isolating during the pandemic some 500 miles away at Windsor Castle with Prince Philip.

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Queen Elizabeth II has been isolating during the pandemic at Windsor Castle. (Photo: Max Mumby/Indigo via Getty Images)

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  • Mexican president exits Trump embrace smiling, Democrats grumble
    Politics
    Reuters

    Mexican president exits Trump embrace smiling, Democrats grumble

    Defying warnings that to seek out Donald Trump was to court disaster, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador instead emerged from their first meeting as a "cherished friend" of his U.S. counterpart, even as some Democrats looked on uneasily. The spectacle of Lopez Obrador and Trump lavishing praise on each other on Wednesday was a far cry from the tension that has plagued bilateral ties since the American launched his bid for power in 2015 with repeated threats and jibes against Mexico. Meeting at the White House, the two leaders pledged to strengthen economic ties, and largely avoided the subject of immigration that Trump has used to extract concessions from Mexico on border security and trade since he took office in 2017.

  • Botswana gets first test results on elephant deaths
    News
    Reuters

    Botswana gets first test results on elephant deaths

    Botswana said on Friday it had received test results from samples sent to Zimbabwe to determine the cause of death of hundreds of elephants but is waiting for more results from South Africa next week before sharing findings with the public. Wildlife officials are trying to determine what is killing the elephants about two months after the first bodies were discovered. Officials told reporters near the Okavango Delta on Thursday that they had now verified 281 elephant carcasses and that the deaths were concentrated in an area of 8,000 square km that is home to about 18,000 elephants.

  • Jasper the dog gets his Hollywood ending after crossing B.C.'s Columbia River 3 times
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    CBC

    Jasper the dog gets his Hollywood ending after crossing B.C.'s Columbia River 3 times

    Jasper, a 63 kilogram Great Pyrenees, was on the lam for three days last weekend after he escaped his backyard in Castlegar, in B.C.'s West Kootenays, making an exhausting journey back and forth across the Columbia River.His owner, Mary Hummel, said he disappeared on the night of July 2. "I don't exactly know what happened but there was a lot of fireworks going on in this neighborhood," she told Daybreak South host Chris Walker. "He had actually never disappeared before so I have no idea exactly how he disappeared."She and her husband went searching through the neighbourhood, looking for their big, white, hard-to-miss dog, but to no avail. Hummel posted about Jasper on social media, hoping someone nearby would spot him. Someone sent her a message saying they saw him in the nearby community of Genelle, about 14 kilometres away. The thing was, he was on the other side of the fast-moving Columbia River. "We saw him," Hummel said.But then he disappeared again. The next morning, another sighting had been reported, back on the original side of the river.The person who saw him tried to coax him over to her, but he ended up swimming toward a sand bar. Search and rescue was called in to try to locate Jasper, and members of a nearby trailer park did what they could to try to help. "Nobody was able to secure him at all," Hummel said.Later than day they got another message saying Jasper was back on the far side of the river. On Sunday, three days since Jasper escaped, someone offered to look for Jasper using their drone, so Hummel took them up on it."I remember looking at this river and just crying my eyes out because it's like there's no way this dog can swim this river again because it's just so awful," Hummel said."My husband [and I], we both thought that he had probably died and both of us were just praying and crying."They pair were driving down a road with the drone operator as they prepared to continue the search, when something unexpected happened."My husband just said, 'You know what, this isn't Hollywood, it's not like this dog's going to just walk in the middle of the road and run towards us.' And 60 seconds later, right there on the road, there was Jasper," Hummel said. He ran toward his owners, slowly because his toes were chafed from his adventures. It took a few days for him to heal, and for him to return to regular eating habits. Either way, Hummel is happy to have her canine pal back, and she's grateful to those who helped her look for him. "It was a miracle," she said.

  • 'Go back to China and take your coronavirus with you': Anti-Asian racist tirade caught on camera in T&T supermarket
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    'Go back to China and take your coronavirus with you': Anti-Asian racist tirade caught on camera in T&T supermarket

    A racist tirade caught on camera in Mississauga, Ont. on Tuesday has gone viral after a white, non-mask wearing man berated staff at T&T Supermarket who told him he couldn’t shop at the store without a face covering. 

  • Police: Mother admits to starving daughter, dumping body
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Police: Mother admits to starving daughter, dumping body

    SILVER SPRING, Md. — A Maryland woman accused of starving her 15-month-old daughter for more than three weeks has been charged with first-degree murder in the toddler’s death, police said Thursday.Kiearra Tolson, 23, of Silver Spring, told investigators that she placed her daughter’s body in a plillowcase and trash bags after she died last month and discarded the chlld’s body in a dumpster at her apartment complex, the Montgomery County Police Department said in a news release.Tolson also told investigators that she had starved her daughter, Blair Niles, for approximately three-and-a-half weeks, police said.The child’s body hasn’t been recovered, but police said investigators found evidence in Tolson's apartment corroborating her account. A court filing says police found a pillow without a pillowcase in Tolson's apartment.Tolson was arrested Wednesday after an acquaintance called 911 to report that Tolson had told her that she killed her child, according to police.The child’s father told investigators that he last saw his daughter on April 17 and hadn’t had any contact with Tolson since then.State District Court Judge John Moffett ordered Tolson held without bond at a hearing Thursday, according to Ramon Korionoff, a spokesman for Montgomery County State's Attorney John McCarthy. Korionoff said a public defender represented Tolson at the hearing. A message left with the public defender's office wasn't immediately returned. Tolson is due back in court on July 16 for a bond review hearing.The Associated Press

  • Wheaten Terrier mom plays with her adorable puppies
    News
    Rumble

    Wheaten Terrier mom plays with her adorable puppies

    This Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier mom is spending some quality time playing catch me if you can with her adorable 9 week old puppies in the back yard. It's so cute watching them hide under the bench until one of them bravely tries to take on mom but inevitably fails again and again until eventually, they decide to gang up on her, but of course mom still wins as she spins them off in a flash.

