Smoking banned from more Singapore public parks and gardens, 10 beaches from 1 July

·Editor
·2 min read
Signage, posters and banners have been put up in public parks and gardens, as well as Park Connectors to remind visitors about the smoking prohibition. (PHOTO: NParks)
Signage, posters and banners have been put up in public parks and gardens, as well as Park Connectors to remind visitors about the smoking prohibition. (PHOTO: NParks)

SINGAPORE — Smoking will be banned from all remaining public parks and gardens, certain water sites and 10 recreational beaches from Friday (1 July).

There will be a three-month grace period during which offenders will get verbal advisories.

Offenders will be subject to enforcement action from 1 October, said the National Environment Agency (NEA), National Parks Board (NParks), national water agency PUB and the Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) in a joint statement on Wednesday (29 June).

The ban on these places had been announced during the Ministry of Sustainability and the Environment’s Committee of Supply Debate on 7 March.

The 10 beaches are: Changi Beach, East Coast Beach, West Coast Beach, Sembawang Beach, Pasir Ris Beach, Coney Island Beach, Punggol Beach, Siloso Beach, Palawan Beach, and Tanjong Beach.

In the joint statement, the four agencies said ‘No Smoking by law’ signage, posters and banners have been put up at the new smoke-free locations as reminders.

"Smoking is currently prohibited in more than 49,000 premises, both indoor and outdoor. We encourage smokers to be socially responsible when smoking in public places, and not to light up in smoking prohibited places," said NEA, NParks, PUB and SDC.

"Friendly and timely reminders from family, friends and other members of the community can help to reinforce the right social behaviour and norms."

Currently, smoking is banned in some green spaces such as neighbourhood parks in private and public housing estates, reservoirs and nature reserves.

To allow smokers to adjust to smoke-free parks, designated smoking areas are provided in some larger regional parks and within the vicinity of the three Sentosa beaches.

Singapore's smoking prevalence rate in 2020 was 10.1 per cent, down from 11.8 per cent in 2017. The legal age for smoking was gradually raised from 19 years in 2019 to 21 years in 2021.

Last year, New Zealand said it plans to ban the sale of tobacco to its next generation, in an aim to eliminate smoking eventually. In a new law expected to be passed this year, those born after 2008 will not be allowed to buy cigarettes or tobacco products over their lifetime.

As part of these efforts, New Zealand plans to raise the legal smoking age by one year every year. It will introduce new legislation to progressively lift the smoking age from 18, starting in 2027 as well as limit the number of shops selling tobacco.

Singapore's health ministry earlier this year said it would study the effectiveness of the anti-smoking policy in New Zealand.

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