  • Changes being made to make it easier for parents to pass on Canadian citizenship
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Changes being made to make it easier for parents to pass on Canadian citizenship

    OTTAWA — The Liberal government is updating a legal definition of "parent" to make it easier for some parents to pass their Canadian citizenship onto their children.Previously, children born to Canadians abroad automatically received citizenship only if there was a genetic link between the parent and the child or the parent gave birth to the child.Now, the government announced Thursday, the government will allow non-biological Canadian parents who are a child's legal parent at birth to pass down their citizenship.Laurence Caron, who is Canadian, and her partner Elsje van der Ven, who is Dutch, are responsible for the change after a long legal battle.When van der Van gave birth to their son four years ago while they were living in the Netherlands, the couple went to apply for his Canadian citizenship and found out he didn't get it automatically.The reason: Caron's biological material was not used for his conception."We were shocked, disappointed and very hurt," Caron said during a virtual news conference Thursday."In the discrimination that we sometimes face as a same-sex family, we always thought that Canada would have our back but the reality was different."While they could have sought a grant of citizenship for Benjamin, it is a cumbersome process, and didn't treat them equally under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, federal Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino acknowledged Thursday.He applauded them for taking the step of challenging the system in court, leading to the new interpretation of the term "parent."The change will benefit LGBTQ communities and parents facing fertility challenges, he said."It makes a strong statement to recognize the diversity of Canadian families, a statement which demonstrates the government's commitment to strengthening diversity and fostering inclusion," he said.However, another commitment to make citizenship more inclusive — a promise in the Liberals' 2019 election platform to make citizenship applications free — appears to be on hold.Mendicino said Thursday the government does remain committed to reducing barriers to citizenship, but noted also the unprecedented situation of COVID-19 that is putting extreme pressure on government finances.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

  • Racist slurs during Conservative leadership debate not surprising: Lewis
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Racist slurs during Conservative leadership debate not surprising: Lewis

    OTTAWA — The litany of racial slurs inserted into the comments section of an online Conservative leadership debate Wednesday was not surprising, candidate Leslyn Lewis said the next day.Lewis, Erin O'Toole and Derek Sloan were debating B.C.-related issues when for nearly a minute, slurs started filling the chat box of the video conference program. Lewis, who is the first Black candidate to run for the Conservative party leadership, said she saw them and then closed the chat screen so she could focus on the event."The racist comments during last night's debate which were directed at me, Black people and Jewish people were sadly not surprising," she said in a statement Thursday. "This past week we saw much more blatant displays of antisemitism in Toronto, and it has not been an irregular occurrence for me to encounter racist individuals during this campaign."A transcript of the debate chat provided to The Canadian Press by organizers suggests the racist slurs were one of several attempts by to hijack the discussion, with the other interjections seemingly nonsensical.Debate organizer Angelo Isidorou called the incident "mortifying."He said as the comments were noticed, moderators booted the user from the chat, but then a new one would pop up. Eventually, they disabled the chat function altogether."We are thankful to the hundreds of members in the chat who alerted us to these terrible comments and demanded swift action, which we took," he said.Isidorou said some cursory research by the organizing team suggested there had been a plan prior to the event to disrupt it.The link to join the online debate was widely circulated as the event was backed by all 42 riding associations in the province.The racist comments weren't mentioned by the candidates or moderator during the event, but screenshots of them circulated online after they were removed.Peter MacKay, who skipped the debate, later condemned the incident on social media, calling it "disgusting and totally unacceptable."Hackers disrupting video conference calls have been a hazard as the software has exploded in use during the COVID-19 pandemic.But Lewis' campaign said though the team has held hundreds of online sessions, they've only experienced a single other instance of someone attempting to disrupt the event, and in that one, the commentator was attacking Lewis for her gender.Her campaign said her previous encounters with racism on the campaign trail have come in the form of social-media messages and direct correspondence.In her statement, Lewis said the response from fellow Conservatives to the events of Wednesday night prove to her that racist behaviour is not acceptable in the party."I truly believe that together we will continue to make Canada a welcoming and safe place for all."Voting is now underway in the race and the mail-in ballots are due back by Aug. 21, with a winner expected to be announced the week after.The debate Wednesday night covered a range of regional topics, including a rise in crimes against Chinese-Canadians since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is believed to have originated in China.Candidates were asked to address how they'd balance effective criticism of China while maintaining strong and positive outreach to the Chinese-Canadian community.All three said they knew they had to be careful and watch their words, ensuring their concerns with China don't get translated to racism in Canada.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.Stephanie Levitz, The Canadian Press

  • Sports
    CBC

    B.C. hockey team to change name out of respect for First Nations

    The owners of the Saanich Junior Braves, a hockey team on Vancouver Island, say they will change their team's name and logo out of respect for Indigenous communities. The team's name and logo have been in use since 1967 when it first joined the Vancouver Island Junior League.Norm Kelly along with Edward Geric, the owners of the team, announced in a statement that the team name "is not respectful to our First Nations and does not reflect the valued relationships we hold with local First Nations communities or with our First Nations players."Kelly, speaking with host Rohit Joseph on CBC's All Points West, said the change was not prompted by a particular controversy."I've never had anyone come up and say they were upset or disgusted," said Kelly, adding the name had sparked conversations over the years."But we feel like we want to be leaders rather than followers."For years, there have been calls for a number of sports teams to reconsider their names on the grounds of offensiveness. The calls have intensified in recent months, especially in the wake of massive anti-racism protests in North America and increasing pressure from sponsors.  The CFL's Edmonton Eskimos say they have accelerated the process of reviewing their team name following recent calls from sponsors. They will provide an update by the end of July.The NFL's Washington Redskins, whose name is an Indigenous slur, have been particularly resistant to criticism. But the team now says it will undergo a "thorough review" of their name after its stadium sponsor, FedEx, demanded a name change, and Nike, the league's official outfitter, dropped the team's merchandise from its online website. Others, however — notably the MLB's Atlanta Braves and the NHL's Chicago Blackhawks — say they've done work to build relationships with Native American communities and won't be considering a name change. Kelly says making a name change is a big decision, especially for teams in the professional leagues."It's a large process. It's an expensive process. It would be more so for them," he said. For now, his team will be referred to as the Saanich Junior B team until a new name and logo can be selected. He says the team has always had a good relationship with the community and any criticism for dropping the Braves moniker is "no more than usual."Kelly said he doesn't know what, exactly, this process of renaming will look like, although it will involve input from the First Nations and Saanich community. "I think it will be good for our hockey team to start with a fresh set of goals and values."Listen to the full interview with Norm Kelly on All Points West here:

  • Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen back in federal prison
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen back in federal prison

    NEW YORK — President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, was returned to federal prison Thursday, after balking at certain conditions of the home confinement he was granted because of the coronavirus pandemic.Records obtained by The Associated Press said Cohen was ordered into custody after he “failed to agree to the terms of Federal Location Monitoring" in Manhattan.But Cohen's attorneys disputed that, saying Cohen took issue with a condition of his home confinement that forbid him from speaking with the media and publishing a tell-all book he began working on in federal prison. The rules also prohibited him from “posting on social media,” the records show.“The purpose is to avoid glamorizing or bringing publicity to your status as a sentenced inmate serving a custodial term in the community,” the document says.Cohen has written a tell-all book that he had been preparing to publish about his time working for the Trump Organization, his lawyers said.“Cohen was sure this was written just for him,” his attorney, Jeffrey Levine, said of the home confinement conditions. “I've never seen anything like this.”A Justice Department official pushed back on that characterization and said Cohen had refused to accept the terms of home confinement, specifically that he submit to wearing an ankle monitor. The official could not discuss the matter publicly and spoke to AP on condition of anonymity.Cohen legal adviser Lanny Davis called that “completely false,” adding that “at no time did Michael ever object to the ankle bracelet.”Cohen later agreed to accept all of the requirements of home confinement but was taken into custody nevertheless, Davis said. “He stands willing to sign the entire document if that’s what it takes” to be released.Cohen was being held late Thursday at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, Levine said. His legal team, meanwhile, was preparing an emergency appeal to spring him from custody.Cohen, who pleaded guilty to tax evasion, campaign finance fraud and lying to Congress, had been released May 21 on furlough as part of an attempt to slow the spread of the virus in federal prisons. Cohen, 53, began serving his sentence in May 2019 and had been scheduled to remain in prison until November 2021 but was permitted to serve the remainder of this three-year term at home.The conditions restricting the publication of his book would only extend through the end of his term.Cohen was once one of Trump’s closest advisers but became a loud critic after pleading guilty.Cohen’s convictions were related to crimes including dodging taxes on $4 million in income from his taxi business, lying during congressional testimony about the timing of discussions around an abandoned plan to build a Trump Tower in Russia, and orchestrating payments to two women to keep them from talking publicly about alleged affairs with Trump. Prosecutors said the payments amounted to illegal campaign contributions. Trump, who denied the affairs, said any payments were a personal matter.Roger Adler, one of Cohen's attorneys, told the AP that the FBI had agreed to return to Cohen two smartphones it seized as part of its investigation, adding Cohen had planned to pick them up Thursday after an appointment at the federal courthouse in Manhattan concerning his home confinement.Davis added the appointment with federal authorities was intended to finalize the conditions of Cohen’s home confinement. Cohen also had been expected to receive an ankle bracelet, he said.“It was nothing other than routine,” Davis said, adding the appointment with his probation officers had nothing to do with him being photographed dining out. Days before Cohen's return to prison, the New York Post had published photos of Cohen and his wife enjoying an outdoor meal with friends at a restaurant near his Manhattan home.“It’s not a crime to eat out and support local businesses,” Adler said, adding Cohen had been “thrown back into a petri dish of coronavirus.”A federal judge had denied Cohen’s attempt for an early release to home confinement after serving 10 months in prison and said in a May ruling that it “appears to be just another effort to inject himself into the news cycle.” But the Bureau of Prisons can move prisoners to home confinement without a judicial order.Prison advocates and congressional leaders had pressed the Justice Department to release at-risk inmates, arguing that the public health guidance to stay 6 feet (2 metres) away from other people is nearly impossible behind bars.Attorney General William Barr ordered the Bureau of Prisons to increase the use of home confinement and expedite the release of eligible high-risk inmates, beginning at three prisons identified as coronavirus hot spots. Otisville, where Cohen was housed, was not one of those facilities.___Balsamo reported from Little Rock, Arkansas. AP investigative researcher Randy Herschaft contributed to this report.Jim Mustian And Michael Balsamo, The Associated Press

  • WE details thousands in fees for Trudeaus as volunteers await revamped program
    News
    The Canadian Press

    WE details thousands in fees for Trudeaus as volunteers await revamped program

    OTTAWA — The WE organization has paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in speaking fees to members of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's family, it acknowledged Thursday, as organizations that need volunteers awaited word of the future of a $900-million program WE was to run.The government says it is working on what to do with the Canada Student Services Grant after its agreement with WE was cancelled amid controversy over the Trudeau family's connections to the Toronto-based charity and its for-profit arm, ME to WE Social Enterprise.The WE organization said Thursday that it had paid Trudeau's mother Margaret about $250,000 for 28 speaking appearances at WE-related events between 2016 and 2020.His brother Alexandre has been paid $32,000 for eight events, according to WE. The organization that represents them as speakers was paid additional commissions, WE said.And Trudeau's wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau received $1,400 in 2012 for a single appearance that year.Most of the payments went from the for-profit component of the organization, which sponsors the charitable component, WE Charity said in a statement, though about $64,000 went from WE Charity to Margaret Trudeau's speaker's bureau because of "an error in billing / payment.""Justin Trudeau has never been paid by WE Charity or ME to WE Social Enterprise for any speeches or any other matters," WE Charity said.Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet said late Thursday that Trudeau should step aside until the matter is fully probed, turning power over to Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland.Trudeau is now under investigation by the ethics commissioner over allegations of a potential conflict of interest when the government awarded the sole-source contract to WE. Trudeau has acknowledged he did not recuse himself when cabinet approved the deal.Trudeau has maintained the non-partisan public service recommended WE to administer the deal, while his spokesman Alex Wellstead on Thursday said "the prime minister's relatives engage with a variety of organizations and support many personal causes on their own accord.""What is important to remember here is that this is about a charity supporting students. The Canada Student Service Grant program is about giving young people opportunities to contribute to their communities, not about benefits to anyone else."WE's sudden departure from the volunteering program has created confusion as the days tick past for young people to put in hours for which the government promises to pay them up to $5,000 toward schooling.Several non-profits say they and their volunteers are anxiously waiting for answers from the government, including whether the program is going to go ahead and the students they have already taken on will be compensated for their work."I have three or four students talk to me and they're anxious, and I get why they're anxious," said Emily Fern, mission co-ordinator for the Saint Andrew's Community Outreach and Support Program in Whitby, Ont. "And I've had a mom call me and she's anxious."I've got a few people who are volunteering in good faith right now and we are keeping track of their hours. And some of the families that use our program have been asking (to volunteer) and I can't tell them anything right now."The grant program promises to pay students up to $5,000 for their post-secondary educations if they volunteer the maximum 500 hours. WE said last week that around 35,000 applications had been received for the program.The Saint Andrew's program provides food assistance to local families in need, among other things. Fern said demand has increased by more than 25 per cent since the pandemic started in March even as the number of volunteers available has dramatically declined.It was for that reason that Fern asked for and was given approval to take on five student volunteers through the Canada Student Service Grant while WE was administering the program. But since WE left last week and the government took over, "it's kind of been radio silence.""It's not like I have a ton of time to deal with this," she said. Most of us are all volunteers too. And it's also such a stressful time that if I didn't need the help I wouldn't have asked for it. And I definitely didn't need more work."Michelle Porter, CEO of the Souls Harbour Rescue Mission in Halifax, said she has also heard nothing from Ottawa since it took over the program from WE, which both she and Fern praised for their level of support."They were giving us frontline care," Porter said of WE. "'What do you need? What do you need them for?' So we thought this is great because we were getting great treatment. And then they kind of got pulled away and we haven't heard anything since."Porter doesn't know whether the five students she has now will be compensated as promised and she is reluctant to advertise the other 10 unfilled positions, which her organization needs to run the 17,000-square-foot thrift store that funds many of its other charitable operations."Students want to come here and I would like to see even more students if we could get them," Porter said. "That's the biggest thing, having to just put it on a hold because we don't know if there are going to be any changes or if they are going to pull it away."Youth Minister Bardish Chagger’s spokeswoman Danielle Keenan appeared to stand by the Canada Student Services Grant program this week even as she said government officials were "working right now to determine the next steps" and acknowledged the likelihood of a delay.The program itself has criticized since the details were rolled out at the end of June, with some questioning the blurry lines between volunteer and paid work. Others have blasted the government for compensating students $10 per hour worked, which is less than minimum wage.Canadian Federation of Students deputy chairperson Nicole Brayiannis echoed those criticisms Thursday as she urged Ottawa to pull the plug on any further positions and invest instead in more direct aid to students, noting the summer is already well underway.She also suggested keeping existing placements, but increasing their pay to at least minimum wage."Students do want to be able to contribute to their communities and they do want to build their resumes and gain that experience," she said."However, the volunteer program just doesn't seem to make sense in the way that it was laid out. It would make much more sense just to ensure that if compensation is received for work that is being done, it should be at the minimum-wage level."This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

  • Cliffs of Fundy given official UNESCO Global Geopark designation
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Cliffs of Fundy given official UNESCO Global Geopark designation

    The Cliffs of Fundy has officially become a UNESCO Global Geopark.The announcement came Friday morning at a meeting of the UNESCO Global Geopark Executive Board in Paris, much to the delight of those who have been working for years on this project.While the announcement comes as a point of pride, and relief, for those involved, it also signals the beginning of more work left to do to make sure the designation does what they want it to do — bring tourists to the area and boost the local economy."The beauty of the designation is that it immediately puts you on the world stage," Beth Peterkin, manager of the Cliffs of Fundy Geopark. "It will let us reach audiences we could never, ever reach on our own."UNESCO Global Geoparks are recognized for their exceptional geological heritage.The park, along with Friday's designation of Discovery in Bonavista, N.L., marks five geoparks in Canada.The Cliffs of Fundy Geopark stretches along a roughly 165-kilometre drive, with about 40 designated sites from Debert to the Three Sisters cliffs past Eatonville, out to Isle Haute.The area is the only place on Earth where geologists can see both the assembly of supercontinent Pangea 300 million years ago and its breakup 100 million years later.Cumberland and Colchester counties brought together geologists, paleontologists, businesses, tourism operators, Indigenous communities and local people to bring the idea for a geopark to life. This partnership is a first of its kind, said Christine Blair, mayor of the Municipality of the County of Colchester, and that teamwork is what made this idea into reality."To have two municipalities form an agreement, that has never happened in the history of the two municipalities before," she said."To have all of the communities and our First Nation community involved is very significant, because it's recognizing the whole of what we have to offer — and not just part of the whole."The designation also comes ahead of a new Mi'kmaw cultural centre that will be built in the next two to three years in Debert, says Donald Julien, an executive director for The Confederacy Of Mainland Mi'kmaq."Our ancestors have been here for over 13,000 years according to archeological evidence. So it's very exciting for the Mi'kmaq, our cultural centre and the recognition is going to be fantastic," he said.The Fundy region in particular, Julien said, is included in many legends about Glooscap, the most famous figure in Mi'kmaw culture who brought peace and restored balance to the world.Julien said he hopes the UNESCO designation will help teach people about the history of the Mi'kmaq."At times in our history books and our histories, it sort of tended that we disappeared but we didn't. We're still here, alive and well," he said."This is probably history in the making. Everybody is going to benefit."Province needs to help, councillor saysBut there's still more work to be done.Donald Fletcher, president of the Cliffs of Fundy Geopark and the board chair, said the province and tourism sector will need to put money forward to make this a success story."I've felt over the years that we've sort of been neglected," said Fletcher, who is also a councillor for the Municipality of Cumberland."This area and we have so much to offer. And as I mentioned before, we've just basically taken what Mother Nature has put here and we're showcasing that to the world.Fletcher said that includes fixing up the roads in the area, helping with signs and supporting their tourism sector."With the whole COVID thing, a lot of them are hurting," he said."This is big and people are going to come, maybe not so much this year, but they're going to come and see what we have to offer."Peterkin said other work to be done includes clearly marking the geosites, updating guidebooks and maps, educating staff working in the parks about the designation, and recruiting volunteers."It's all about making the visitors feel welcome, so that they'll come back again and again," she said.But the promise of a lucrative tourism sector is also bringing hope to communities still reeling after a gunman killed 22 people on April 18 and 19, in what is now one of Canada's deadliest mass shootings in history."That will be with us forever. But we don't want to be remembered specifically for that event," Blair said."I believe we will all move forward together in the healing process. To have a positive announcement like we have at this geopark will be part of that, I truly believe that."Peterkin says they're hoping to plan a celebration this summer once it's safe to do so with the Public Health guidelines around COVID-19."I think we have so much to offer with the mixture of the geology, the culture, the music, the arts, the local experience," she said. "Get your feet and hands dirty in the tide."MORE TOP STORIES

  • Undeterred by coronavirus, China takes influence campaign online to win Taiwan hearts
    News
    Reuters

    Undeterred by coronavirus, China takes influence campaign online to win Taiwan hearts

    As the coronavirus pandemic all but halts travel across the Taiwan Strait, China is taking its campaign pushing for "reunification" with Taiwan to the virtual world of live broadcasts, online conferences and video-making competitions. The intensifying efforts to win hearts and minds in democratic Taiwan come amid widespread support on the island for anti-government protests in Hong Kong and opposition to a new Chinese-imposed security law for the city. Taiwan is China's most sensitive territorial issue, with Beijing claiming the self-ruled island as its own, to be brought under its control by force if needed.

  • Wisconsin Supreme Court OKs GOP-authored lame-duck laws
    Politics
    The Canadian Press

    Wisconsin Supreme Court OKs GOP-authored lame-duck laws

    MADISON, Wis. — The conservative-controlled Wisconsin Supreme Court on Thursday upheld Republican-authored lame-duck laws that stripped power from the incoming Democratic attorney general just before he took office in 2019.The justices rejected arguments that the laws were unconstitutional, handing another win to Republicans who have scored multiple high-profile victories before the court in recent years.The 5-2 ruling marks the second time that the court has upheld the lame-duck laws passed in December 2018, just weeks before Gov. Tony Evers and Attorney General Josh Kaul, both Democrats, took office. The actions in Wisconsin mirrored Republican moves after losing control of the governors' offices in Michigan in November 2018 and in North Carolina in 2016. Democrats decried the tactics as brazen attempts to hold onto power after losing elections.The Wisconsin laws curtailed the powers of both the governor and attorney general, but the case decided Thursday dealt primarily with powers taken from Kaul.The attorney general said in a statement that Republican legislators have demonstrated open hostility to him and Evers and made it harder for state government to function. Evers echoed that sentiment in a statement of his own, saying Republicans have been working against him “every chance they get, regardless of the consequences.”Thursday’s ruling involved a case filed by a coalition of labour unions led by the State Employees International Union. The coalition argued that the laws give the Legislature power over the attorney general’s office and that this violates the separation of powers doctrine in the state constitution.The laws prohibit Evers from ordering Kaul to withdraw from lawsuits, let legislators intervene in lawsuits using their own attorneys rather than Kaul’s state Department of Justice lawyers, and force Kaul to get permission from the Legislature’s Republican-controlled budget committee before settling lawsuits.Republicans designed the laws to prohibit Evers from pulling Wisconsin out of a multistate lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, and to ensure that they have a say in court if Kaul chooses not to defend GOP-authored laws.Evers still pulled the state out of the health care lawsuit after a lower judge temporarily blocked the laws, but the restrictions on settlements have proven divisive. Kaul has said settlement discussions are confidential and has refused to share details of cases with the committee, putting tens of millions of dollars in potential settlement revenue in jeopardy. In recent months the committee has signed off on a handful of settlements after the litigants allowed Kaul to share details of the deals, but no formal process exists for how to handle settlements under the laws.The court ruled that the attorney general derives his powers from state statutes, not the constitution, and his role is not a core function of the executive branch. The Legislature clearly has an interest in joining lawsuits independently and signing off on settlements because it's responsible for spending the state's money, Justice Brian Hagedorn wrote for the majority."While representing the State in litigation is predominately an executive function, it is within those borderlands of shared powers, most notably in cases that implicate an institutional interest of the legislature," Hagedorn wrote.The Legislature's top Republicans, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, hailed the ruling as a victory.“A rogue attorney general can no longer unilaterally settle away laws already on the books,” Fitzgerald said.The court's two liberal justices, Rebecca Dallet and Ann Walsh Bradley, argued in dissent that the ruling blurs the lines between the executive and legislative branches.“The power of the purse cannot be understood so broadly as to permit substantial burdens on another branch’s intersecting power,” Dallet wrote. “The Wisconsin Constitution, like the United States Constitution, does not contemplate an active role for the legislature in executing or in supervising the executive officers charged with executing the laws it enacts.”The unions' attorneys didn't immediately respond to messages seeking comment.The decision doesn't close the door to future legal challenges. Hagedorn wrote that the ruling doesn't address how the lame-duck laws are specifically applied, leaving open a potential line of attack. For example, a litigant looking to get a case settled with the state could sue if the budget committee simply won't address the matter, Evers' attorney Lester Pines said.Kaul said in a phone interview that he wasn't sure what his next steps would be, but he didn't rule out that he or his allies might file more challenges.“That (the court) didn't rule more broadly indicates we're going to have success in challenging applications of those laws,” he said.Democrats and liberal groups have been trying to push back against the laws since they were passed but have had little success.Liberal advocacy group One Wisconsin Now persuaded a federal judge in January 2019 to block language in the law that restricted in-person early voting to the two weeks before an election.The League of Women Voters and other groups filed a state lawsuit arguing the laws as a whole were invalid because Republican lawmakers passed them after the Legislature’s regular session had ended months earlier. The justices ruled last year that lawmakers can meet whenever they wish.The Supreme Court did deliver a partial win for Evers on Thursday, throwing out some of the rules the Legislature put in place that required his administration to rewrite thousands of government “guidance documents” and websites. The law also gave the Legislature more power to block rules written by the Evers administration.The court found the rules were overly broad and unconstitutional. Evers had argued that the new requirements to rewrite documents were so extensive it would make it impossible for the executive branch to get information to the public.The court is set to hand down another significant ruling Friday on whether Evers exceeded his authority with four partial budget vetoes he issued last year. That decision could further weaken his ability to rewrite proposals coming out of the Republican-led Legislature.___Associated Press writer Scott Bauer contributed to this report.Todd Richmond, The Associated Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Foreign students weigh studying in person vs. losing visas

    International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America. Students from countries as diverse as India, China and Brazil told The Associated Press they are scrambling to devise plans after federal immigration authorities notified colleges this week that international students must leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filed a lawsuit this week to block the decision, and now California has become the first state to seek an injunction against enforcing the new visa policy.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Alberta RCMP charge man with attempted murder after Mountie beaten with club

    RCMP say a man faces two dozen criminal charges, including attempted murder, after a Mountie was beaten with a club. Police say an officer was trying to make an arrest on Tuesday after a stolen vehicle was spotted in the parking lot of a Walmart store in Cold Lake, Alta. RCMP say someone then smashed the window of a nearby vehicle, threatened the driver with a knife and the baton, and drove away before being arrested later.

  • Captain, pull out my teeth! Desperate times for sailors stranded by pandemic
    News
    Reuters

    Captain, pull out my teeth! Desperate times for sailors stranded by pandemic

    Jens Boysen disembarked one of the world's largest container ships on Thursday after 167 days at sea when he has acted not only as captain but also as doctor, dentist, mental coach and entertainment director for his stressed-out crew. Almost 200,000 seafarers like Boysen are stuck onboard merchant ships, some for more than a year, because coronavirus travel restrictions make it almost impossible to rotate crews, according to the U.N.'s International Maritime Organization (IMO). The crews, who come from all over the world to meet their ships, suffer the mental stress of not knowing when they can return home, their plight worsened by a lack of access to medical treatment.

  • Thousands of health workers, others, ineligible for 'essential workers' bonus
    Business
    CBC

    Thousands of health workers, others, ineligible for 'essential workers' bonus

    Brittany MacLean considers her work as a staffing clerk at the Cape Breton Regional Hospital to be essential.However, the Nova Scotia government does not, at least when it comes to the program set up to compensate workers deemed essential during the pandemic."It's a slap in the face," she said, referring to the provincial government's decision to limit the up-to-$2,000 payout to workers who have provided hands-on care beginning mid-March."The people who have been here, who have been having an increased workload, and are coming into the building day in and day out, are getting no recognition for the commitment that they're providing to the communities," said MacLean.She said she doesn't believe teamwork is being recognized."If you start plucking out pieces from this system, the system's going to fall apart, and I don't think they realize that's how this works."Money mostly from federal governmentThe Essential Health Care Worker Program is administered by the province with money coming mostly from the federal government. According to the Nova Scotia Health Department: "The Federal Government committed to funding $71.3M towards the Essential Workers Payment with a commitment of $9.9M by the Province."Although the federal funding was received in June, most of the money will not be disbursed until the fall.Those eligible for the money include: * Hospital staff involved in direct contact with patients or their families. * Long-term care home staff involved in direct care, such as nurses, continuing care assistants, program support staff ,housekeeping, food service, maintenance workers who had frequent contact with residents. * Publicly funded home support and home care agencies, home support workers and home care workers. * Publicly funded disability support program residential front-line staff.  * Paramedics/Dispatchers. * 811 tele-health associates, nurses, counsellors. * transition house employees working with residents. * shelters/pop-up shelter staff working with clients.When the program was announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on May 7, he suggested a much broader definition of an essential worker.At the time he said the money should go to "Canadians who are providing us with essential services so we can continue to keep our families safe and healthy."Collaborative effortThe prime minister called it a collaboration between Ottawa and the provinces."It will be up to each province and territory to determine who exactly qualifies for this wage increase, but the bottom line is this, if you're risking your health to keep this country moving and you're making minimum wage, you deserve a raise," he said.New Brunswick and P.E.I. have crafted their programs more in line with Trudeau's focus on those who earn low to modest incomes.Workers must earn $18 per hour or less to be eligible for the money in New Brunswick but the top-up is also available to people who work in early learning and child-care facilities.Prince Edward Islanders deemed essential must have an hourly wage of $18.75 or less to qualify, but that province recognizes a broad sweep of essential employees, including people who work at banks, pharmacies or supermarkets and grocery stores.Concern for those who need money mostMacLean, who is also a shop steward for the Canadian Union of Public Employees, was also disappointed the Nova Scotia government chose not to focus on employees who need the extra money most."You've got people who are at the higher end of wages in the building getting this top-up while there's other people in the building who they're deeming non-essential who are on the lower end of the pay scale."MacLean made the point she had no beef with her employer, but was disappointed with the provincial government.The Nova Scotia Health Authority, in a memo to employees this week noted: "The Essential Health Care Worker Program will see employees working on the front line of health care receive $500 per month worked for each month worked, over a four-month period beginning March 13, 2020."According to NSHA spokesperson Brendan Elliott, roughly 15,000 of the authority's more than 23,000 workers may be eligible for the top-up which is expected to be included in the first pay in October.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Canada not ready for second wave of COVID-19, Senate committee says
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canada not ready for second wave of COVID-19, Senate committee says

    OTTAWA — Canada is ill-prepared for a second wave of COVID-19, says a Senate committee, calling on the federal Liberals to deliver a plan by Labour Day to help people and communities hit hardest by the pandemic.Seniors, in particular, are a focus of the report from the Senate's social affairs committee, from those in long-term care homes to those with low incomes.Just this week, the Liberals rolled out one-time special payments of $300 to the more than six million people who receive old-age security, and $200 more for the 2.2 million who also receive the guaranteed income supplement.The income supports are meant to help seniors facing increased costs as a result of the pandemic, such as more frequent prescription fees and delivery charges for groceries.Senators on the committee wrote of evidence of "financial insecurity and increased vulnerability" for low-income seniors as a result of the first wave of the novel coronavirus.A potential second wave, which could coincide with the annual flu season that starts in the fall, would make the situation even worse for these seniors "without concrete and timely government action," the report says.Senators say the Liberals should deliver a plan to help low-income seniors, among other populations vulnerable to economic shocks like new immigrants, no later than the end of August, and contain short- and long-term options.The report also says the federal government needs to pay urgent attention to seniors in long-term care homes where outbreaks and deaths in the pandemic have been concentrated.The document made public Thursday morning is the committee's first set of observations on the government's response to the pandemic, with a final report expected later this year.Before then, the Liberals are planning to provide another economic update like the one delivered Wednesday, or possibly a full budget. The government shelved plans to deliver one at the end of March when the House of Commons went on extended hiatus due to the pandemic.The long-awaited economic "snapshot," as the Liberals styled it, said federal spending is closing in on $600 billion this fiscal year. That means a deficit of $343 billion, fuelled by emergency pandemic aid that the government budgets at over $230 billion.The Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada said the spending figures demand a "full and transparent assessment" to see what worked, what didn't and what needs to change for an economic recovery.Hassan Yussuff, president of the Canadian Labour Congress, said the Liberals should take back up their promise to create a national pharmacare system as the government considers its next steps.A federal advisory council last year calculated the cost of a program at over $15 billion annually, depending on its design."The last thing we want to have is Canadians in frail health as we're dealing with this pandemic and I think the government really needs to think of that," Yussuff said in an interview Wednesday."Had it not been for the health care system we have right now," he added later, "think of how this country would have fared in this pandemic."The Senate committee's report also notes the national emergency stockpile of personal protective gear like masks, gowns and gloves wasn't managed well over the years, nor sufficiently stocked when the pandemic struck.Committee members added concerns that military members could be deployed without sufficient personal protective equipment because of "inconsistencies from international procurement."This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 9, 2020.Jordan Press, The Canadian Press

  • Sports
    The Canadian Press

    Tootoo says Edmonton team name discussion should centre on feelings of Inuk people

    Jordin Tootoo says he doesn't find the Edmonton Eskimos' team name objectionable, but that doesn't mean the CFL club should keep it. Edmonton promised to speed up a review of its name and provide an update at the end of the month after at least one of its sponsors announced it plans to cut ties with the  team unless it changes its name. The team has seen repeated calls for a name change in the past and faces renewed criticism as sports teams in Canada, the United States and elsewhere are urged to remove outdated and sometimes racist names and images.

  • Meghan tries to prevent 'friends' being named in suit
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Meghan tries to prevent 'friends' being named in suit

    LONDON — The Duchess of Sussex asked a British court Thursday to prevent a newspaper from publishing the names of five friends who defended her while speaking to an American magazine under the shield of anonymity.The former Meghan Markle made the request in a witness statement for her lawsuit against the Daily Mail and its parent company over excerpts from a “private and confidential'' letter she wrote to her father that the newspaper published last year.Her statement, filed in Britain's High Court, claims the newspaper has threatened to publish the names of the five women who spoke to People Magazine anonymously but are named in confidential court documents as part of her lawsuit.“For the Mail on Sunday to expose them in the public domain for no reason other than clickbait and commercial gain is vicious and poses a threat to their emotional and mental well-being,’’ Meghan said in the statement. “The Mail on Sunday is playing a media game with real lives.”Papers drawn up by lawyers for the newspaper argue that the publication of the letter to the duchess's father, Thomas Markle, was in response to a “one-sided” article in People Magazine in February 2019 featuring an interview with the “close friends.” The article referenced the letter, meaning it was in the public domain, the lawyers said.The newspaper said it has “no intention,’’ of publishing the names this weekend. But it said the court should decide on the confidentiality to which Meghan's friends are entitled.“Their evidence is at the heart of the case, and we see no reason why their identities should be kept secret,? a newspaper statement said. “That is why we told the duchess’s lawyers last week that the question of their confidentiality should be properly considered by the Court.''The duchess said in her statement Thursday that the five friends made the choice on their own to speak to People. She accused the newspaper of trying to create a distraction.“These five women are not on trial, and nor am I,’’ the statement said. “The publisher of the Mail on Sunday is the one on trial. It is this publisher that acted unlawfully and is attempting to evade accountability; to create a circus and distract from the point of this case - that the Mail on Sunday unlawfully published my private letter. “Each of these women is a private citizen, young mother, and each has a basic right to privacy.''Meghan's civil lawsuit accuses the newspaper and its published, Associated Newspapers, of copyright infringement, misuse of private information and violating the U.K.’s data protection law with the publication of the letter.The newspaper also argues there is “huge and legitimate public interest in the royal family and the activities, conduct and standards of behaviour of its members.?It argues this extends not merely to their public conduct, but “to their personal and family relationships because those are integral to the proper functioning of the monarchy.”Danica Kirka, The Associated Press

  • Venezuela socialist party boss announces he has COVID-19
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Venezuela socialist party boss announces he has COVID-19

    CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuelan socialist party chief Diosdado Cabello revealed Thursday that he has tested positive for COVID-19, making him the highest-ranking leader in the distressed South American nation thus far to come down with the virus.Cabello is considered the second-most powerful person in Venezuela after President Nicolás Maduro and made the announcement on Twitter, stating that he is isolated, getting treatment and will overcome the illness.“We will win!” he wrote in conclusion.Venezuela is considered one of the world’s least prepared countries to confront the pandemic. Hospitals are routinely short on basic supplies like water, electricity and medicine. The nation has registered considerably fewer COVID-19 cases than others in the region, though the number of infections has grown in recent weeks.As of Wednesday, officials had reported 8,010 confirmed cases and 75 deaths.Cabello was last seen Tuesday, when he met with South Africa’s ambassador, Joseph Nkosi. Photographs released by the government showed him standing alongside and bumping fists with the envoy while wearing a black mask.The 57-year-old politician is head of the National Constituent Assembly, an all-powerful legislative body created by Maduro’s government in 2017.He had missed his weekly television program Wednesday, stating at the time that he was “fighting against a strong allergy” and resting.Maduro said in a broadcast Thursday that Cabello’s diagnosis was confirmed with a molecular exam — a test that is usually conducted with a nasal swab sample. Venezuela has done far fewer of these tests than neighbouring countries, instead largely deploying rapid blood antibody tests. Some experts fear that relying so heavily on the rapid tests, which don’t detect signs of illness early in an infection, means cases are being missed.“Venezuela is with Diosdado,” Maduro said. “I am sure soon enough we will continue on in this fight.”The Associated Press

  • Bolivian president has COVID-19 as virus hits region's elite
    Politics
    The Canadian Press

    Bolivian president has COVID-19 as virus hits region's elite

    LA PAZ, Bolivia — Bolivia’s interim president and Venezuela’s No. 2 leader announced Thursday that they have been infected with the new coronavirus, just days after Brazil’s leader tested positive as the pandemic hits hard at some of Latin America’s political elite.Three Cabinet ministers in the administration of Bolivian leader Jeanine Áñez have also tested positive for the virus, including Health Minister Eidy Roca and Presidency Minister Yerko Nuñez, who is hospitalized.The infections in Venezuela, Brazil and Bolivia, which is seeing a spike in cases, come after Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández tested positive in June and was briefly hospitalized.Áñez said she will remain in isolation for 14 days when another test will be done, but she will continue to work remotely from the presidential residence.“I feel good, I feel strong,” she wrote on her Twitter account.Bolivia’s Health Ministry says the Andean country has 42,984 confirmed coronavirus cases and 1,577 deaths, and is seeing a rebound in the number of new cases amid reports that hospitals are being overwhelmed in some regions. In the highland city of Cochabamba, scenes have emerged of bodies lying in the streets and coffins waiting for days in homes to be taken away.Bolivia is scheduled to hold a presidential election Sept. 6. Áñez is running third in opinion polls. Former Economy Minister Luis Arce, who represents the party of ousted President Evo Morales, is in front, with ex-President Carlos Mesa in second.In Venezuela, meanwhile, socialist party chief Diosdado Cabello revealed that he had tested positive for COVID-19, making him the highest-ranking leader in the distressed South American nation thus far to come down with the virus.Cabello is considered the second-most powerful person in Venezuela after President Nicolás Maduro and made the announcement on Twitter, stating that he is isolated, getting treatment and will overcome the illness.“We will win!” he wrote in conclusion.Economically struggling Venezuela is considered one of the world’s least prepared countries to confront the pandemic. Hospitals are routinely short on basic supplies like water, electricity and medicine.The nation has registered considerably fewer COVID-19 cases than others in the region, but the number of infections has grown in recent weeks. As of Wednesday, the government had reported 8,010 confirmed cases and 75 deaths.Cabello was last seen Tuesday, when he met with South Africa’s ambassador, Joseph Nkosi. Photographs released by the government showed him standing alongside and bumping fists with the diplomat while wearing a black mask.The 57-year-old politician is head of the National Constituent Assembly, an all-powerful legislative body created by Maduro’s government in 2017. He had missed his weekly television program Wednesday, stating at the time that he was “fighting against a strong allergy” and resting.Maduro said in a broadcast Thursday that Cabello’s diagnosis was confirmed with a molecular exam — a test that is usually conducted with a nasal swab sample. Venezuela has done far fewer of these tests than neighbouring countries, instead largely deploying rapid blood antibody tests. Some experts fear that relying so heavily on the rapid tests, which don’t detect signs of illness early in an infection, means cases are being missed.“Venezuela is with Diosdado,” Maduro said. “I am sure soon enough we will continue on in this fight.”In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Tuesday.He appeared Thursday on an online broadcast from the presidential residence as defiant as on previous occasions. He coughed once, but did not show other symptoms of the disease that has killed more than 69,000 people in the South American nation.Bolsonaro repeated his view that the economic crisis brought on by the pandemic is more dangerous than the coronavirus itself. He insisted that mayors and governors need to reopen the country for business.“We need governors and mayors, within their responsibilities, to reopen commerce. Otherwise the consequences will be harmful for Brazil,” Bolsonaro said, wearing a gray shirt and sitting comfortably in front of two national flags.Paola Flores, The Associated Press

  • COVID-19 in Canada: Social distancing won't stop until there's a vaccine, B.C. health officials say
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    COVID-19 in Canada: Social distancing won't stop until there's a vaccine, B.C. health officials say

    As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians are concerned about their health and safety.

  • Great Dane puppy goes full zoomies through freshly planted vegetables
    News
    Rumble

    Great Dane puppy goes full zoomies through freshly planted vegetables

    When Covid 19 required lockdowns and caused concerns about future food supplies, Dave and Kristy decided to turn their back field into a vegetable patch. They dug and hoed and dug and hoed some more. They began getting ready to feed the family, and maybe even the neighbours. As concerns faded and food was still widely available, they decided to continue growing vegetables with all of their original enthusiasm. And they were not the only ones who were enthusiastic! Raven is a ten month old Great Dane puppy with a playful nature. And, like all puppies, she gets the zoomies. She will suddenly start running full speed around the yard, around the garden, around Dave and Kristy, and sometimes, straight through the nice rows of tomotoes, potatoes, and squash that Kristy has planted. These fragile plants get torn to ribbons under the thundering paws of a Great Dane. Understandably, Kristy is no fan of Raven's garden antics and she scolds Raven, even turning the sprayer on her as she gallops past her and over the greens. Like all puppies, Raven takes the scolding and spraying as encouragement and she runs through the garden even more. She seems to be hoping that somebody will join her or chase her. Few things are as graceful as a giant breed like a Dane at full gallop. Raven seems more like a horse trying out her new legs during these moments. She is adorably clumsy as she stumbles on some of her turns. Raven does this several times each day, and even though Kristy doesn't like it happening in the vegetables, it's better than having it happen in the house as it often does in the morning. Great Danes are a majestic and lovable breed. They are fiercely loyal and make excellent family members and companions. It's no wonder that those who have loved a Great Dane never want to be without one.